WA - WH Surnames

History of Luzerne County, Pa.,

by H.C. Bradsby, 1893

JAMES WADDELL, a member of the firm of J. Waddell & Co., plumbers, Wilkes-Barre, was born near Edinburgh, Scotland, April 2, 1834, and is a son of Thomas and Mary (Selkirk) Waddell, who emigrated to America in 1854, locating in Pittston, Pa., where they resided until their death. Their children were six in number, as follows: Mary (Mrs. Lewis Morrison), who remained in Scotland; Thomas; David; Margaret (Mrs. William Williams); James, and Jessie (Mrs. Duncan Ferguson). Our subject was reared in Scotland until eighteen years of age, and then (1852) came to America, locating in Pittston, where he worked in the mines until 1858, and, with the exception of four years, during which he was in the oil and milling business, was boss and superintendent of different mines up to 1891. In the fall of 1890 he embarked in the plumbing business with his sons Thomas and Henry, in Wilkes-Barre, under the firm name of James Waddell & Co., in which he still continues. Mr. Waddell married, in 1862, Maria, daughter of Henry Williams, of Scranton, Pa., and they have four children: Thomas, Henry, Minnie (Mrs. Alex­ander Dick) and Secey. Mr. Waddell is a popular and well-known citizen of Luzerne county; politically he is a Republican.

F. M. WAGNER, merchant, Prichard, was born in Ross township, October 11, 1844, where he was also reared and educated. He is a son of J. P. and Elizabeth (Naugle) Wagner, the former born in Plains township in 1809, the latter in Colurnbia county in 1814. J.P. was a son of Peter, a native of Northampton county, who removed thence to Luzerne county about 1805. He located in Plains town­ship, where he and his brother Fred bought a property of 100 acres each, on which they resided several years. Peter traded his share off for a mill property situated on Tunkhannock creek, where he became an extensive lumber manufacturer. He was a thorough-going business man, and a worthy citizen; he died in 1845, aged seventy years. His wife died in 1866, aged seventy-eight years. They reared a family of eight children, one of whom is supposed to be living in Wisconsin. Their son, J. P. Wagner, began his active life as a farmer in Plains township, where he resided eight years after his union with Miss Naugle. They then removed to Huntington township, where they resided a few years, thence going to Ross township, and here ended their earthly pilgrimage. Their farm was not large, but they were worthy and respectable people. Mr. Wagner was honored with several township offices, and enjoyed the*full confidence of his neighbors. He was a true son of the soil, always devoting himself to agricultural pursuits. He died February 22, aged seventy-nine; his wife died September 5, 1886. There were seven children born to this couple; six grew to maturity, five of whom are now living.

F.M. Wagner is the fifth in this family in order of birth, and began his active life in Ross township. In his early life he devoted the summer months to boating, and in winter his time was utilized to the best advantage possible. In this way he soon saved enough money to buy himself a property. After following the canal for sixteen years he bought a farm, on which he lived for a few years. In 1874 he went into mercantile business in Ross township, which he followed for four years, when he removed back on his farm, remaining there another four years; in 1878 he removed to Hunlock township, where he purchased thirty acres of land on which he built a storeroom and dwelling house, and where he has again installed himself behind the counter. His storeroom is large, and is well stocked with a general supply. Mr. Wagner is gentlemanly in his dealings with all, observing and practicing the "golden rule," building for himself a trade that defies competition. Besides his property in Hunlock, he has 127 acres in Ross and 285 in Fairmount township. He has held several township offices. He has held the office of postmaster for four years, which he still retains. On December 31, 1866, he wedded Miss Mary C., daughter of John F. and Eliza Wesley, and to this happy union there were born thirteen children, nine of whom are living: Eliza (Mrs. Dodson), J. J.,  E. U.,  E. E., Ida L., F., Virgie P., Victor R. and Neva G. Mrs. Mary (Wesley) Wagner was born in Ross township April 28, 1848. Mr. and Mrs. Wagner, with their daughters Eliza and Ida L., are consistent members of the M. E. Church. Politically he is a Republican.
            GEORGE WAGNER, farmer, P. O. Wyoming, was born October 23, 1831, in Columbia county, N. Y., a son of Henry and Jane (Clark) Wagner, natives of New York State, and of German and English origin, respectively. They reared a family of six children, four of whom are now living. Our subject, the eldest of these, was reared on a farm, and educated in the common schools, afterward working with his father until thirty-three years of age. He then left the home roof and worked in a vineyard for seven months, and then purchasing a team, worked at carting for thirteen years. Mr. Wagner next began farming on rented farms, moving January 3, 1891, to the farm he now works; it is owned by D. O. McCullom, and is known as the Wm. Shoemaker farm. He was united in marriage August 7, 1867, with Miss Emily F. Wagner, who was born April 25, t838, a daughter of Benjamin and Hannah (Whitcomb) Van Dyke, natives, respectively, of New York and Connecticut, of German and English origin, respectively. Her father was a farmer by occupation, and reared a family of six children of whom Mrs. Wagner was second in order of birth; she is a member of the Episcopal Church. Mr. and Mrs. Wagner have adopted two orphan children: Martha E. Galligan, thirteen years of age, a daughter of Mrs. Wagner's sister Martha, and George Van Dyke, a brother of Mrs. Wagner. In politics Mr. Wagner is a strong Republican, but is not active in politics, devoting his whole time to his calling and his family.
            GEORGE WAGNER, retired farmer, Huntington township, P. O. Town Line, was born November 25, 1821, in Plains township, and is a son of John and Mary (Miller) Wagner, natives of Pennsylvania and of German origin, and a grandson of Adam Wagner. He and his twin brother, Adam, were third in order of birth in a family of nine children, seven of whom are living. Our subject was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and has followed farming from early childhood. He was married, November 30, 1843, to Hulda, daughter of Wells and Abiah (Harrison) Sutliff; she is the eldest in a family of nine children, and was born April 18, 1824. This union was blessed with three children, two of whom are living: Francis, a farmer of Wayne county, Pa., and Wells S., who was born August 19, 1847, in Boss township; he was educated in the common schools and Wyoming Seminary, and at twenty years of age built his present home and opened out a hotel, conducting same for four years, when he gave up the business and farmed the homestead property till 1878; he then went to Michigan and inspected lumber for six years, when he returned to his home and has since conducted the farm for his father; Wells S. Wagner was married, June 27, 1867, to Lizzie, daughter of Stephen and Elizabeth (Tubbs) Davenport, which union has been blessed with five children, viz.: Lillie H., born March 30, 1868, married to George McMullin, foreman of a large fruit plantation in California; Harvey, born March 20, 1870, died March 10, 1872; Jennie E., born January 14, 1872, lives with her sister in California; Harrie, born August 10, 1877; and Eva P., born June 18, 1881. Our subject is a member of the F. & A. M., and is a Republican.
     JACOB L. WAGNER, contractor and builder, Hazleton, was born June 5, 1849, and is a son of Louis and Anna M. (Schraeder) Wagner, natives of Germany. The family came to America in 1858, settling in Hazle township, this county, where the
children, four in number, Jacob L., being the eldest, were reared and educated. At the age of fifteen the subject of this sketch began to work at the mines, and at ten years he commenced to follow that occupation, which he continued until nine­teen years of age, when he learned the trades of carpenter and cabinet-maker. These he carried on until 1882, when he engaged in contracting and building at Drifton, during one year, and at Freeland, two years. He then came to Hazleton, · and has here continued that business. For two years he was in partnership with Fredrick May, but since that time he has carried on business on his own account. Mr. Wagner was married, September 20, 1873, to Miss Catherine Thrash, of Butler Valley, daughter of Daniel Thrash, and to this union were born seven children: Christiana, Anna (deceased), Claral, Andrew, Alvin, Della, and Elmer (deceased). The family attend the English Lutheran Church. In politics Mr. Wagner is a stanch Republican, and he is a member of the Improved Order of Red Men, Knights of Malta, and Shield of Honor.

      J. L. WAGNER, engineer, Nottingham Colliery. One of the greatest anthracite collieries in the world is "the Nottingham," and it is doubtfill whether in the bituminous regions there is a single shaft mine that can compete with it. There is hoisted daily an average of about 2,800 tons, and to do this great amount of work in a single shaft, and with one pair of hoisting engines, requires the machinery to be of the best possible make, and that those who are entrusted with these powerful machines shall not only have the mechanical skill, but shall possess a cool head, steady nerve, and ready action. Such a man is J. L. Wagner, who has handled the levers at "Nottingham" for the past ten years. On September 30, 1891, he hoisted from the above-named colliery 1,305 cars of coal in nine hours, for which he was granted a silver medal for surpassing all previous records in the history of coal hoisting. Mr. Wagner was born at Stroudsburg, Pa., June 6, 1842, and is the sixth in the family of ten children of John and Jane (McNeil) Wagner, the former a native of Alsace, Germany, and the latter of County Kildare, Ireland. Our sub­ject was educated in the common schools of Luzerne county, and commenced life as a fireman at the Butler mines, remaining there until the Civil war broke out, when he enlisted April 19, 1861, in Company E, Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, under Capt. John Johnson. During this term of enlistment, which was in the three months' service, he was in the battle of Falling Waters, fought July 2, 1861. His three months' service having expired, he re-enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Forty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, under Capt. Charles Flagg, but, owing to severe illness, he was never mustered in. On June 22, 1863, he enlisted, for the third time, in Battery H, One Hundred and Twelfth Regiment, and in December, 1864, he was promoted to corporal, and on September 13, 1865, to sergeant. The company was mustered out January 29, 1865, and was under Capt. Wilhelm. They participated in the following: battle of Cold Harbor, attack on Petersburg (June 16), mine explosion in front of Petersburg, engagement at Chapin's Farm, and at the fall of Petersburg. Sergeant Wagner was twice wounded: first time at the battle of Falling Waters, and the second time at Petersburg. After the war closed, Hr. Wag­ner came to Plymouth and engaged as fireman at the Sweatland Colliery, remaining there as fireman and engineer for four years. He then took a position under the Dela­ware & Hudson Company as engineer at Shaft No. 1, where he continued for three years; afterward went to the Grand Tunnel for a short time, as engineer. He then changed his mode of work, and, in company with Thomas Edwards, ran the river steamer "J. C. Coons," plying between Wilkes-Barre and Nanticoke. This boat they ran for but one season when our subject returned to his old occupation of engineering, this time at No. 5, where he operated a hoisting engine for nearly a year, at the end of which time he proceeded, in 1879, to Leadville, Colo., where he put up, and operated for two months, a large pair of hoisting engines at the Glass Pendy Silver Mines. He then returned east and went to No. 5 as engineer for about one year, after which he took the position at the Nottingham, which he has occupied since 1880. Mr. Wagner was married, December 24, 1868, to Miss Fannie, daughter of William and Mary (Wheeler) Caton, natives of Pennsylvania, and eight children have been born of this union, viz.: Anna, Andrew F. (deceased), Mary, John Henry, Jennie (deceased), Willie (deceased), Stella and Lulu. The family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Wagner is a member of the G.A. R. and F. & A. M.; politically he is a Republican.
            ZIBA B. WAGNER, drilling contractor, P.O. Plainsville, Plains township, was born in Plains, November 16, 1850. He is a son of Adam and Lydia (Benjamin) Wagner, the former a native of Plains, and of Dutch origin, and the latter a native of Connecticut, and of New England origin. His father, who was a carpenter, and later a
farmer, reared a family of eight children, of whom Ziba B. was the seventh. He spent his boyhood on a farm, was educated in the common school, and has since made drilling and contracting on artesian wells and air-ways the chief occupation of his life. On September 10, 1872, he was united in the holy bonds of matrimony with Miss Margaret, daughter of John and Ann (Willits) McGeehen, natives of New York. They have one child, Adam Clark, born September 15, 1877. Mrs. Wagner  is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; Mr. Wagner is a member of the P. O. S. of A., and, politically, is a Republican.
            GEORGE L. WALKER, miner, Plainsville, was born in Walsall, England, April 6, 1861, and is a son of George and Mary (Parks) Walker, also natives of England. The father, who was a man of much ability as a workman, was killed by a fall of coal in Mine No. 14, Plains, on March ]2, 1889. George and Mary Walker had a
family of seven children, four of whom are living, viz.: George L., William E., Mary A. and Charles H. The family came to America in i869, and located at Black Walnut, removing a few months later to Plains, where they still reside. Our subject received a common-school education, and at the age of nine years began picking slate on the breakers; he has always worked about the mines, and has worked his way through all the different stages until he is now a full-fledged miner. He built his present residence in 1891, and removed therein in September, same year. Mr. Walker was married, April 25, 1888, to Anna H., daughter of Henry and Ann (Adamson) Jopling, of Inkerman; he is a member of the F. & A. M., and has always given his political support to the Republican party.
            JOHN J. WALKER, miner, Inkerman, was born December 15, 1838, son of John and Ann (Rooney) Walker, natives of County Silgo, Ireland, who reared a family of four children, of whom John J. is the youngest. Our subject was educated in the parish school, and left Ireland in 1846, landing in Quebec, Canada, where he
worked for one year, carrying water to the men on the city works. He came to New York City in 1847, where he followed boating on the canal until 1851, in which year he came to Pittston and went to work as a driver in the mines; in 1852 he worked as a laborer, and in 1855 became a miner for the Pennsylvania Coal Company,
by whom he is still employed. Mr. Walker was united in marriage, May 9, 1858, to Sarah, daughter of John and Sarah (Williams) Jones, a native of Staffordshire, England, and of Welsh descent. Their union has been blessed with the following issue: Thomas J., born May 17, 1859; Ann E., born July 27, 1862, was married, March 15, 1885, to Patrick Martin, a laborer, of Inkerman; May J., born October 17, 1867, was married, November 14, 1890, to William Vaughan, a conductor, of Sayre, Bradford Co., Pa.; William H., born September 23, 1869; Sarah A., born July 16, 1871; James A., born October l, 1873; Agnes, born October 23, 1876; and Nellie, born January 9, 1878. Our subject is a member of the Catholic Church, and in politics is a Democrat.

            STANLEY W. WALKER, architect, Wilkes-Barre, was born in that city June 29, 1868, a son of David and Margaret (Conner) Walker. The paternal grandfather, John Walker, a native of Scotland, and a distiller and stone-mason by occupation, settled in Wilkes-Barre as early as 1835; later removed to Fairfield, Iowa, and died there. The father, David Walker, was reared in Wilkes-Barre from twelve years of age, and, with the exception of tea years, has resided there, where he learned the bricklayer's trade, which he followed until 1891, when he retired. Our subject, the only child, was reared in Wilkes-Barre, educated in the public schools, and studied architecture eight years in the office of W. W. Weur. In 1889 he embarked in business for himself, as a member of the firm of Davey & Walker, in which he has since continued, and has already built up a lucrative business. Politically, Mr. Walker is a Republican.

           THOMAS WALKER, fire-boss in No. 14, Pennsylvania Coal Company, Inkerman, Jenkins township, was born in Scotland, September 1, 1857, and is a son of Robert and Jenet (Thompson) Walker. His father, who works about the Abbot Mines, reared a family of four children, viz.: William, a miner in Peckville, Pa.; Thomas; Robert, a miner in Plains, and George, a miner living with his father. Our subject was educated in the public schools of his native country, and at the age of eleven years began working about the mines, which occupation he followed till he came to America in 1881. I-Ie located in Plainsville, near his present home, has since remained working about the mines, and has held his present position since 1891. Mr. Walker was married January 18, 1883, to Miss Mary, daughter of James and Jane (Routledge) Jopling, of Inkerman, and they have three children, viz.: Jennie R., Ethel A. and James R. Mr. and Mrs. Walker are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in his political views he is a Republican.

            W. B. WALKER, barber, Plains, was born in Bethany, Pa., April 12, 1849, and is a son of Francis and Ann (Best) Walker, natives of Southampton, England. The family came to America about 1840, and located at Philldelphia, where the father was engaged in the hotel business for two years, and then removed to Bethany where he purchased a farm, later resuming the hotel business, which he followed until his death. His father's family consisted of two children: Frank, foreman in the office of the Texas Siftings, New York, and William B. The subject of this memoir was educated in the common schools, and at the age of fourteen engaged with M. B. Peck, of Honesdale, to learn the marble-cutting trade. After serving an apprenticeship of three years, he went to Carbondale, and worked on the Thomas Dixon monument; he then served a three years'  apprenticeship at the barber's trade, since which he has been engaged in business for himself, successively, at Waymart, Honesdale, Kingston, Carbondale, and again at Waymart, Carbondale and Kingston, and in 1880 came to Plains, where he has since resided. Mr. Walker was married, February 22, 1870, to Miss Sarah, daughter of Benjamin and Oliver (Porter) Gunsaulus, natives of New York and Connecticut, respectively, and they have five children, viz.: Lizzie E., Mary L., Millie M., Edith O. and Roberta A. Our subject is a member of the I. O. O. F. and Encampment, the A. O. K. of M. C., and the O. U. A. M.; politically he is a Republican.

Henry Wall, farmer, P.O. Lockville, Wyoming County, was born in Little Exeter, Wyoming County, June 6, 1840, and is a son of Dennis and Ursula (Hubbard) Wall, both of whom were also born in Wyoming County. Dennis was a son of John, a native of Rhode Island, who removed to Little Exeter about 1810, in which place he passed the remainder of his days. He was a shoemaker of some experience, and worked at the trade for a number of years in his younger days, following the custom of his day in going from family to family to do their "shoeing." He removed from the east of this county at a time when good mechanics were of great worth to their fellow men. He served in the war of 1812, and was not only a soldier and a master mechanic, but a successful and practical farmer as well, owning, in Little Exeter, a farm of one hundred acres. He reared a family of nine children, and died in 1862, at an advanced age. Dennis Wall began life in Little Exeter, as a farmer, and at his death owned five farms, all the result of his own hard labor. He was a man of great endurance and strict honesty, and a devout member of the Christian Church, whose influence was much sought after. He held most of the town offices with great credit. Mr. Wall died January 20, 1891, at the age of seventy-six years. His family consisted of nine children, eight of whom are now living. Henry Wall is the eldest in the family. He lived at home until he reached his thirty-seventh year, when he married on February 27, 1878, Miss Mary E., daughter of A. O. and Elizabeth Lutes, to which union have been born three children, two of whom are living: Ursula E. and Ellen A. Mrs. Mary E. (Lutes) Wall was born in North Moreland Township, Wyoming County. In 1878 Mr. Wall moved on to his present farm of ninety acres; he is an industrious and practical farmer. He has been elected to the office of constable, and also to other local positions, which he has held with credit.

Sylvester Wall, brother of Henry, was born in Exeter, November 13, 1854, where he was reared and educated. In the early years of his life, he followed butchering. He made his home with his parents until he reached his twenty-eight year, when on September 30, 1881, he married Miss Rose, daughter of Spencer and Elizabeth Fitch, and they have had two daughters, Edith and Rose, aged nine and six years, respectively. After his marriage Mr. Wall removed to his farm of seventy-five acres; he is a general and practical farmer, and, since his residence here, has made many improvements in buildings and on fields. He has been honored with several township offices. Mrs. Rose (Fitch) Wall was born in Wyoming County, November 9, 1860. The Walls are stanch Democrats.

John Wall, fire-boss, Plains, was born in Herefordshire, England, May 17, 1846, son of John and Sarah (Seal) Wall. His father, who was a miner, reared a family of six children, of whom he is the only son. He came to America in 1865, the rest of the family following in 1867; his father located at Mill Creek, where he worked in the mines and was killed in 1870. John located at Yatesville, where he worked in the mines, and, later at St. Clair and Sugar Notch, removing in 1867 to Plains, where he has since resided and worked in the mines, with the exception of 1888-89, when he was engaged in the mercantile business, and, in 1889, in tax collecting. Mr. Wall was married, August 31, 1869, to Margaret A., daughter of George and Mary (Slater) Martin, natives of England. They have seven children, viz.: George, bookkeeper, Sheldon Axle Works, Wilkes-Barre; Sadie; John William; Mary J.; Annie; Elizabeth, and Emma. Mr. and Mrs. Wall are members of the Primitive Methodist Church, and his two sons are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church; he is a member of the I. O. O. F. and Encampment, and the Sons of St. George; in politics he is a Republican.

Anthony Walsh, painter, P.O. Oliver's Mills, was born in County Mayo, Ireland, in 1859, a son of John and Catherine (Sweeney) Walsh. In 1872 he came to America with his mother and two brothers, John and Michael, and located in Wilkes-Barre. He resided there until 1888, engaged in mining; then removed to Laurel Run Borough, where he has since followed painting as his occupation. On January 23, 1888, Mr. Walsh married Miss Mary, daughter of John and Bridget (McCarroll) Daly, of Wilkes-Barre Township, and has one son living, Anthony. Mr. Walsh is a member of the Catholic Church, and of the A. O. of H. In politics, he is a Democrat, and is one of the school directors of Laurel Run Borough.

John P. Walsh, grocer and hotel-keeper, Wilkes-Barre Township, was born in Hawley, Wayne Co. Pa., March 24, 1863, and is a son of Patrick and Margaret (Kilboy) Walsh, who settled in Wilkes-Barre in 1865, where they now reside. Our subject was reared in Wilkes-Barre, educated in the public schools, and from 1880 to 1887 was employed on the railroad as brakeman and conductor. In 1887 he embarked in his present business in Wilkes-Barre Township, in which he has successfully continued. On August 1, 1883, Mr. Walsh married Miss Mary, daughter of James and Ann (Kennedy) Kane, of New York, and has four children living: Ann, Margaret, Jane, and Delia. He is a member of the Catholic Church, and in politics is a Democrat.

William WALTER, farmer, P. O. Conyngham, was born in Baden, Germany, November 23, 1845, a son of David and Catherine (EXLY) WALTER, the former of whom came to America in 1849, locating in Butler township, where his family joined him in 1854. Later he settled in Wilkes-Barre, and died there. His children were Christopher J. (deceased), William and Christian. Our subject was reared in Luzerne county from nine years of age, and began life as a farm hand. He served one year in the Civil war as a member of Company E, Fifty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was honorably discharged at expiration of his term of service. Since 1870 he has been engaged in farming, the past twelve years in Sugar Loaf township, where he owns one of the finest farms in the county. On July 3, 1870, he married Sarah A., daughter of Jacob and Eliza (HOUSEKNECHT) BALLIET, of Sugar Loaf township, and has five children: Harry, Jennie, William, Jr., Charles and Florence. He is a prominent farmer and citizen, a member of the Lutheran Church, and G.A.R., has always been a stanch Democrat, and is now the nominee of his party for the office of sheriff of Luzerne county.

David WALTERS, merchant, Miners Mills, was born in Brecon, South Wales, February 9, 1852, and is a son of John and Jane (JONES) WALTERS. His father, who was a tailor by trade, came to America in 1859, locating at Carbondale, Pa., but later resided at Rushdale, and died in 1890, at the age of seventy-five years, while on a visit to his native country. The family consisted of five children, viz.: Catharine, who died in childhood; John, who died in Miners Mills, at the age of forty-one years, after having worked in the mines at that place fourteen years; David, subject of this sketch; Amelia, married to William PHILLIPS, a miner in Plymouth, Pa., and Mary Ann. Our subject received his education in the common schools of his native country, where he worked in the mines till 1878, when he came to America, bringing with him several thousand dollars; he located in Miners Mills, and worked in the Wyoming Colliery for five years, when he erected his present store and residence, and engaged in the mercantile business; he also built several tenement houses. In 1886 Mr. WALTERS discontinued the mercantile business, sold some of his houses, and removed to Texas, where he worked in the mines and kept boarders for eight months, when, on account of the poor health of himself and family in that climate, he returned to Miners Mills and embarked in his present business. Mr. WALTERS was married, April 7, 1877, to Miss Sarah, daughter of David and Catherine (GRIFFITHS) JAMES; her parents, who were natives of Wales, died in Miners Mills, and were buried in the Hollenback cemetery, Wilkes-Barre. The fruit of this union has been four children, viz.: David, who died at the age of sixteen months; Jane, who died when three months old; one that died in infancy, and Catharine, born June 3, 1888. Mr. WALTERS and wife attend the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which she is a member. He is a member of the K.of P., and the I.O.R.M.; he is a epublican in his political views, and was appointed postmaster October 7, 1889.

A. H. WALTMAN, lumberman, Nescopeck, was born in that village July 4, 1835, a son of Samuel and Susan (SWANK) WALTMAN. The father, who was a native of Berks county, Pa., came to Nexcopeck township in 1832, followed boating on the canal for several years, and in partnership with another built two sections of the Catawissa Railroad in 1838. He removed to Muncy, Pa., in 1840, and died at Shenandoah, same State, in 1868. His children were Alfred H., Mary (Mrs. Post HART) and Julia (Mrs. Elias JONES). Our subject was reared in Lycoming county, Pa., from five years of age. In 1854 he returned to his native town, where he has since resided, and he was engaged in boating on the canal thirty-five years; also conducted a successful mercantile business in Nescopeck seven years. He has erected fourteen houses in the town, twelve of which are double dwellings, and one store building, and expects to build several more. In 1867 he married Ella, daughter of John and Anna RUCH, of Berwick, Pa., the former of whom was a prominent citizen of Berwick, and postmaster there for about twenty years. By this union there are seven children living: Laura (Mrs. Harvey BOND), Harry, Susie, John, Howard, Clara, and an infant son. Mr. WALTMAN is a prominent citizen of Nescopeck, is enterprising, and has done as much toward building up and improving the village as any one. In politics he is a Republican, and has held several township offices.

E. P. WALTON, proprietor of meat-market, Plymouth, was born in Salem township Luzerne county, September 15, 1838, and is the third in a family of nine children born to Enoch and Julia (LONGER) WALTON, natives of this county. Our subject was educated in the public schools of Luzerne county, and began life as a farmer, in which vocation he continued for six years. He then removed to Foundryville, Columbia Co., Pa., where he was engaged in the mercantile business for two years, coming thence to Plymouth, where he kept a livery and boarding stable for eight years, at the stand where C. J. BOYLE is now located. He afterward opened a grocery in the building which stood where the "Eley House" is now located, and continued it for one year, at the end of which time he removed to Virginia, remaining there nearly a year and coming from there back to Plymouth, where he established his present business, a large and well-stocked market, which is liberally patronized. Mr. WALTON was united in marriage, September 22, 1855, to Anna M., daughter of Jacob and Phoebe (GENSELL) HOOSLER, natives of Columbia county, Pa., to which union have been born eight children, as follows: Charles; Emeline, wife of J. C. DEVERS a merchant of Plymouth, Pa., Ida Belle, wife of W. W. MULTER, of Philadelphia; Ella, deceased; Minnie, deceased; Kate J., and Frederick B., both attending the Wyoming Seminary; and Carrie. Mr. WALTON's political views are Republican. The family are adherents of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a member of the Knights of Honor.

Joseph WALTON, farmer, P. O. Shickshinny, was born in a log house on the Walton homestead, in Salem township, this county, February 14, 1830, and is a son of Enoch and Julia A. (LONGER) WALTON. His paternal grandfather Joseph WALTON, of Berks county, Pa., was one of the early settlers of Salem township, where he cleared and improved the farm on which our subject was born, and lived in the township until his death. Enoch WALTON was his only son, and he resided on the old homestead until he died. He was twice married, his first wife being Julia A. LONGER, by whom he had three children: Joseph, Annie (Mrs. E. POLLOCK) and Ellis; his second wife was Rachel GARRISON, and by her he had also three children: Morris, George and Almira (Mrs. C. S. NESBITT). Our subject has always resided in Salem township, where he has followed farming and lumbering. He married Lavina, daughter of William and Elizabeth (FREEMAN) POLLOCK, of Salem township, by which union there were nine children, as follows: A son that died in infancy, William E., Enoch S., John F. and Annie F. (Mrs. Wallace MOORE), Lemuel P., a daughter that died in infancy, Effie (Mrs. Lockard HICKS) and Elizabeth L. Mr. WALTON is a prominent citizen of Salem township, and in politics he is a Republican

W. E. WALTON, farmer, P. O. Lehman, was born May 6, 1854, in Salem township, this county, where he was reared and educated. He is a son of Joseph and Lavina (POLLOCK) WALTON, both of whom were also born in Salem township. Joseph is a son of Enoch WALTON, who was also a native of Salem township, and an extensive land owner, having as much as 600 acres at one time. He was a director of the Berwick Bridge at one time, and also owned "stock" in the same. He was a peaceable citizen and a good farmer. Enoch was a son of Joseph WALTON, who was either a native of Holland or a descendant of Dutch parents, a resident of Berks county, and by faith a Quaker. He moved to this county about 1800, locating in Salem township; he was a blecksmith by trade, a man of energy and push, and died at the age of eighty-four years. He had two children. His son Enoch lived to be eighty-one years of age, and reared a family of six children, four of whom are now living. Joseph, the father of the subject of this sketch, is still living in Salem township at the age of sixty-one years; he has a family of seven children, all living. He owns 600 acres of land which produces an abundance of lumber which he manufactures. Joseph WALTON is also a prosperous farmer and a thorough-going business man. His son, W. E., is the eldest of the family, and has always confined himself to farming. At the age of twenty-two, he married, for his first wife, Miss Dora, daughter of Jacob and Mary PRINDLE. She died without issue, October 27, 1877. For his second wife he married, on October 16, 1879, Miss Mary, daughter of John and Aminda SHAW, in Huntington, Luzerne county. By this marriage there were born four children, all of whom are living, viz.: John S., Joseph E., Dora O. and William A. Mrs. WALTON was born in North Moreland, Wyoming county, October 22, 1852. Mr. WALTON moved to Lehman township, on his present place of 115 acres of fertile land, in 1882. He is a general farmer of marked ability, whose surroundings show his taste and judicious management. He has been elected to several local offices, which he has held with credit. He and his esteemed wife are both consistent members of the M. E. Church. Politically, he is a Republican.

John G. WARD, machinist, Duryea, was born in the County of Durham, England, April 22, 1850, son of John and Thomasina (WHEATLEY) WARD, natives of that place. They reared a family of eight children, of whom our subject is the second in order of birth. He received his education in the common schools, and in 1864 was apprenticed to learn the trade of machinist. In 1871 he came to the United States, and worked for the firm of Hillman & Sons, Miners Mills, this county, as engineer, for eighteen months. He afterward worked at his trade for a few months in Mahanoy Machine Shops, in Schuylkill county. He then returned to England and worked at his trade until July 18, 1879, when he again came to this country, locating in Scranton. In 1881 he took up his residence in Duryea, where he is employed as engineer by the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Coal Co. He was united in marriage May 12, 1870, with Jane A., daughter of Carnaby and Ann (CARRICK) WILLIS, natives of Durham, England. Their union has been blessed with the following issue: Robert C., born September 16, 1871; Thomas H., born October 29, 1872; Annie, born May 7, 1874, Margaret, born December 30, 1876; Lillie G., born August 16, 1878; John G., born June 27, 1881; Sydney E., born March 30, 1883; William E., born January 7, 1885; Charles H. , born February 10, 1887. Our subject is a local minister of the M. E. Church, and in politics is a Prohibitionist. He is now holding the office of township auditor, and has also served as township clerk. Mr. WARD is prominently connected with the Sons of Temperance, K. O.P., and K.of M.C. He is also largely interested in the Moosic Co-operative Association, of which he was one of the originators.

Rev. James P. WARE, pastor of the St. Peter's Church, Plymouth. This gentleman was born at Salem, Mass., April 6, 1859, and is a son of William and Jane (GRAHAM) WARE, natives of England. Mr. Ware was educated first at Providence, Rhode Island, where he prepared for a higher course of study which he took at the Delaware College, Newark, graduating from there in the class of '83, having the degree of B. L. conferred upon him. He then entered the Episcopal Theological Seminary of Cambridge, Mass., where he was graduated June, 1886, with the degree of B. D. On June 13, same year, he was ordained a deacon by Bishop Clark, of Rhode Island, and in May, 1887, was ordained priest. Was rector of Trinity Church at Woburn, Mass., and later of Manville, R.I. He is at present assistant minister of St. Stephen's Church, Wilkes-Barre, and has charge of the Mission church at Plymouth. Mr. Ware was united in marriage October 12, 1887, with Helen E., daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth C. (ROWE) STORY, natives of New York, the ceremony being performed at Providence, Rhode Island.

John A. WARING, proprietor of the "Dairy Kitchen," Wilkes-Barre, was born in Bolton, Lancashire, England, August 18, 1853, a son of Charles and Jane (MOORE) WARING. His father came to America in 1868, and located at Binghamton, N.Y., where he resided until his death, June 14, 1876. The family settled in Binghamton in 1870. The children were George, James, John A., Sarah E. (Mrs. Thomas WATSON); George (II), William and Charles. Our subject was reared and educated in England, and came to America in 1870, locating at Binghamton, N.Y., and was clerk in a dry-goods store there eleven years. In 1881 he removed to Wilkes-Barre, and was superintendent of the Boston Store ten years, and was afterward manager of the store of Conyngham, Scrage & Company two years. In December, 1889, he established the "Dairy Kitchen," a popular resort and the only exclusive ladies' and gentlemen's restaurant in the city. On June 9, 1878, Mr. WARING married Miss Kate, daughter of William MC KEEVER, of Louisville, Ky., a native of Scotland, and has one daughter living, Lizzie M. Mr. WARING is a member of the Episcopal Church, and of the American Legion of Honor. Politically he is independent.

Emanuel M. WARNER, farmer and laborer, Huntington township, P. O. Harveyville, was born July 2, 1860, in Union township, only child of Henry and Sarah Ann (HOUTZ) WARNER, natives of Pennsylvania, who were of English and German origin, respectively. Emanuel M. was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and at eighteen years of age began life for himself, as a common laborer, following the same until the fall of 1875, when he purchased his present farm, and has since devoted a part of his time to working and improving it. He was married, April 14, 1888, to Miss Elsie, daughter of Ami and Ann (COPE) MASTERS. Mr. WARNER is a careful energetic young man, well liked by all his neighbors. Politically he is a Republican.

James WARNER, farmer, P. O. Dorrance, was born in Hollenback township, April 18, 1844, a son of John and Elizabeth (SMITH) WARNER, both of whom were born in Northampton county, whence they removed to this county about 1850, and located in Hollenback township. Mr. WARNER purchased several small parcels of land at various times, out of which he made a complete farm. After the lapse of years, when he became an old man, he sold this farm and went to live with his son James, the subject of this sketch. He had been a man of remarkable push and energy in his day, and he is now seventy years of age; his wife died in September, 1884. Their family consisted of fifteen children, of whom seven are now living, James being the eldest. Our subject was reared and educated in Hollenback township, and in his younger days worked at various callings. He spent several years in Dupont's Powder Mills, where he was much appreciated for his superior abilities. In 1867 he married Miss Sarah, daughter of Samuel and Barbara CRAGLE, by which union children were born as follows: John, Catherine, Martha, Annie, William, Lizzie, Norman, Garfield, Albert, Ida, Hannah and Harry. After his marriage Mr. WARNER removed to Dorrance township, on a farm of eighty acres, where he has since lived, a prosperous man and a practical farmer. In 1864 he was mustered into the service of the United States for a term of three years, as a member of Company E, One Hundred and Eighty-eighth P.V.I., and he displayed great heroism in various engagements while encountering Mosby and his band. He was honorably discharged at the close of the war, and now enjoys a pension. Politically Mr. WARNER is a stanch Republican.

James Nelson WARNER, a prominent dentist of Wilkes-Barre, was born in Huntington township, this county, December 5, 1845, a son of Dr. Sydney H. and Cornelia (MACHETTE) WARNER, the former a native of Connecticut, the latter of Trenton, N.J. Dr. Sydney H. WARNER, who was a graduate of Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, settled in Huntington, this county, in the early "thirties," and was a prominent physician of his day. He was twice married: his first wife was Hannah LOOMIS, of Susquehanna county, Pa., by whom he had five children: Geraldine, Adelaide (Mrs. M. C. KOONS), Theodosia (Mrs. Hiram PARK), Jared D. and Hannah (Mrs. Dr. H. C. BACON). His second wife was Cornelia MACHETTE, a lady of French parentage, by whom he had three children, of whom our subject is the only survivor. James Nelson WARNER was reared in Huntington township, received an academical education, and began the study of dentistry in 1871, graduating from the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery, Philadelphia, in 1873. After practicing his profession in Hazleton two years, he located, in 1875, in Wilkes-Barre, where he has since been in active practice. On November 7, 1883, Mr. WARNER married Jennie, daughter of John M. and Sarah (DAVISON) STARK, of Wyoming, and has two children living; Sydney and an infant son. Our subject is a member of the Susquehanna County and Pennsylvania State Dental Associations; in religion he is an adherent of the Episcopal Church, and politically he is a Republican. He is a Knight Templar.

JOHN WASLEY, mine contractor, Wilkes-Barre, was born in the County of Cornwall, England, May 14, 1841, a son of Stephen and Elizabeth (Edwards) Wasley. Our subject was reared and educated in England, and at ten years of age began working in the mines, and remained there in different capacities until 1873. He then came to America and settled in Wilkes-Barre, where he has since resided, following mining until 1881, since which time he has been engaged in contracting, sinking shafts, driving tunnels, etc. On August 15, 1867, Mr. Wasley married Miss Mary J., daughter of Henry and Mary A. (James) James, of Cornwall, England, and by her has six children: Bessie, Jennie, Stephen, Edward, John and Amelia. Mr. Wasley is a F. & A. M.; politically he is an Independent.

EDWIN C. WASSER, proprietor of the "Bristol House," Wilkes-Barre, was born at White Haven, July 9, 1841, and is a son of John and Letitia (Clark) Wasser, natives of Pennsylvania, the former of whom was a contractor in the building of dams, and a lumber man. Our subject's maternal grandfather, Clark, was with Gen. Sullivan on his famous expedition through the Valley after the Wyoming Massacre in 1778. Edwin C. Wasser was educated at the public schools of White Haven, and at the Wyoming Seminary. While yet in his minority he was clerk two years in a drug store. On December 9, 1861, he enlisted in Battery H, Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, or One Hundred and Twelfth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and participated in all the engagements of the regiment; he was honorably discharged from the service December 9, 1864. In 1866 he engaged in the hotel business at White Haven, and was the proprietor of the "Pacific House" at that place until 1870, when he located at Pittston, and there conducted the "Getting House" until 1872. He then went to Shamokin to take possession of some tracts of land, the claim to which the Reading Railroad Company disputed, but which land was, after a long and severe contest, finally held by the Reading Railroad Company. In 1874 he located in Wilkes-Barre, and here he carried on the "Exchange Hotel" until 1876. In 1878 he took charge of the "Bristol House," of which he has since been the proprietor. In 1878 Mr. Wasser was united in marriage with Miss Mary A. Wilson, of Huntington township, this county. He is a member of the Methodist Church, of the K. of P. and G. A. R., and in his chosen vocation he is business-like in his methods, a strict disciplinarian, and competent, executive, affable and generous to a fault, courteous, popular and successful host.

CHARLES WATKINS, contractor and builder, Plymouth, of the firm Watkins & Heness. This enterprising and energetic young man was born in Monmouthshire, South Wales, June 8, 1863, and is the second in the family of three children born to Morgan and Ann (Rodgers) Evans, natives of Wales. After the death of Morgan Watkins, his wife, Ann, subsequently married William Watkins, whose name the subject of this sketch bears. Charles Watkins was educated in this country, whither he came in March, 1881; he, however, had learned the mason's trade in Wales, and became a very competent workman before coming to America. He located at Plymouth and worked at his trade. In 1885 he formed a partnership with Samuel W. Heness, for the purpose of contracting and building, in which business they are competent and skillful workmen. Mr. Watkins was united in marriage May 1, 1887, with Mary J., daughter of George and Elizabeth (Williams) Coombs, the former a native of England, the latter of Wales. To this union three children have been born, namely: Ernest, Steward (deceased) and Mabel.

EVAN WATKINS, inside foreman for Coxe Bros. & Co., Gowen Colliery, Gowen, was born in Merthyr, Glamorganshire, South Wales, October 16, 1840, a son of Evan and Ann (Parry) Watkins. Their children were eleven in number, ten of whom grew to maturity: Margaret (Mrs. Abram Abrams), Ann (Mrs. Thomas Richards), John, Evan, Morgan, Septie, Thomas, William, James and Mary (Mrs. Daniel Jones). The mother of our subject came to America in September, 1869, and died in Black Creek township in 1885. Mr. Watkins was reared in Wales, where, at the age of fourteen, he began work in the ore mines, and later worked in the coal mines for eight years. In 1869 he came to America, and to Pennsylvania, and worked in the mines at Girardville, Schuylkill County, until 1870, when he located at Upper Lehigh, Luzerne County. Since 1875 he has been in the employ of Coxe Bros. & Co., and for two years was assistant foreman at Drifton; since December 12, 1881, he has held his present position at Gowen Colliery. In 1864 our subject married Gwennie, daughter of Thomas and Ann (Lloyd) Lewis, of Wales, by whom he has two children living, Mary A. and Septie. Mr. Watkins is a member of the Baptist Church; he belongs to the I. O. O. F. and K. of P. of Drifton, and in politics is a Republican.

MESACH WATKINS, lamp inspector, Parsons, was born in Merthyr, South Wales, April 15, 1829. He was educated in Wales and at the age of twenty came to America, locating at Minersville, Pa., where he engaged in mining for five years. He afterward mined at Shamokin, Ashland and Mt. Carmel, remaining in the last place twenty-five years. In March, 1865, he enlisted and served until the close of the war, when he returned to Mt. Carmel to resume mining. In 1879 he moved to Wilkes-Barre, and in 1883 to Parsons, where at different times he has engaged in the sewing machine and insurance businesses, and where he is at present in the employ of the Delaware & Hudson Coal Company. Mr. Watkins was married, March 24, 1850, to Miss Sarah, daughter of Reese Davis, and by her had the following ten children: Benjamin; Mary Ann, who married William Smith, or Northumberland County; Ruth (deceased); Gullivan; Morgan (deceased); Elizabeth (deceased); Ruth, who married David D. Jenkins; Sarah Jane (deceased); Naomi, wife of William Morse, of Mt. Carmel; Mesach (deceased); Mirean (deceased). Mr. Watkins is a member of the Welsh Congregational Church, and of the I. O. R. M.; in politics he is a Republican.

W. E. WATKINS, merchant, Freeland, is a native of Minersville, Schuylkill Co., Pa., and was born November 19, 1849. He is a son of Shadrach and Mary (Evans) Watkins, both natives of Wales, now deceased. When our subject was about seven years of age, his parents removed from Minersville to Lansford, Carbon County, where he received his early education. When he was a youth he began working around the mines, and he remained in Lansford and worked in the mines in the employ of the Lehigh Coal & Navigation Company until 1873, when he removed to Freeland, where he has since resided. In 1888 he engaged in the mercantile business, where he has gained the confidence of the appreciative public by his fair dealing and strict business methods. In 1871 Mr. Watkins was united in marriage with Miss Jane Powell, an accomplished lady, daughter of Thomas Powell, of Upper Lehigh.This union has been blessed with two children, viz.: William and George. He is a firm supporter of the principles of the Republican party, and is at present a member of the Freeland school board.

SAMUEL B. WATSON, superintendent of Mountain Park, Ashley, was born in Germantown, Pa., September 5, 1839, and is a son of Joseph and Belmaih (Medare) Watson, natives of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, and of Scotch-Irish and French origin, respectively. The father, who was a shoemaker by trade, and a local preacher in the Methodist Episcopal Church, reared a family of eighteen children, ten of whom were by his second wife, Rebecca J. Moore; his third wife, Mary Moore, was a sister of his second. Samuel B. Watson was educated in the public schools, and at the age of eight years began boating on the Lehigh Canal, which he followed until 1859, when the family removed to White Haven; there he went to work in a sawmill, soon becoming head sawyer. On November 1, 1861, he enlisted, at White Haven, in Company H, One Hundred and Twelfth Regiment, Second Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery; he was taken prisoner before Richmond, September 29, 1864, and was in Libby, Belle Isle and Salisbury prisons, until March 2, 1865, but waited for his discharge until the surrender of Lee, receiving the same April 9, 1865. He then returned to White Haven and resumed his position in the mill, in 1866 removing to Ashley, where he worked in the Central shops until 1874. In this year he went back to White Haven and worked two years in the old mill, after which he again came to Ashley and engaged in carpenter work on the Central Railroad of New Jersey, between White Haven and Scranton, an occupation he still follows during the winter. Mr. Watson was married, December 20, 1866, to Mary M., daughter of John C. and Julia A. (Childs) Strong, the former a native of New York and the latter of Stoddartsville, this county, where her ancestors were early settlers. They have six children, viz.: Clara B. (Mrs. J. Lincoln Black), Sarah J. (Mrs. Charles W. Vincent), John C., Archippus B., Lillian A. and Buella. Our subject and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he is trustee and class leader; he is a Republican is his political views.

PHINEAS ARNOLD WATT, foreman of the Eastern Boston Mine, Luzerne, was born in Wayne County, Pa., April 12, 1847, and is a son of Matthew and Hortentia M. (Brooks) Watt, natives of Pennsylvania, the latter being a daughter of Capt. Brooks, of Revolutionary fame. Our subject received his education in his native village, and quite early in life came to Luzerne County, where he began as a slate picker in a breaker operated by the Delaware & Hudson Railroad Company. He worked there two years and then took charge of the boys at that colliery. At the age of seventeen, Mr. Watt entered the transportation department of the Delaware & Hudson, where he spent some time, afterward acting in the capacity of assistant engineer. He followed engineering and carpenter work until he came to the Eastern Boston Mine, where he first had charge of the breaker machine, subsequently being promoted to the position of outside foreman, which he has occupied since 1872. Mr. Watt was married December 21, 1871, to Louisa, daughter of Amos Pool, a native of Pennsylvania, and of this union have been born two children, Carrie and Bert F., who reside at home. Mr. Watt and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church; he is a member of the I. O. O. F. and F. & A. M. In politics he is a follower of the Republican party.

GEORGE WEAVER, brewer, Wilkes-Barre, was born June 28, 1853, a son of John and Barbara (Decker) Weaver, natives of Germany, who came to this county in 1837. They were the parents of four children. Our subject, the third in order of birth, was educated in the public schools of Wilkes-Barre and a private school taught by Col. Harvey. After leaving school he was employed at Reichard & Company's brewery, where he still remains, and in 1888 he was admitted into the firm. In 1883 Mr. Weaver married Miss Frances, daughter of Eusebius Hortman, of German origin, and of this union have been born three children: Lizzie, Catherine and George.

WILLIAM A. WEAVER, foreman of the Delaware & Hudson Railroad Company, Laflin, was born in Wayne County, Pa., February 28, 1852, and is a son of William and Rietta (White) Weaver, natives of Rhode Island and of early German origin. The grandfathers were both in the Revolutionary War, in which one of them was poisoned while a prisoner. The father, who was a farmer and in later life a carpenter, reared a family of eight children, of whom William A. is the sixth. Our subject spent his boyhood on the farm, attending the common school till the age of fourteen, when he engaged in teaming, which he followed seven years; then for one year was farming and one year laboring on the railroad; in 1880 he was promoted to his present position. Mr. Weaver was married August 31, 1871, to Miss Josephine Roselle, who was born August 31, 1854, a daughter of Samuel and Delight (Ross) Roselle, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German and English origin, respectively. They have two children, viz.: Bartley R., brakeman on the Delaware & Hudson Railroad, and Elsie L. Our subject is a member of the I. O. R. M.; in politics he is a Republican, and has held the offices of councilman four years and school director six years in Laflin borough.

MARTIN WEINTZ, farmer, P. O. Orange, was born in Essex County, N.J., June 10, 1841. He is the son of Peter and Julia Ann (Bear) Weintz, the former a native of Germany, born February 9, 1816, the latter born in France, March 21, 1826. Peter Weintz was a shoemaker by trade. He emigrated to this country in 1836, locating in New York City, where he stayed four years. His wife, then a stranger to him, came to this country one year later, making New York City her home. During the four years of Peter's residence in the city, they became friends, then lovers, and finally were married in 1840, at which time they removed to Essex County, N.J., where he became a farmer. He remained in Essex County until 1843, when he removed to this county, locating in Jackson township; here he stayed two years, when, in 1845, he removed to Franklin township, after making a temporary stay in Dallas. He located near what is now known as the Flat Rock schoolhouse, where, with the help of his brother Martin, who came to this country in 1837, and who was also a shoemaker, he purchased a farm, to the cultivation of which they confined themselves, with the exception of short periods, now and then, accommodating their neighbors in the shoemaking line. During their lives they did much to embellish the farm, in the erection of buildings and clearing of fields. Martin Weintz never married. Peter had a family of ten children, nine of whom grew to maturity; seven are now (1892) living. He was a staunch Democrat, and advocated the principles of that party. He was a useful man in his town and held in high esteem. He held the office of school director for seventeen years. In religion he was a member of the Lutheran Church. He died in March, 1879, at the age of seventy-four, his wife, in March, 1889, also aged seventy-four.

Martin Weintz was in his third year when his father removed to this county. He was reared and educated in Franklin, and always confined himself to farming. He has always lived in that town, making his home on the homestead. He was twice married: first, in 1869, to Miss Hannah A., daughter of William and Ann Shaver, by whom he had one daughter,Julia Ann, aged twenty years. In 1878 he married, for his second wife, Mrs. Elizabeth, widow of the late B. C. Randall, and daughter of Thomas and Mary Price. Mrs. Elizabeth Weintz was born in Pittston, in 1847. Her father, who is a native of Wales, emigrated to this country about 1835, locating in Wilkes-Barre. He was engaged in the coal business, being an active operator himself, and was employed in opening several mines. He worked the first mine that was ever operated in Pittston, called the Butler Works, being also a merchant while in that place, and he opened the first shaft in Wilkes-Barre. He finally removed to Franklin on a farm of eighty-four acres, which is now occupied by Giles Gay. His family consisted of five children, four now living. He lived to be seventy-three years of age, dying in 1877. Mr. and Mrs. Weintz each have a farm containing sixty-eight and fifty-two acres, respectively. He is a practical agriculturist, and has lived on his present place since 1886. In 1889 he erected a beautiful house, with many modern improvements. His stock is fine, tinctured with the Jersey breed. Politically he is a Democrat.

PETER WEINTZ, farmer, P. O. Weintz, was born in Essex County, N.J., October 12, 1842, a son of Peter and Julia Ann (Bear) Weintz, the former born in Germany in 1805, the latter in France in 1815. Peter emigrated to this country in 1837, stopping at New York City, where he worked at his trade, shoemaking, for three years. In 1840 he removed to Franklin township, Essex Co., N.J., where, in company with his brother, he purchased a farm of seventy acres, which is now occupied by his son, Martin. He cleared his farm and erected buildings suitable to the times. He proved himself to be a worthy man in every sense of the word, and held nearly all the offices in the township, that of school director for a long period. He and his good wife were in full, fellowship in the Presbyterian Church, and he imbibed the spirit of his Master in doing that which was good and benevolent. On March 7, 1879, he died at the age of seventy-four years. His family consisted of ten children, seven of whom are yet living: Martin, Peter, George, Matilda, Mary A., F. F. and Julia A. Peter Weintz, who is the second in the family, was reared in Franklin township and educated at the common school. At the age of eighteen he began to work out for himself, and has always confined himself to agricultural pursuits. On June 18, 1884, he married, at Sunbury, Miss Barbara, daughter of Christopher and Dorothy Mackert, and there was one child, George C., born to this union. Mrs. Weintz was born in Germany, December 7, 1846. Our subject and his brother, George, own a farm of 476 acres which they have, by hard labor and a strict eye to business, converted into a beautiful home. Their house is neat and modern; their barns are commodious and comfortable, while their surroundings stand a monument to their enterprise and energy. They are successful farmers, in every sense of the term. Peter is a man of influence, is a Democrat in politics, and has held nearly all the offices of the township, such as treasurer, collector, assessor, supervisor, etc. Socially, he is a member of the I. O. O. F. He and his wife are members of the Reformed Church.

JONATHAN WEIR, mine foreman, Mocanaqua Mines, was born at New Philadelphia, Schuylkill Co., Pa., March 12, 1852, a son of James and Mary A. (Walker) Weir, natives of Scotland, who came to America about 1830, settling in Schuylkill Co., Pa., where the father engaged in mining. James Weir died at Warrior Run, Luzerne Co., Pa., in 1892, after a residence there of only three months. His children who grew to maturity were: Allen, Joseph G., James, Mary, and Jonathan and Andrew (twins). Our subject was reared in Nova Scotia, where he began work in the mines at eleven years of age. In 1869 he located in Luzerne County, Pa., and worked as a car runner, driver and miner seven years. He then spent several years in Nevada and California, working in the coal, gold and silver mines, and since 1880 he has been a permanent resident of Wilkes-Barre. He was fire-boss of the South Wilkes-Barre Mines nine months, and has held his present position at the Mocanaqua Mines since January 20, 1892. In 1883 Mr. Weir married Jennie, daughter of William and Elizabeth Dickey, of Wilkes-Barre, and they have five children living: Robert B., William, Myrtle, Clara E. and Joseph S. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and in politics is a Republican.

WILLIAM WEISHEIT, proprietor of the "Port Blanchard Hotel," was born in Germany May 14, 1864, and is a son of John and Anna (Eck) Weisheit. The father, who was a shoemaker, reared a family of seven children, three by his first wife and four by his second, Anna Eck. Our subject came to America in 1880, and after a short time came to Wilkes-Barre, where he was engaged in table-waiting for Charles Gable, two years; J. L. Rueffer, four years, and in Lohmann's famous restaurant six years and eight months, after which he was engaged in his present business. Mr. Weisheit was married, May 7, 1885, to Miss Lena,daughter of Daniel Schwenk, of Wilkes-Barre, and they have three children, viz.: John, Ida and Nellie. Mrs. Weisheit is a member of the Catholic Church. He is a member of the K. of P., A. O. K. of M. C., and I. O. O. F., and is a Democrat in his political views.

ANTON WEISS, proprietor of the "Old Fell House," Wilkes-Barre, was born in Dalberg, Rhine Province, Prussia, May 28, 1858, and is a son of William and Elizabeth (Backer) Weiss. In 1870, when but twelve years of age, he immigrated to America with his mother and brother Philip, and located in Syracuse, N.Y., residing there until 1880, when he removed to Wilkes-Barre. After being employed as clerk in a hotel for one year, he engaged in the hotel business for himself two years; then embarked in the manufacturer of baskets three years; and again engaged in the hotel business, in which he still continues, and since 1888 has been the proprietor of the "Old Fell House," the oldest hostelry in the city, and one of the most historic in the county. In this house the first court in Luzerne County was held, and here the first coal was burned in the county, in the grate in the log part of the building, which is still standing. Mr. Weiss was married in 1882 to Christiana, daughter of Matthias and Susannah Walter, of Wilkes-Barre, and they have five children: Susannah, Philip, Margaret, Anton and William. He is a member of the German Catholic Church, and in politics he is a Democrat.

PHILIP WEISS, railroad and steamship ticket agent, Wilkes Barre, was born in Dalberg, Germany, September 21, 1851, son of William and Elizabeth (Backer) Weiss. He was reared and educated in his native country, and in 1870 came to America, locating at Syacuse, N.Y. In 1876 he removed to Wilkes Barre, and served for a time as clerk in the leather store of A.G. Hull, later being in the employ of Robert Baur as solicitor and collector. In 1880 he embarked in the hotel business, in which he successfully continued until December, 1891, when he engaged in his present business, being ticket agent for the Central Railroad of New Jersey, as well as ticket agent for several of the leading steamship lines between the United States and Europe. In 1873 he married Elizabeth Scherrer, of Liverpool, N.Y., and they have four children: Mary, Philip, Lena and Anton. Mr. Weiss is a member of the Catholic Church. During Cleveland's administration he was appointed United States Consul to Mannheim, but refused to serve. In 1884 he ran for the office of county auditor for Luzerne county, and wa defeated by but one vote. Politically he has always been an ardent Democrat.

HERMAN WEISS, car inspector, Mountain Top, Fairview township, was born in Germany January 18, 1855. The father died when Herman was five years old, and the latter stayed with his mother in Germany, working on a farm until he as seventeen years old, when he started for America. Coming here he secured employment as a trackman on the Central Railroad of New Jersey, at Mountain Top, Fairview township, this county. After four months he accepted a osition as engine hostler in the roundhouse at the same place, and after orking at that for one year began work as a brakeman, first on the Lehigh Valley Railroad, where he remained for three years, and then on the Central Railroad of New Jersey, where he worked till 1891, when he resigned and accepted the position as car inspector, which he now holds. By being careful and industrious Mr. Weiss saved enough money to purchase, in 1882, a farm in Fairview township, where he now lives; the place is well stocked. On April 17, 1875, Mr. Weiss was united in Marriage with Amanda, daughter of Mr. And Mrs. George, both natives of this country, the former of German and the atter of French descent. They reared a family of seven children, as follows: Margaret Lena, Elizabeth J., Joseph E., William C., Albert G., Mary E. and Stella M. Mr. and Mrs. Weiss and family are members of the Presbyterian Church. In politics Mr. Weiss is a Democrat; he is a member of the Royal Arcanum, and of the I.O.O.F.

LEWIS WEISS, farmer, P.O. Hobbie, was born in Nescopeck township, December 2, 1833, a son of Jesse and Julia Ann (Buss) Weiss. The former was born in Northampton county, in 1811, the latter in Nescopeck township in 1815. Jesse Weiss removed to this county about 1820, locating in Hollenback township, where he owned considerable property. After some time he disposed of that and removed to Carbon county, where he now resides. There were seven children born to them, six of whom are now living. Lewis Weiss is the eldest of the family. He was reared and educated in Hollenback township, where he has always made his home. He learned the blacksmith's trade when young, but followed it only six years. In 1862, he was mustered into the U.S. service is a private in Company C, One Hundred and Seventy-eighth P.V.I. for the term of nine months. During this time he proved himself a man of daring and courageous spirit, and was honorably discharged at the expiration of his term of service. On his return from the army he purchased a farm of 100 acres, ninety-six of which were cleared; the remainder he has cleared since that time (1866). In 1856 he married Miss Rosanna P., daughter of John N. Zeiser, and to them were born eight children, six of whom are living: Lorenzo E. (now a practicing physician at Hobbie), U. G., Cora A., Rosa B., Clyde A. and Bertha M. Mr. Weiss has held several township positions with much credit. He is a genial, good-natured hospitable "hail fellow well met!" He is a member of the O.U.A.M. He and his wife are members of the Old Lutheran Church, and politically he is a Republican.

JOSEPH WELCH, weighmaster, Lehigh Valley Railroad Company, at Coxton yards, was born at Bethlehem, N.Y., December 9, 1843, a son of William S. and Hannah A. (Alpaugh) Welch, natives of New Jersey. Our subject is the eldest of a family of seven children, was reared on a farm and educated at Easton private school. At the age of twenty-two he engaged in the drug business at Philadelphia with his brother William M., for two years, then located at Washington, N.J., having charge of a drug store for six months. He then worked with the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company, at New Hampton Junction, two years and a half. In 1869 he accepted a position as way-bill clerk with the Lehigh Valley Railroad Company at Coxton, and served in that capacity until 1875. For one year afterward he was connected with the company as brakeman and baggage-master, then resumed the position of weighmaster in 1876, a position he still holds. On September 18, 1871, Mr. Welch married Miss Maggie S., daughter of John S. Carpenter, of West Pittston, and of this union have been born two children: Willie M., and Stella M. Mrs. Welch died in 1884. our subject is a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Pittston. In politics he is a Republican.

J. H. WELCH, farmer, P.O. Dallas, was born in Mauch Chunk, Pa., August 23, 1828, a son of Daniel and Betsy (Hepler) Welch, the former born in Orange, Columbia county, the latter, in Salem, Pa. Daniel was a son of Isaac Welch, who was an Englishman, and a very early resident of Columbia county. Both Isaac and Daniel Welch confined themselves to agricultural pursuits. The latter removed to this county about 1833, locating in Berwick. He was an honest and industrious man, attending strictly to his own affairs. He lived to be seventy-three years of age, and died in 1872, having reared a family of eight children, all of whom grew to maturity. J.H. is the third in the family, and was educated in Wilkes Barre, where, in his early life, he learned the blacksmith's trade, remaining there six years after serving his apprenticeship. In 1860 he removed to Jackson township, where he worked one year at his trade, and in the following year removed to Dallas township, where he now resides on a farm of 128 acres of fertile land. Mr. Welch is a model and practical farmer; he raises a general crop. On March 18, 1850, he married Miss Susan, daughter of Philip and Susan Houpt, and they have had eight children, five of whom are living, viz.: Ellenora, Frances M., William, Alpheretta and Harry B. Ellenora is married to Myron B. Austin; Frances M. is married to J. R. Gregory; Alpheretta is married to Clinton G. Honeywell; Harry B. is married to Miss Mamie Harris, and William is married to Miss Minnie Hinman. Mrs. Welch was born at Newport, Pa., in 1830; her mother, Mrs. Susan Houpt, is now living with her daughter, at the age of ninety-four years. Our subject and family are consistent members of the M. E. Church in Dallas.

DAVID E. WELLS, merchant, Fairview township, P.O. Mountain Top, was born May 9, 1862, at Beach Pond, Wayne Co., Pa., and is a son of Frank and Emeline L.(Lathrop) Wells, both natives of this State and of German descent. The great-grandfather of Frank Wells came to this country with the Hessians during the Revolutionary war, but afterward deserted the British and fought on the American side. David E. is the third eldest in a family of eight children, three of whom are living. Our subject attended the common schools in Wayne county two years, and then entered an academy in New York State, where he remained until seventeen yars old, when he returned to Wayne county and began to learn the shoemaker's trade. He continued at that for three years, when he went to work as a brakeman, and worked at that two years, one year on the Delaware & Hudson and one year on the Central Railroad of New Jersey. Then, in partnership with his father, he purchased the stock in a general store in Fairview township, where he is still doing business. On November 2, 1887, Mr. Wells was married to Frances, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eicke, of Ashley, both of German descent, and this union has been blessed with two children, viz.: Maud and Willard F. Mr. Wells is not a member of any religious denomination, but attends, with his wife, the Presbyterian Church, of which she is a member. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., and of the Royal Arcanum. In politics, he is a Republican.

JOHN C. WELLS, senior member of the firm of Wells, Bowman & Co., Wilkes Barre, with residence in Ashley, was born in Dundaff, Susquehanna Co., Pa., September 25, 1836, and is a son of John W. and Sarah (Roberts) Wells, natives of Pennsylvania, and of Welch origin. The father, who operated a carding and cloth-dressing mill, reared a family of seven children, five of whom are living and of whom our subject is the youngest. Mr. Wells was educated in the public school, and worked in the mill with his father until he was sixteen years of age, when he taught school and in the spring accepted a clerkship in Dundaff, where he remained a year and a half. He then went to Hyde Park, where he clerked in a store until 1859; next to Kingston as station agent for the Lackawanna & Bloomsburg Railroad Company, and telegraph operator, and after four months was promoted to paymaster and superintendent's clerk, and at the death of Judge Pettebone acted as ticket agent and assistant treasurer. In 1864 he came to Ashley as shipping clerk and cashier for the Lehigh & Susquehanna Coal Company, of which he was made superintendent and general manager after a few months. In 1872 he engaged in the lumber business with William N. Jennings, of Wilkes Barre. The firm later became Wells & Smith, and in 1878 he became sole proprietor. He continued the business for three years, and then sold the lumber part to Patterson & Co., but continued the flour and feed business which had been previously added, and to which he then added a full line of groceries. The present partnership with Capt. James Bowman was made in 1883. Meantime he has been engaged in the manufacture of lumber and clearing land with John Bowden and others at Black Walnut, Hunlock Creek and Ashley, and supplies stores connected therewith. He withdrew from the firm of Bowden & Co. in 1888. In 1866-68 he manufactured brick in Ashley, from which many large buildings in Wilkes Barre were constructed, also the roundhouse and M. E. Church, Ashley, and his own beautiful residence, in 1868. He was instrumental in organizing the Ashley Savings Bank, which operated from 1872 to 1888, platted and sold many building lots in Ashley, and was president of Building Associations Nos. 1 and 2. He helped to secure the charter for Ashley borough, and was president of the first council; also a member of the cemetery association. In February, 1857, Mr. Wells married Miss Jane, daughter of J. Turvy Fellows, of Hyde Park, and of this union one child, Sterling E., was born November 7, 1860. Sterling was educated in the public school, Bloomsburg State Normal School, and took the commercial course of the Wyoming Seminary. He worked for his father until 1887, when he engaged in the mercantile business in Ashley. He was married, October 25, 1886, to Miss Lulu, daughter of C. D. and Mary Geisler, of Ashley, and by her had two children: Elsie, who died at three and a half years; and Howard. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the F.& A.M., the K. of H., and is Republican. When our subject's wife died he presented the Centenary Methodist Episcopal Church with a bell, dedicated to her memory. October 27, 1873, he married Miss Fidelia A., daughter of William H. Barnes, Esq., of Mehoopany, Pa., and by this union has two children, John B. and Ethel. Mr. Wells and his family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he has been many years trustee and steward, and superintendent of the Sunday school; in 1866 he organized a choir in which he has since been the leader. He is a member of the F.& A.M., and of the K. of H.; in his political views he is a Republican. Mr. Wells is a shining example of the success that is sure to crown the efforts of the honest and energetic in this glorious country, and the fruit of his success has been judiciously used in the upholding of the town, the maintenance of the church, religion and every worthy enterprise.

MARTIN WENDEL, proprietor of steamship and foreign exchange agency, Hazelton. This gentleman was born in the Province of Hesse, Germany, February 18, 1833, and is the seventh in the family of nine children of Magnus and A. Catharine (Gonnerman) Wendel, also natives of Germany. Our subject was reared and educated in his native land, and was early in life taught the trade of tailor. He came to America in 1852, locating at Hazleton, this county, where he worked as a journeyman until 1857, when he opened a clothing store on Broad street, where he carried on an extensive business until 1875, in which year he opened a saloon and restaurant, at the same time engaging in the steamship and foreign exchange business. He continued the restaurant business for six and one-half years, and then decided to devote his entire time to the agency and exchange business. Mr. Wendel was united in marriage, September 25, 1859, with Miss Mary, daughter of William Ringleben, of Hazleton, and to this union have been born five children, namely: Lizzie A. (wife of Dr. John N. Becker, of Reading), August F. (bank clerk), Harry M., Irene A. and Eva G. The family attend the German Reformed Church. Mr. Wendel is a member of the "Seven White Men" and the Fire Department; in political matters he is a stanch Democrat.

H. F. WENNER, Freeland. Among the leading business enterprises of the town of Freeland is the general store of S. Wenner & Sons, of which firm our subject is a member. He was born in Butler Valley, August 17, 1856, and is a son of Samuel and Barbara (Scheidy) Wenner, natives of Butler Valley, of German descent. Their family consists of three sons, viz.: H. F. and W. A. (both of whom are members of the firm above mentioned), and J. A., a merchant in Hazleton. H. F. Wenner was educated in the public schools and was reared on a farm in Butler township. At the age of eighteen he learned the carpenter's trade with his father, who is now a pattern maker in the Drifton shop. After following this occupation for two years he engaged in the plumber's trade, which he followed one year. He then entered the general store of Coxe Bros. & Co., at Drifton, where he was employed as clerk for eight years. In 1883 the father, Samuel, and his three sons engaged in their present business, and about seven years later J. A. left the partnership and embarked in business for himself at Hazleton. H. F. Wenner was married May 13, 1887, to Miss Mary J., daughter of Isaac Balliet, of Butler Valley. They have four children, viz.: Charles Edward, Harvey Arthur, Bertha May and Barbara Lacelto. Mr. Wenner is a supporter of every worthy enterprise, and in his political views is Democratic.

XAVIER WERNET, Nanticoke, who is among the most hightly respected men of Luzerne county, is a native of Germany, born at Baden January 21, 1831. He received his education in his native land and emigrated to America in the spring of 1851, landing in New York April 9 of that year. He located at Pittston, this county, where he immediately found employment in the mines, remaining there, however, but a very short time. He then went to Carbon county, Pa., where he turned his attention to lumbering. This branch of industry being not altogether satisfactory to him, he came, after a brief stay there, to Nanticoke, and engaged in working in the coal yards. Here, too, becoming dissatisfied, he learned the shoemaker's trade, which he followed fourteen years in Nanticoke, at the end of which time he engaged in the grocery and liquor business, which he continued successfully until 1868. He then removed to Berwick, Columbia county, where he was engaged in the hotel business about two years, and then returning to Nanticoke built the large and handsome hotel on Main street, known as the "Wernet House", which he still owns. As soon as the building was completed, he opened the hotel, and for seventeen years was the popular landlord of Nanticoke. In 1888 Mr. Wernet leased the hotel, and has since retired from active business. Mr. Wernet is among the citizens of Luzerne county who can well afford to spend the remainder of their days in luxury and ease, enjoying the fruits of early perseverance and industry. He was united in marriage March 2, 1861, with Miss Hannah E. Garinger, of Hanover township. They have no children. He is a member of the F.& A.M., and of the I.O.O.F.; in politics he is a Democrat, and has been a member of the Nanticoke borough council for two terms.

GEORGE F. WESLEY, furniture dealer and undertaker, P.O. Sweet Valley, was born at Sweet Valley, Ross township, in January , 1851, and was reared and educated there. He is a son of John B. and Eliza (Bronson) Wesley, the former born near Poughkeepsie, N.Y., August 14, 1818, the latter in Lake township. John B. was the son of Benjamin F. and Charlotte (Beyea) Wesley, both of whom were born in Dutchess county, N.Y. Benjamin F. was a soldier in the war of 1812, was wounded and afterward placed on the pension list. With his family of five children he removed to this county in 1826, locating in Ross township on a tract of 400 acres of timber land, out of which he made a fine farm, that was subsequently divided amongst his heirs. Benjamin F. Wesley was a man of intelligence and great influence. He held the office of justice of the peace for several terms, was at one time county auditor, and held several township offices. A stanch Democrat, he was popular with his party, and died in 1858, aged seventy years; his wife passed away in 1886, aged eighty years. Their family consisted of twelve children, six of whom are living. John B., the second child, was eight years old when he came with his parents to this county, and spent fourteen years, from 1868 to 1882, in the mercantile business. When a young man he located on the Pennsylvania Canal, and devoted some of his attention to farming. At one time he held the office of postmaster. In 1846 he married Miss Bronson, by whom he had eight children, seven of whom are living. Mrs. Eliza (Bronson) Wesley died in 1865, aged forty years. The subject of this sketch, the third child in the order of birth, has always been a resident of Ross township and the county, and has confined himself principally to farming, and is a young man of great promise. He has been twice married, the last time in 1870 to Miss Cassie, daughter of Benjamin and Rhoda Long. Of this union have been born three children, one of whom, B. E. is now living. Mr. Wesley has held the office of justice of the peace for two terms, and is now in his third term. He and his good wife are members of the Christian Church, of which body he is an elder. Mr. Wesley is a member of the F. & A.M., a man of good influence in his township, and delights in doing his duty.

WILLIAM H. WESLEY, farmer, P.O. Sweet Valley, was born in Ross township, April 23, 1837, and is a son of Benjamin F. and Charlotte (Beyea) Wesley, both of whom were born in Dutchess county, N.Y. Benjamin F. was a brave soldier in the war of 1812, a patriotic lover of liberty and independence, and received a wound which disabled him for life. About 1825 he removed to this county, locating in Ross township on a farm of 350 acres, sixty of which he cultivated successfully. He lived a useful life, dying in 1859 at the age of sixty-seven years. His family consisted of twelve children, all of whom reached maturity. The subject of our sketch, the tenth of the family, was raised and educted in Ross township. He had always confined himself to agricultural pursuits, and at the age of twenty-one began business for himself in lumber woods, where he succeeded financially. Mr. Wesley is a thorough business man. In 1869 he married Miss Prudence Post, who was born in Ross township in 1844, a daughter of Ganett Post, and by her he had seven children, five of whom are now living: Frank, Alice, Luther, Birdie and Lizzie. Mr. Wesley owns a fine farm of 120 acres that he works to great advantage, and exhibits evidence of superior skill in agricultural pursuits. He has been honored with several township offices, and in each has displayed good judgement. He is a member of the Methodist Church, his wife of the Baptist.

AMBROSE WEST JR., manufacturer, Plymouth. This enterprising gentleman was born at Leicester, England, November 28, 1856, and is a son of Thomas and Maria (Allen) West, also natives of Leicester. Mr. West was educated partly in England, finishing at Philadelphia, Pa. At an early age he and his brother Thomas (who was born June 10, 1859, at the old homestead in England, and was also educated partly in that country and partly in Philadelphia) learned the business of knitting and manufacturing hosiery. They came to America together in 1865, and have since been closely identified in business. After learning their trade, they revisited England, remaining there two years studying the finer points of their particular line, and returning to this country at the end of that period, they located in Germantown, where they worked at their trade for a few months, and then again started out, locating near Boston, where they completed their trade, being able when they left there to manufacture the full-fashioned hose. They then returned to Germantown, where Thomas took full charge of the Lewery knitting establishment, and Ambrose was given charge of J. B. Allen's knitting factory. These positions they held until it was decided to go into busines for themselves, when the firm, consisting of Charles Taylor, Henry H. Hawthorne, and the West brothers was organized. They did an extensive business in Germantown for many years, and also established the Pioneer Hosiery Mills at Plymouth. This firm was dissolved August 8, 1891, and the West brothers, Ambrose and Thomas, succeeded to the business at the Pioneer Mills at Plymouth. This factory originally employed but fifteen hands, and the West Bros. now employ 180 girls and eight men, and average from 400 to 500 dozen pair of hose daily. The factory is a neat, two-story building, located on Shawnee avenue, and contains a valuable set of machinery necessary for the manufacture of hosiery. Ambrose West, Jr., was married in 1878, to Miss Lizzie Boyer, of Germantown, Pa., and four children have been born to them, viz.: Albert, Willie, Warren and Bessie. Thomas West was married, also in 1878, to Miss Jennie Pyffer, of Philadelphia, Pa., and six children have been born to this union: Willie, Harry, Thomas, Benjamin H., Joseph and Jennie. The West Bros. are both Republicans, and are members of the Episcopal Church. They have come to Plymouth with an enterprise that should be encouraged by all who desire to see this remarkable Valley yield not only an abundant supply of coal, but feed the furnaces of hundreds of factories similar to the one just spoken of, giving employment to thousands of men, boys and girls.

CHRISTOPHER C. WESTFIELD, stone-paving contractor, was born in Wilkes Barre June 2, 1848, and is a son of Charles and Julia (Clarke) Westfield, natives of Germany and Ireland, respectively. They were married in New York City, and settled in Wilkes Barre in 1841, where the father, who was a shoemaker by trade, followed his vocation, and was also a contractor on plank roads and railroad. He was sergeant in Company I, Seventh Pennsylvania Reserves; was wounded at Haymarket, near Richmond, Va., in the Seven Days' Fight; he was taken prisoner and sent to Libby, where he remained a month and then exchanged, but while on his way home he died in Philadelphia, where he is buried. His children who grew to maturity were: Mary, Charles A., Christopher C., George W., William P. and Julia. The subject of this memoir was reared in Wilkes Barre, and received a limited education in the common schools. since 1875 he has been engaged as a contractor on street paving, and has filled many important contracts in Wilkes Barre and outside towns, where he is popularly and favorably known. Mr. Westfield has been twice married: his first wife was Mary A., daughter of John Nailes, of Scranton, Pa., and by her he had four children: Vincent, Arthur, Frank and Christopher. He was married, the second time, on February 12, 1889, to Ellen daughter of Patrick Gallagher, of Plains, this county, and by her has one son, Cyril. Our subject is a member of the Catholic Church, and in politics is a Democrat.

Jonathan Westley, locomotive engineer, Reading System, was born in Berks County, Pa., December 29, 1843, a son of Isaac and Elizabeth (Cole) Westley, and is of German descent. He was reared and educated in Pennsylvania, and on November 20, 1861, when in his eighteenth year, enlisted as private in Battery M, Fifth U. S. Artillery; was promoted August 31, 1862, to corporal, and on May 1, 1865, to sergeant. On March 13, 1862, he was assigned to the Fourth Corps, and participated in the battles of Savage Station, White Oak Swamp, Jones Bridge and Malcolm Hill; on July 15, 1863, he joined the army of the Potomac at Berlin, where he was assigned to the First Division, Sixth Corps, and engaged in the battles of Rappahannock Station, Mine Run, and Locust Grove. He was discharged February 12, 1864, at Bruhdy Station; re-enlisted the same day, and later took part in the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania (2), North Anna, Cold Harbor, before Petersburg, Snicker's Gap, Berryville, Winchester, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek. He was on duty in defense of Washington several months in 1865, and was detailed one of the guards at President Lincoln's funeral cortege, April 19, 1865; was afterward detailed as provost-sergeant in charge of State prisoners (assassins of President Lincoln) at the Dry Tortugas, and was honorably discharged February 12, 1867, after five years and six months service. He has been engaged in railroading twenty-two years, twenty-one as locomotive engineer, and has resided in Wilkes-Barre since 1871. On November 6, 1876, Mr. Westley married Miss Annie, daughter of David and Mary A. (Williams) Vipond, of Pittston, this county, and by her has two sons: Isaiah S. and Robert E. Mr Westley is a member of the F. & A. M., G. A. R. K. of H., and the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. In politics he is a Republican.

Michael F. Whalen, county detective, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Schuylkill county, Pa., August 27, 1866, and is a son of Patrick and Julia (Malone) Whalen, natives of County Kilkenny, Ireland. The father came to America about 1846, locating in the coal regions of Schuylkill county, Pa., and engaging in mining, which occupation he followed until his death in 1886; the last three years of his life were spent in Wilkes-Barre. His children were Anna (Mrs. James Bergan), Mary, Martha (deceased), Joseph (deceased), Thomas, Kate (Mrs. Patrick Farrell), Nellie and Michael F. Our subject was reared in the anthracite coal regions, and received his education in the public schools of Shenandoah. In 1883 he removed with his parents to Plymouth, this county, and in 1886 located in Wilkes-Barre, where he embarked in the bottling business, in which he successfully continued until January 1, 1892. On January 4, 1892 he was appointed county detective for Luzerne county for a term of two years. Mr. Whalen is a popular and well-known citizen, wide awake and enterprising, and is a genial gentleman. He is a member of the Catholic Church, and in politics is a Democrat.

Frank Woodruff Wheaton is of New England origin on both the paternal and maternal sides. The first of the name came from England to Salem in 1636. A descendant, Moses Wheaton, married Sarah, a daughter of Maturin Ballou and sister of Rev. Hosea Ballou. The Ballous are well known as among the most distinguished of New England families. Many noted preachers have come of the stock besides soldiers, jurists, statesmen and successful business men. Thomas J. Wheaton, son of Moses Ballou Wheaton, and father of Frank Woodruff Wheaton, was born in Jackson, Pa., March 29, 1826. He was a practicing physician in Bradford and Susquehanna counties, and in Binghamton, N. Y., from 1849 to 1858. He was an engineer on the "Dictator," Commodore Rodgers' flag ship, during the war, and for a number of years past has been a dentist in Wilkes-Barre. Mrs. Wheaton (Maria) is a Woodruff, and direct descendant of Matthew Woodruff, who was among the first settlers of Hartford, Conn. Her father, Lewis H. Woodruff, was for nearly half a century a leading citizen of Dimock, Pa. Frank Woodruff Wheaton was born in Binghamton, N. Y., August 27, 1855, received his preliminary education in the public schools, and was graduated at Yale in 1877. He read law with E. P. and J. V. Darling, and was regularly admitted to practice September 2, 1879. From 1884 to 1886, inclusive, he was a member of the Wilkes-Barre city council, and chairman of the law and ordinance committee. He married, May 16, 1878, L. Maria Covell, of Binghamton, N. Y. Mr. Wheaton is a Republican.

Myron Wheaton, dental surgeon, Pittston, was born in Owego, N. Y., October 13, 1835, a son of Ira and Barbara (Ballou) Wheaton, the former of whom was a native of New Hampshire and of English parentage, the latter of French descent, and both were cousins of Gen. Garfield. Ira Wheaton, the father of our subject, was a shoemaker during the time of his residence in New Hampshire, and he afterward removed to Owego, where he followed his trade for a short time. There he remained until 1837 and then removed to Bradford Co., Pa., and carried on farming. In 1870 he removed to Rome, Bradford Co., residing with his son Myron until 1877, when he died; his wife survived him two years. They had a family of five children, viz.: Barbara A., now the wife of John Chubuck, a farmer of Potterville, Pa.; Stephen D., deceased; Cassendena R., deceased; Ira, Jr., at one time a carpenter of Binghamton, N. Y., now deceased, and Myron. The subject of this sketch was reared in southern New York and northern Pennsylvania, and educated in the public schools of Owego. He left school at the age of sixteen, and at intervals was employed as teacher and clerk until 1858, when he entered the dental office of his cousin, Thomas J. Wheaton, of Binghamton, remaining there until 1860. At that time he became associated as partner with Dr. William W. Wheaton, opening a dental office in Susquehanna county, Pa., where he remained eighteen months; then removed to Brooklyn, Pa., and established a dental office, but had been there but a short time when he enlisted in the Seventeenth Pennsylvania Cavalry. After a short service he was taken sick and sent home, and later was assigned to duty as hospital steward in the regular army, in which capacity he served four years. In 1868 he received his discharge and returned home, resuming the practice of his profession with T. J. Wheaton at Binghamton, N. Y., there remained until 1870, and then removed to Rome, Pa., and opened a dental office: in Rome he remained until 1877, and then entered the dental office of Dr. T. J. Wheaton, in Wilkes-Barre, where he was operator until April, 1891, when he came to Pittston and here opened an office on North Main street. Mr. Wheaton was united in wedlock November 24, 1858, with Jennie Evans, a daughter of Evan Evans, of Bradford county, and this union was blessed with two children, Charles L. (deceased), and Cora B., wife of John W. Hughes, son of the late H. R. Hughes, of Pittston. Mr. Wheaton is a member of the Presbyterian Church; politically he is identified with the Republican party. The long experience and satisfactory work of the Doctor has secured him a large patronage the Wyoming Valley, and his excellent social qualities have won him hosts of friends wherever he has been.

John J. Whelan, merchant, Miners Mills, was born in Pittston, June 9, 1856, and is a son of Patrick and Ann (Burk) Whelan, natives of County Wexford and County Mayo, Ireland, respectively; they had two children, viz.: John J. and Mary A. (Mrs. Hugh McGroarty, Jr.). Our subject was educated in the common schools and began working in a wholesale liquor store, compounding whiskies, in Pittston; he followed this one year and has since been engaged in the grocery business, excepting eight months in 1884, during which time he was in Wilkes-Barre. Mr. Whelan was married October 15, 1891, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Edward Barrett, of Mill Creek; he and his wife are members of the Catholic Church at Parsons; he is a member of the A. O. H. Mr. Whelan has always given his political support to the Democratic party and has held the office of school director.

Aaron Whitaker, proprietor of the "Exchange Hotel," Wilkes-Barre, was born in Sussex county, N. J., April 2, 1824, and came to Luzerne county with his parents in 1836. He was educated in the public schools of Wilkes-Barre, and when sixteen years of age entered the employ of a lumber firm at Pine Swamp (now Stoddartsville). From there he went to White Haven, entered into partnership with Jacob Blakeslee, and engaged in the lumber business, but after three years of successful operation the business was wholly destroyed by a freshet. Our subject then purchased a farm in Denison township, and the "Lehigh Hotel" at White Haven, which he continued to operate until 1871, when he was elected sheriff of Luzerne county by the Democratic party. In this capacity his career was a brilliant one, and he discharged his duties in a careful, conscientious manner throughout the whole four years of his service, giving entire satisfaction. In November, 1877, he leased the "Exchange Hotel," where he has since been the popular and obliging landlord. Mr. Whitaker was united in marriage, September 11, 1849, with Miss Clara Barnes, daughter of Timothy Barnes, of Stoddartsville, which union was blessed with five children, two of whom are now living: Alice A. (Mrs. Duncan Weir) and Margaret C. Mrs. Whitaker departed this life in 1858, and our subject was married, March 14, 1861, with Miss Alice, daughter of John Taylor, of White Haven, and by her he had four children, all now deceased; this lady died April 6, 1892. In politics Mr. Whitaker is a stanch Democrat, and has won for himself a host of warm and admiring friends.

James Whitaker, dealer in hardware, Hazleton, was born near Pottstown, Chester county, July 12, 1832, and is the seventh in the family of ten children born to John and Rachel (Ruth) Whitaker, natives of Pennsylvania. Joseph Whitaker, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was an Englishman who came to America during the Revolutionary war, as a soldier of "His Majesty." He was in the English army but a short time in this country, however, when his sympathy was aroused in behalf of the cause of the patriotic band of American heroes. He accordingly deserted the crimson banner of "George," and cast his lost in favor of the cause of freedom. James Whitaker was reared and educated in Chester county, and, after leaving school, went to Tamaqua, Pa. He was employed in a flour and feed store until 1856, when he came to Hazleton, and here engaged in the drug and shelf hardware business. He subsequently discontinued the drug department, and now deals exclusively in general hardware. Besides his present business at Hazleton, Mr. Whitaker is interested in a large hardware store at Johnstown, Pa. Our subject was married, February 22, 1859, to Miss Harriet Horn, of Patterson. Three children have been born to this union, namely: Alice Lavinia, Ella Virginia and Oliver Cromwell. Mr. Whitaker casts his vote and sympathizes with the Republican party. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and the family attend the M. E. Church.

G. R. White, farmer, Lehman township, was born in Johnsonburgh, Warren Co., N. J., and is a son of Charles and Catherine (Kishpaugh) White, both of whom were born in New Jersey. Charles moved to Stroudsburg, Pa., where he lived about sixteen years, after which, in 1842, he moved to Kingston; he next moved to Jackson township, where he remained about ten years, and finally moved to Lehman township, where he remained the rest of his life, but died in Plymouth. He was a carpenter by trade, and followed farming in connection with it. He and his son purchased a farm of one hundred acres, which is now owned by his son George R. Charles died in 1876, in the seventy-eight year of his age. His children were three in number, George R. being the eldest. He was reared and educated in Jackson township, and in his early life worked with his father at the carpenter's bench. He has, however, confined himself to farming. In 1852, at the age of twenty-seven years, he married Miss Emily, daughter of Thomas and Caroline Van Loon, in Jackson township, and to their union have been born nine children, five of whom grew to maturity: Caroline, Thomas, Frederick, Minnie and Robert, all married. Mr. White is a general farmer, raising everything that can be raised on a farm in Lehman township. His place is a model one, his house is palatial, and his out-buildings are commodious and extensive. Politically Mr. White is a Republican, and has been honored with the offices of tax collector and school director, which he discharged with credit. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and both he and his wife are consistent members of the M. E. Church.

Henry White, farmer, P. O. Plainsville, was born in Somersetshire, England, January 1, 1846, and is a son of Richard and Caroline (Rocket) White. The father, who was superintendent of an English lord's estate, reared a family of five children, of whom Henry is the eldest. He came to America in 1871, landing at Portland, Me., and made his way to Boston, where he remained six months, thence coming to Plainsville. Here he engaged in mining, which he followed until 1891, excepting the years 1876-80, during which time he was engaged in farming in Greene county, Miss. In 1891 he engaged in farming on the "Apple farm," near Plainsville, belonging to the Pennsylvania Coal Company. Mr. White was married July 5, 1866, to Miss Ellen, daughter of James and Charlotte (Mote) Larkomb, natives of England, and they have had eleven children, viz.: Henry E., Richard, Emma, Jane (deceased), Anna, William, Alice, Bessie, Ella, Caroline and Rosa. Our subject is a member of the Knights of Honor, and the I. O. R. M., and, in his political views is a Republican.

John C. WHITE, proprietor of the "South Wilkes-Barre Hotel," was born in Lanarkshire, Scotland, April 24, 1833, a son of John and Jeannette (RUSSELL) WHITE. He was reared in Scotland, educated in the common schools, and served an apprenticeship of five years at the moulder's trade. In 1855 he came to America, locating, in June, same year, in Hazleton, this county, where he worked at his trade as a journeyman for sixteen years, and was afterward foreman of the Lehigh Valley Railroad Shops eight years. In 1879 he located in Wilkes-Barre, where has since been the proprietor of his present hotel. On July 7, 1856, Mr. WHITE married Miss Ellen, daughter of James CAROTHERS, of Scotland, and has four daughters: Jessie (Mrs. B. J. MOONEY), Madge (Mrs. James T. LONG), Ida (Mrs. William CARTER) and Elsie (Mrs. John RITTER). Our subject is an attendant of the Presbyterian Church, of which several of his family are members; he was a member of the I.O.O.F. at Hazleton three years, and of the Encampment twenty years. Politically he is a Republican, and served as member of the school board of Hazleton six years.

Milton WHITE, butcher, Orange, was born August 1, 1857, and reared in Eaton township, Wyoming Co., Pa. He is a son of Jesse and Ann M. (SICKLER) WHITE, the former born in New York State, the latter in Wyoming county. Jesse came to this county in 1864, settling on a farm of fifty-five acres, where he remained four years. He then removed to Eaton, Wyoming county, where he now resides, and where he is known as a prosperous farmer and a man of worth in his town. Of his twelve children the following are now living: Chester, Frank, Jane, Byron, Milton and Cora. Milton WHITE, the seventh by birth, followed farming in early life, living at home with his father until he was of age. On March 12, 1879, he married, at Wyoming, Miss Flora HAWK, who was born in Hope, Warren Co., N.J., a daughter of A. M. and Lottie HAWK. Of this union were born two children: Claude N. and A. Maude. Mr. WHITE is an active and energetic young man, full of business and enterprise, and keeps well up with the times. In 1881 he embarked in the butcher business, which he still follows with unabated success. He removed to his present beautiful home in 1882, and has done much to add to the attractiveness of the place in various ways. Mr. WHITE, aided by his estimable wife, bids fair to make his mark in the world.

William D. WHITE, a prominent druggist of Wilkes-Barre, was born in Wilkes-Barre November 12, 1849, and is a son of John and Melinda C. (BLACKMAN) WHITE. His paternal grandfather, Daniel WHITE, was a wheelwright by trade, and settled early in Wilkes-Barre, where he followed his trade and resided until his death. His children were: Mary, Joseph, Ellen, Sarah, John, Charles, Daniel, Jane and Thomas. The father of our subject was a native of Wilkes-Barre, and a wheelwright by trade, which vocation he still follows; he is now a resident of Ashley. His wife was a daughter of Henry BLACKMAN, a pioneer of Hanover township, this county, and by her he had three children who grew to maturity: William D., Mary (Mrs. Thomas C. WILLIAMS) and Charles B. Our subject was reared in his native county, and educated in the public schools of Wilkes Barre, Harvey's Academy, and Wyoming Seminary, Kingston. He served an apprenticeship of seven years at the drug business, after which he was clerk and manager of a drug store in Wilkes-Barre. In 1883 he embarked in business for himself as a member of the firm of W. D. WHITE & Co., in which he has since successfully continued. Mr. WHITE married, February 9, 1872, Sarah A. Harper, a lady of English descent, and has three children: Maude I., Edward R. and William. Mr. WHITE is a member of the M. E. Church; in politics, he is a Republican.

Frederick WHITEBREAD, farmer, P. O. Hobbie, was born in Nescopeck township, July 8, 1811, and is a son of Henry and Catherine WHITEBREAD, the former born in Germany, the latter in Philadelphia. Henry WHITEBREAD emigrated to this country when he was a young man, locating in Philadelphia, where he worked at his trade, shoemaking, for several years. During his residence there he was married to Miss DOWNHIMER. About 1822 he removed thence to Hollenback township, where he purchased 200 acres of land, seventy of which were brought under cultivation during his lifetime; he was a sturdy pioneer, not afraid to work. His life, aside from his pioneer hardships and inconveniences, was quiet and uneventful; he died at the age of sixty-five years. His family numbered sixteen children, by two marriages, three of whom are now living. Frederick is the third in the family, and was reared in Nescopeck township and educated at the common schools. He has always lived on the same place, his occupation being farming, at which he has succeeded beyond all expectation. In his early life, out of his father's estate, he received $11.00; now he owns 118 acres of valuable land, the result of industry and economy. In 1840 he married Miss Lydia, daughter of Philip ROOT, and they have six children, all of whom are living: Jacob, Maria, Abraham, Sallie, Flora, and Peter. Mrs. Lydia WHITEBREAD was born in Butler township in 1815. Mr. WHITEBREAD is a man much respected in his community. Politically he is a Republican, and has been appointed to several offices of trust in the township. He and his wife are members of the Reformed Church.

Abraham WHITEBREAD, farmer and sawyer, Dorrance, was born in Hollenback township July 20, 1845. He is a son of Frederick and Lydia (ROOT) WHITEBREAD, the former born in Nescopeck township July 8, 1811, the latter in Butler township September 15, 1815. Frederick was a son of Henry, a native of Germany, who emigrated to this country in middle life, locating first in Germantown, near Philadelphia. He removed, however, to Nescopeck (now Hollenback) township, and was one of the first pioneers of that section of country. He lived a life of usefulness and died at a good old age. His family numbered eleven children, by two marriages, three of whom are now living. Frederick began his active life in Hollenback township, where he was born, as a thrifty and competent farmer, to which calling he has always confined himself. He and his wife are now (1892) living in the same township, enjoying the labors of their younger days. Mr. WHITEBREAD owns 100 acres of good farming land, and is a practical agriculturist. Politically he is a stanch Republican. He and his wife are members of the Reformed Church. They reared a family of six children, all of whom are living. Abraham is the third of the family in order of birth. He was reared and educated in Hollenback township, where he resided until he reached his twenty-sixth year. In early life he learned the carpenter's trade, at which he has worked several years with success, being counted a first-class mechanic. July 15, 1871, he married Miss Sarah A., daughter of Conrad and Hannah EROH; she bore him five children, four of whom are living: Wilson H., Martha E., Addie L. and Lottie A. Mrs. WHITEBREAD was born in Hollenback township October 30, 1851. After this happy union Mr. WHITEBREAD removed to Dorrance township, but not until 1873 did he remove to his present residence. He owns a neat little farm of twenty-five acres, on which is situated a fine mill property, on a never-failing stream. Mr. WHITEBREAD is a practical sawyer as well as a good mechanic. He manufactures lumber, shingle and lath. He has made many needed improvements around his place in buildings and fields. Mr. WHITEBREAD is an affable, kind and courteous man, who is well informed on general topics. Politically he is a Republican.

John P. WHITEBRED, farmer, P. O. Hobbie, was born in Hollenback township, October 18, 1855, a son of Samuel and Caroline S. (DRUM) WHITEBRED, the former born in Hollenback (then Nescopeck) township, August 5, 1814, the latter in Butler township, in 1824. Samuel was a son of Henry and Catherine Whitebred, the former of whom was a native of Germany, who, when he emigrated to this country, located in Philadelphia, where he worked at his trade, that of shoemaking. It was there he met and married his wife. After the lapse of some years, in 1822, he removed from Philadelphia to this county, locating in Hollenback township, where he purchased 200 acres of land. He wa a hard-working man, who took life easy, yet advanced in the esteem of his fellows. He was married twice, and reared a family of sixteen sturdy pioneers, who in their busy vocations in life proved themselves a credit to their native county, the father of our subject being one of the sixteen. Samuel took up the plough and axe where his sire had laid it down, and was a practical farmer in his day, considering the disadvantages he encountered. He was a very devout and devoted man; was chosen elder of the Reformed Church several times, and was universally liked by all who knew him. Politically he was a Republican. He died August 26, 1884, aged seventy-one years, his wife on October 12, 1886, aged sixty-two years. Their family numbered eight children, five of whom are living, John P. being fifth in order of birth. Our subject has always resided on the farm he now owns (which property belonged to his father), consisting of 110 acres. He has always followed agricultural pursuits, and is a practical farmer. In 18--, he married Miss Della R. EROH, who was born in Hollenback township in 18--, daughter of John and Abbie EROH, and to this union were born five children, all of whom are living: Carrie E., William A., Pearl M., Florence A. and Boyd E. Mr. and Mrs. WHITEBRED are both devout church members, he of the Reformed, she of the Lutheran. He is a member of the P.O.S. of A., and politically he is a Republican.

C. E. WHITESELL, merchant, Prichard, was born in Union (now Hunlock) township, this county, October 11, 1855, where he was reared and educated. He is a son of D. S. and Rachel M. (HUNGERFORD) WHITESELL, the former of whom was born in Monroe county, May 6, 1825, the latter in Union township, March 7, 1835, and were married December 31, 1854. D. S. WHITESELL is a son of Andrew WHITESELL, who removed from Monroe to this county in 1840, locating first in Lake township, where he resided a few years, when he removed to Union (now Hunlock) township, where he purchased 122 acres of land, some of which was partly improved. Andrew confined himself to agricultural pursuits, and did much for the advancement of this department of industry. His life, like most yeomen of his day, was uneventful. He lived to be eighty-two years of age, his wife to be eighty-six. They reared a family of ten children, eight of whom are now living, D. S. being the fifth issue and the third son. He began his active life in Union township, being sixteen years of age when he removed from there with his father. In early life, like all farmer boys, he confined himself principally to tilling the soil, but also followed the trade of mason at various intervals. He owned a farm of seventy-seven acres which he improved and beautified. In 1866 he embarked in mercantile business on a small scale, which proved a good venture, and in 1869 he removed to the store now owned and occupied by his son C. E., where he extended his business. In 1880 C. E., his son, became his partner, bearing the burden as well as himself, and in 1884, the father sold out to the son, retiring from active life. D. S. WHITESELL has held several township offices with much credit; he has been assessor, collector, auditor and supervisor, and he is universally honored and esteemed in his township. His family consisted of five children, two of whom are now living, viz: C. E. and Rhoda L. His wife, Mrs. Rachel M. WHITESELL, died December 8, 1881.

C. E. WHITESELL, the subject of this sketch, in early life worked on his father's farm, and when old enough to be of use in the store, his father placed him there, instructing him in all the mysteries of the business. As years rolled on and trade extended, C. E. became junior partner, the firm name becoming WHITESELL & Son, and in 1889 he became the entire owner of the extensive concern, built up by honesty and a close attention to business principles. Mr. C. E. WHITESELL keeps a neat and yet extensive storeroom in the pleasant neightborhood called "Roaring Brook." His goods are fresh, and of the best quality possible. His motto is "Goods cheap, but not cheap Goods." His line supplies all demands made by his country customers, who are numerous. On July 6, 1879, he married Miss Sarah A., daughter of Abram and Rachel GARTHWAITE, and there have been born to them one daughter, Nellie, and one son, Oscar, the latter born August 8, 1892. Mrs. Sarah A. WHITESELL was born in Union township, November 27, 1856. Mr. WHITESELL makes many friends by his courteous, obliging manner. Politically, he is a stanch Republican, and he has held the office of postmaster for eight years; is school director and treasurer of the school board, and is now serving as township clerk. He is a member of the Jr. O.U.A.M.

D. B. WHITESELL, farmer, P. O. Prichard, was born in Monroe county, Pa., October 8, 1830. He is a son of Andrew and Sarah (DRAHER) WHITESELL, both of whom were born in Monroe county, the former in 1791 (died December 19, 1873, aged eighty-two years), the latter in 1798 (died March 13, 1883, aged eighty-five years). They removed to this county about 1840, locating first in Lake township, where he resided a short time, when he removed to Union (now Hunlock) township, where he purchased a farm of 122 acres upon which were a few improvements. He was a man of even temper, good habits and upright principles. Andrew and Sarah WHITESELL reared a family of ten children, eight of whom are now living. D. B. is the seventh in order of birth. He was reared and educated in Union township, Luzerne county, being eight years of age when he removed hither with his father. He always followed agriculture, and is a practical farmer. He has always resided in the same township, and has lived a peaceable, honest, and industrious life. He owns a farm of seventy acres, which he has well under cultivation, and upon which he has erected a new house, which is both neat and commodious. He has set out 200 apple trees, the fruit of which is of the best quality and flavor. He has also a well-stocked carp pond, which supplies his table with the finny tribe. Mr. WHITESELL married January 1, 1859, Miss Mary, daughter of Solomon and Angelina TINKLEPAUGH, and to this union have been born seven children, as follows: J. Addie, Hattie J., Maggie A., Shedrick M. Gilbert H. Harry E. and Owen D. Mrs. Mary (TINKLEPAUGH) WHITESELL was born in Lackawanna county, August 14, 1840, and is a most refined and estimable lady. She, her husband, and family are consistent members of the M. E. Church. Politically our subject is a Republican.

George D. WHITESELL, butcher, Wilkes-Barre, was born in that city March 16, 1857, son of Charles and Pauline (RUGGLES) WHITESELL. The father was a native of Luzerne county and a son of Andrew WHITESELL, formerly of New Jersey, and a pioneer of Luzerne county, of German descent. Charles WHITESELL was a mason by trade, and with the exception of twenty-five years that he lived in Michigan, has been a resident of Luzerne county, residing now in West Pittston. He has three children living: Andrew L., George D. and Nettie J. Our subject was reared in Michigan and Wilkes-Barre, was educated in the public schools of same, and served a five years' apprenticeship at the mason's trade, for two years thereafter working as a journeyman. In 1879 he embarked in the butcher business at West Pittston, where he was engaged seven years; in 1886 he located in Wilkes-Barre, where, as a member of the firm of ANDERSON & WHITESELL, he has since conducted a successful business. Mr. WHITESELL married, May 9, 1883, Althea G., daughter of William N., and Harriet (SNIFFIN) ANDERSON, of West Pittston, and has three children: Edna M., Frank E. and Lena. He is a member of the P.O.S. of A. and I.O.O.F.; politically he is a Republican.

Harry L.WHITNEY, physician and surgeon, Plymouth, was born November 30, 1860, at Dallas, Luzerne Co., Pa., and is the only child of Capt. John J. and Mary Jeanette (DAVENPORT) WHITNEY, also natives of Pennsylvania. The Doctor is a descendant of one of the old pioneer families of the Wyoming Valley; his great-great-grandfather was the famous Capt. Ransom, of Wyoming Massacre fame, and his grandfather was Col. George P. Ransom, of Revolutionary distinction. The subject of this sketch was educated at Wyoming Seminary, Kingston, Pa., and also, at Williston Seminary, East Hampton, Mass.; he then took a medical preparatory course at Cornell University, and in 1881 entered the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania, where he was graduated in 1884. He was then appointed resident physician in the German Hospital at Philadelphia, where he served his appointed time, after which he located at Scranton, Pa., and here practiced one year, returning from there to Plymouth, where he has established himself, and enjoys a very lucrative practice. Dr. WHITNEY is a member of the Luzerne County Medical Society; politically, he votes the Republican ticket, and in religious faith he inclines toward the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Back to Bios Index

Back to Luzerne County Genweb

These Bios were typed by the Wonderful people on PA-LUZERNE Listserver.

© 1997-2010 by Mary Ann Lubinsky for the PAGenWeb Project, and by Individual Contributors

 Mary Ann Lubinsky
County Coordinator

Back To Luzerne
Genweb