SP - SY Surnames

History of Luzerne County, Pa.,

by H.C. Bradsby, 1893

SOLOMON SPADE, farmer, P. O. Dorrance, was born in Cherryville, Pa., January 24, 1818. He is a son of Daniel and Mary (Kester) Spade, both of whom were born in the same place. They removed to this county about the year 1830, and settled in Dorrance township. Daniel Spade owned eighty acres of woodland, out of which he produced a well cultivated farm. He was a powerful man, physically, and was not afraid to use his strength in the advancement of agricultural pursuits; he lived to be seventy-eight years of age. His family numbered ten children, four of whom are yet living, Solomon being the eighth in order of birth. Our subject was educated chiefly in Dorrance township, whither he had removed when about twelve years of age, with his father. Since then he has been a resident of Dorrance township. He has always followed farming, in which vocation he prides himself. In 1849 he purchased fifty-eight acres in one lot, out of which he made a model farm; after the lapse of a few years more he bought another lot of fifty-two acres, which he also converted into a farm, and these two are now occupied by his two sons, Milton and Nelson. Besides these he owns a neat house and lot, where he resides. Mr. Spade was a very strong, muscular man in his prime of life, hardworking and honest to a fault. He is a Democrat, and has been honored with several township offices. In 1849 he married Miss Mary, daughter of Philip and Maria Ruth, and seven children were born to them, five of whom are now living: Milton, Nelson, Emma J., Harriet and Maria. Mr. Spade and his wife are both church members--he of the Reformed, she of the Presbyterian.

LEVI SPAIDE, member of the firm of Spaide Brothers, general merchants, Hazleton. This enterprising young businessman was born in this county January 15, 1853, and is a son of Daniel and Lydia (Flickinger) Spaide, natives of Dorrance township. The Spaide family was one of the first to settle in that beautiful spot, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch arriving there when it was a dense forest, where he experienced all the privations and hardships to which the settlers of that period were subjected. Levi Spaide was reared and educated at his birthplace, and in 1873 came to Hazleton, where he was engaged as a clerk by William Deisroth, with whom he remained some five years; he then, in partnership with his brother Simon, established the present business. They have the largest general store in this part of the county, and two branch stores are operated--one at Ashland and the other at Wilkes-Barre. Mr. Levi Spaide was united in marriage September 18, 1879, with Miss Martha Gerlock, of Hazleton, and to this union have been born two children, namely: Rollin L. and Hazle Elizabeth. In political matters Mr. Spaide is independent; the family are members of the Methodist Church.

SIMON SPAIDE, the other member of the firm of Spaide Brothers, was born November 6, 1849, at Butler Valley, was reared on a farm, and educated in the public schools and at Wyoming Seminary, Kingston. In 1870 he came to Hazleton, and was here employed as clerk by different merchants until 1878, when the present mercantile business of Spaide Brothers was established, Simon having charge of the drygoods department. Mr. Simon Spaide has been twice married: first, in May, 1875, to Miss Hannah M. Klinger, and two children were born to this union, namely: Elora Maud and Ira E. Hannah, his first wife, died July 29, 1880, and for his second wife he married, in March, 1883, Miss Maggie McGran. One child, Elda May, has blessed this union. In political matters Simon Spaide is independent.

CHARLES W. SPAYD, physician, surgeon and druggist, No. 159 East Market Street, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Philadelphia, March 3, 1840. He is a son of John E. and Catherine Ann (Bilighaus) Spayd, natives of Saxony (Germany) and Pennsylvania, respectively. The father emigrated to America in 1802, and engaged in the manufacturer of planes in Philadelphia, where he died February 13, 1871, aged seventy-two years. He was a son of John E. Spayd, who came from Germany to Philadelphia, where he married Martha Geiss, and later returned to Germany. Our subject, who is the ninth in a family of ten children, five of whom are now living, was educated in Philadelphia, passing through the public school, and then entered the Pennsylvania Medical College. After attending that institution three years, he joined the U.S. service as assistant surgeon of the United States general hospital at St. Louis. He was afterward transferred and promoted to surgeon on the steamer "Empress," serving there until August 16, 1862, when he was transferred to the Fifty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, as regimental surgeon, in which capacity he served until his discharge, June 30, 1865. He then returned to Philadelphia, and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in the spring of 1866. He immediately came to Wilkes-Barre, and on April 15, following, opened an office at No. 159 East Market Street for the practice of his profession. In the spring of 1885 he established "Spayd's Drug Store," which he operates in connection with his large practice. He makes a specialty of surgery, and today he is one of the best known surgeons in Luzerne County. On March 3, 1868, Dr. Spayd married Barbara J., daughter of Charles and Mary (Cridler) Hay, of Scotch and German origin, respectively. The result of this union was one child, Samuel B., who died at the age of three and one-half years, while on a visit with his mother at Easton, Pa. Mr. and Mrs. Spayd attend the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was a coroner of Luzerne County from 1881 to 1884; is medical examiner for the Travelers, New York Life, and Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Companies. He is a charter member of the Conyngham Post, G. A. R.; politically he is a Democrat.

AMBROSE SPENCER, P. O. Dallas, was born August 27, 1835, in Kingston township, where he was reared and educated. He is a son of Daniel and Susanna (Amy) Spencer, the former born in Connecticut, the latter in Bucks County, Pa. The Spencers settled in Dallas about 1837, where they have since resided. Daniel was an honest, industrious man; he purchased a farm of fifty-three acres, on which he had lived an uneventful life, dying January 27, 1878, at the age of eighty-two years, having been preceded to the grave by his wife, Susanna, July 23, 1856. Our subject, at his father's death, inherited the latter's farm, but in early life, commenced agricultural pursuits in Franklin township, at which vocation he has continued. He married Jane, daughter of Samuel and Betsy (Nulton) Honeywell, by whom he had three children--two sons and one daughter--James E., and Susan E. and Daniel J. (deceased). Mr. Spencer is a general farmer and an honest and industrious man. He has the confidence of his fellow citizens, who have elected him to the office of constable for three years, and to other minor offices. Politically, he is a Democrat. His wife is a consistent member of the M. E. Church. Her father, Samuel G. Honeywell, Sr., was born in Hope, Warren Co., N.J., December 27, 1804. He is a son of Richard and Catherine (Sutton) Honeywell, who came to this county about 1809 with a family of six sons and two daughters, locating in Dallas on 400 acres of land. Richard was an old pioneer in the true sense of the term. The country was entirely new, in which the wolf, the deer, and the bear reigned supreme; but by the help of his six trusty sons and his two virtuous and willing daughters, managed by the loving words of his wife, the forest gave way to the harvest field and the rude log cabin was succeeded by a more pretentious house. Richard was a man of influence, holding the offices of the justice of the peace, constable, and collector at various times; he lived to be sixty years of age. Samuel G., Sr., who is the only surviving member of the family, received part of his education in Hope, N.J., and part in Dallas, this county. He has always confined himself to agricultural pursuits, having begun life in Dallas on a farm of seventy-five acres, where he was looked upon as a practical farmer. In 1827, at the age of twenty-three, he married Miss Betsy, daughter of Jacob and Hannah Nulton, and there were born to them eight children, seven of whom grew to maturity, and five of them are at this writing living. He and his deceased wife lived consistent lives, and were members of the M. E. Church. Politically, he is a Democrat.

WILLIAM SPENCER, farmer, P. O. Town Line, was born in Kingston township, May 29, 1823, and is a son of Daniel and Susan (Amey) Spencer, the former of whom was born in Connecticut, and who removed to this county in its early settlement. He located in Kingston township, on a farm, where he passed the remainder of his lifetime. The grandfather served in the Revolution, in the defense of that liberty which the true patriot loves better than life itself. He lived to be ninety-two years of age. His family consisted of four children. His son, Daniel Spencer, began his business career as a farmer in Kingston, where he lived for a number of years, after which he removed to Dallas, on a farm of fifty acres. He was a hardworking man, and an industrious and practical farmer. During his lifetime he held several township offices. He died in 1880, at the age of eighty-four years, having reared a family of five children, all of whom are living. William, the subject of this sketch, is the second in the family in order of birth. He was reared and educated in Dallas and Carverton, and has always confined himself to agricultural pursuits. In 1864 he was mustered into the U.S. service for the term of one year, in the Fourth New Jersey Light Artillery. He served until the end of the conflict, and proved himself a valiant and courageous soldier. After the close of the war, he removed from Dallas to Union township, where he bought a farm of ninety acres of land, on which he erected buildings and also cleared and beautified the farm, all with his own hands. Mr. Spencer has been twice married. For his first wife, he married Miss Ellen R., daughter of Jamison Meeker, and to their union were born eight children, seven of whom are living. Mrs. Ellen R. Spencer died in 1873, and for his second wife, he married Mrs. Mary, widow of James Richardson, who bore him two children, one of whom is living. Mr. Spencer is a practical farmer and a worthy citizen, who enjoys the full confidence of his fellow men. Politically, he is a Democrat, and has been honored with several township offices, and has held that of school director for nine years.

Simeon S. SPENCER, farmer, P. O. Idetown, was born August 27, 1854, in Dallas township, where he was reared and educated. He is a son of Horace and Hannah (ROGERS) SPENCER, both of whom were born in this county, the former in 1822, the latter in 1832. Horace was a son of Orin, who was one of the first pioneers of the county, coming from New York State, and locating in Kingston township. He was a hard-working, honest, industrious and upright man, and a consistent Christian. He died in the year 1879, having reared twelve children, all of whom came to maturity. His son Horace began business for himself in Kingston township, and in 1857 moved to Dallas township, on a farm of ninety-six acres. Like his father, he was a worthy man and an industrious farmer, and held several offices of trust in his township. He died in 1890. Horace and Hannah Spencer were the parents of five children, four of whom are now living. Simeon S. is the second in the family, and worked with his father till he reached the age of twenty-five, when he married, on September 3, 1879, Miss Lydia, daughter of Jacob and Margaret DAMON. By this union there were born three children, all yet living: Clarence, Raymond and Lloyd. Mrs. Margaret Spencer was born in Centre Moreland, Wyoming county, May 25, 1862. She is a consistent member of the Baptist Church. Her family were early settlers in Wyoming county. Mr. Spencer moved on his present farm of twenty-five acres in 1881. He is an enterprising man, upright and industrious.

Z. SPENCER, farmer, P. O. Ketcham, was born January 28, 1828, reared and educated in Kingston township. He is a son of Orin and Ann (AMY) SPENCER, the former born in Connecticut, the latter in Easton, Northampton Co., Pa. Orin was a son of David, who came to this county about 1775, locating at Forty Fort; he served three years in the Revolutionary army as a valiant soldier, defending his rights as a free-born man. He participated in the defense of the fort at the time of the Wyoming Massacre, and caused several Indians to "bite the dust." He is said to have been the owner of several hundred acres of land in the Wyoming Valley, which he disposed of for a trifle, not knowing its value at that time. He afterward moved to Dallas, and subsequently bought a farm in Kingston township, where he lived for a number of years. He died in Dallas at the age of ninety-five years, having reared a family of five children, all of whom grew to maturity. Orin, the father of our subject, began life in Kingston township on the farm purchased by his father after he moved out of the Valley. This farm consisted of fifty acres of fertile land. Orin was a hard-working, honest and industrious man, whose life, like that of other farmers, was uneventful. In religion he was a consistent member of the M. E. Church. Politically he was a Democrat. He reared a family of twelve children, all of whom came to maturity, and eight of whom are now living. Our subject is the fourth in the family, and has always "followed the plough." On July 4, 1850, he married Miss Sarah C., daughter of Conrad and Mary KINKLE, by which union there have been born ten children, eight of whom are living, as follows: Mary, Frank, Elizabeth, Thaddeus S., Marshall, George, Wealthy and Frederick. Mary is married to DeWitt LORD, a farmer; Elizabeth is married to Lyman LORD, and George is married to Miss Louisa SMITH. Mr. Spencer has lived in Dallas all his life excepting one year he spent in Wyoming county. He moved on his present place, a farm of sixty-five acres, in 1865, and is a general and industrious farmer, owning some very fine stock of a superior grade. He has made extensive improvements, clearing land and building out-houses; he was unfortunate enough to lose two barns by fire. Our subject has been honored with several township offices. Politically he is a Republican.

Rev. Levi L. SPRAGUE, A. M., D. D., was born December 23, 1844, in the town of Beekman, Dutchess Co., N. Y. His paternal and maternal ancestors were New England people for several generations. The father moved his family to New Milford, Pa., when the son was a lad, and where the latter was given the advantage of excellent schools. The family afterward moved on a farm, near Le Raysville, Pa., and young Levi was sent to the academy of that place. This school at that time was one of the best of its kind in the State. When twenty years of age he took a business course at Eastman's Business College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and on returning home was made principal of the Le Raysville Academy, where he remained one year. In the spring of 1866 he entered Wyoming Seminary, where he graduated in 1868, and was immediately elected principal of the College of Business connected with the seminary. By private study Dr. Sprague completed a college course, and received the degree of A. M. from Allegheny College. He read law with Hon. W. W. KETCHAM for nearly two years, but believing his duty to lie in the Christian ministry, he joined the Wyoming Annual conference in 1874. He remained principal of the College of Business until 1882, when he was made president of the Wyoming seminary, the position he now (1892) holds. In 1885 the Wesleyan University conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity. He is a trustee of Wyoming Seminary, of Syracuse University, and of the Wyoming Annual Conference, and was a member of the General Conference of the M. E. Church held in Omaha, in May, 1892. On December 22, 1869, Dr. Sprague married Miss Jennie E. RUSSELL, of Otego, N. Y., and they have two children: Laura J. and E. Russell.

Charles E. ST. JOHN, Wilkes-Barre, was born at Norwich, Conn., September 20, 1820, and is a son of Albert and Clarissa (HOYT) ST. JOHN. His paternal grandfather, Jesse St. John (whose wife was a Miss WEED) was a soldier of the Revolution, and one of a party of seven men to capture Fort Montgomery, on the Hudson from the British during that war. He was a farmer, and died at Wilton, Fairfield Co., Conn. Albert St. John was an edge-tool manufacturer, and was in business at Canterbury, Orange Co., N. Y., during the panic of 1832. Having failed, he returned to Connecticut, and worked as a journeyman at Norwich for some years; afterward located at Fleming, N. Y., and engaged in farming, and about 1857 he removed to Janesville, Wis., where he died in 1889, at the age of ninety-seven. Our subject was reared in Connecticut and New York, is an edge-tool maker by trade, which he learned in Cohose, N. Y., and followed nine years. In 1837-38 he took part in the Seminole war in Florida, and witnessed the capture of the Seminole chief, "Billy Bowlegs." For many years Mr. St. John has been a salesman on the road. He came to Luzerne county in 1858, and has resided in Wilkes-Barre since 1860. He was twice married, his first wife being Lucy L., a daughter of Jesse and Mary WORD of Dutchess county N. Y., and by her he had six children: Jesse, George A., Charles W., Frank J., William H. and John N. His second wife was Mrs. Sallie (TICO) OWENS, of Columbia county, Pa., by which union he had four children: Lucy (Mrs. Roland EVANS), Hattie, Mary, and Daisy (deceased). Mr. St. John is a member of the M. E. Church, and the F. & A. M. and Council; in politics he is a Republican.

Charles W. ST. JOHN, wholesale liquor dealer, Pittston, was born at Honesdale, Pa., August 6, 1850, and he is the third son of C. E. and Lucy (WOOD) ST. JOHN, who were typical Americans, and resided for a number of years at Honesdale, Pa. The mother died in 1856; the father is still living, and is a traveling salesman. The family consists of six sons, viz.: Jesse, now retired from active business and residing at Mansfield, Ohio; George, a blacksmith, of Wilkes-Barre; Charles W.; Frank, salesman for the Newton Coal Mining company and resident of Philadelphia; William, a blacksmith, of Scranton; John, a coppersmith, of Perth Amboy, N. J. Our subject passed the first six years of his life in Honesdale, and his mother dying at this time, he went to Prompton and lived on a farm for two years. He worked in the coal mines of Plymouth for a short time, and removed from there to Espyville, same State, where he was in the employ of Thomas EDGAR, a planing operator, for two years. He next entered the employ of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, and remained with them about six months, then accepted a position with the Lehigh Valley Railroad and was in the employ of that company sixteen years, being one of the most popular conductors of that road. After leaving the railroad, he purchased an interest in the wholesale liquor business of Benjamin BEVAN, at No. 73 Main street, Pittston, and shortly afterward became manager for the firm, which position he has filled until the present time. On January 12, 1880, Mr. St. John married Miss E. Lillian, daughter of Benjamin BEVAN, a prominent merchant of Pittston, and this union has been blessed with one child, Lucy. The family worship at Trinity Episcopal church, of West Pittston. Mr. St. John is a Master Mason. Politically he is a stanch Republican. An entirely self-made man, he has reached his present success not by hasty flight, but by the rugged road of toil and application, and is one of the representative citizens of this county, occupying a prominent position among the business men of the county.

Edwin S. STACKHOUSE, coal operator and merchant, Shickshinny, was born in that borough February 11, 1866, a son of John M. and Mary C. (LANNING) STACKHOUSE. His paternal grandfather, Joseph Stackhouse, a native of Columbia county, Pa., and a farmer, lumberman and foundryman, was the first of the name to locate in Luzerne county, and lived and died in Shickshinny Valley. He was a son of James Stackhouse, a wood-worker and engraver, who spent most of his life in Columbia county and died there. The latter was a son of Benjamin Stackhouse, and his wife was Mary, daughter of Christopher BOWMAN, both of Bucks county, Pa. Benjamin was a son of Robert Stackhouse, and with his father left Bucks county prior to 1770, and made the first settlement at Berwick, Pa., with a colony of Friends, and died there in 1776. Robert, who died in Berwick in 1788, was born in 1692, and was a son of Thomas and Grace (HEATON) STACKHOUSE..Thomas Stackhouse came to Bucks county in 1682, and represented Bucks county in the Colonial Assembly, Province of Pennsylvania, in 1711, 1713 and 1715. He died in Middletown, Bucks Co., Pa., April 26, 1744. He was a nephew of Thomas Stackhouse, who was a fellow passenger of William PENN, in 1682, on the ship "Welcome," from England to Philadelphia.

John M. Stackhouse, the father of our subject, was born in the Shickshinny Valley in 1839, and died at Shickshinny in 1883. He was a lumberman, and first leased and operated, with others, what is now known as the Salem Coal Field, which he afterward purchased and operated until his death. His wife, Mary C., was a daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth (WINTERS) LANNING, of Shickshinny Valley, formerly of New Jersey, by whom he has six children living: Annie (Mrs. James M. FRITZ), Edwin S., Alice G., Jennie M., Charles P. and Mary M. Our subject was reared at Shickshinny and educated at Lehigh University, where he was graduated in 1886 with the degree of Mining Engineer, and has since been engaged in coal operating and merchandising. He is a member of the M. E. Church; also of the American Institute of Mining Engineers, the P. O. S. of A., and is master of Sylvania Lodge No. 354, F. & A. M; in politics, he is a Republican. Mr. Stackhouse was married May 4, 1892, to Lidie B., daughter of Rev. William H. and Marietta (MULLIN) KEITH, of Gettysburg, Pa.

Benjamin F. STARK, proprietor of livery and transfer stables, Wilkes-Barre, was born July 15, 1845, and is a son of Cornelius and Louisa (WAGNER) STARK, natives of Luzerne county. They were the parents of nine children, Benjamin F. being the fourth in order of birth. Our subject was educated at the Montrose Academy and Lowell's Business College. On October 10, 1868, he was united in marriage with Miss Mary F., daughter of Hon. D. D. and Mary A (RAYNSFORD) WARNER, natives of Connecticut, by which union five children were born as follows: Fred W., Helen W., Jared W., M. Louise and Harold R. Mrs. Stark is a member of the Episcopal Church, Mr. Stark of the Presbyterian Church. He is a member of Lodge No. 61, F. & A. M., and is a Knight Templar, Dion Le Vent Commandery No. 45. In politics he affiliates with the Republican party. He was a member of the Ninth Regiment, N. G. P., from its reorganization until recently, and was captain of Company F, six years, a major three weeks, and lieutenant colonel seven years.

Henry STARK, retired, Plains township, P. O. Hudson, was born October 10, 1831, in Plains township, on the old Stark homestead, about twenty rods from his present residence. He is a son of John and Cornelia (WILCOX) STARK, and a grandson of Henry Stark, one of the pioneers of Luzerne county. In his father's family there were nine children, seven of whom are living, and of whom Henry is the sixth; his brother, John R., is also living on a portion of the old homestead. Our subject received a common-school education, and has been engaged in farming nearly all his life. His father built Henry's present residence, and there died June 22, 1878, at the age of eighty-three years, followed by his widow, May 11, 1884, at the age of eighty-seven years. Henry Stark was married, March 15, 1884, to Miss Letitia, daughter of Nelson C. COOLBAUGH, of Mountain Valley, Pa,. and one child was born to them, Cornelia, who died in infancy. Mr. Stark has a very comfortable home, in which he can pass the declining years of his life. Mrs. Stark is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Stark has always given his political support to the Republican party.

Henry J. STARK, proprietor of a restaurant, Plains township, P. O. Hudson, was born in Germany, May 3, 1858, and is a son of Henry and Elizabeth (APPLE) STARK, and a step-son of Christian KEIL, of Mill Creek. In his father's family there were three children, of whom Henry J. is the youngest. Our subject came to America in 1870, and located at Wilkes-Barre, where he began picking slate; he followed the mines chiefly, seventeen years, being engaged as pumpman six and a half years and as engineer about six years. In 1887 he engaged in his present business, which he has conducted in such a manner that he has built up a large patronage. Mr. Stark was married October 27, 1878, to Maggie S., daughter of Frederick and Catherine (KILIAN) REICHERS, of Miners Mills. They have six children, four of whom are living, viz.: John F., Katie M., Henry C. F. and Fred O. He and his wife are members of the Lutheran Church of Wilkes-Barre; he is Sachem of Lodge No. 283, I. O. R. M., and is also a member of the I. O. O. F. of Wilkes-Barre, the A. O. K. of M. C., No 72, all of which are German Orders; in his political views, he is a steadfast Democrat.

John M. STARK, retired farmer, Wyoming borough, was born in Plains township, this county, February 23, 1819, a son of James and Mary (MICHAEL) STARK, natives of Pennsylvania, and of English and German origin, respectively. James Stark, who was a farmer and contractor, was married three times and reared a family of fourteen children. By his second wife there were two children, of whom John M. is the eldest. Our subject was educated in the common schools, and at twenty-one years of age, began working his father's farm on shares; laboring thus for seven years, when he was employed as superintendent of the North Branch Canal for ten years. He then moved upon his farm in Franklin township, which he had purchased some time before, and farmed for one year; being then employed as superintendent for the Pennsylvania Coal Company eight years, after which he moved back to his farm and remained there six years. He then sold that property, and purchased a large farm at Wyoming, where he has since resided. Mr. Stark was married October 16, 1841, to Miss Sarah, daughter of Morris and Ann (NUN) DAVISON, natives of New Jersey, of English origin. This happy union was blessed with seven children, six of whom are living: George M., a manufacturer at Pittston; Harriet E. (Mrs. M. COOLBAUGH); Joanna (Mrs. Miles STEVENS); Mary L. (Mrs. William SHOEMAKER); Lydia E. (Mrs. Frank MOSIER); Charles B. (died July 27, 1882), and Jennie E. (Mrs. Dr. J. N. WARNER). Mrs. Stark is a member of the Methodist Church. Mr. Stark was school director of West Pittston for some years; was supervisor of Franklin township and also served as a member of the council of West Pittston borough. He operated the first gas works in Pittston, manufacturing gas from rosin, in the year 1861; he is one of the substantial men of his borough, and politically is a Democrat.

GEORGE M. STARK, manufacturer of iron and steel roofing, Pittston, and one of the leading residents of Wyoming, was born in Plains township, September 11, 1842, a son of John M. and Sarah (Davison) Stark; he is the eldest in a family of seven children, six of whom are yet living. Our subject was educated in the common schools and at Wyoming Seminary, and at sixteen years of age began work on the canal with his father, where he remained one summer. During the following winter he attended school, and in the spring of 1859 he engaged with the Pittston Gas Company, in whose employ he remained until August, 1862, when he enlisted in Battery M, Second Pennsylvania Artillery, Capt. D.R. Schooley, with which he served until the close of the war; he then returned to Franklin township and worked on his fathers farm for a year and a half, when he engaged in general mercantile business in Moosic for six years, at the end of which time he moved to Wyoming and operated a general store four years. In November, 1885, he engaged in his present business with the Pittston Iron Roofing Company, of which he is secretary and treasurer. He also owns and operates a farm near Dallas. He was married, October 10, 1867, to Miss Albertine, daughter of Dr. Alford and Catherine (Van Loon) Brace, respectively natives of New York and Pennsylvania, and of English and German origin. Mr. and Mrs. Stark have a large circle of friends; in his political views he is independent, and he devotes his entire time to his business and home.

PETER STAUB, SR., farmer, P.O. Trucksville, was born in Germany February 26, 1830, and is a son of Peter and Mary Staub, both of whom were born in Germany; the former emigrated to this country in 1854; the latter had died in Germany. The son, Peter, had emigrated to this country one year previous to his father, April 30, 1853, and located in Wilkes-Barre, where he was employed by the Baltimore Coal Company for six years. He then removed to Sugar Notch, where he farmed eight years, and in 1867 removed to Kingston township, having, in 1865, purchased a farm of 150 acres of well-improved land, on which he has made many visible improvements. He was married December 27, 1853, to Miss Mary E., daughter of John Kline. To their union have been born two sons, John N. and Peter W. The latter is a farmer, and is married to Miss Lena Heck, who has borne him three children, two of whom are living. The former is a dairyman, milking fourteen cows; he married Miss Mary Heck, sister of Lena, and to them have been born five children, two of whom are living. Mr. Staub is a general and practical farmer, and a thorough-going business man. He is a member of St. Nicholas Catholic Church, as well as organized Catholic Societies, and politically is a Republican.

JOHN STEEL, farmer, P.O. Huntsville, was born in the County of Salop, England, February 20, 1826, a son of John and Mary (Smith) Steel, both also natives of England. John Steel, the father of our subject, was an old English farmer. He had a family of seven sons, five of whom grew to maturity, John, whose name opens this sketch, being the eldest in the family. He was reared and educated in England, and in early life learned the butchers trade. In May, 1848, he came to this country, landing in New York, whence he proceeded to Pottsville, where he remained about eight years. In 1855 he came to this county, making his home in Wilkes-Barre, where he resided four years. Here he engaged in the manufacture of rope, twine and cordage, which he sold by the wholesale in the county, doing his own drumming, at which he succeeded beyond all expectations. In 1866 he moved to Jackson township, where he now resides on a farm of 115 acres. This he has redeemed from Mother Nature, converting the bleak wilderness and causing it to Ablossom as the rose. On August 12, 1855, at the age of twenty-nine, he married in Berks county, Pa., Miss Ann, daughter of Samuel and Ann Errel, by which union there were born thirteen children - nine sons and four daughters - eight of whom are now (1891) living: Mary A., John, Maggie, Alexander, Thomas, Isabella, Kate and Henry. Of these, Mary A. married H. Randall; Alexander married Miss Fannie Ayers; John married Miss Alice Maddock, and Isabella married William Lamareaux. Mr. Steel serves well the country of his adoption. He was made a citizen in 1853, in Berks county, and although he did not enter the army in the Civil war, yet he contributed liberally to the substitute fund. He and his estimable wife are members of the Episcopal Church; politically he is independent.

SIMON STEIN, farmer, P.O. Dorrance, was born in Hazle township, September 2, 1858, a son of Henry and Gertrude (Stein) Stein, both of whom were born in Germany, the former May 16, 1833, the latter May 29, 1844. They emigrated to this country in 1855, and first located at Tamaqua, Pa., where they resided for a short time; thence removed to Hazleton, where for a brief space he worked at his trade, that of shoemaker. He finally went to work in the mines, an occupation he followed for several years. During his residence at Hazleton he was married to Miss Gertrude Stein, and then removed to the neighborhood of Scranton, where he was also engaged in the mines; there he tarried five years, and then removed to Dorrance township, where he purchased fifty acres of land, to which he soon afterward added 110 acres, making in all a farm of 160 acres, of which he cleared about forty-five. These figures show Mr. Stein to be a hard-working, sober, honest and industrious man. He is well thought of in his township, where he has held several offices. His wife died Januaary 11, 1885, aged fifty-one years. They reared a family of five children, three of whom are living: Simon, Conrod and Annie, Simon being the eldest in the family. Our subject was reared and educated at Scranton and Dorrance; he has always followed agricultural pursuits, and is a promising young man of energy and pluck. He has in his own name forty acres adjoining his fathers, and works both. He and his father have always lived together. On June 28, 1890, Mr. Stein married Miss Addie, daughter of Lyman and Susan Engler, to which happy union there was born one child, Henry M. Mrs. Addie Stein was born in Dorrance September 4, 1870. Mr. Stein is a member of the P.O.S. of A., and he and his wife are members of the Lutheran Church.

JOSEPH STEINBERG, hotel proprietor, Kingston borough, P.O. Edwardsdale, was born in Germany, March 17, 1858, and is a son of John and Milanda (Balaska) Steinberg. Our subject was reared and educated in the land of his birth. Upon reaching his majority he became dissatisfied with the conservativeness of the Old World, and started out in search of new fields of enterprise. He came to America in 1880, and located at Drifton, Pa., where he engaged in mining, remaining there about seven years; he removed thence to Shenandoah, Pa., where he followed mining for two years more, and then came to Kingston, and engaged in his present business, in which he has met with crowning success. Mr. Steinberg was married, in 1888, to Miss Martha Warchensca, also a native of Germany. The fruits of this union are four children, viz.: Mary, Joseph, Charles and Leon. Mr. Steinberg and his family are members of the Polish Church; he is a faithful supporter of the principles of the Democratic party.

MATTHEW J. STEPHENS, a popular and prominent merchant tailor of Wilkes-Barre, was born in the County of Durham, England, May 6, 1853, and is a son of William J. and Kate (Callen) Stephens, being of Irish parentage. He was educated in his native country, where he served a partial apprenticeship at the cutters trade, finishing in New York City, where he located in 1870. He came to Wilkes-Barre in 1871, and entered the employ of J. Stern, in whose service he remained fifteen years as cutter. In 1886 he embarked in business for himself, in which he still continues. Mr. Stephens married, January 14, 1890, Letitia M., daughter of Robert C. and Ellen (McGroarty) Rogers, of Cincinnati, Ohio, and has a son, Robert R., and a daughter, Beatrice M. He is a member of the Catholic Church, and in politics is a Democrat.

C.M. STEVENS, general grocer, No. 34 N. Main street, Pittston, was born April 27, 1838, in Orange county, N.Y., and is a son of Isaac and Riannah (Drew) Stevens, who were also natives of Orange county. In 1839 they, with their family of three children, left for what was then the far West, and settled on a farm in Exeter, Luzerne county. Two sons and two daughters were afterward born to them, all of whom are now living. Here the parents spent the remainder of their days, the mother dying September 26, 1878, and the father October 19, 1889, in his eighty-third year. Our subject received his education in the public schools, was afterward a student in the Wyoming Seminary, and taught school for a number of years. In July, 1870, he, with his younger brother M.H., engaged in the mercantile business in Pittston, under the firm name of Stevens Bros. In May, 1883, he purchased his brothers interest, and has since been sole proprietor. In 1872, Mr. Stevens was married to Miss Mary A. Davidson, of Wyoming, and they have one son, Rolland D. Mr. Stevens is a member of Gohonto Lodge I.O.O.F., and in politics is a stanch Democrat.

FRANK STEVENS, carpenter, Plymouth, was born at Honesdale, Pa., March 24, 1855, and is a son of Mark and Sarah (Williams) Stevens, natives of Wayne county, Pa. Frank is the second in a family of four children, who were left fatherless by the cruel hand of the Civil War. He was educated at the Harford Orphan School in Susquehanna county, this State, and after leaving school learned the carpenters trade, working at it a short time in Harford, and afterward proceeding to Callicoon, N.Y., spending two years in the public schools of that place. He then moved to Nanticoke, Pa., where he worked at his trade and about the mines until 1870, in which year he came to Plymouth, and was engaged by the Delaware & Hudson Canal Company, where he has worked at his trade ever since. Mr. Stevens was married, July 21, 1884, to Miss Annie, daughter of Josiah and Rebecca (Wagner) Sterner, natives of Pennsylvania, and to this union have been born three children, as follows: Josiah, Carrie and Nellie. Our subject is a Republican in politics; he belongs to the P.O.S. of A. and Sons of America. The family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church.

MRS. MINERVA W. STEVENS, widow of the late John B. Stevens, was born in Briar Creek township, Columbia Co., Pa., August 12, 1826, a daughter of Joseph and Ellenor (Bowman) Dilce. The Dilces were formerly from Ohio, but removed to Northampton county, thence to Columbia county, and finally to Luzerne county, Pa., locating in Cambra, latter county, in 1841. In October, 1843, Mrs. Stevens was married to John B. Stevens, who was born in Huntington township in 1821, a son of Zebulon H. Stevens, who was born on Pine Creek. Zebulon H. was a son, of Capt. Thomas Stevens, a native of Connecticut, who served as captain in the Revolutionary army. After the close of that war he removed to this county, where he became one of the foremost pioneers of Huntington township. He was a worthy gentleman, enjoying the full confidence of his fellow citizens. He owned 100 acres of land in Huntington township, and there reared a family of eight children. His son, Zebulon H., began life on the old homestead in Huntington township, and was a prosperous farmer as well as an extensive contractor; he was self educated and a man of marked intelligence. He led a life of usefulness and died in 1854, aged sixty-three years. His family consisted of ten children, four of whom are yet living, and three were in the army, viz.: Thomas Q.A., Stratton Z. and John B., Thomas Q.A. having been first lieutenant. Of these, John B. began his first struggle in life near Cambra, where he resided two years, and seven years afterward he spent in Illinois. In 1851 he removed to Ross township, where he purchased a farm of 140 acres of land, 125 of which were cleared during his lifetime. He was a hard-working, honest, and industrious man, enjoying the full confidence of his fellow citizens. At various times he held office in the township, and he was a strong believer in Republican principles. In religious connection he and his family were strict Methodists. His children were eight in number, four of whom are now living. He was a member of Company D, One Hundred and Ninety-Ninth P.V.I., and served his country faithfully during the Civil war. He died July, 1890, from disease contracted in the army. His son, Joseph W., was also in the war of the Rebellion, as a member of Battery M, U.S. Artillery, for over three years; he lived only three weeks after getting home.

Z.H. STEVENS, son of John B., is living on his fathers old place, and is a practical farmer. In 1878 he married Miss Amy Rood, who was born in Ross township in 1859, a daughter of George C. and Elizabeth Rood, and to them were born five children, four of whom are now living: Arthur, Nellie, Stratton and Eva.

GILBERT B. STEWART, master mechanic, Empire Shops, Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Chicago, Ill., September 20, 1844, a son of William L. and Eliza (Barnes) Stewart, the former a native of Philadelphia, Pa., a machinist by trade, the latter a native of Hollisterville, Luzerne Co., Pa. William L. Stewart has resided in Wilkes-Barre since 1864, and is now master mechanic in the Olive Powder Works at Laurel Run. His children were three in number, viz.: Gilbert B., Sarah (Mrs, Charles E. Ayars) and Ruth (Mrs. Alfred F. Smith). Our subject was reared and educated in Wilkes-Barre, and in June, 1862, enlisted as drummer in Company G, One Hundred and Forty-First P.V., later was promoted to drum-major of the regiment, and after serving three years was honorably discharged. Returning to Wilkes-Barre, he finished his trade of machinist, and with the exception of the five years he was locomotive engineer on the L. & S. division of the Central Railroad of New Jersey, and four years engine dispatcher for the L. & S. R.R. Co., he has since followed his trade; was assistant master mechanic in the D. & H.C.R.R. shops at Carbondale, four years, and since 1888 has been master mechanic at the Empire Shops, Wilkes-Barre. On November 3, 1867, Mr. Stewart married Drusilla, daughter of Ziba Kremer, of Newport, this county, and they have five children: Edith, Annie, Alice, William and Bertha. Our subject is a member of the Grant Street Presbyterian Church, Wilkes-Barre, of the F. & A.M. and G.A.R., and in politics is a Republican.

REV. WINFIELD SCOTT STITES, minister of the Gospel, Wyoming, was born at Cape May, N.J., August 9, 1847, a son of John K.F. and Harriet (Marcy) Stites, natives of New Jersey and of English origin. Mr. Stites was a Presbyterian clergyman; he reared a family of three children, of whom Winfield S. was the youngest. Our subject received his primary education in the public schools of Philadelphia; he is a graduate of Princeton College and the Allegheny and Princeton Theological Seminary. In 1873 he came to Wyoming, as pastor of the Presbyterian Church, where he remained four years. In 1877 he was called to the pastorate of the Second Presbyterian Church of Pittsburgh, Pa., where he remained until broken health forced him to resign this charge. Since then he has spent the years in travel and in preaching in several churches. In politics Mr. Stites is a Republican.

CHESTER B. STIVERS, merchant, Ashley, was born in Hanover township May 30, 1839, and is a son of Samuel B. and Mary (Mosher) Stivers, natives, respectively, of Newport township, this county, and Easton, Pa., and of Dutch, German and Irish origin. He is a grandson og John and Phoebe (Barber) Stivers, the latter a member of an Irish family. The Stiverses (formerly Von Stiver) settled in Long Island in 1645, and soon after 1800 a branch came to

Luzerne county, settling in what is now Newport township. In the family of Samuel B. Stivers there were eight children, viz.: Thomas B., Conrad L. (died at the age of seven), Chester B., Malinda (Mrs. Peter Smith), Elizabeth (Mrs. William Field), Hendrick W., Phoebe and Horace. Our subject passed his boyhood on the farm and attended the common school, afterward learning the shoemakers trade. He enlisted at Wilkes-Barre, August 18, 1861, as private in Company L, Twenty-third P.V., and March 1, 1862, was detached to Battery H, First Pennsylvania Artillery, as artificer. He was discharged November 26, 1863, re-enlisting the next day, being dismounted in May, 1864, and assigned to garrison duty at Fort Whipple. He also carried mail, did other detached service during the war, and was discharged at Philadelphia June 27, 1865. He then returned to Ashley, worked two years with an engineering corps, and in 1868 embarked in the grocery business, which he has since followed, and in connection with which he also ran a saloon in the same building, which he had put up in 1868. Mr. Stivers was married, March 15, 1866, to Miss Anna, daughter of Michael and Mary (Monahan) Donnelly, natives of Ireland. The issue of this union was five children, three of whom are living, viz.: William C.; Edward D., a farmer of Wright township, and Bessie J. Mrs. Stivers is a member of the Catholic Church. Mr. Stivers is a member of the F. & A.M. and the I.O.O.F. He is a Republican in his political views, and has held the offices of constable, assessor and councilman in Ashley borough, and in 1890 was appointed census taker. The great-grandfather of our subject, George Stivers, who died in New Jersey at the age of one hundred and twelve years, served seven years in the Revolutionary war, as did also his four sons, including John, whose gun is still in the possession of Mr. Stivers.

William C. Stivers, brakeman on the Central Railroad of New Jersey, was born at Solomons Gap April 11, 1867, and is a son of Chester B. and Anna (Donnelly) Stivers. He was educated in the common schools, and then began picking slate in the breaker, at which he remained two years. After this he worked three years in the shop yard at Ashley, then was brakeman on the Lehigh Valley Railroad eighteen months, and in July, 1888, began in a similar occupation on the Central. He has been on a passenger train since June 21, 1891. Mr. Stivers was married, July 31, 1889, to Miss Anna, daughter of Philip and Ruth (Bullock) Evans, natives of Wales. He is a member of the Jr. O.U.A.M. and B.R.T., and is a Republican in his politcal views.

FREDRICK STOCK, farmer, P.O. Forty Fort, was born July 25, 1837, in Bavaria, Germany, and is a son of Peter and Mary (Weaver) Stock, who reared a family of eleven children, of whom our subject is the sixth. He was educated in the common schools of Germany, came to America December 31, 1856, and engaged in public works for one year and three months; then worked for William Loveland, of Kingston, three years and nine months. He then worked for Payne Pettebone, of Wyoming, three years and nine months; then lived with his brother, Jacob, for two years; then in the Old House, by the Barber Mill, for two years, on the Shoemaker farm in Forty Fort. Then he came to Forty Fort, and in 1871 built his cozy home where he has since lived. On January 29, 1868, Mr. Stock was married to Susan, daughter of William and Martha (Flemming) Hartzell, natives of Pennsylvania, by which happy union they had three children, one of whom is now living: Miss Jennie, who is the pride and joy of the pleasant home, and is a member of the M.E. Church of Forty Fort. Mrs. Stock is also a member of the M.E. Church of Forty Fort, while Mr. Stock is a member of the German Reformed Church. In politics he is a stanch Democrat.

JACOB STOCK, farmer, Forty Fort, was born in Bavaria, Germany, May 22, 1831, and is a son of Peter and Mary (Weaver) Stock, both also natives of Bavaria, and farmers by occupation. Our subject came to America June 1, 1852, and was engaged in chopping wood by the cord, in Wyoming county, for three weeks. He then went to Tunkhannock, same county, and worked three months in a brickyard; also drove team in same town fifteen months. He then moved to Delaware Water Gap, Pa., and worked as foreman on the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, two years, thence in 1856 proceeded to Kingston, and there worked on the railroad, three years. He then came to Forty Fort, and was engaged as farm hand with Anson Church, five years; then for William Sweatland, eighteen months, at the end of which time he returned to Kingston, and worked one year in the car shops. Once more coming to Forty Fort, he worked one year for H.H. Wells on the farm, and then in 1866 purchased a house and moved to his present farm, which he has since cultivated. In his fathers family there were eleven children, eight of whom are now living, Jacob being the third. Our subject was married August 11, 1855, to Elizabeth Biear, daughter of Adam and Elizabeth (Snider) Biear, natives of Germany. This union was blessed with seven children, only one of whom is now living, Adam, head man at the Pettebone Mine, who married Alice Hawk (both he and his wife are members of the Kingston Presbyterian Church; he is a member of Walnut Lodge, I.O.O.F., Luzerne). Jacob Stock is a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Wilkes-Barre; his wife of the Presbyterian Church of Kingston. Politically he is a radical Democrat.

 Thomas Stoneham, mine foreman, Parsons, was born in Pittston October 3, 1859, and is a son of Thomas and Latte (Cook) Stoneham, the former a native of New York and the latter of Connecticut, both being of New England parentage. Our subject was educated in the public schools at Pittston, and began life for himself at the age of twenty-one, working in the mines at Plymouth, Pa. He remained there about ten years, when he came to Parsons, and engaged in mining at the Mineral Spring Colliery; he is now inside foreman at the Conyngham Shaft. Mr. Stoneham was married October 3, 1884, to Miss Anna, daughter of John and Mary (Gardner) Mountford, of Jermyn, Pa. The fruits of this happy union are four children, viz.: Emerson, born March 16, 1886; Burtie, born May 1, 1887; Harrison, born August 23, 1888, and Anna, born September 1, 1890. Our subject is a member of the I.O.R.M., and of the F. & A.M.; in politics he is a Republican.

Daniel W. STOUT, ticket agent, Nanticoke, Pa., was born in Briar Creek township, Columbia Co., Pa., December 9, 1861, and is the youngest in the family of ten children (eight sons and two daughters) born to William and Mary (Shaffer) Stout, natives of Luzerne county. Daniel W. was educated in the public schools and at the Orangeville Academy in his native county. After leaving school he began work in the machine shops at Berwick. Pa., continuing here for three years. He was then employed in the Jackson & Woodin Car Shops until 1885, when he engaged in farming, which he continued for two years. In 1887 Mr. Stout began railroading, following this until 1891, when he was appointed ticket agent at the east end of the Nanticoke bridge, which position he now occupies. Mr. Stout was united in marriage, March 28, 1889, with Florence L., daughter of John and Elizabeth (McGraw) Collins, natives of Luzerne county. In politics Mr. Stout is a Democrat. He is a member of the Knights of Malta, and in religion is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

John G. STOUT, retired farmer, Forty Fort, was born June 3, 1813, at Nazareth, Pa., and is a son of Christian and Sarah (Gross) Stout, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German origin. Our subject, who is the second in a family of three children, two of whom are now living, was educated in the common schools, and at twenty-three years of age began work in the lumber woods, where he remained one year; then did general work two years, after which he came to Forty Fort, and was engaged in general work for five years. In 1844 he purchased his present farm, and rented the Myers farm, which he worked fourteen years. He then moved on his farm, and followed truck farming until he retired some years ago. On May 10, 1836, he married Eunice Lamoreaux, daughter of James and Sarah (Hunter) Lamoreaux, natives of Pennsylvania, and of French descent. Mr. and Mrs. Stout have three children: Robert, Anson, and Dyer. Our subject and wife are members of the Methodist Church, and in his political preferences he is a Republican.

A. J. Strait, famer and lumberman, Hunlock Creek, was born in Franklin township December 30, 1851, where he was reared and educated in the common schools. He is a son of Lewis and Amelia (Alling) Strait, both of whom were born in Morris county, N. J., the former in 1809, the latter in 1813. They removed to this county when they were both young, and located in Franklin township, where they live a life of peace and quietness. Lewis died in 1874, his wife, Amelia, in 1890. They reared a family of seven children, four of whom are living. Our subject is the sixth in the family, and has always confined himself to farming and lumbering and railroad bossing. On April 15, 1874, he married Miss Olive, daughter of James Lamoreaux, to which union have been born eleven children, all of whom are living: Cora S., Louise e., Harvey B., Amelia J., Priscilla M., Hiram J., Christian E., Emily A., Mahlon L., Jessie M., and Fannie A. Mr. Strait owns fifty acres of land in Humlock township, which he purchased in 1872, besides a mill property of twenty acres, known as the "Koons Mill." He is a member I.O.P.S.A. and Sons of Veterans. His father served his country in Company G, One Hundred and Forty-third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, for three years. He is a Republican in politics, and has held various township offices.

Captain Nelson Stranberg, a prominent citizen of Parsons, and inside foreman at Laurel Run Mine, was born in Sweden, March 18, 1854, a son of Nelson and Bertha (Anderson) Stranberg. At the age of fifteen, he enlisted in the Royal Life Guards of Charles XV., at Stockholm, and after serving his Majesty for three years, the term of enlistment, he came to America and engaged in mining at Kingston. In the fall of 1878, when he went to Wilkes-Barre, remaining there one year, and next came to Parsons, where he has since been engaged in mining for the Delaware & Hudson Coal Company. He was promoted to his present position in 1883. At the organization of Company F, Ninth Regiment N.G.P., July 7, 1879, our subject was commissioned first lieutenant; May 11, 1882, was commissioned captain, and is now serving his third successive commission as captain of that company, which amply demonstrates his aptitude to military life. Mr. Stranberg was married December 27, 1882, to Miss Jennie, daughter of John Anderson, of Parsons; and of this union has been born one child, Etta. He is a member of the I.O.O.F. and Encampment, and is one of those strictly independent political thinkers of which the present age is greatly in need.

William J. Strange, a prominent citizen of Plains township, was born in Pittston, October 14, 1854, and is a son of William and Caroline (Sharren) Strange, natives of England. The parents came to America in 1844, and located in Pittston, where the father engaged first in farming and later in teaming around the mines; he was for several years stable-boss and veterinary surgeon, having charge of several barns, until he retired from active life and removed to Plains, in February, 1891. William and Caroline Strange were the parents of seven children, of whom William J. is the fifth. The last named was educated in the common schools and at Wyoming Seminary, where he completed the English and commercial courses. He began life for himself at Pittston, where he was successively engaged in painting, two and a half years; butchering, two and a half years; firing and stable-bossing, two and a half years; as stable-boss for Waterman & Beaver, one year. He then made an extended tour of the West; going by the way of Canada, he traveled through Michigan, Indiana, Missouri, Illinois and Kentucky, then back to Illinois, whence he returned to Pittston, where he resumed painting for a short time, and was afterward employed by W. J. Marvel, of Wilkes-Barre, as clerk in a green market, remaining as such about five months. He then entered the employ of the Lehigh Valley Railroad Company, continuing eight years, during which time, while acting as brakeman, he received an injury whereby he lost his right arm; he then resumed butchering at Plains, which business he has followed to some extent since. Mr. Strange was married, March 27, 1886, to Miss Mary , daughter of Peter Neuman, of Plains, and they have three children, viz.: Maria, William and Rena. Our subject is a member of the I.O.O.F., P.O.S. of A., and the Jr. O.U.A.M. He is a Republican in politics, and renders his party much valuable service; he has hold the office of assessor, two consecutive terms, and in February, 1891, was elected tax collector of Plains township.

George Stroh, farmer, at Dorranceton borough, was born September 4, 1853, and is a son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Blanchard) Stroh, natives of Pennsylvania and of English and German origin, respectively. Our subject is the fourth in a family of twelve children, five of whom are now living. At the age of nineteen he engaged with Adam Heiss as farm hand, and remained with him for two years, after which he worked one year on the farm of Jacob Ely, also one year for John Dorrance. He then purchased the stock of the Dorrance farm, rented the land and farmed on same for eleven years, when he rented the Myers farm at Kingston, where he is now engaged in agricultural pursuits. He purchased a lot and built his present cozy home in 1888. In 1873 Mr. Stroh was married to Callie, daughter of David and Emily (De Long) Bryant, natives of Pennsylvania and of Irish and German descent, respectively. This union was blessed with one child, Daisy Maude, born December 19, 1874. She is a pupil at the Dorranceton high school, where she stands at the head of her classes, and has won the love and respect of her tutors and schoolmates alike. Mrs. Stroh is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics Mr. Stroh is a sound Republican, and is a member of the Dorranceton school board.

Henry Stroh, who was in his lifetime for many years sexton of the Forty Fort cemetery, was born in Luzerne, November 25, 1842. He was a son of Henry and Margaret (Kridler) Stroh, natives of Pennsylvania, the father a miller by occupation, and of German origin. They reared a family of eight children, of whom Henry was the fourth. At the age of ten years our subject began work on a farm, and followed same until the age of thirty-one years, when he moved to his late residence and engaged as sexton of the Forty Fort cemetery—the position he held until his death, which occurred January 17, 1892. He was married, July 9, 1863, to Martha A., daughter of Charles and Catherine (De Long) Wolfinger, natives of Monroe county, Pa., and of German descent. Mr. And Mrs. Stroh had three children: William J., a butcher at Forty Fort, married to Helen Keeler; Maggie T., married to Samuel Marsden, a conductor on the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad; and Katie W. Mrs. Stroh is a member of the Methodist Church of Forty Fort. Mr. Stroh enlisted in Company C, Eight Pennsylvania Volunteers, and after his discharge, re-enlisted in Company H, Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry, with which company he participated in the following battles: Richmond, Bowling Green and Perryville, all in Kentucky, and several other minor engagements; he was discharged in January, 1862, on account of disability. Mr. Stroh was a member of the G.A.R., and in his political views he was independent.

William J. Stroh, butcher, Forty Fort borough, was born April 1, 1864, at Forty Fort, and is a son of Henry and Martha A. (Wolfinger) Stroh, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German descent. [See sketch of Henry Stroh.] Our subject, who is the eldest in a family of three children, was educated in the common schools and at the Wyoming Seminary. At the age of nineteen he engaged as clerk in the Wyoming Valley Coal Company’s Company Store (E. A. Spaulding, manager) for three years, after which he opened a meat market in Forty Fort, where he is still in business. Mr. Stroh was married to Helen Keeler. He is a member of the I.O.G.T., and politically he votes the Prohibition ticket.

Albert Stull, lumberman, Moosic, Lackawanna county, was born in Buck township, September 29, 1830, a son of Lewis and Elizabeth (Guinter) Stull, the former born in Philadelphia in 1797, the latter in Germany. The father came to Luzerne county about 1817, locating in Buck township, where he owned 166 acres of land, some of which he cleared, making also other needed improvements. He made his home there till his death, which occurred in 1867, when he was aged sixty-eight years. His family consisted of nine children, eight of whom grew to maturity, and six of them are now living, Albert being the sixth in the family. Our subject was reared and educated in his native township, and confined his labors to farming and lumbering. On June 21, 1857, he married Miss Elizabeth De Haven, who was born in Monroe county in 1830, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth De Haven, and there were ten children born to them, nine of whom are now living: Emma, Henry, Lydia, Elmer, William, Thomas, Alvin, George and Mame. Mr. Stull owns, in partnership with his son-in-law, J. W. Ziegler, 300 acres of valuable land, some of which is improved. Mr. Stull is a practical business man, hard-working, economical and industrious. Politically, he is a Republican.

W. D. Stull, miner, Larksville, was born in Plainsville, June 26, 1856, a son of David and Amanda (Smith) Stull, the former born in Easton, Northampton county, in 1826, the latter, in Stoddartsville, Pennsylvania, in 1836. David was a miller by occupation, but followed other vocations. He removed to this county about 1855, locating in Plainsville, where he purchased some property. In 1858 he sold his estate and removed to Larksville, where he purchased property and where he and his sons now reside. He and his wife are both living at this writing and enjoying good health. Their family consisted of six children, of whom five are living: J. O., Elizabeth, Hattie J., Ellen and W. D. The subject of this sketch, the eldest by birth, was reared and educated in Larksville, and has followed mining all his lifetime. During his mining experience, he met with an accident which caused a permanent lameness in his hips, caused by being crushed between two cars. May 26, 1875, he married Miss Mary H., daughter of William and Mary A Smith, and of this union were born six children, one of whom is living, James E. For his second wife Mr. Stull married Miss Smith, a sister of his former wife, September 27, 1886, and by her had five children, all now living, viz.: Jennie, Howard, Warren, Charles and Hattie. Both his wives were born in Larksville. Mr. Stull is a member of the I.O.O.F., I.O.R.M., and of the Golden Eagle.

Colonel Samuel H. Sturdevant, lumber dealer, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Braintrim township (now in Wyoming county, Pa.), March 29, 1832, and is a son of Laverius D. and Ada (Morley) Sturdevant. The paternal grandfather, Samuel Sturdevant, was a native of Connecticut, as was also the great-grandfather, Rev. Samuel Sturdevant, both of whom were among the pioneers of Black Walnut bottom, in Braintrim township, where they died. The father was born and reared in that township, and was successively a farmer, hotel-keeper and merchant; he died there at the age of eighty-three years. His wife was a daughter of John Morley, a poineer of Tuscarora, Wyoming county, and by her he had eight children: Samuel H., Ebenezer W., Elizabeth M. (Mrs. James M. Robinson), Martha (Mrs. Frank Ames), H. Sinton, Dunning, Ella (Mrs. Jerome Swartwood) and Harriet Morley (Mrs. W. F. Goff). Our subject was reared in Luzerne county, and educated in the common schools and at Wyoming Seminary. In 1851 he began his business career as a merchant in Wilkes-Barre, in which he continued until 1855, when he embarked as in the lumber business, at which he remained until 1861. On August 3, of that year, he was appointed, by President Lincoln, captain of C.S. of U.S. Volunteers; was promoted to lieutenant-colonel, and later ot colonel, and September 15, 1865, was mustered out of the service. He has since been in the lumber business at Wilkes-Barre, since 1869 as a member of the firm of Sturdevant and Goff. Col. Sturdevant was married November 9, 1853, to Leah, daughter of John and Emily (Naylor) Urquhart, of Lambertville, N. J., and has five children living: Harry, Ella, George, Samuel H., Jr., and Robert. Mr. Sturdevant is a member of the first Presbyterian Church of Wilkes-Barre. Politically, he is a Republican, and has held the office of school director, six years, and councilman, three years.

Daniel A. Sullivan, proprietor of the "Eagle Restaurant," Miners Mills, was born in Hackettstown, N. J., December 26, 1862, and is a son of Michael and Honora (McTigne) Sullivan, natives, respectively of Counties Kilkenny and Mayo, Ireland. His father, who was a brewer by trade, came to New Jersey in 1858, and reared a family of nine children, seven of whom are living, viz.: Mary, married to Herman Riechardt, hotel-keeper, Chicago; James, brakeman on the Lehigh Valley Railroad at Delano, Pa.; Catharine and Michael, residing with Mr. And Mrs. Riechardt, in Chicago; Ann, living with Daniel A.; and Patrick, attending school in Cleveland, Ohio, living with his mother. Our subject received a common school education, and at the age of eleven years began working about the mines, which he has followed as the chief occupation of his life; while tending door in the Midvale Shaft, he was driven through a double door by a loose car, and had both arms and one leg broken, hip disjointed, and received a gash in the head which required twenty-four stitches in sewing up; when he was somewhat recovered, his hip was again displaced by a kick, and he was disabled, in all, about eighteen months. He worked in many different places, and in nearly every capacity about the mines. After serving four years as brakeman, fireman and conductor on the Delaware & Hudson Railroad, he again engaged in mining, and at the same time had a grocery and confectionery store in Parsons for one year. He engaged in his present business in 1889. Since then he has contracted and acted as foreman to some extent for the Abbot Coal Company; he passed the examination as mine foreman, July 6, 1891. Mr. Sullivan was married, June 18, 1885, to Mary E., daughter of John and Maria (Welch) Sheridan, natives of Ireland and Archbald, Pa., respectively, and of Irish origin. Mrs. And Mrs. Sullivan had four children, viz.: Mary M. (who died at the age of seventeen days), Anna, John L. and Ellen. Mr. Sullivan and family are members of the Catholic Church; he is a member of the C.M.B.A., A.O.H., B. of V., and formerly belonged to the B. of R.R.T.; in politics he is a Democrat, but votes for principle aside from party lines.

Barnard Sutliff, retired farmer, Huntington township, P.O. Town Line, was born August 28, 1810, on the property he now owns. He is the only son of Darius and Rosanna (Hungerford) Sutliff, who were natives of Waterbury, Conn., of English origin, and came to Huntington about 1795. Our subject was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and has followed agriculture all his life. He was married, September 17, 1835, to Miss Elizabeth Walton, who bore him eight children, six of whom are living, vix.: Darius C., Isabella (Mrs. Harrison Wilkinson), Theodicia (Mrs. Edward Remaly), Josephine (Mrs. William A. Masters); Chester B., born December 27, 1846, married Hattie M. Benscoter November 2, 1879, which union was blessed with four children, viz.: Daisy M., born January 25, 1880; Gussie J., born September 18, 1881, died August 1, 1883; Francis B., born October 14, 1883; and Gertie A., born March 31, 1887 (the father of this family is a member of the P. of H., and politically is a Republican); and Rebecca J. (Mrs. Joseph Wilkinson, of Colorado). Mr. Sutliff is a member of the I. O. O. F.; he has held all the township offices in his day, and in politics is a good Republican.

D. C. Sutliff, farmer, Union township, P.O. Town Line, was born August 26, 1836, in Huntington township, this county, and is a son of Bernard and Elizabeth (Walton) Sutliff. He is the eldest in the family, was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools, and began life for himself at twenty-two years of age, working the homestead on shares for two years. He then moved to Stillwater, Columbia county, and worked a rented farm for five years, when he returned and bought his present property in Union township, where he now resides. He was married, February 22, 1860, to Maria, daughter of Andrew and Sarah Whitesell, of Monroe county, Pa., by whom he has had seven children, five of whom are living: Lizzie (Mrs. John Williams, of Huntington township); Ida (Mrs. D.M. Hobbse, of Kingston, Pa.); William, a teacher in the State Normal School, Bloomsburg; Fred, attending same school; and Stanley, at home. Mrs. Sutliff is a member of the M. E. Church. In politics he is a Republican, and has held the offices of school director and supervisor.

J. B. Sutliff, a prominent farmer of Huntington township, P.O. Huntington Mills, was born in that township November 20, 1839, and is a don of Darius S. and Lydia (Dodson) Sutliff, natives of Pennsylvania, and of English origin. The father was a son of Miles and Phoebe (Culver) Sutliff, who came from Connecticut to the Huntington Valley among the first settlers. Our subject is the third in a family of twelve children, seven of whom are now living. He was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and at the age to twenty-two rented a farm and began life for himself. He farmed on rented lands for about twelve years, and in 1873 purchased his present property of 156 acres, on the Shickshinny and Huntington Mills turnpike, about one-half mile from latter place, and in the spring of 1886, built his fine residence thereon. Our subject married, October 13, 1861, to Miss Eveline Culver, which union was blessed with five children, two of whom are living, vix.: Mary E. (Mrs. E. E. Trumpore) and Ida. The family are members of the M. E. Church. Mr. Sutliff enlisted, December 8, 1864, in Company B, Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers; was in the battle of Petersburg and various minor engagements, and was discharged June 28, 1865. He is a member of the P. of H. and G. A. R.; in politics he is a Republican, and holds the office of school director.

James M. Sutliff, farmer, Huntington township, P.O. Waterton, was born July 8, 1844, a son of Abel and Lydia (Brader) Sutliff, natives of Pennsylvania, and of English and German origin. The father, who was a farmer by occupation, and died June 28, 1867, aged sixty-two years, was a son of Miles and Phoebe (Culver) Sutliff, natives of Connecticut and Pennsylvania, respectively, and a grandson of Abel and Charity (Barber) Sutliff, natives of Connecticut. Our subject is the ninth in a family of fourteen, nine of whom are living. He was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and when twenty-three years of age began life for himself by working the homestead farm on shares, and after a year went to the Lehigh tannery, and worked a year in the lumber woods. He then returned to his native township and worked one year as a laborer, after which he moved to New Columbus and worked a year for D.L. Chapin, as farmer and huckster. He next followed huckstering for three years on the Eli McDaniels farm; returned to the homestead, where he has since resided. He was married, July 3, 1868, to Martha M., daughter of Christian L. Moore, by whom he has five children, viz.: Nora M., born May 12, 1870; William H., born April 3, 1872; Edward E., born January 10, 1875; Maggie M., born September 16, 1878; and Phoebe A., born June 20, 1883. Mrs. Sutliff died February 28, 1890. She was a member of the M. E. Church, and a devoted wife and mother. Mr. Sutliff is a member of the K. of H.; in politics he is a Republican, and has held the office of supervisor.

John W. Sutliff, farmer, Huntington township, P.O. Waterton, was born March 12, 1837, and is a son of Abel and Lydia (Brader) Sutliff, natives of Pennsylvania, and of English and German origin respectively. Abel Sutliff was a farmer by occupation, and died June 28, 1867, aged sixty-two years; he was a son of Miles and Phoebe (Culver) Sutliff, natives of Connecticut and Pennsylvania, respectively. Miles Sutliff was a son of Abel and Charity (Barber) Sutliff, of Connecticut. Our subject, who is the fifth in a family of fourteen children, nine of whom are now living, was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and when twenty-two years of age, bought his present farm. He has devoted his entire life to farming pursuits. Mr. Sutliff was married June 25, 1859, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Henry and Amy (Chapin) Zimmerman, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German and English origin respectively. This union has been blessed with six children, viz.: Alden M., born August 26, 1860, a farmer at Town Line (he married Della Wolf, and they have one daughter, Addie E., born March 24, 1891); Abia C., born April 29, 1863 (she married J. M. Kline, and they have one daughter, Pearl I., born March 15, 1886; Mr. Kline is a music dealer at Benton, Pa.); Geraldine E., born July 18, 1866 (she married E. F. Williams, and they have two children: Ethel M., born June 10, 1889, and Helen C., born August 5, 1891; Mr., Williams is a butcher at Glen Lyon, Pa.); and Myra A., born November 7, 1873 at home. Mr. and Mrs. Sutliff are members of the Baptist Church. Socially, he is a member of the K. of H. and P. of H. Politically, he is a Republican, and has held the office of school director.

Sterling D. Sutliff, farmer, Huntington township, P.O. Waterton, was born September 21, 1842, in that township, son of Abel and Lydia (Brader) Sutliff, natives of Pennsylvania, of English and German origin respectively. The father was a farmer by occupation, and died in 1867, and his wife, Lydia, survived him till 1887. Abel was a son of Miles and Phoebe (Culver) Sutliff, natives of Connecticut. Sterling D. Sutliff, who is the eighth in order of birth in a family of fourteen children, nine of whom are now living, was reared on a farm, and educated in the common schools. On August 18, 1862, he enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Forty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, Capt. Tubbs. He participated in the following battles: Gettysburg, Cold Harbor, Antietam, Weldon Railroad, Spottsylvania, Chancellorsville, and minor engagements. He was disabled at Fort Slocum, and discharged June 12, 1865, at Hart Island, N.Y. He then returned to his native township and purchased his present farm of forty-seven acres, situated one mile from Waterton postoffice. On December 25, 1866, he married Miss Mary A., daughter of John and Amy (Van Horn) Killion. She was born January 13, 1849, the fourth in a family of fourteen children. This union has been blessed with seven children, viz.: Blanche E., born November 19, 1867 (now Mrs. George Moonie, of Berwick); Mattie M., born March 5, 1870; Annie A., born April 24, 1872 (Mrs. Benjamin Wineings, of Union township); Charles W., born October 14, 1875; Cora A., born October 31, 1878,; Gracie V., born November 4, 1881; and Mason B., born October 24, 1883. Mr. and Mrs. Sutliff and their four eldest children are members of the M. E. Church. He is a member of the G. A. R., and politically is a Republican.

Oliver S. Sutliff, merchant, Bloomingdale, was born February 10, 1869, a son of Bloomfield and Martha R. (Seward) Sutliff, the former of whom was born in Huntington township, this county, the latter in Sugar Loaf township, Columbia county, Pa. Bloomfield is the son of Stiles Sutliff, who was one of Huntington’s early settlers. He was a worthy man, highly esteemed by his fellow citizens, and lived to a good old age. His son, Bloomfield, began his active business career in Huntington township as one of its prosperous farmers. During his life, which was brief, he was a successful, practical farmer. He died in 1874, aged thirty-five years. He had only one child, Oliver S., who was reared and educated in Ross township. Our subject worked a farm until 1886, when he began clerking in the "Boston Store" and other places in Wilkes-Barre. In 1892 he embarked in mercantile business on his own account in Bloomingdale, where he keeps a general and well regulated store. On February 20, 1891, he married Miss Susie E. Hontz, who was born in Ross township in 1866, a daughter of Andrew and Mary Hontz. Mr. Sutliff is a worthy young man, possessed of good business abilities --- sure to succeed in his chosen calling. His store is well kept, and his goods are first-class and of good quality. He believes in and practices the cash system. His motto is "Goods cheap for cash, but not cheap goods."

Renaldo Sutliff, farmer, Huntington township, P.O. Waterton, was born on the farm he now owns, June 23, 1849, and is the son of Daniel and Clarissa (Harrison) Sutliff, natives of Pennsylvania and of English origin; the father was a farmer by occupation, and died November 4, 1889, aged seventy-three years. He was a son of Miles and Phoebe (Culver) Sutliff, and a grandson of Abel and Charity (Barber) Sutliff, of Connecticut. Our subject is the third in a family of seven children, six of whom are still living. He was reared on the farm he now owns, was educated in the common schools, and at the age of twenty-three rented and worked the homestead farm on shares, until 1876, when he purchased fifty-three acres of the property, where he has since resided. Mr. Sutliff was married, September 26, 1871, to Ester J., daughter of William and Catherine (Downing) Thomas, which union is blessed with five children, viz.: Bertha V., born October 7, 1872, married June 13, 1892, to Frank Chapin; Eva D., born September 12, 1874; Howard B., born November 30, 1878; Floyd W., born May 11, 1880; and Merea Maud L., born March 28, 1892. The family attends the M.E. Church. Mr. and Mrs. Sutliff are members of the P. of H. Politically he is a sound Republican, and has held the office of school director.

S. H. Sutliff, farmer, P.O. Koonsville, was born in Ross township, August 16, 1838, and is a son of Wells and Abiah (Harrison) Sutliff, both of whom were born in Huntington township. Wells was a son of Miles Sutliff, who was a native of Connecticut, and who removed to this county in its early settlement, locating in Huntington township, where he owned 200 acres of land. He was an industrious and honest man, and passed away at the age of sixty years. He reared a family of eight children, all of whom are now deceased. Well began to farm for himself in Ross township on a farm of 200 acres, which he worked in a practical manner. He lived to be forty-nine years of age. He reared a family of eight children, six of whom grew to maturity, and three of whom are now living. Stephen H., the subject of this memoir, is the fourth in the family, and was reared and educated in Ross township. He removed to Union township in 1890, where he is now about to enter into mercantile business. In connection with his store he conducts a small farm of twenty-one acres. In 1861 he enlisted in the U. S. service for the term of three years, as a member of Comapany D, Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry, in which command he proved worthy to be called a soldier of the United States. He is a member of the G. A. R. On April 17, 1889, he married Miss Aurphy, daughter of Simon and Rydie Hainsley. To this union there has been no issue. Mr. Sutliff is an active and wide-awake business man and a loyal citizen.

S. W. Sutliff, druggist, Nanticoke one of Luzerne country’s most prominent and worth citizens, is a native of Huntington township, this county. He is a son of D. S. and Lydia (Dodson) Sutliff, both of whom are natives of Pennsylvania, and descendants of pioneer families of Luzerne county. Our subject’s father was a son of Darius Sutliff, who also was born and lived in this county, Mr. Sutliff’s mother, was a daughter of John Dodson, of Shickshinny Valley. He was a descendant of the Dodson family, some of whom were among the victims of the Indians during the Revolutionary period. The Sutliffs and Dodsons were both descendants of very prominent English families. Our subject is the eighth of twelve children. He was educated in this county and reared on a farm, and then went to the New Columbus Seminary. Commencing life as a miner at Maquara, he continued there for two years, until the great strike. After teach school for a time, he engaged in clerking in a store at MT. Pleasant, Pa, for the firm of Tigret & Butler, where he remained two years. When business was suspended in the store, the same firm gave him employment as assistant mule-boss in the mines, which business he followed a short time. Shortly after this, he went to Avondale and clerked in the company store of Lee Spy. Mr. Sutliff next went to Philadelphia, entering the employ of his brother, who was a wholesale and retail liquor dealer. While there he also attended the School of Pharmacy, and after two years in that city came to Nanticoke, and accepted a clerkship in the store of D. K. Spy, where he clerked about six months, being then given the entire management. After having filled this position three years he entered the employ of Dr. Lape, as manager of his drug-store, and in June, 1881, he engaged in business for himself, having ever since been one of Nanticoke’s most flourishing druggists. Mr. Sutliff is a first-class apothecary. In the fall of 1886 he was unanimously nominated by the Republican party for the Legislature, but declined. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, American Protestants, I. O. O. F., Sons of St. George, I. O. R. M., P. O. S. of A., American Mechanics, Knights of Honor and Royal Society of Good Fellows. He married, for his first wife, Miss Jane Kostenbauder, of Catawissa, who died leaving one child, Hattie. He was again married, this time to Miss Emma, daughter of G. W. Nicely, of Nanticoke. Politically Mr. Sutliff is a Republican.

Charles B. Sutton, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Exeter township, this county, July 9, 1830, a son of Samuel and Mary D. (Buckingham) Sutton, and is among the descendants of the first settlers of the Wyoming Valley. He was reared on the homestead in Exeter township, and at Kingston, until sixteen years of age; was educated at Wyoming Seminary, and in 1850, began his business life as clerk in a general store in Kingston, where he was employed three years. In 1853 he came to Wilkes-Barre and entered the store of his brother, James, as clerk, in which capacity he served until 1861. On September 2 of that year he enlisted as musician in the Fifty-second Pennsylvania Regiment, and after one year’s service was honorably discharged. After his return home he was again employed in his brother’s store, until 1864, and then embarked in general merchandising for his own account, in which he continued seven years. After that he was engaged in the insurance business three years. On May 27, 1863, Mr. Sutton married Frances A., daughter of Daniel Woodward, of White Haven, and has four children: Charles H., Samuel, John and Nancy B. Mr. Sutton is a member of the G. A. R. In politics he is a Republican, and from 1874 to 1886 he was alderman of the Twelfth Ward, Wilkes-Barre; was mayor (pro tem.) from 1883 to 1886, and mayor from 1886 to 1892. In February, 1892, he was again elected alderman of the Twelfth Ward, for a term of five years, which incumbency he is now filling.

James Sutton, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Exeter township, this county, December 22, 1825, and is a son of Samuel and Mary (Buckingham) Sutton. His paternal grandfather, James Sutton, a native of White Plains, N.Y., and for several years a prominent hardware merchant of New York City, settled in Wilkes-Barre prior to the Revolutionary war, erected a gristmill on Mill creek, and later removed to Exeter township, where he had a farm and mill property at the time of the Wyoming Massacre, in which he took an active part. Soon after he, with others, built a raft, and with their families went down the river to near Harrisburg; after a year of more he returned to the homestead at Exeter, rebuilt the mills that had been burned down during the Indian troubles, and resided there until his death. His wife was Sarah, daughter of Dr. William Hooker Smith, formerly of Westchester county, N.Y., and among the pioneer physicians of Luzerne county. By here he had children as follows, who grew to maturity; Deborah (Mrs. Jacob Bedford), William, Polly (Mrs. Putnam Catlin), Sarah (Mrs. David Sterling), John. Samuel and James. Of these Samuel, father of subject, was a native of Luzerne county, and spent most of his life in Exeter township, where he was engaged in farming, milling and lumbering, and where his death occurred by drowning March 25, 1842. His wife was Mary D., daughter of Stephen and Polly (Dorrance) Buckingham, and granddaughter of Col. George Dorrance, who was killed at the Wyoming Massacre. By her he had six children: Nancy A., James, Stephen B. (now a resident of Minnesota), who served throughout the late Civil war as a member of the First Minnesota Regiment; Charles B. and Samuel, twins, and Benjamin D., deceased. All were reared on the old homestead at Exeter, and all but three are residents of Wilkes-Barre, vix.: James, Charles B. and Samuel. Our subject left the homestead on Exeter when sixteen years of age commencing life as a clerk in a general store, and in 1853 he embarked in general merchandising in Wilkes-Barre, in which he was successfully engaged twenty and one half years, retiring in 1873. His brother, Samuel, who resides with him, was for many years a resident of New York City, where he was engaged in the rubber trade. Both are unmarried.

J. G. Sutton, farmer, P.O. Outlet, was born in Bradford county, February 22, 1815, a son of Isaac and Hannah (Quick) Sutton, the former born in New Haven, Conn., the latter near Skinner’s Eddy, Pa. Isaac Sutton was a ship carpenter by trade, and followed the sea for seven years, passing most of his life, however, in Bradford county. His father, a native of Ireland, came to this country as a British soldier, but, on seeing the brave men struggle for freedom and independence, he left the stronger for the better side and fought with the patriots. Isaac Sutton had three children, two of whom reached maturity, and one of them is now living, John G. Our subject was reared and educated at Towanda, Pa., and always confined himself to agricultural pursuits. At the age of twenty-eight, he removed to this county, settling in Lake township, where he purchased a lot of 300 acres of unreclaimed land, at which time there was only one house between Outlet and Lehman. During the intervening years he has cleared about fifty acres of land. He is a self-made man, who began life a poor boy and has accomplished much for himself, as well as for the development of the township in which he settled. On February 19, 1845, he married Miss Caroline O., daughter of John and Sally Ide, to which union were born nine children, six of whom came to maturity, and five of them are now living: Solindia, Estella, Sharp J., Kate and Hannie, the latter of whom is unmarried and an invalid. Mr. Sutton is much honored for his worth as a man of sterling qualities and strictly moral principles. He is a stanch Republican and has served his town creditably and in the following offices: justice of the peace, five years; school director, six years, and supervisor, two years.

Alexander Swartwood, farmer, P.O. Lockville, Wyoming county, was born in Exeter township, March 22, 1827, and is a son of Alexander and Elizabeth (Sickler) Swartwood, both of whom were born in Wyoming county. The grandfather of the subject of this memoir was a native of New York State, and was one of the early settlers in the county before its division. He was the owner of four or five hundred acres of land, and the proprietor of a first-class hotel in those days. He was a man of influence and intelligence, and in politics was a stanch Whig. His family consisted of eight children, all of whom grew to maturity. His son, Alexander Swartwood, followed the example of his father, being an industrious farmer, and occupied part of his father’s vast estate on which he passed his lifetime. He was a consistent member of the Christian Church till his death, after which he became a member of Christ’s Church triumphant, as his reward for faithfulness here. He departed this life in the year 1867, at the age of eighty-five years, having reared a family of eleven children, nine of whom are now living. Alexander Swartwood, the subject of this sketch, is the seventh in the family; he was reared and educated in his native township, and has always followed agricultural pursuits. Mr. Swartwood continued to reside in his birthplace till April, 1885, when he removed to his present place of residence, a farm of 106 acres near Suttons creek, formerly owned by E. Williamson. He is a general and practical farmer, fully understanding his calling in all its various and intricate branches. In 1852 Mr. Swartwood married Miss Elizabeth Frances, daughter of Benjamin and Ellen Eight, by whom he has had twelve children, as follows: Martin V., Henry, Elizabeth, David, Bertha, Mary Jane, Ida, Horton, William, Clarence, Lawrence and Garfield. Martin, Henry, Bertha and Mary Jane are married and in prosperous circumstances. Politically, Mr. Swartwood is a Republican.

Hon. James A. Sweeny, editor of the Plain Speaker, Hazleton, was born at Allentown, Pa., July 12, 1850, and is the eldest in the family of ten children of Edward and Hannah (Sweeny) Sweeny, natives of Ireland, who removed from Allentown to Summit Hill when our subject was but a child. Early in life the latter began work in the mines picking slate during the summers and attending school in the winter season. In 1863 the family removed to Ebervale, where the lad worked about the mines until fourteen years of age, when his patriotic spirit and strong desire to participate in the great Rebellion, which at this time was at its height, removed the age qualification in his enthusiasm, and he went to Philadelphia and enlisted in the regular army. Before the boy-soldier had been transferred to the fields of active duty; his parents raised objections, and he was compelled to return to his home without even reaching the front where battles are won and lives sacrificed, and his military hopes were blasted, yet he received the appellation of "Colonel" for his youthful escapade which title has since clung to him. After his return home he came to the conclusion that an education was an essential thing even for a breaker-boy, and for seven years thereafter he worked early and late, saving his hard-earned dollars until he should have enough to pay for a course of study. At the age of twenty-one he entered the Bloomsburg State Normal School where he remained several terms, and then returned to the coal regions and followed mining until 1875, in which year he was appointed reporter on the Anthracite Record and Daily News, remaining in that capacity until the following summer. Again he lit his mine lamp, took charge of a coal chamber, and there continued until 1877 when he accompanied a traveling show, as press agent, for two seasons. In 1879 he returned to Hazleton, and was here engaged as reporter on the Sentinel, which was commenced as a weekly paper. In 1880, when the Independent Democrat was started, he was largely interested in that organ, and worked on it for about one year, at the end of which time he went to mining again until 1882, when he was elected on the Democratic ticket to the State Legislature, in which he served in the sessions of 1883, consisting of the regular and an extra session; in 1885 he was re-elected and served his term. Since that time he has been newspaper correspondent during the Legislative sessions at Harrisburg, and editor of the Plain Speaker. "Col. Jim" is one of the best-known men in the county – an illustration of the amazing self confidence and resources of the real American lad who hoes is own row, and expects and asks no favors. His wit and originality charm every one, and his popularity outruns even high birth and the "Almighty Dollar. " In the field of politics, or among the craft of newspaper men, his friends are legion, and instead of buying his way to the most votes, his friends and supporters not only rally at the polls, but are willing to go into their own pockets and pay his election bills. "Col. Jim" as a marked character, but they are all those "marks" that are pleasant to see.

Steward Swingle, merchant, Plymouth. This enterprising gentleman was born July 30, 1844, in Wayne county, Pa., and is the second in the family of twelve children of Harmon and Elizabeth (Hutchins) Swingle, also natives of Pennsylvania. The subject of this sketch was educated in the county of his birth, and after coming of age he took Horace Greeley’s advice, and went West, locating in Iowa, where he learned the carpenter’s trade. He remained in the West six years, returning at the end of that period to his old home in Wayne county. After a short sojour there, he came to Plymouth, and worked at his trade for the Delaware & Hudson Canal Company until 1881, when he again journeyed westward, this time proceeding to Colorado, where he was prospecting and mining. He remained there about a year, and then returned to Plymouth, engaging with his old employer at his chosen trade, and here he continued until 1886. He then established his present business at No. 112 Vine street, Plymouth, which was at first operated on a small scale, but since has been greatly enlarged, and is now among the largest general stores in the city, commanding an immense trade. The subject of this sketch was married, June 25, 1873, to Martha, daughter of John Moyer, and two children have been born to this union, Elizabeth and Fred. In politics Mr. Swingle is a Republican. The family attend the Christian Church.

William Switzer, farmer, Wyoming borough, was born March 8, 1847, in Wyoming county, Pa., and is a son of John and Julia (Sult) Switzer, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German origin. Our subject is the fifth in a family of ten children, nine of whom are living. He was educated in the common schools, and at the age of twenty-one embarked in life for himself as a farm hand, and so worked for two years; he then rented a farm on shares whereon he remained twelve years; then moved to his present farm, owned by Samuel Shoemaker, and pays a cash rent. On June 17, 1873, Mr. Switzer was married to Miss Sarah, daughter of Henry and Madalene (Kemery) Houser, natives of Pennsylvania and of German origin, the former of whom was a farmer; they reared eleven children, of whom Mrs. Switzer is the tenth in order of birth. The union of Mr. And Mrs. Switzer has been blessed with three children: Maggie L. born September 13, 1874; Nellie B., born March 21, 1880; Archie H., born September 3, 1886. Mr. and Mrs. Switzer are members of the Methodist Church; he is a member of the I. O. O. F., Monument Lodge, No. 887, and in politics is a sound Republican.

William Sword, merchant, Parsons, was born at Fellingsberg, Sweden, a son of Andrew and Carolina (Carlson) Sword. He was educated in Sweden, and in 1869 emigrated to America, locating at Wilkes-Barre where he remained about a year, when he came to Parsons, engaging in the mercantile business and carrying a full line of general merchandise. Through his honesty and strict business integrity he has established a trade and reputation unparalleled in his locality. The firm is now known as Sword & Sons. Mr. Sword was married to Miss Christina, daughter of N. Nelson, of Sweden, and of this union have been born six children, vix.: Minnie, who is proprietor and manager of a first-class millinery store at Parsons: Oscar W., associated with his father in the mercantile business. And first lieutenant of Company E, Ninth Regiment, N. G. P.; Alma, also engaged in her father’s store; Alfred; Edward, also engaged in his father’s store; and Anna. Our subject and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Chuch, and all are earnest advocates of the cause of prohibition.

Edwin Synott, iron moulder, Inkerman, was born in Norfolk, England, November 29, 1841, and is a son of John and Susan (Sutcliffe) Synott, native of the same place, who now reside in Binghamton, N. Y. The family came from England in 1845, when our subject was but four years old. He received his education in the common schools, and learned the trade of a moulder in Binghamton, N.Y., moving in this county in the year 1883, where he has since been employed at his trade. On October 1, 1865, Mr. Synott was united in marriage with Miss Jennie, daughter of John T. and Elizabeth J. (Helms) Brewster, native of Binghamton, and of English descent. They have one son, Edwin, born January 13, 1868. Mr. Synott is a member of the I. O. O. F., Sons of St. George, and K. of P., and in politics is a Republican.

Back to Bios Index

Back to Luzerne County Genweb

These Bios were typed by the Wonderful people on PA-LUZERNE Listserver.

© 1997-2011 by Mary Ann Lubinsky for the PAGenWeb Project, and by Individual Contributors

 Mary Ann Lubinsky
County Coordinator

Back To Luzerne
Genweb