T Surnames

History of Luzerne County, Pa.,

by H.C. Bradsby, 1893

CHARLES W. TAMMANY, furniture dealer, Wilkes-Barre was born in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., December 31, 1851, a son of Moses C. and Susan J. (Bellas) Tammany, and is of Irish descent. His father, a native of County Donegal, Ireland, came to America in 1836 and located in Wilkes-Barre, where for many years he boated on the canal between that city and Baltimore; later he was a contractor in the building of railroads, and during the last years of his life was engaged in the real estate business. He died May 10, 1892, at the age of eighty-three years, three months and seven days. His children were three in number, viz.: Margaret T. (Mrs. Edward G. Hart), Martha (Mrs. Hiram Cany), and Charles W. Our subject was reared in Wilkes-Barre and educated in the public schools. He served seven years apprenticeship at the bricklayers trade; afterward worked two years as a journeyman from April, 1879, to June, 1887; was constable of Wilkes-Barre; in April, 1887, he embarked in the furniture business on a small scale, and increased his trade to such an extent that he had to enlarge his facilities to accommodate his numerous patrons, so that now he has one of the leading establishments of the kind in the county. Mr. Tammany was married April 25, 1870, to Sarah J., daughter of Jacob and Caroline Engle, of Wilkes-Barre, and they have one son, Stanley G. Mr. Tammany is one of the prominent merchants of Wilkes-Barre; is a member of the M. E. Church, and in politics is a Democrat.

DOMINIC TANNANT, miner, Port Blanchard, was born June 10, 1842, in County Roscommon, Ireland, and is a son of Dominic and Catherine (Boyd) Tannant, natives of the same place. Our subject came to America in 1856, and immediately settled at Port Griffith, this county, where he went to work as a laborer in the mines; in 1860 he was employed as a miner by the Pennsylvania Coal Company, and still retains that position. On November 20, 1861, Mr. Tannant was united in marriage with Catherine, daughter of John and Mary (Herly) Murphy, natives of County Mayo, Ireland, and the issue of this union was five children, as follows: Mary A., born August 23, 1862, a teacher in Port Griffith high school; Kate, born July, 7, 1864; John, born January 12, 1867; Mattie, born November 10, 1869, and Winifred, born November 7, 1875. Our subject is a member of the Catholic Church, and of the Father Mathew T. A. B. Society; in politics he is a Democrat. In the summer of 1884 he built the house where he now resides.

WILLIAM TASKER, proprietor of Restaurant, Miners Mills, was born in Glamorganshire, South Wales, September 12, 1826, and is a son of Reese and Margaret (Davies) Tasker. The father, who was an inside mine foreman for the British Company, reared a family of ten children, two of whom are living, viz.: William, and Guinlean, who married Edward Jenkins, a miner in Glamorganshire, Wales. Our subject came to America in 1865, and located in Providence, Pa., where he engaged in mining, which had also been his occupation in Wales. He remained in Providence eight years, and then removed to Plains, where he followed mining till 1875, in which year he embarked in his present business, and in 1887 built a large hall adjoining, in which five different Societies meet. Mr. Tasker was married, December 4, 1851, to Miss Martha Davies, of his native town, and the fruit of this union was two children, viz.: Reese, an engineer in Glamorganshire, and William, a miner in Miners Mills. Mrs. Tasker died in 1855, and he was again married, December 10, 1861, this time to Miss Margaret Roberts of Glamorganshire. Five children were born to this marriage, viz.: George, Mary E., David, Margaret A. and Jennie; Mrs. Margaret Tasker died January 8, 1884. Mr. Tasker is a member of the I. O. R. M. and I. O. O. F.; is a Republican politically.

SOLOMON W. TAYLOR, a prominent farmer of Huntington township, P. O. Harveyville, was born at Red Rock, Fairmount township, this county, February 27, 1846, and is a son of Firman V. and Eliza C. (Goss) Taylor, natives of Pennsylvania, of English origin. Firman V. Taylor, who was a carpenter by trade, died October 11, 1882, aged sixty-six years; he was a son of Thomas and Mary (Valentine) Taylor, natives of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, respectively. Thomas Taylor was a son of Thomas Taylor who came from Connecticut about the close of the Revolution, having served in the Continental army throughout the war; he settled on land now owned by Horace Harrison, in said township. Our subject, who is the third in a family of nine children, five of whom are now living, was reared on a farm, and when fifteen years of age enlisted in the United States army, in Company A, Fifty-second P. V., Capt. George R. Leonard; he served all through the war with his regiment, was captured at White Oak Swamp, but escaped in a short time; participated in all the battles of McClellans Peninsular campaign; was promoted to corporal in January, 1864; had charge of a detachment of men at the Swamp Angel Battery for seven months; during the siege of Charleston, S. C., his regiment was the first to enter that city after the rebels evacuated, and joining Shermans army marched to Greensboro, N. C., where Johnsons army surrendered; he was discharged July 22, 1865, at Salisbury, N. C. Returning to his native county, he here operated a sawmill and turning lathe for two years; then went to Elk county, where he was in the lumber business for one year; thence returned to Huntington township, and rented the Trescott farm for eight years, after which he was for three years on the J. C. Laycock farm in Fairmount township. In 1882 he bought his present farm, containing thirty acres, and he also owns two other small farms. Mr. Taylor was married February 22, 1866, to Ellen, daughter of Tarbel and Huldah (Dilts) Reed, natives of Pennsylvania, and of English and German origin, by which union he had four children, three of whom are living, viz.: Bayard C., teaching in Hunlock township; Blanche, teaching in Lake township, and Thomas B., who superintends the farm. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor are members of the M. E. Church. He is a strong Republican, and has been constable for one term, justice of the peace and constable of Fairmount township. Socially he is a member of the G. A. R. and I. O. O. F. Mr. Taylor is engaged in the business, having one of the largest apiaries in this section of the State, being an importer of and dealer in bees, queens, honey and bee-keepers supplies.

JOHN TEASDALE, manager of the West End Coal Company, Mocanaqua, P. O. Shickshinny, was born at Minersville, Schuylkill Co., Pa., August 3, 1831. He is a son of John and Elizabeth (Sunter) Teasdale, natives of England who came to America about 1828, settling in Schuylkill county, where they resided until their death. The father was one of the first miners of that county, and continued at that occupation until his decease. Our subject was reared in his native county and educated in the common schools, and when but seven years of age began work about the mines. In 1850 he was made outside foreman of mines for James C. Oliver, at Glen Carbon, Pa., serving him three years, and in 1856 located at Wilkes-Barre, and was foreman for Lewis, Audenried & Co., fourteen years; from 1870 to 1871 he was engaged with the Wilkes-Barre & Seneca Lake Coal Company, above Wilkes-Barre. In 1872 he sunk the No. 1 Shaft for the Susquehanna Coal Company, at Nanticoke, and then, for nearly eight years, was general agent of the Hollenback Coal Company; and since 1880 he has been general manager and superintendent of the West End Coal Company, at Mocanaqua, in which he is a large stockholder. Mr. Teasdale was married, in 1852, to Sarah Nesbitt. They have one adopted daughter, Elizabeth M. (Mrs. Dr. George A. Clark). Mr. Teasdale is a member of the F. & A. M. and in politics is a Republican.

NELSON C.TEETER, track foreman, Delaware & Hudson Canal Company, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Tunkhannock, Pa., June 1, 1836, a son of Jacob E. and Elizabeth (Waldron) Teeter. His paternal grandfather, Conrad Teeter, a native of Hope, Sussex Co., N. J., a saddler and harness-maker by trade, was a pioneer of Wilkes-Barre, where he resided until his death. He carried the first mail between Wilkes-Barre and Painted Post, New York. His children were five in number, as follows: Eliza, Jacob E., Houghton B., Mary A., and Charles H., of whom Jacob E., father of subject, a tanner and currier by trade, resided in Wilkes-Barre until his death. His wife was a daughter of Major and Elizabeth Waldron, of Honesdale, Pa., and by her he had eight children, five of whom grew to maturity: Nelson C., George, Elizabeth (Mrs. C. W. Tatro), Kate (Mrs. Henry Riddle), and Horace H. Our subject was reared and educated in Luzerne county. In April, 1855, he enlisted at Wilkes-Barre, in the regular army, as a member of Capt. Frank Bowmans company, and served five years in the old Indian war, on the northwestern frontier, receiving an honorable discharge at the expiration of term of service. He afterward engaged in gold and silver mining in Idaho, Oregon and Utah, and for a time was in the service of the Government, as guide and interpreter among the Indians. He visited China and Australia, and in 1872 returned to Wilkes-Barre, where he has since resided. During the Civil war he served four months in Capt. Nathan Olneys company of volunteers, Oregon Cavalry, for the protection of the Canyon City Road, in which he was first sergeant, and during his five years previous service in the regular army he was a non-commissioned officer. Since 1884 he has been in the employ of the Delaware & Hudson Canal Company. On June 13, 1872, he married Rebecca, daughter of Martin L. and Mahala (Fox) Brown, of Plains, Pa., and they have one daughter, Mahala E. Politically Mr. Teeter is a stanch Republican.

STEPHEN A. TELLER, proprietor of the "Central House," Kingston, Pa., was born July 11, 1858, at Neversink, Sullivan Co., N. Y., and is a son of David and Elizabeth (Black) Teller, both native of New York, the former of French lineage, the latter of Irish. Mr. Tellers great-grandfather, Teller, came to this country at a very early date, settling on a portion of the present site of the City of New York, and what has since been generally known as "Tellers Point, and concerning the claims of his descendants, has arisen the celebrated "Teller Case," involving the title of the land where Trinity Church now stands, and that vicinity. Our subject was educated in the common schools of his native county, and in 1878 went to Dakota, where he was engaged in farming two years, at the end of which time he again returned to Sullivan county, N. Y., remaining there about one year. He then came to Wilkes-Barre, embarked in the hotel business, and was proprietor of the "Baltimore House" three years. He then abandoned the hotel business, turning his attention to the mechanical world, and was engaged in slating, which business he carried on very extensively about one year, when he again returned to his former business and took charge of the "La Peer House," remaining there two years. Again quitting that business, he bought a half interest in the Albany Shoe Store, Wilkes-Barre, where he carried on a successful trade for about six months, when he sold his interest, and in October, 1889, came to Kingston and took charge of the "Central House." As a landlord he has given general satisfaction to the people of Kingston, as well as to the hosts of commercial men who frequent his house. Mr. Teller was united in marriage, May 2, 1883, with Miss Victoria, daughter of Robert Armstrong, of New York City. He is a member of the I. O. M., and P. O. S. of A., and in politics is a Republican.

HUGH TEMPLETON, general merchant, Plymouth, was born in Scotland, January 9, 1840, and is the third in a family of nine children born to William and Jeanette (McGuffey) Templeton, natives of Scotland. The subject of this sketch was educated in Scotland, and came to America in 1859, locating in Plymouth, Pa., where he engaged in mining at the Old Union Mine, continuing there till 1862, when he enlisted in Company K, Seventh Pennsylvania Reserves, under Capt. Rice and Col. Harvey. He served out his time and re-enlisted, March 18, 1864, in Company I, attached to the One Hundred and Ninety-first Veterans, under Lieut. Colburn, Chas. Hartshorn commanding. Mr. Templeton was engaged in many battles, being in the Seven Days campaign under MacClellan, and participating in the following engagements: Second Bull Run, South Mountain and Antietam, where he received a wound in the left shoulder. In the Grant campaign he was taken prisoner near Mechanicsville Pike, May 30, 1864, and was confined in Libby Prison for three weeks; was then taken to Andersonville, where he was kept for three months; thence taken to Charleston, S. C., where he was incarcerated three weeks, and finally removed to Florence, S. C., where he was exchanged; his discharge bears the date of July 3, 1865. After returning home, Mr. Templeton again engaged in mining, continuing at that until August 9, 1866, when he was seriously injured by a portion of coal falling on him from the roof of the chamber in which he was working, injuring his back and depriving him of the use of his ankles and feet. Our subject then embarked in mercantile business, and now has, at No. 568 W. Main street, one of the largest general stores in the borough, where he commands an immense trade. Mr. Templeton was married, December 25, 1865, to Miss Christine, daughter of Thomas and Margaret (Hutchinson) Wier, natives of Scotland. Christine Wier was born and reared at Sydney, British America. The fruits of this marriage have been eight children, viz.: Thomas, born October 25, 1866; Willie, born November 2, 1868; James, born January 17, 1871; Hugh, Jr., born February 14, 1873; Harry, born February 1, 1875; Maggie, born May 28, 1878; Jessie, born June 29, 1880, and Agnes, born May 11, 1883. Politically Mr. Templeton is a Republican. The family attend the Presbyterian Church.

JAMES P. TERRY, harness maker, P. O. Orange, was born in Franklin, November 9, 1855, a son of Chauncy F. and Catharine (Honeywell) Terry, the former of whom was born in Centre Moreland, Wyoming county about the year 1830, locating in Franklin township, as a farmer. He, however, moved back to Wyoming county, and soon after again came to Luzerne county, this time locating in Kingston township, but finally removed to Wilkes-Barre, where he now resides. During his life he has held various offices of trust and responsibility in the various townships in which he has resided, such as constable, supervisor and collector. He reared a family of seven children, four of whom are living, James P., being the sixth. Our subject received his primary education at various places, finally finishing at Wilkes-Barre. In early life he learned harness-making, in Kingston, at which he has worked most of the time since. In 1890 he removed to Franklin, where he is now engaged at his trade, and is doing good business. He is a worthy young man and will yet make his mark in his life vocation. His work, which is first-class, is drawing an increase of custom that warrants an extensive trade. On May 22, 1886, at Wyoming, he married Miss Rose, daughter of Phineas and Eunice Ferry, to which union there was born December 3, 1889, one son named Ray M. Mrs. Rose Terry was born at Mount Zion in 1867. Politically Mr. Terry is a Democrat.

TIMOTHY THEOPHILUS, mine foreman, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Carmarthanshire, Wales, November 7, 1853, a son of William and Rachel (James) Theophilus, and is a half-brother of the Hon. Morgan B. Williams, of Wilkes-Barre. Our subject was reared and educated in Wales, and from twelve to twenty years of age was employed in the lead mines of his native place. He first came to America in 1873, and locating at Wilkes-Barre, entered the employ of the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, with whom he remained three years, when he revisited Wales. In 1879 he returned to Wilkes-Barre and was employed in the mines of the Red Ash Coal Company a year. He then embarked in business as a contractor on rock work, doing successful work for the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, the Red Ash Coal Company and Hanover Coal Company. In 1886-87 he engaged in the same business at Shamokin. In 1887 he spent three months in Wales, and on his return to Wilkes-Barre, engaged in butchering for nine months. Since 1888 he has held the responsible position of mine foreman for the Red Ash Coal Company. Mr. Theophilus was married in 1878 to Sarah, daughter of Morgan and Sarah (Williams) Williams, of Wales, and they have two children living: Clifford and Albert. In politics our subject is a Republican, and he is now serving his second term of three years as councilman-at-large of Wilkes-Barre.

ALBERT D. THOMAS, physician and surgeon, Forty Fort, was born in Llewellyn, Pa., January 31, 1858, and is a son of Duncan and Margaret (Scott) Thomas, natives of Glasgow, Scotland, who came to America in 1842, resided in Nova Scotia two years, and then located permanently at Llewellyn, Pa. Our subject, who is the seventh son in a family of eight children, attended the common school when a boy, took his academic course under a private tutor, and graduated from Hahnemann Medical College in 1881. He immediately thereafter began practicing medicine in Shamokin, Pa., where he remained two years, after which he removed to Forty Fort, where he has built up a large practice, and done much toward the upbuilding of the town and the promotion of many public enterprises. Dr. Thomas was married, January 28, 1886, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Edwin A. and Elizabeth (Donaldson) Denniston, natives of Pennsylvania, and of English origin. This union has been blessed with two sons and one daughter, viz.: Ethel S., Frank D. and Albert D. Mrs. Thomas died March 1, 1892. Dr. Thomas is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; in his political views he is a Prohibitionist, and has held the office of treasurer of the borough of Forty Fort since its incorporation in 1886; he was also a member of the first school board, and is a very active member of the Board of Trade.

DAVID A. THOMAS, Hazleton, is one of that citys most progressive and deserving citizens, and is a native of Wales, born August 24, 1842. He was reared and educated in his native land, and at the age of twelve years began an apprenticeship at the millers trade, following that about five years, and then engaged in working in the mines, where he had previously been employed. He followed mining until 1865, in which year he came to America, locating at Audenried, Carbon county, where he was mine superintendent for A. L. Mumphin & Co. for a considerable period; this he resigned and next went to Virginia, there managing a plantation for a time. In 1882 Mr. Thomas came to Hazleton and engaged in the livery business, which he has since carried on very extensively, keeping on hand about twenty very fine road horses and carriages, which are excelled by none. Our subject was married, December 25, 1866, to Miss Anna John, of Audenried, and their union has been blessed with ten children, viz.: Anna (married to Elmar Drake), Mary (married to James Johnston, Hazleton), Margaret, Selina, Elizabeth, Thomas, David, Olive, Harry and Sarah. In politics Mr. Thomas is a stanch Republican.

EVAN H. THOMAS, engineer at the Parrish Slope, Plymouth, was born at Danville, Pa., April 23, 1863, and is the fifth in a family of eleven children born to John H. and Hester (Davis) Thomas, natives of Monmouthshire, Wales. The subject of this sketch was reared and educated at Danville, and, after completing his education learned the blacksmiths trade at the Montour Locomotive Works, at which place he remained three years, going from there to the Frosty Valley Iron Ore Mines, where he was given the responsible position of hoisting engineer; he filled this position four years, at the end of that time coming to Plymouth, and running the locomotive used in the Gaylord Mine. He continued in this about one year, when he was given his position at the Parrish mines, where he has been since 1886. Our subject was married, April 19, 1886, to Miss Effie, daughter of Bartholomew and Elmira (Crumbley) Perry, natives of Pennsylvania. The results of this union have been four children, namely: John, Jessie, Raymond and Howard, the last named the only one now living. Mr. Thomas is independent in political matters. He belongs to the Knights of Pythias and P. O. S. of A. The family attend the Pilgrim Church.

JOHN W. THOMAS, master mechanic for the Parrish Coal Company, Plymouth, was born in Aberdare, South Wales, April 9, 1851, and if the fourth in the family of eleven children born to John H, and Hester (Davis) Thomas, also natives of Wales. The family came to America when our subject was but a child, locating in Montour county, Pa., where the children were reared and educated. John W. started in life as hoisting engineer at the Montour Iron and Steel Works, where he ran an engine for five years, going at the end of that period into the shops of the same company. here he worked for about a year at his trade, that of machinist, and then for one year as boiler inspector, afterward resuming his former position of engineer, in which he continued two years. Having a desire to try railroading, he went on the Reading as fireman between Catawissa and Williamsport, where he remained one year, and next worked for a short time as a machinist, at the Funnell Ridge Colliery, Schuylkill county, and the Gaylord, at Plymouth. In 1885 Mr. Thomas again took charge of a hoisting engine, this time at the Gaylord, where he worked one year, and in 1886 came to the Parrish Slopes, putting in the first pump at that mine and running same one year. He then ran a hoisting engine one year, and was at the end of that period promoted to his present position, where he now has charge of all the machinery used in this extensive mine. Mr. Thomas was united in marriage, January 4, 1872, with Miss Annie, daughter of Jacob and Tillie (Kemmer) Miner, natives of Germany, and two children have been born to this union, namely: Gertrude and Maud. Mr. Thomas is a Republican in politics; he is a member of the Knights of Pythias; the family attend the Congregational Church.

JAMES J. THOMAS, Wilkes-Barre, was born at Minersville, Schuylkill Co., Pa., June 23, 1856, a son of John S. and Elizabeth (Leg) Thomas, natives of Wales and England, respectively, who came to America in 1842, locating at Minersville, Pa. The father was a foreman in the mines of Schuylkill county for many years; in 1869 he removed to Plymouth, this county, and died there in 1888. Our subject was reared in Schuylkill and Luzerne counties, and at the age of eight and one-half years he began life in the breakers, and worked about and in the mines, in various capacities, until 1879. He was then appointed deputy prothonotary of Luzerne county, which position he held five years; from 1883 to 1886 was U. S. Revenue gauger, under E. H. Chase, Esq.; and from January 1, 1886, to January 1, 1892, was deputy clark of courts, under William P. James. On February 13, 1879, Mr. Thomas married Sarah, daughter of David J. and Mary Williams of Danville, Pa., natives of Wales, who came to America in 1840. Mr. Thomas has one daughter living, named Lizzie. He is a member of the K. of P., and in politics is a stanch Republican.

JOHN F. THOMAS, carpenter at the Keystone Colliery, Miners Mills, was born in lanerchymedd, Anglesea, North Wales, march 10, 1864, and is a son of Hugh and Ellen (Williams) Thomas, the former of whom is at present a shoe merchant in his native country. The family consisted of eight children, six of whom are living, viz.: Hugh, a shoemaker, in South Wales; Ann, married to Hugh Hughes, a shoemaker, in North Wales; William, a shoemaker, in South Wales; Elizabeth, married to James Grimshaw, a mechanic, in Birkenhead, England; Ellen, married to Thomas Jones, farmer, in West Winfield, N. Y.; and John F. Our subject learned his trade in Wales, and in 1880 came to America, locating first at Waterville, N. Y., where he worked eight months on a farm, then proceeded to Parsons, where he engaged in mine labor for eight months, and in 1882 removed to Miners Mills, where he has since resided, with the exception of two months when he was on a visit to Wales. Mr. Thomas was married, February 2, 1884, to Mary A., daughter of John J. and Ann (Jones) Thomas, and they have four children, viz.: Anna E., John, William and Mary. Mr. Thomas and wife are members of the Welsh Congregational Church; he is a member of the I. O. O. F. and Ivorites, and a Republican in his political views. He built his present residence in 1885.

John J. THOMAS (deceased) was born in Pembrokeshire, South Wales, July 23, 1837, and was the eldest of nine children born to David and Esther (JONES) THOMAS. He was a carpenter in Wales, and came to America November 2, 1879, locating in Miners Mills, where he followed mining till his death, which occurred March 6, 1890. The homestead residence, now occupied by his widow, was constructed in 1886. Mr. THOMAS was married, November 3, 1863, to Miss Ann, daughter of William and Mary (JONES) JONES, natives of Carmarthenshire, South Wales, and the fruit of this union was six children, three of whom died in infancy, the others being David, who died January 10, 1890, at the age of twenty-six years; Mary A., married to John F. THOMAS; and John Henry, a driver in the Pine Ridge Mine. Mr. THOMAS was a member of the Welsh Congregational Church, with which his widow is also identified; he was a member of the A.O.K.of M.C., and the Ivorites, and was a Republican in his political views.

Joseph R. THOMAS, merchant, Edwardsville, was born in Aberystwyth, Wales, March 19, 1841, and is a son of John WATTS and Helena (JONES) THOMAS. Our subject came to America in 1870, locating at Wilkes-Barre, Pa., where he remained one year engaged in mining, and then went into the hotel business as proprietor of the "Pleasant View House," at Wilkes-Barre, where he remained three years previous to coming to Edwardsville. He also engaged in the hotel business at the latter place as proprietor of the "Hanover House," which he conducted for ten years, and then embarked in his present business. Mr. THOMAS was married in 1865 to Miss Phoebe, daughter of David REESE, of Wales, and the fruits of this marriage were six children, viz.: Margaret Helen (deceased), Susanna (deceased), Anna, Ida, David William and Arthur. Our subject and his family are members of the the English Baptist Church, and he is a member of the P.A.S. and the A.O.F.; he now holds the office of burgess of Edwardsville.

Robert THOMAS, tailor, Ashley, was born in Anglesea, North Wales, in December, 1840, and is a son of Thomas and Catherine (HUGHES) THOMAS. The father, who was a watchman, reared a family of four children, two of whom are living: Hugh, a quarryman in Wales, and Robert. Our subject was educated in Wales, and then learned his trade in Glasgow (Scotland), which he followed in Liverpool (England), Dublin (Ireland), on the Isle of Man, and at other places. In 1865 he came to America, and conducted a shop eight years in Slate Ridge, Pa.,; then at Slatington a few months; Upper Lehigh, six years, and in 1879 removed to Ashley. Mr. THOMAS was married August 10, 1862, to Miss Ann, daughter of Richard and Jane (WILLIAMS) JONES, the issue of which union was thirteen children, five of whom are living, viz.: Richard, Robert, John, Jennie, and David. Mr. THOMAS and family are members of the Presbyterian Church, and he is a member of the I.O.R.M. A Republican in politics, he has held the office of justice of the peace since 1887, and that of burgess twice.

Robert G. THOMAS, Ashley, brakeman on the Central Railroad of New Jersey, was born in Beech Bottom, N. Y., June 3, 1868, and is a son of Robert and Ann (JONES) THOMAS. Our subject was educated in the public schools and at an early age began working about the mines, where he remained four years, and was then employed blocking at the foot of the Ashley Plane for some time, and in 1889 began the occupation of brakeman. Mr. THOMAS was married September 24, 1890, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Hugh and Mary (JOHNSON) BLAIR, and they have one child, Bertha May. He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is a member of the Jr. O.U.A.M., and the B.of R.T., and is a Republican in his political views.

Rev. Roland S. THOMAS, Presbyterian minister, Nanticoke, was born in Carmarthenshire, South Wales, April 24, 1844. He attended school very little in his native land and came to America in 1869. When a young man he worked in the mines, in the meantime taking advantage of every opportunity for improving his mind; he devoted all his spare time to study, and it may be well said of him that he is a self-made man. By the year 1879 Mr. THOMAS had prepared himself to enter Princeton Theological Seminary, where he was graduated three years later. Immediately after graduating he engaged in the ministry at Taylorsville, Pa., where he remained until 1886, in which year he came to Nanticoke as pastor of the Welsh Presbyterian Church, the duties of which position he performed until 1890, when he resigned. He is now engaged in preaching in various places, from Carbondale to Danville. Mr. THOMAS was united in marriage, December 29, 1866, with Miss Margaret EVANS, of Tully, Carmarthenshire, South Wales, and to their union were born six children, all of whom are deceased.

Thomas THOMAS, outside foreman of the Exeter Coliery, Pittston, Pa., was born in Wales, January 9, 1858. He is a son of Shadrach and Margaret (DAVIES) THOMAS, natives of Wales who came to America in 1861, settling in Schuylkill county, where the father followed the occupation of a miner, at which he is still employed. THOMAS is the second in a family of six children, and was reared in Pittston, where the family had located in 1864. At the early age of eight years he began working about the mines, doing all kinds of work pertaining to mining. His early educational opportunities were very limited, but by hard work and economy he accumulated, through years of toil and hardship, enough to pay his way at school for a few years. In 1882 he extinguished his miner's lamp, and entered the Lewisburg (now better known as Bucknell) University. Here he spent one year, and in 1883 entered Lehigh University at Bethlehem, Pa., where he remained until 1885, in which year he became identified with the Lehigh Valley Coal Company in the capacity of civil engineer. He remained on the surveying corps for four years, when he was given the position as foreman under this company, which he has since occupied. Mr. THOMAS was married January 3, 1884, to Miss Jennie, daughter of Daniel WILLIAMS, of Olyphant, Pa., and their union has been blessed with three children, namely: Harold, Earle and Beatrice. In political matters he is a Republican; the family attend the Baptist Church. Mr. THOMAS is a self-made man, having by individual effort and perseverance obtained a thorough education.

T. D. THOMAS, hotel proprietor, Duryea, was born in Wales, December 4, 1850, and is a son of Daniel and Hester (HUGHES) THOMAS, natives of the same place. Our subject received his education in Wales, and afterward worked in the mines, and in 1867 came to America, locating in Scranton, where he was employed as a miner until early in the year 1885, when he rented the "Eagle Hotel," Scranton. His business there prospered so well, that, when Duryea commenced to boom he came down there in 1889 and bought the old homestead hotel, where he now resides. Mr. THOMAS was united in marriage November 11, 1870, with Ann, daughter of John M. and Mary (DANIELS) JONES, of Scranton, Pa., and natives of Swansea, Wales. Their union has been blessed with the following children: Hester, born September 24, 1872, was married March 8, 1892, to Steven B. Price, a carpenter, of Duryea; Daniel J., born March 27, 1877; Cora M., born August 27, 1879; Margaret A., born March 30, 1882; John C., born August 6, 1883; and Jenkins, born December 24, 1887. Our subject is a Republican in politics; he is a member of the I.O.O.F., A.P.A, .K of M.S., and I.O.O.R.

Thomas R. THOMAS, mine foreman, Parsons, was born November 24, 1850, in Carmarthenshire, South Wales, and is a son of Thomas and Hannah (REESE) THOMAS. He was educated in his native town and came to America in 1870, settling at Ashley, where he engaged in mining and remained about fifteen months; he then came to Parsons, where he has since resided, devoting his entire attention to mining, and for over ten years has been foreman at the Mineral Spring Mine, where he is at present employed. Mr. THOMAS was married, February 13, 1869, to Miss Jane, daughter of Reese DAVIS, of Mountain Ash, Glamorganshire, South Wales, and they have children as follows: Nellie, Thomas, Reese, Hannah, Jane, Edison, Gwladys, Daniel and William. Mr. THOMAS and his family are members of the Baptist Church; he is a member of the I.O.O.F. and the Knights of Honor, and in politics always has been, and still is, a Republican.

William N. THOMAS, fire-boss at the Cunningham Shaft, Parsons, was born in Llanddybe, Wales, February 13, 1844, and is the second in the family of eight children of Thomas and Hannah (REESE) THOMAS. He was educated in the common schools of Wales, and came to America in 1866, engaging in mining in Schuylkill county, Pa., where he remained for a short time. He then moved to Upper Lehigh, and after a short time, removed to Wilkes-Barre, where he remained about twenty-one years, working in the mines. In 1874 he came to Parsons, where he has since been permanently engaged in mining. Mr. THOMAS was married October 8, 1865, to Miss Jane, daughter of Pew and Jane (JONES) JENKINS, and of this union were born thirteen children, viz: Hannah (Mrs. Evan THOMAS, of Parsons); Benjamin; Mary Jane (Mrs. Morgan L. DAVID, of Wilkes-Barre); Thomas (deceased); Jenkin; Sarah; William; Wirewood; Edith (deceased); Edith (second); Blodwin; Ethel (deceased); and Naomi. Mr. THOMAS is an adherent of the Baptist Church; he is a member of the I.O.O.F., I.O.R.M. and Knights of Honor. He is a Republican in politics, and has held the office of borough councilman two terms, and school director one term.

Rev. W. D. THOMAS, pastor of the Baptist Church, Parsons, was born in Wales June 17, 1842, and is a son of David and Elizabeth (SIMONS) THOMAS. He was educated in the common schools, Lewisburg Academy, and at Bucknell University, and in 1871 began active work in the ministry at Mahanoy City, Pa., where he remained ten years, and then removed to Parsons, where he has since been engaged in the pursuit of his profession. Mr. THOMAS was married, December 11, 1860, to Ann, daughter of James and Elizabeth (JONES) KELLEY, and they have had children as follows: Elizabeth A., born September 9, 1864, died April 24, 1866; Cardec, born December 26, 1865, died April 25, 1881; Addie, born June 26, 1868; Gladius, born October 12, 1870; Minerva, born November 3, 1872; Lorenzo, born November 3, 1874; Lillie, born March 22, 1877, William, born January 8, 1880; Anna, born October 27, 1882; and Leroy, born June 22, 1885. Our subject is a persistent worker in the cause of Christianity; he is a member of the I.O.O.F., and politically is a Republican.

William H. THOMAS (deceased) was born in South Wales, August 31, 1826, and was a son of John and Mary (JONES) THOMAS, who died in their native country. He came to America in 1854, and located at Wilkes-Barre, where he engaged in mining; in 1864 he removed to Ashley, where he was for nineteen years a mine foreman. In 1874 he built the comfortable home now occupied by his family. Mr. THOMAS was married November 22, 1858, to Miss Catherine, daughter of Peter and Catherine (NEW) COONS, natives of Germany, whence the family emigrated in 1836. The issue of this union was four children, viz.: Charles, died at the age of nineteen years; Byron, died at the age of five and one-half years; one who died in infancy, and Oscar, a very promising young man, who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1892, and is now practicing medicine in Cleveland, Ohio. Mrs. THOMAS also has an adopted child, Helen S. THOMAS. The family are Presbyterians in their religious views, and Republicans in politics, in which Mr. THOMAS was very active; he held the office of school director in Ashley borough for seven years. He was killed by being smothered in a culm bank at the Franklin Mine, February 16, 1883. His death was a severe shock to his family, and was a cause of deep regret to the community in general, but Mrs. THOMAS rallied as soon as the delicacy of true womanhood would allow and managed the estate and reared her family in a way which devolves much credit upon her. Mr. THOMAS was a man who commanded the highest respect of his employers as well as those under his charge. He was a kind husband, a loving father, and a man of great influence in the town in which he lived, and from which he was so suddenly swept by the cruel hand of death.

William M. THOMAS, inside foreman, Stanton Mines, Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Breconshire, South Wales, April 22, 1838, a son of William and Gwennie (MORGAN) THOMAS. He was reared and educated in his native place, and when nine years of age began life in the coal mines there, working in various capacities up to 1865. On August 3 of that year he landed in New York City, and the following week located in Wilkes-Barre, where he has since been in the employ of the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, as miner, assistant fire-boss, fire-boss, assistant inside foreman, and inside foreman, having held his present position since 1881. Mr. THOMAS married, December 19, 1869, Miss Mary A., daughter of John and Gwennie (WILLIAMS) THOMAS, of Carbondale, Pa., formerly of Wales. Mrs. THOMAS's father was an official with the Delaware & Hudson Canal & Coal Company at Carbondale for twenty-eight years, but in later life he removed to Susquehanna county, Pa., where he engaged in farming, and died there in 1882, at the age of eighty-five years. Mr. and Mrs. THOMAS have three children: Thomas, Gwennie and Richard. They are members of the Welsh Presbyterian Church. Mr. THOMAS is a member of the I.O.O.F. and R.A.; in politics he is a Republican.

William O THOMAS, engineer at the Nottingham Colliery No. 2 Slope, Plymouth, was born in England, September 14, 1851, a son of Thomas O. and Jenefer (ROWE) THOMAS, natives of England. William O. was the third in a family of four children, and was reared and educated in England, coming to America in 1865, and settling in Orange county, N.Y., where he worked about the lead mines for one year. In 1871 he began as fireman at the Nottingham, continuing in that capacity for six years, when he was given charge of an engine at the Wright Slope, which he ran for twelve years, coming from there to No. 15, where he has since had charge of the large pair of slope engines. The subject of this sketch was united in marriage, June 29, 1882, with Lutisia J., daughter of William and Mary (CROSBY) CULVER, natives of Luzerne county. Two children have blessed this union: Emma S., born April 10, 1883, and William C., born April 24, 1885. Mr. THOMAS is a member of the following Orders: I.O.O.F., Mystic Chain, Knights of the Golden Eagle, and Knights of Honor. He is independent in political matters; the family attend the Methodist Church.

Alexander THOMPSON, mine foreman, Pittston. This skillful and experienced mine foreman was born in Lanarkshire, near Edinburgh, Scotland, April 12, 1844, and is the third in the family of eight children of James and Elizabeth (SIMPSON) THOMPSON, also natives of Scotland. The subject of this sketch was reared and educated in his native land, and early in life learned mining, which he followed there until 1866, when he emigrated to America and located at Pittston, Pa. Here he engaged in mining and sinking shafts for the Pennsylvania Coal Company, continuing in that capacity nine years. In 1876 he was promoted to the position of mine foreman for the the company, and has since been so employed. He now has charge of Shafts Nos. 1 and 8, having 250 men under him, who daily prepare for the market nearly 600 tons of the black diamonds. Mr. THOMPSON was united in marriage, August 27, 1869, with Miss Annie, the accomplished daughter of William and Caroline (WILLIAMSON) REID, natives of Scotland, and one child has been born to this union, James R., who has chosen the medical profession. Mr. THOMPSON is a member of the F.& A.M. and the K. of H. He attends the Presbyterian Church. Standing in a position as he does, between a great corporation on the one hand and its hundreds of employees on the other, it requires the utmost ability in action and impartiality of judgment, and it is truthfully said of him by the voice of the people that no man is better fitted for such a position than Mr. Alexander THOMPSON.

Peter THOMPSON, Pittston, is the proprietor of that popular resort known as the Keystone Restaurant, located at No. 110 South Main street, Pittston. He is a native of Scotland, born November 25, 1858, and is a son of Robert and Jemelta (WIER) THOMPSON, both natives of Scotland. When our subject was about six years of age the family came to America, locating at Pittston, and there he was reared and educated. He followed mining until he reached the age of twenty-eight, then engaged in running a diamond drill, and worked in various places through the anthracite coal fields, and after four years assumed proprietorship of the Keystone Restaurant, where he has since enjoyed a flourishing trade. Mr. Thompson was married, in 1879, to Miss Bridget GIBBONS, one of Pittston's fair daughters, and of this union have been born six children, three of whom are living, viz: Robert, John and Peter. The subject of our sketch is a member of the Caledonian Society; in politics he is a Republican.

Dr. William THOMSON, physician, Luzerne, was born at Nanticoke, Luzerne Co., Pa., in June, 1823, and is a son of David and Susan (SAYLOR) THOMSON, the former a native of Connecticut, the latter of German origin. The family consisted of three sons, of whom our subject is the youngest. He received his education principally at the old Wilkes-Barre Academy, and in 1845 began the study of medicine with Dr. A. P. GARDENER, of Carbondale, Pa. He completed his course at the Castleton Medical College, Vermont, graduating there in 1845. After receiving his "sheepskin," the Doctor located at Nanticoke, Pa., where he practiced for six years, at the end of which time he removed to Orange, Pa., remaining there until 1857, when he took up his abode at Centre Moreland, Wyoming Co., Pa., where he practiced thirty years. In the spring of 1887 the Doctor came to Luzerne, where he and his son, Benjamin, established the lumber business that has since flourished under their management. The Doctor was married in March, 1852, to Mary Ann, daughter of John and Eliza (NAYLOR) URQUHART, and the children born to them are Frank H., born in June, 1853, died in July, 1884; Benjamin S., born in Centre Moreland, Pa., October 23, 1862; and Ruth S., born June 28, 1868, and now residing with her parents. The Doctor was commissioned as army surgeon, November 1, 1862, and assigned to the One Hundred and Thirty-third Pennsylvania, where he served his time, after which he was re-commissioned to the Forty-second Pennsylvania, and served therein until the regiment was discharged; he was then assigned to the One Hundred and Ninety-eighth Pennsylvania, where he remained until the close of the war. He is now a member of the G.A.R., and no man was more faithful to his post than he. He is a member of the M. E. Church, and in politics casts his ballot with the Republican party. His son, Benjamin S., with whom he is in partnership, was educated in Luzerne county, and embarked in the general lumber business with his father in 1887, where he can always be found attending strictly to business. He was married, October, 16, 1884, to Ida L., daughter of Heister and Adaline (SHARPE) KEELER, natives of Pennsylvania, and among the first settlers of this Valley. Three children have come to Mr. and Mrs. THOMSON: E. Roy, born September 9, 1885; Albert Lewis, born August 6, 1887, and Benjamin N., born November 12, 1889. As regards politics and religion, Mr. THOMSON adheres to his father's views. Dr. THOMAS and son, since establishing the lumber business at Luzerne, have succeeded well, and a survey of their neat establishment will afford ample proof of their prosperity.

Fred THORN, proprietor of the City Bottling Works, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Rhemish Hesse, Germany, November 2, 1845, and is a son of Balthasar and Julia (WINTERNBEITNER) THORN. He was reared in his native country and educated at the Gymnasium of Mayence, near Biogen on the Rhine, and in 1864 immigrated to America, after which he followed the seas for several years as a sailor. In 1871 he located at Wilkes-Barre, where he was employed as clerk in Reichard's brewery, in which capacity he served nearly three years. In 1874 he engaged in the bottling business, as a member of the firm of KNORR & THORN, which partnership existed up to 1881, when, on account of illness, he disposed of his interest to Mr. KNORR. In 1883 he purchased of A. M. BRYDEN the City Bottling Works, established in 1879, which he has since successfully conducted, and in 1884 erected his present plant on North Main street, one of the leading establishments of the kind in the State. Since 1889 he has conducted a branch works in Nanticoke, this county, and in 1891 embarked in the business of bottling the Lathia and Chalybeata waters at Tallapoosa, Ga. These waters are known as the "Southern Pride." Mr. THORN was married in 1879 to Mrs. Katherina (WEDDA) KREBS, of Wilkes-Barre, and they have three children: Louisa, Julius, and Adolph. Mr. THORN is a member of the Legion of Honor, Royal Arcanum, Knights of Pythias and Red Men and Harugari; in politics he is independent.

Thomas TIGHE, proprietor of the "Ashland House," Wilkes-Barre, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., July 1, 1839, a son of Dennis and Ellen (DURKIN) TIGHE, natives of County Mayo and County Sligo, Ireland, respectively. The father came to America in 1834, locating in Philadelphia, where he was married. In 1841 he settled in the Wyoming Valley, where he engaged in mining thirty years, and next embarked in the hotel business at Pittston, in which he continued seventeen years, dying there August 6, 1891, at the age of eighty years. He was the father of five children: Anthony, Thomas, John D., Patrick and James. Our subject was reared in Luzerne county from two years of age and began life as a miner, which occupation he followed twenty years, since which time he has been engaged in the hotel business, fifteen years in Pittston, two years in Scranton and five years in Wilkes-Barre, and since November, 1889, has been the proprietor of the "Ashland House." In 1860 Mr. TIGHE married Miss Bridget TAYLOR, a native of County Sligo, Ireland, and by her he had eight children, five of whom are living: Dennis, Ellen J., Mary, Kate and John. He is a member of the Catholic Church, and in politics is a Democrat.

M. J. TIGUE, merchant, Port Griffith, was born in Jenkins township, January 12, 1862, and is a son of Patrick and Bridget (McGee) Tigue, natives of County Mayo, Ireland. His father came to America in 1853, and in the same year located in Port Griffith, where he has since been engaged in mining. The family consisted of eight children, six of whom are living, viz.: Michael J., Bridget (Mrs. John T. Flannery), Ellen (Mrs. John McCormick), John, Mary and Catherine. Our subject was educated in the common schools and then worked about the mines for twelve years, including four years' mining. In 1884 he engaged in his present business, which he has since successfully conducted. Mr. Tigue was married November 26, 1889, to Miss Mary, daughter of Thomas and Bridget (McHale) Blewit, natives of County Mayo, Ireland, which union has been blessed with three children, viz.: Maria and Mabel (twins), who died at the age of ten months, and Elizabeth. Our subject and family are members of the Catholic Church; he is a member of the Father Mathew Society, the A.O.H. and the C.M.B.A. He is a Democrat in politics, and has held the offices of school director and tax collector in Jenkins township.

SOLOMON TINKLEPAUGH, farmer, P.O. Prichard, was born in Schoharie county, N. Y., May 27, 1817. He is a son of Hontice and Ellenor (Shoefelt) Tinklepaugh, both of whom were born in New York State, of Dutch descent. Hontice and his wife were married in New York and removed to this county in 1817, when Solomon was six months old. They located near Pittston, in what is now a part of Lackawanna county, where they purchased 200 acres of virgin soil, which the father improved during his lifetime. He confined himself strictly to agricultural pursuits, and the improvements on his farm speak for his industry and perseverance. He died at the age of seventy-five years, after living an uneventful but toilsome life. He reared a family of seven children, all of whom grew to maturity, and four of whom are now living. Solomon is the sixth in the family, and was reared and educated near Pittston, in Lackawanna county. Here he resided until he reached his twenty-fifth birthday, when he removed to Union (now Hunlock) township, there purchasing a property of 100 acres, to which he has added thirty-one acres more, all of which he and his sons have brought under cultivation. Mr. Tinklepaugh is an industrious man and an practical farmer; while belonging to no religious body, his life and principles are honest and upright. Politically he is a Democrat, and has been honored with several township offices, all of which he filled with credit. In 1839 our subject married Miss Angeline, daughter of William and Mary Cappell, who bore him nine children, seven of whom are living: George, William, Jane, Mary, Amy, Martha and Margaret. Mr. Tinklepaugh is a hearty man of seventy-five years; he is a social and genial companion, and has the full confidence of his neighbors.

ROBERT TODD, JR., butcher, Plymouth, was born at Pittston, Pa., October 25, 1854, and is a son of Robert and Isabella (Haston) Todd, natives of Edinburgh, Scotland, who came to this county when it was but sparsely settled. The family consisted of seven children--five boys and two girls--of whom five are now living. The subject of this sketch was educated in Pittston, and began life as thousands of the boys of the Valley have done, and still do--picking slate in the breaker. He worked in and about the mines in many capacities for twelve years, and in 1887 opened a meat market on West Main street, Plymouth, near his present place of business, which is located at No. 505 same street, and where he has since continued. Mr. Todd has a very neat, well-regulated market, and commands a large portion of the trade in his locality. He attends the Methodist Church, and in politics is a sound Republican.

A. L. TOWNER, proprietor of the Star Shoe Store, Pittston. Among the prominent young business men of Pittston is to be found the gentleman whose name heads this sketch. He was born on Towner's Hill, Bradford county, and is a son of J. G. and Julia (Forbes) Towner. The Towner family is one of the oldest and best known in Bradford county, of which his parents were both natives. He was a teacher of vocal music, and obtained the reputation extending far beyond the borders of his native county, of being one of the most successful teachers that the State ever produced. Many members of the Towner family have proved themselves to be musicians of note, and the father of our subject was one of the best. He died on his farm in Bradford county, December 8, 1870. J.G. and Julia (Forbes) Towner had a family of four children, viz.: Ladorna, who died when about twenty-two years old; Daniel B., who now resides in East Northfield, and is a vocalist of national repute, has devoted many years of his life to evangelical work, and by means of his sweet songs has been enabled to win many souls from the ways of destruction; he has accompanied Moody, Bliss, Munhall, Whittel, and many other noted evangelists, in their work in the different parts of the United States, and has visited almost every State in the Union; is a composer of decided ability, and many of his songs have won immortality); A.L., our subject; and William F., a commercial traveler, and a resident of Cleveland, Ohio. The mother is still Living, and resides in East Northfield, Mass. Our subject was born and reared on the farm in Bradford county, and received his education in the common schools of his native county and the commercial department of the Wyoming Seminary, graduating from the latter in 1876. He then came to Pittston and embarked in the grocery business, associating himself as a partner with W. R. Sax, under the firm name of Sax & Towner. He continued in this business for three years, then sold his interest to Sax, and became a clerk in the store of T. W. Kyte, of West Pittston, remaining there six years. After leaving the employ of Mr. Kyte he went west, but finding no suitable opening returned to pittston, and in October, 1888, purchased the boot and shoe business of James Fitch, in which he has since been engaged. His establishment, known as the "Star Shoe Store", is one of the most popular places in the county, and Mr. Towner has built up a trade second to none. Under his able management the business is constantly increasing. His shelves are lined with a very complete stock of goods, and there you can purchase anything in the boot and shoe line, from a baby's French kid shoe to a miner's heaviest brogan. Mr. Towner makes a specialty of fine goods, and in his establishment you can procure the best goods manufactured. Our subject was united in marriage, September 26, 1878, with Christine Polen, daughter of Winters Polen, a carpenter of Pittston, and their union has been blessed with two children: Burt T. and Paul D. He and his family are members of the First M.E. Church of West Pittston, and are earnest workers in the same. He is a contributing member of the Y.M.C.A.; also a member of the E.A.U. and P.O.S. of A., both Pittston societies. Mr. Towner has resided in Pittston since his fifteenth year, and has created for himself a host of friends. As a business man he has been very successful, and his methods have been such as to command the respect of all. He has won for himself an enviable position in the city of his adoption.

CHARLES W. TRAVER, proprietor of the "Hotel Traver", Wilkes Barre, was born in Steuben county, N.Y., February 7, 1849, son of Charles and Olivia (Veley) Traver, of English and German descent, respectively. He was reared in his native county, receiving his education in the common schools, and in 1865 began life for himself as a news agent on the Erie Railroad, which occupation he followed until 1868. He then filled a position as brakeman two years, being next employed from 1870 to 1873, as baggageman, and from 1873 to 1884, as freight and passenger conductor. From 1884 to 1888 he managed installment houses in Wilkes Barre and Sunbury, and from 1888 to 1891 was traveling salesman for wholesale liquor houses in Wilkes Barre and Philadelphia. In March, 1891, Mr. Traver embarked in the restaurant business in Wilkes Barre, in which he still continues, being one of the most popular caterers in the city. On July 4, 1871, he married Sallie Shaffer of Sunbury, Pa., and after her decease wedded Lillie, daughter of Jacob Hill, of Shamokin, Pa. By the latter union there are two children, Millie and Frances.

PETER TRAXLER, a prominent farmer of Huntington township, P. O. Town Hill, was born on his present farm, November 24, 1834, a son of Henry and Sarah (Dodder) Traxler, natives of Pennsylvania, and of English origin. The father was a farmer by occupation; he died October 3, 1863, aged sixty-three years. Our subject is the fourth in order of birth in a family of seven children, six of whom are living. He was reared on the farm he now owns, educated in the common schools, and worked for his father until the death of the latter, when he purchased the farm from the heirs, and has since devoted his attention to its improvement. The property consists of seventy-five acres, one and one-half miles southwest from Town Hill postoffice. Mr. Traxler was married, September 17, 1859, to Martha E., daughter of Philip and Rebecca Dodder, and by her he has one child, Charles L., who resides with his father and helps work the farm; he is married to Bertha Fullmer. The family are members of the M.E. Church, and politically, Mr. Traxler is a Republican.

FRANK TRENERY, shoemaker, Plains, was born in England May 7, 1865, and is a son of Frank and Sarah (Trenery) Trenery. The father, who is a shoe maker and dealer, in company with his youngest son, came to America in 1871, followed a year later by the remainder of the family, and located in Jersey City, where all except Frank still remain. The family consisted of twelve children, seven of whom are living, viz.: Edward, proprietor of the largest boot and shoe store in Jersey City; Jennie, married to John Walbrecht, a shoemaker, formerly of Plains, now of Greenville, N.J.; Sarah, married to William Leach, a boss carpenter, in Jersey City; Emma, married to William Furze, a car drive, also in Jersey City; Joseph, a shoemaker and dealer, Jersey City; Frank, whose name appears at the head of this memoir; and Richard, in partnership with his father. In 1887 our subject located in Plains, where he has done a thriving business. Mr. Trenery was married, December 26, 1887, to Miss Martha, daughter of Jacob and Martha (McIntyre) Covart, of Jersey City, and natives of Maryland and Ireland, respectively; her father, who was formerly a resident of Wilkes Barre, went, in 1841, to Philadelphia, the next year to New York, and in 1867 to Jersey City, where he has since remained. To the union of Frank and Martha Trenery have been born two children, one of whom is living, Frank A. Our subject is a member of the A.O.K. of M.C., and is a Republican in his political views.

GEORGE W. TRIMBLE, veterinary surgeon and barn-boss, Edwardsville, was born in Elizabethtown, Pa., and is a son of George W. and Eliza (Vance) Trimble, both natives of Pennsylvania and of French and German origin, respectively. Our subject began life for himself at the early age of seven, working on a farm on Middletown, Pa., where he remained about eight years, and thence going to Pottsville, where he was employed as a teamster until 1846, when he went to Danville, driving team there until 1859. He next went to Light Street and remained there until April 9, 1861, at this time Mr. Trimble enlisted in the Bloomsburg Iron Guards and went with them to Harrisburg, and when that organization was not accepted, re-enlisted, this time in Company A, Sixty P.V., under Capt. Richetts. He was all through the Peninsular Campaign, and was mustered out with his regiment at the close of the war. He then returned to Bloomsburg, where he was engaged at teaming, and remained there three years, when he again returned to Danville, in which place he reamined until 1875. In this year he came to Edwardsville and engaged as barn-boss for the Kingston Coal Company, where he is still employed. Mr. Trimble was married March 2, 1858, to Miss Sarah, daughter of William Hilburn, of Mt. Pleasant, Pa., and they have had eight children, namely: Mary Jane, who is married to John Harris, of Plymouth; Anna, who is married to William J. Edwards, of Plymouth; Olive (deceased); William F., an engineer, at Plymouth; Ida, who is married to Benjamin Fox (now deceased), at Edwardsville; George, an engineer, at Edwardsville; Elias, who married Sarah Lines, of Edwardsville; and Bertha. Mr. Trimble and his family are members of the M.E. Church, and in politics, he is a Republican.

JOHN TRIMBLE, restaurant keeper, Fairview township, P.O. Mountain Top, was born in Ireland in 1844, and is the fourth in the family of seven children born to Alexander and Jane (Burns) Trimble. He attended the public schools in his native country until he was twelve years of age, afterward working on his father's farm until 1863, when he came to this country, and to Durham, Bucks Co., Pa., securing employment there in a blast furnace, where he stopped but a short time, thence proceeding to Catasauqua, and working on the Lehigh Valley Railroad as repairman. After a few months he secured work in Mauch Chunk, and worked around there until 1868, when he went to Seigfried's Bridge, in Lehigh county; he was employed there as a railroad brakeman, and, in July 1869, had his right leg mangled so badly by the cars that it was necessary to have it amputated. In April, 1870, Mr. Trimble came to Solomon's Gap, and accepted a position as weighbill clerk in the scale office for the Lehigh & Susquehanna Railroad Company. He held that position until 1874, when he opened a cigar and confectionery store in Solomon's Gap; and, in 1878, secured a retail liquor license, and opened a restaurant in the same building. He did business in that place until 1884, when it became necessary to remove the old building, and on the site was erected a three-story building with hall attached, which is now being used by several Societies. Mr. Trimble was married in March, 1887, to Rosetta, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Coleman, of Benton, Columbia county, both natives of that county. Mr. and Mrs. Trimble have five children, as follows: Harry W., Stella M., Cora D., Nora M. and Mable G. Mr. Trimble is a member of the I.O.O.F. and of the Royal Arcanum. In politics, he is a liberal Democrat.

SAMUEL WILLSON TRIMMER, M.D., White Haven, was born in Kingwood township, Hunterdon Co., N.J., August 12, 1833, a son of Henry S. and Ure (Willson) Trimmer, natives of New Jersey, and of German and Scotch origin respectively, the former of whom was a wheelwright by trade. The father died, April 24, 1890, aged eighty-four years, leaving a family of nine children, seven now living, of whom Samuel Willson is the eldest. Our subject was educated in the common schools, also at Col. Chapman's private school, at Flemington, N.J., and in 1852 he began the study of medicine under Albert S. Clark, M.D., of Quakertown, N.J. He graduated from the Philadelphia College of Medicine, March 1, 1854, and opened an office at Point Pleasant, Pa., where he practiced two years, at the end of which time he moved to White Haven, where he has since followed his profession. The Doctor was married, September 7, 1857, to Elizabeth, daughter of Washington and Jane (Bevan) Bennet, natives of the Wyoming Valley, and of English and Welsh origin, respectively. Mrs. Trimmer, who was the eldest in a family of ten children, was born August 26, 1836, and died March 8, 1875. The fruits of this union were eight children, four of whom are living, viz.: Harry W., born April 6, 1863, a physician at Harvey's Lake, Pa.; Julia M., born August 5, 1865; Edwin S., born June 19, 1873, and Francis, born January 25, 1875. The family attend the Presbyterian Church. Dr. Trimmer is a member of the National Association of Railway Surgeons; the Luzerne County Medical Society, and the Lehigh Valley Medical Association. He was a member of the Legislature in 1863; has been burgess of White Haven, and is school director, an office he has held since 1868. He was prothonotary of Luzerne county from 1872 to 1875, is one of the prominent men of his borough, and an honor to his profession.

ISAAC TRIPP, farmer, Forty Fort, was born in Providence, Pa., September 7, 1817, the seventh in the family of eleven children of Isaac and Catherine (LaFrance) Tripp, natives of Pennsylvania, and of English-Quaker and Scotch and French origin, respectively. He is a grandson of Isaac and Martha Tripp, and a great-grandson of Isaac Tripp, who came from Rhode Island to the Wyoming Valley during pioneer times; he was a great friend of the Indians, by whom he was painted, somewhat according to their custom, and on one occasion, having to go to Connecticut on account of the disputed land title, he washed off the stripes given him by the Red man, and, after his return, while foddering cattle one morning at daybreak outside the fort, he was fallen upon by the savages and slain before he could regain the enclosure. His father dying while our subject was young, the latter's success in life has been largely due to his own efforts, and as he himself attributes it, to the fact that he had a good mother. Embarking in life for himself at the age of eighteen, he followed the example of his father, and chose farming as his occupation, in which he has always continued. He located in Kingston in 1854, on the place where Frank Helms now lives, subsequently living a year and a half on a farm on the hill west of Kingston, and in 1859 purchasing his present home of 138 acres, known as the "Abbot Farm". Mr. Tripp was married February 17, 1840, to Miss Margaret, daughter of Jacob I. and Elizabeth (Woulthmuth) Shoemaker, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German origin. Six children were the fruit of this union, four of whom are now living, viz.: Mary, who resides with her parents; Penelope E., married to Isaac Estabrook, a farmer, at Catharine, N.Y.; Phebe M., married to W. L. Sherwood, a farmer, at Trumansburgh, N.Y., and Emma C., married to Stephen F. Williams, a druggist at Plymouth, Pa. Mrs Margaret (Shoemaker) Tripp, died November 23, 1856, and Mr. Tripp was married, December 28, 1861, to Hannah Rogers, daughter of Nelson and Jane (Durling) Rogers, natives of Maine and Orange county, N.Y., and of New England and Irish lineage, respectively. To this union have been born six children, viz.: Flora T., married to Simeon Bronson, a farmer, in Schuylkill township, Chester Co., pa.; Maud S., married to Frederick Space, of Forty Fort; Isaac, Jr., farming in Schuylkill township; Edwin McN.; Catherine J., living with her parents, and Bertha M., attending school at Trumansburgh, N.Y. Mr. Tripp and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal and Baptist Churches, respectively. He is a Republican in his political views, and has held the office of assessor in Providence. Mr. Tripp has in his possession a cow, which he has raised on his farm, weighing over 3,000 pounds, undoubtedly the largest cow in the world; she is a very beautiful, well-proportioned animal of the Shorthorn-Durham breed, and has been looked upon in wonder by stock-raisers from various parts of the United States and Canada, who have in many cases traveled long distances to see so estraordinary a creature.

GEORGE H. TROUTMAN, attorney at law, Hazleton, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., January 18, 1842, and is a son of J. Hamilton and Elizabeth (Esler) Troutman. His father was a native of Reading, Pa., and a son of George C. Troutman, who was a son of George Peter Von Troutman, a German baron, who, September 16, 1736, came to America from Vienna, Austria. The maternal grandfather of subject was Benjamin Esler, a native of County Antrim, Ireland. J. Hamilton Troutman was a resident of Philadelphia the greater part of his life, and at the time of his death, in 1865, was a member of the firm of Kay & Brothers, law booksellers and publishers. Our subject was educated in his native city, and was graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1862, whilst in the army. On April 22, 1861, he enlisted in the First Regiment Commonwealth (Pennsylvania) Artillery, in which he served three months, and he afterward enlisted for three years in the Anderson Troop, the first company in what was afterward the Fifteenth Cavalry Regiment, or One Hundred and Sixtieth Pennsylvania Volunteers. He was wounded in the Stone River Campaign, where he commanded a battalion of Kentucky troops. In June, 1862, he was taken prisoner at Huntsville, Ala., but six months later he escaped. After recovering from wounds and imprisonment, he entered the service in the Military family of Gen. G.S. Dodge. He was in the service until March, 1866. He read law with Edward Hopper, of Philadelphia, and was admitted to the bar March 20, 1862, whilst on leave of absence from the army. In 1868 he located at Mahanoy City, Schuylkill county, and practiced in the courts of that county until 1879, when he returned to Hazleton, this county, where he has since resided and succeeded in building up an extensive practice. He was admitted to the Luzerne county bar September 16, 1874. Mr. Troutman is a stanch Republican. He has never held public office, except as city solicitor of the city of Hazleton, but has taken an active part in county conventions and committees.

J. C. TUBBS, farmer, P. O. Town Line, was born in Union township, March 8, 1842, a son of Charles and Catherine (Benscoter) Tubbs, the former born in Huntington, the latter in Union township, in 1795 and 1799, respectively. Charles was a son of Earl Tubbs, a native of Connecticut, who removed to this county as one of its early pioneers. He located in Huntington township, where he owned about 300 acres of land, a great part of which he was instrumental in clearing. In addition to this farming he was also a distiller, and was indeed a business man of considerable ability. He died at the age of seventy years. His son Charles began life in Huntington township, where he purchased a farm of twenty-six acres, on which he lived the rest of his life. His life was devoted to good works, and he was a consistent member of the M. E. Church; he died in 1864, aged sixty-nine years. His family numbered eleven children, seven of whom grew to maturity, and four are now living, J. C. being the tenth in the family. Our subject was reared and educated in his native township, having always confined himself to agricultural pursuits. In 1861 he was mustered into the United States service as a member of Company F, One Hundred and Forty-third P. V. I., for the term of three years. He proved himself a valiant soldier, and participated in the following battles; Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, North Ann, Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, Hatchers Run, first and second. In February, 1865, his regiment was sent to Hart Island to guard prisoners. At the close of the war he was honorably discharged with the rank of corporal. On his return to civil life he again began the life of a farmer. In 1867 he married Miss Sarah, daughter of Weston and Delena Goss, who bore him four children, all of whom are living; Kate, Edgar B., Blanche, and Pearle. Mrs. Sarah Tubbs was born in Fairmont township, December 15, 1846; she passed away October 17, 1886, aged thirty-nine years, ten months and two days. J. C. Tubbs is an energetic business man, a practical farmer, and has held several township offices with credit. He is a member of the Grange and G. A. R.

A. D. TUCK, proprietor of a boarding stable, Wilkes-Barre, was born in that city February 6, 1866, a son of William and Catherina (Dean) Tuck. His father was a native of England, a druggist by profession: he established one of the first drugstores in Wilkes-Barre, and continued in the business until his death, which occurred in 1881; his wife a daughter of Amon Dean, one of the pioneers of Wilkes-Barre, a wheelwright by trade, wh, before the day of railroads, was proprietor of a freight line, with teams, between Wilkes-Barre and Tunkhannock. William Tuck had six children who grew to maturity: Alice (Mrs. R. A. Spaulding), Kate (Mrs. Dr. Ernest Birkins), William, Nellie, A. D. and Nan. Our subject was reared in his native city, receiving his education in the public schools and Harry Hillman Academy. He has been engaged in his present business since 1885. In February, 1890, he married Louise, daughter of Christian and Hannah Heinbach, of White Haven, this county. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. and S. O. S. A., and in politics he is a Republican.

ADAM TUCKER, SR., proprietor of the "Parlor Hotel," Public Square, Wilkes-Barre, was born in that city, September 20, 1858, a son of Adam and Catherine (Leffler) Turkes, natives of Germany. The father emigrated to America in 1844, and located in Wilkes-Barre, where he worked in the mines seven years. He then embarked in the hotel business, continuing in that for twenty-five years, when he engaged in the grocery business. This he carried on for three years, when he again entered the hotel business for four years, after which he retired from active life. His children were Adam Jr., Anthony, Kate (Mrs. N. G. Landmesser), Margaret (Mrs. Frank Flosser), Mary (Mrs. Hans Schmidt), Nannie (Mrs. George Bartholomew) and Frances (Mrs. Samuel Michaels). The subject of this sketch was reared in Wilkes-Barre, and educated in the public schools. He began life as a clerk, in 1880 embarking in the saloon business. In 1885 he started his present business, in which he has since successfully continued, being a popular and well-known citizen. He is a member of the K. of P.

EDWARD TURNBACH, Agent for the Atlantic Dynamite Company, Hazleton, is a descendant of an illustrious Revolutionary soldier, being a great-grandson of John Turnbach, who served in the Pennsylvania ranks under Gen. Anthony Wayne. The advent of the Turnbach family in America dates back to 1728, when the father of John Turnbach, with a colony of Germans, emigrated to America, owing to religion difficulties which had arisen in the Fatherland during that period. The subject of this sketch was born in White Haven, Pa., July 25, 1848, and is the fifth in a family of ten children born to William and Maria (Drescher) Turnbach, both of whom were born in this country. Edward was reared and educated near White Haven, and, when quite young, began working at the mines at Eakley, Ebervale, and Stockton. This he continued until seventeen years of age, when he went to Drifton and was engaged by Coxe Bros. & Co., as shipping clerk, from 1869 to 1882 in which year he came to Hazleton, and engaged in the dynamite business. In 1884 he admitted Mr. Monroe into partnership, the business having since been known by the firm name of Turnbach & Monroe. Mr. Turnbach was united in marriage, August 9, 1870, with Miss Hannah E., daughter of Jacob and Mary (Weaver) Hartranft, natives of Berks county, which union has been blessed with six children, namely: William A., John J., Edward R., Mary B., Prentiss and Walter. Mr. Turnbach is a stanch Democrat of the old Jacksonville school; the family attend the Lutheran Church.

STEPHEN TURNBACH, retired farmer, P. O. Rock Glen, was born in what is now Black Creek township, January 27, 1827, a son of Samuel and Mary (Hill) Turnbach. His paternal grandfather, William Turnbach, a native of Pennsylvania, was a pioneer of what is now Black Creek township, and cleared and improved a farm there on which he lived and died. His children were: William, John, Samuel, Susan (Mrs. Whitney), Eliza (Mrs. Peter Kaup), Rebecca (Mrs. David Enbody) and Sarah (Mrs. William Kaup), of whom Samuel, father of our subject, succeeded to the homestead, and resided in Black Creek township until his death. His wife was a daughter of Frederick Hill, of Salem township, and his children where Phoebe (Mrs. Samuel Nugester), Catherine (Mrs. George B. Seybert), Stephen, Joseph and Samuel. Our subject was reared in Black Creek township, where he has always resided, and was engaged in farming and merchandising until his retirement from business. He married, December 19, 1850, Hannah, daughter of Philip and Maria (Creasy) Hetler, of Mifflinville, Columbia Co., Pa., and has five children living: Joseph H., Mary C. (Mrs. Dr. L. L. Creasy), Emma U. (Mrs. Charles W. Barber), Alice D. (Mrs. John Platt) and Ellsworth C. Mr. Turnbach is a member of the M. E. Church; in politics is a Republican, and served as a commissioner of Luzerne county one term of three years.

FRED F. TURNER, dealer in mine supplies and machinery, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., August 31, 1860, a son of George F. and Mary (Smith) Turner. The father was a native of Philadelphia, and a son of Joshua L. and Kate (Fowler) Turner, formerly of Milford, Del. The maternal grandfather was David Smith, of Milford, Del. Our subject lived in Philadelphia until twelve years of age, when he removed with his parents to Pittsburgh, Pa. He was educated at the Friends school, Wilmington, Del., where he graduated in 1875. He then entered the auditors office of the Pittsburgh, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad, at Pittsburgh, where he was employed as a clerk three years; clerked in an iron brokers office in Pittsburgh until 1882, and worked with the Pittsburgh Supply Company until 1887. At that time he took charge of the Pittsburgh agency for the Magnesia Suctional Steam Pipe Covering, and after the Pittsburgh office was closed, was sent to Scranton, Pa., in 1889. After remaining there a year, he organized the Pennsylvania Supply Company at Wilkes-Barre, in January, 1890, and in May, 1891, sold his interest in the business an embarked in his present business. He is meeting with great success. January 17, 1882, Mr. Turner married Miss Virginia, daughter of Valentine and Grace (Huron) Short, of Pittsburgh, and of this union have been born two children: Irene and Edward. Mr. Turner is second lieutenant of Company D, Ninth Regiment N. G. P., and is a director, and member of the executive committee of the Wyoming Valley Lace Mills. In politics he is a Republican.

JOSEPH M. TURNER, proprietor of the "Eagle Hotel," Shickshinny, was born in Union township, this county, September 28, 1838, and is a son of George G. and Nancy (Moore) Turner. The paternal grandfather, Manuel Turner, of New England stock, was one of the pioneers of Plymouth and the Huntington Valley, and died in what is now Union township. His wife was Rebecca Gabriel, of Plymouth, and by her he had six children: John, George G., James, Caroline, Catherine and Irene. The maternal grandfather was Joseph Moore, of Connecticut, a pioneer of Union township. Our subject was reared in Union township, where he received a limited education in the common school. After attaining his majority he worked at the masons trade until 1882, and then embarked in the hotel business in which he has since continuedBthree years at Orangeville, Columbia Co., Pa., and seven years at Shickshinny. Mr. Turner was married August 3, 1862, to Rebecca, daughter of Joseph H. and Delilah (Walton) Wilkinson, of Schuylkill county, Pa., and has four children: Charles, Lizzie (Mrs. Henry Dietrick), Mary (Mrs. William Senior) and Clem O. Mr. Turner is a member of the F. & A. Am, and in politics he is a Democrat.

ALANSON B. TYRRELL, contractor, Kingston, was born at Waterbury, New Haven Co., Conn., and is a son of John A. and Esther (Roberts) Tyrrell, both natives of Connecticut and descendants of some of the oldest New England families. Our subject may well be proud of the patriotism of his ancestors, for it is a remarkable fact that his four great-grandfathers were soldiers in the Revolutionary war. Their names were Tyrrell, Tuttle, Roberts and Beebe. Mr. Tyrrell was educated in the public schools of his native town, and between the ages of seventeen and twenty-two he served an apprenticeship at the carpenters trade, in Waterbury, Conn., afterward working at same in that town until 1854, when he determined "to go West and grow up with the country." After nearly a year sojourning in the Far West, he came to Kingston, Pa., where he has since resided. He immediately began taking contracts for building of coal breakers, a business he has since followed, contracting in that line throughout the coal regions of Pennsylvania. He has also built salt breakers in the State of New York, and he is now the leading breaker contractor in Pennsylvania. Mr. Tyrrell was married June 20, 1855, to Miss Susan, daughter of William Marks, of Connecticut, who was a seafaring man and a great traveler. They have four children, viz.: Esther (a student at the Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia), Jennie (now Mrs. C. E. Roat, of Kingston), Fred (who married Nellie Miller, of Peckville, Pa.: he now resides in Wilkes-Barre, a member of the firm of Tyrrell Bros., grocers, Kingston), and Frank (who is the other member of the above firm, and manager of the business). Mrs. Tyrrell is a member of the M. E. Church. Mr. Tyrrell is a member of the F. & A. M.; in politics he is a Republican.

JOSEPH C. TYRRELL, contractor, Forty Fort, was born June 19, 1835, at Watertown, Conn., and is a son of John A., a shoemaker, and Esther T. (Roberts) Tyrrell, also natives of Connecticut, who reared a family of nine children, of whom Joseph C. is the eighth. Our subject was educated in the public schools, and at the age of nine years began work in the factories and on the farms of Connecticut, continuing until 1852, when he commenced learning the carpenters trade at Waterbury, Conn., where he remained three years; then came to Forty Fort, and worked at this trade until 1864. He then took up breaker building by contract, at which he is still engaged. In 1861 he built himself a home, on December 22, 1870, purchased of his father-in-law the land on which it stood, and in 1883 rebuilt his home, which is now a model of elegance. Mr. Tyrrell was married December 26, 1857, to Matilda, daughter of William and Rachel (Culver) Culver (deceased), natives of Pennsylvania, and of German descent. By this union there were seven children, three now living: Alanson W., who married Ruth Parish, and is a carpenter, with residence at Forty Fort; Charles D., who married Lizzie Sanders, and is a foreman for his father, with residence at Forty Fort; and Lizzie, at home. Mr. Tyrrell was married a second time, February 6, 1890, to Martha Detrick Poe, a native of Pennsylvania, of German origin. Mr. and Mrs. Tyrrell are members of the Bennett Presbyterian Church of Luzerne. Socially he is a Freemason, politically he is a Democrat.

Back to Bios Index

Back to Luzerne County Genweb

These Bios were typed by the Wonderful people on PA-LUZERNE Listserver.

1997-2010 by Mary Ann Lubinsky for the PAGenWeb Project, and by Individual Contributors

 Mary Ann Lubinsky
County Coordinator

Back To Luzerne
Genweb