SI - SO Surnames

History of Luzerne County, Pa.,

by H.C. Bradsby, 1893

EARL SICKLER, farmer, P. O. Orange, was born in Exeter township, February 6, 1825, a son of James and Eliza (Montanye) Sickler, the former born in New York State, the latter in Luzerne county. James was the son of Zachariah Sickler, who came from Germany to this country when a young man, locating in New York State, where he engaged in farming, and accumulated some property by his persistent effort to succeed. He lived to a good old age. His son James removed to this county when about twenty years of age, locating in Exeter township on a farm of 100 acres of unimproved land, which he cultivated with great care, causing the golden grain to succeed the forest. He died in 1863 at the age of sixty-five years. His family consisted of five sons, four of whom are living. The subject of our sketch, the second by birth, always lived in this county and followed farming as his chosen vocation. September 27, 1849, at the age of twenty-seven, he married Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas and Louisa Carscadden. Of this union were born seven children, six of whom are now living: June, Phoebe, Effie, Enoch, Cora and Sarah. In 1872, he removed on his present farm of ninety acres. Mr. Sickler is a general farmer, one whose life has been uneventful. Politically a Republican, he has been honored with some township offices, such as constable, supervisor, etc., all of which he filled with credit to himself and the satisfaction of his constituents.

GILES SICKLER, farmer, P. O. Lockville, Wyoming county, was born in Exeter township, Wyoming county, February 21, 1852, and is a son of Benjamin and Ellen (Eyte) Sickler, the former of whom was born in New York State. Benjamin removed to this county when he was a very young man, locating in Exeter township, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits on a farm of 200 acres. He was a hard-working, honest and industrious man, and was honored with several township offices which he filled creditably. He died in 1886 at the age of sixty-three years. His family consisted of nine children, eight of whom are living. Giles is the third in the family, and was reared and educated in his native township. He has always followed farming, a business to which he is naturally adapted. Mr. Sickler was married, November 19, 1874, to Miss Almeda, daughter of Ira and Mary Swartwood. Mrs. Almeda Sickler was born in North Moreland township, Wyoming county, August 15, 1852. They removed on their farm of sixty-six acres in 1887, since which time he has made many needed improvements. He is a general farmer, and a man of high standing in the community.

GEORGE F. SIEGEL, farmer, P. O. Slocum, was born in Germany, February 6, 1837, a son of John N. and Peterine Siegel, both of whom were born in Germany, where they died. George F. came to this country in 1853, and located in Wyoming county, Pa., where he spent one year, and then (in 1854) removed to this county. In early life he worked at various occupations, but finally settled down to farming. In 1861 he removed to his present place of residence, a farm of fifty-seven acres of land, all now under cultivation, thus showing Mr. Siegel to be a man of industry and thrift. In 1861 he married Miss Maria S., daughter of George and Susanna Belles, and to this union were born eight children: Wellington, Clarence, Frederick, Matthias, Charles, George, Augustus and Elsie. Mr. Siegel is a practical farmer far beyond the average; he is a man of intelligence, and believes in the golden rule which in his life is exemplified. While not a professed Christian, yet he is a good man, and in religious faith leans toward the Lutheran doctrine. He has held several township offices with much credit. Mrs. Maria S. Siegel is a descendant of Col. John Lutsey, a German by birth, but a British subject and soldier who was sent to this country to fight the Americans during the Revolutionary war. He was taken prisoner and afterward became loyal to the American cause. At the close of the struggle he settled in Newport township, Luzerne Co., Pa., on a large tract of land, some of which is now possessed by his heirs, or descendants. His children were six in number: Josiah, the grandfather of Mrs. Siegel, being one of his sons, who proved himself a mighty pioneer in his day, and an experienced and inveterate hunter. His family consisted of ten children, Susanna, the fifth in order of birth, being the mother of Mrs. Siegel by her husband, George Belles.

MATT. SIEGER, proprietor of the "Cottage Hotel," Freeland, was born in Siegersville, Lehigh Co., Pa., April 6, 1847, a son of Joseph and Emma (Kern) Sieger, also natives of Lehigh county. His ancestors were early settlers in the Lehigh Valley. Mr. Sieger received his education in the public schools of Lehigh county, and worked on his fathers farm until he reached the age of seventeen years, when he commenced the tinners trade, at Siegersville, at which he continued until he was twenty-seven years of age. He then traveled on the road as commercial salesman, fifteen years, after which he settled in Allentown, and took charge of the "Snyder House." Here he remained one year, at the end of which time he came to Freeland as proprietor of the "Cottage Hotel." Mr. Sieger is a genial landlord, and keeps a first-class hotel, much to the satisfaction of is many patrons. In 1872 he was married to Emma Snyder, of Snydersville, Lehigh county, and this union has been blessed with four children, viz.: Jenny, Alice, George and Harry (the last named being deceased). In politics Mr. Sieger is a Democrat.

CHARLES S. SIMPSON, landlord of the A Huntington Valley Hotel, Huntington township, P. O. Harveyville, was born in the Fairmount township July 20, 1862, and is a son of John and Sarah (Smith) Simpson, natives of Pennsylvania and New York, and of French and German origin, respectively. The father was a blacksmith by trade and died while on his way home at the close of the Civil war. Our subject is youngest in a family of thirteen children, five of whom are living. He was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and when fifteen years of age began life for himself at farm work, which he followed for one year. He then worked five years in the car shops at Berwick; then at Nanticoke on a farm, one year, when he removed on his present farm, and in the spring of 1892 opened the "Huntington Valley Hotel," which he has made one of the most popular hotels in the section. Mr. Simpson was married, October 23, 1884, to Miss Ida Trescott, who was born October 25, 1860, a daughter of William H. and Ann D. (Hoyt) Trescott. This union was blessed with two children, viz.: Howard K., born November 2, 1885, and Samuel R., born January 28, 1890. Mrs. Simpson is a member of the M. E. Church. Politically, our subject is a Republican; he is a kind landlord, solicitous for the welfare of his patrons.

CAPT. GEORGE SIMPSON, Nanticoke. This gentleman, himself a soldier, and one of a family of true American soldiers, is a native of Philadelphia, born December 22, 1820, and is a son of William T. and Anna Maria (Horton) Simpson, also natives of Pennsylvania, and of New England origin. At the age of sixteen our subject engaged at carpenter work in Philadelphia, where he completed his trade, and then removed to Mauch Chunk, same State, at which place he worked at his trade and as a general contractor until September 24, 1861, when he enlisted in Company I, Sixty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and, at the organization of the company, October 26, 1861, was commissioned first lieutenant. He participated in the following service: Guard duty at Eastern Shore, Md., from April, 1862, until February, 1863; garrison duty at Harpers Ferry, Va., from February to March, 1863. His company was then assigned to the Third Brigade, Second Division, Eighth Corps, and was immediately thereafter engaged in the four days fight from Berryville to Winchester, under the command of Gen. Milroy; and was present at the following named battles: Upperville, Va., June 10, 1863; Middletown, June 11; Berryville, June 12; Opequan Creek, June 13; Milroys retreat, June 13 and 15; Winchester, June 13 and 15; defense of Winchester and garrison of Star Fort, June 14; and Martinsburg Peak, near Winchester, June 15. Our subject was taken prisoner at Winchester, June 15, and was confined in the following Confederate war prisons: Libby and Danville, Va.; Macon, Ga.; Camp Ocelthorp, Ga.; Charleston, S. C., jail and marine prison, when the city was under fire; Columbia, S. C.; Camp Sorgum, S. C.; Asylum Camp, Charlotte, N. C.; Greenville, N.C.; Raleigh, N. C.; Camp Conscript, N. C.; and Goldsborough, N. C., serving a total of 625 days in Confederate war prisons, and never sick a day during the entire imprisonment. He received his promotion as captain while in Libby prison, but he never did any field service while in that capacity from the fact that during the remainder of the Rebellion, or nearly so, he was in Confederate prisons. Capt. Simpson was mustered out of service March 12, 1865, at Washington, D. C., and then returned to his home in Mauch Chunk, where he engaged in his old business as contractor and general builder about a year. He then removed to Summit Hill, and followed the same business until 1868, in which year he again returned to Mauch Chunk, remaining there until 1877, when he removed to Shickshinny, at which place he sojourned until 1879--all this time following the occupation of contractor and general builder. In 1879 he came to Nanticoke, and entered the employ of the Susquehanna Coal Company as carpenter and builder, where he has since been employed. Capt. Simpson was married September 19, 1844, to Miss Louisa Harris, of Mauch Chunk, and they had eleven children: Emma, married to J. C. Roberts Jr., coal operator, of Wilkes-Barre; William T., chief of police of Scranton, Pa., who served throughout the Rebellion as drummer boy; Charles (deceased); Robert (deceased); Anna M., now Mrs. F. P. Detweller, of Scranton, Pa.; Harry H., breaker foreman of No. 7 Breaker, Susquehanna Coal Co., Nanticoke, Pa.; Mahala H., now wife of William Davenport, a commercial salesman in Scranton; Laura K., married to Willard Good, mine foreman, Sugar Notch; Jennie (deceased); George W., Jr., a carpenter in Nanticoke, Pa.; and John H., now at college. In addition to his own incomparable military record, it may be added that Capt. Wilsons [NOTE: Wilson is written rather than Simpson; this seems to be an error in the original text.] mother was an active member of the Womens Sanitary Commission during the Rebellion, losing her life by contracting typhoid fever while nursing soldiers who had it; that his three brothers and a son served throughout the entire war, and that his grandfather, Jesse Horton, though of Quaker descent, was a soldier in the war of 1812. Our subject is a member of the G. A. R. Post No. 161, and was one of the promoters of its organization. Politically he is a Republican, and has served as a member of the Nanticoke borough council.

WILLIAM D. SIMON, miner in the Waddell Colliery, was born in 1846, in the Parish of Llanwinio, Carmarthenshire, South Wales, son of David and Mary (David) Simon. The father, who was a farmer, reared a family of five children, at Conwill, Carmarthenshire, viz.: John (died at the age of eight years), Samuel, Phebe (Mrs. Rees Rees), Esther (Mrs. Thomas Morgan), and William D., the last named being the only one in America. Our subject first visited here in 1862, traveling for six months along the Atlantic coast, from Boston to Baltimore. He then returned to Wales, remaining three years, spent two and a half years at sea, and then engaged in mining in Glamorganshire, where he remained till 1880, when he again came to America. He worked in the mines, in Hyde Park, fifteen months; Plains, six weeks; Parsons, five years; removed to Miners Mills in 1887, and purchased his present residence. He was in the disasters at Ferndale, Wales, December 8, 1867, at which time 178 were killed, and June 19, 1869, when fifty-three were killed, and both times he escaped uninjured. Mr. Simon was married, January 24, 1873, to Miss Anna, daughter of Titus and Ann (Williams) Williams, and they had one child, David T., a farmer, in Conwill, Wales; he was married, the second time, September 4, 1876, to Mrs. Eliza Williams, daughter of William and Mary (Davis) Thomas, natives of Maenclochog, Wales, and widow of John Williams, by whom she had one child, Lewis, a miner, in Wales. The fruits of this union were four children, viz.: Mary A., William T., John Mirrddyn, and Idris, who died at the age of one year. Mr. Simon and his son, William T., are members of the Foresters; he is a member of the Ivorites, and in 1891 was elected a member of the borough council for three years, by the Republican party.

ABRAHAM SIMS, farmer, P. O. Dorrance, was born in Dorrance, in 1817, a son of Cornelius and Catherine (Smith) Sims, both of whom are supposed to have been born in Newport. The Simses are of English origin, the Smiths of Dutch, and both are old families in the county. The Simses were settled in this county prior to the Revolutionary war, although no mention of them is made in that struggle for independence. They have confined themselves exclusively to agricultural pursuits, and Cornelius Sims was a prosperous man in Dorrance township, then Newport, owning 300 acres of land, and was active in advancing agricultural industry; he lived to a good old age. His family numbered eight children, two of whom are living, Abraham being the eighth. His education was confined to the common schools, and was somewhat limited. His companion died in July, 1885, leaving him in the midst of his family of nine interesting children, to console and cherish his lonely heart in his declining years. Their names are: John, Samuel, George, Josiah, Reuben, Linfred, Annie, Mary A. and Maggie. Mr. Sims has a neat farm of seventy-seven acres under good cultivation, sixty of which are under the plough. Although an aged man Mr. Sims is still active. Politically he is a Democrat.

J. ANSON SINGER, physician, Forty Fort borough, son of Adam and Sarah (Williams) Singer, natives of Pennsylvania, of Welsh and German descent, respectively, the former of whom was a carpenter by occupation, and for twenty-five years notary public, and justice of the peace at Scranton, where he now resides. He raised a family of seven children, of whom the Doctor is the fourth. Our subject was educated in the common schools, the collegiate institute at Stroudsburg, and at Columbia County Academy. In 1883 he graduated in medicine at the University of the City of New York, and commenced practice in July of the same year at Broadheadeville, Monroe county, where he remained until June, 1891, when he came to Forty Fort, and is now engaged in the practice of medicine in that borough. Dr. Singer was married May 20, 1885, to Mamie Levering, daughter of Dr. J. Rogers and Sarah (Keller) Levering, natives of Pennsylvania, of French and German descent, respectively, the father being a physician near Stroudsburg. This happy union was blessed with two children, one now living, Emma A., aged three years (1892). The doctor and his wife are members of the M. E. Church of Forty Fort. He is a member of Barger Lodge No. 325, F. & A. M., Stroudsburg; Easton Chapter No. 173, Royal Arch Masons, and Hugh De Paynes Commandery No. 19, K. T., Easton, Pa. In politics he is a Democrat.

WILLIAM SITES, farmer, Lehman township, was born in Huntington, Pa., January 5, 1826, and reared and educated in Lehman township. He is a son of Cornelius and Sarah (Tex) Sites, the former born in New Jersey, the latter in Connecticut. Cornelius was a wagon-maker by trade, and was the son of Peter Sites, who was a native of Germany. Cornelius moved to this county about 1820, locating in Kingston, where he worked at his trade. He soon moved to Hunstville, thence removing to Huntington township in 1825, and in 1827 moved to Lehman township, where he remained until his death, which occurred June 28, 1865. His family consisted of twelve children, nine of whom grew to maturity, and six of whom are now living. William is the third in the family. In his early life he learned the carpenters trade, at which he has always worked. He also learned the wheelwright trade of his father. Mr. Sites is not only a scientific, but a natural mechanic. His large shop, with every facility for plying his trade, is a credit to his industry. Besides his trade, he also attends to a farm of seventy acres of fertile land, well watered, stocked, and with suitable out-buildings thereon. In the first year of the was, he was impelled by the true spirit of patriotism to defend his home and flag, and entered, at the call for emergency men, Company G, Thirtieth Pennsylvania Militia, from which he was honorably discharged. He re-enlisted, in February, 1864, in Company M, Second Heavy Artillery, for the term of three years, displaying heroic courage in every battle in which he participated. He served until January, 1866, when he was honorably discharged. He now enjoys a pension. Mr. Sites is a member of the G. A. R. He has been twice married. For his first wife he married Miss Effey, daughter of John R. Fox, by whom he had eight children, five of whom are now living. For his second wife he married, September 7, 1891, Miss A. De Long. Politically, he is a Republican.

GEORGE SKIDMORE, fire-boss in the Mill Creek Colliery, Plains, was born in Dudley, Worcestershire, England, July 4, 1858, and is a son of Samuel and Susanna (Lane) Skidmore, the former of whom is now engaged in Company work at the Waddell Colliery, with residence at Miners Mills, while the latter died in 1882, at the age of sixty-four years. Their family consisted of twelve children, five of whom are living, viz.: James, a miner in Illinois; Sophia (Mrs. John Lovett, of Cleveland, Ohio); Ephraim, a miner in the Waddell Mine; George; and William, fire-boss at Miners Mills. James came to America in 1861, followed in 1863 by his father, and in 1865 by the rest of the family; they located first in Tuscarora, Schuylkill Co., Pa., and afterward removed to Luzerne county. Our subject was educated in a private school in England, also in public schools in America, and at the age of seven years began working about the mines, which he has since followed, including six years as a miner and two years as fire-boss. Mr. Skidmore was married, March 23, 1880, to Miss Alice, daughter of John T. Moore, of Parsons, and they have one child, Isabelle May. Our subject is a member of the I. O. O. F., and in his political views is a Republican.

A. S. SLYKER, outside foreman at the Honora Colliery, Laflin, was born near Triangle Pond, this county, August 15, 1848, and is a son of Stephen and Keturah (Stetler) Slyker, natives of Pennsylvania, and of Irish and Dutch origin, respectively. The father, who was one of the best mechanics in the State and an extensive breaker builder in the Wyoming Valley, was born in Hanover township, Luzerne county, and in later life removed to Wilkes-Barre, and passed away March 5, 1887, at the age of seventy years. Dying very suddenly, a post-mortem examination was considered necessary, during which his heart was stolen, but was regained by the strenuous efforts of our subject. He was followed by his widow January 23, 1889, at the age of sixty-seven years. The family consisted of nine children, five of whom are now living, viz.: William, Alice (Mrs. D. J. Beers), George, Alfred S. and Jane (Mrs. Isaac Hayden). Our subject attended the public schools until he was thirteen years of age, after which he was employed as carpenter with his father, four years; as machinist with Carter & Allen, Tamaqua, Pa., four years; foreman of two breakers, at Yorktown, Pa., one year; bridge builder with his brother, William, as foreman on the Southern Minnesota Railroad, eight months; again with his father, one year; in mining, at Shickshinny, Pa., one year; carpenter for the Central Railroad of New Jersey, three and one-half years; then with his father again for a short time; after which he engaged with the Franklin Coal Company as outside foreman, nine years, and was then employed as carpenter for the Hazard Wire Rope Company, sixteen months. He removed to Laflin, September 19, 1889. He is a mechanic of no mean ability, and has made and patented several inventions that may yet yield him a handsome fortune. Mr. Slyker was married, April 3, 1870, to Mary E., daughter of Louis and Susan (Sorbor) Smale, natives of Pennsylvania and of German origin. To their union have been born three children, viz.: Benjamin L., Lotta and Maud; they have also an adopted child, who was found on Lincoln street, Wilkes-Barre, at the age of two weeks, and whom they adopted at the age of six weeks. Our subject and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a Republican in his political views, was the second burgess in Laflin borough, and has been justice of the peace since its organization.

WILSON A. SMAWLEY, contractor and builder, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Northampton County, Pa., September 3, 1852, a son of Henry and Sarah (Lilley) Smawley, and is of English and Pennsylvania-Dutch descent. He was reared in his native county, educated in the common schools, and served an apprenticeship of three years at the carpenters trade. For twelve years he worked as a journeyman in Northampton and Luzerne counties; located in Wilkes-Barre in 1878, and in 1885 embarked in business as a contractor and builder, in which he has succeeded in building up a lucrative trade, having erected some of the principal residences in the city. Mr. Smawley married, in 1876, Frances Greene, of Carbon County, Pa., and they have six children: Ida M., William H., Raymond, Bessie, Charles and Lee. Mr. and Mrs. Smawley are members of the German Reformed Church.

CHARLES M. SMETHERS, moulder, P.O. Beach Haven, was born at Beach Haven, Salem township, this county, May 2, 1863, and is a son of Conrad and Sarah (Minnich) Smethers. His paternal grandparents were William and Catharine (Biebelhammer) Smethers, of Salem township; and his maternal grandparents were Henry and Leah (Shiley) Minnich, of Shickshinny. His father, who was a native of Nescopeck township, from a boy boated on the Pennsylvania Canal, and was captain of a boat at eighteen years of age. He died at Beach Haven June 23, 1892, at the age of sixty-one. His children were Warren W., Charles M. and Lizzie (Mrs. Echart Jones). Our subject was reared in Beach Haven, educated in the public school, and for one and one-half years has been in the employ of the Jackson & Worden Car Company, at Berwick, Pa. He married September 25, 1891, Stella Seely, of Beach Haven. Mr. Smethers is a member of the P.O.S. of A., and is a Democrat.

A. SMITH, teamster of Miner & Co., Plains, was born in Plainsville, November 24, 1852. Our subject began picking slate at an early age, and when fifteen years old left home, went west, and located at Sabetha, Kans., where he was engaged in farming and herdin; he followed this occupation fifteen years, including three years passed on a ranch in Colorado, and then returned to Plains, where he has since been engaged in teaming and farming; he has held his present position since 1887. Mr. Smith was married October 25, 1888, to Miss Ida, daughter of Asa Brader, of Plains, and to their union has been born one child, Asa B. Mr. Smith and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church; he is a member of the P.O.S.of A., and of the O.U.A.M.; he has always given his political support to the principles of the Republican party.

AARON SMITH, farmer, P.O. Sybertsville, was born in Nescopeck township, June 27, 1848, a son of John and Mary (Keen) Smith. His paternal grandfather, Samuel Smith, settled in Nescopeck in 1814, purchased a large tract of land, and while going to Philadelphia to meet his last payment on same, was killed by his horse within a short distance of home. The maternal grandfather of our subject was Frederick Keen, a pioneer of Nescopeck township. The father, Aaron Smith, was born in Nescopeck township, was a farmer and drover, and met his death by being killed by his horse. His children who grew to maturity were Susan (Mrs. J. H. Nyer), Aaron, Martha, George, Arletta (Mrs. Jacob Young), Sabina (Mrs. Philip Young), Ellen (Mrs. William Seely) and John. Our subject was reared in Nescopeck township, and educated in common schools, remaining with his father until his twenty-fourth year. He has been a resident of Sugar Loaf township since 1875, and has occupied his present farm since 1881. On August 15, 1872, he was married to Mary J., daughter of Jacob S. and Eliza (Housenecht) Balliet, of Sugar Loaf township, and has one son living, Reuben H. Mr. Smith is a member of the Reformed Church, of which he was deacon five years; in politics he is a Republican.

ABNER SMITH, a rising, brilliant and popular young attorney at law of Hazleton, was born December 13, 1865, at Montreal, Canada, and is the only child of Joseph and Ann (Ball) Smith, natives of Staffordshire, England. The family removed to Troy, N.Y., when Abner was but one year old. They remained there six years, removing at the end of that period to Philadelphia, where the subject of this sketch received his early education: first at Cheltenham College, where he received a thorough preparatory course, and, later, at Prof. S. A. Smith's academy. After six years' thorough training in these institutions of learning, Mr. Smith went to England, and for five years was a student at Cambridge University. On returning to this country, he passed one year in the University of Pennsylvania; he then began the study of law with Harry Halsey, of Philadelphia, whoafterward, accompanied by Mr. Smith, came to Hazleton and established a practice. Mr. Smith was with Lawyer Halsey for about two and a half years, and then entered the office of C. W. Kline, with whom he has since been associated. He was admitted to the Luzerne county bar in April, 1891. Mr. Smith was united in marriage, January 21, 1891, to Miss Sarah, daughter of Thomas and Mary A. (Green) Hale, of West Pittston, Pa., and one son has blessed this union. In his political views Mr. Smith is a stanch Republican. He is well known not only at Hazleton but at the county seat, where he is exceedingly popular among the members of the bar. In religious faith he is a supporter of the Episcopal Church.

ADAM D. SMITH, locomotive engineer, Ashley, was born in Scott township, Lackawanna Co., Pa., March 2, 1847, and is a son of Valentine and Eliza (Fellers) Smith, natives of Dutchess county, N. Y., and Columbia county, Pa., respectively, and of Dutch origin; the father, who was a blacksmith by trade and later a farmer, had a family of twelve children: Hannah C., who die young; Henry and John (twins); David; Mary J. (Mrs. Isaac Hass); Charles; Valentine, who died on his engine at Rockport, Pa., at the age of forty-two years; Sophia, who died at the age of twenty-one; Adam D.; Catherine (Mrs. Frank Benedict); Alfred who was killed at the age of two years by falling into a tub of lye; and Emma E., who died at the age of thirteen years. Our subject was educated in the public schools of Scott township, and at the age of seventeen began working in a sawmill near Moosic, Pa., for Edward Delph, where he remained two years and then leased a mill and operated it for three years. After this he engaged in blacksmithing with his brother, Valentine, one year. They worked their father's farm a year, and purchased a farm which they worked a year. In June, 1871, he became brakeman on the Central Railroad of New Jersey, was promoted to fireman in March, 1872, and to his present position September 20, 1875. He moved to Ashley in 1886, and built his comfortable house two years later. Mr. Smith was married in 1873 to Miss Jessie A., daughter of Samuel and Julia (Messenger) Crane, natives of Illinois and Pennsylvania, respectively, and of Dutch origin. Of this union were born four children: Josephine died at the age of six weeks; Frank E. and Lena W. are attending school; and Gaius died at the age of two and a half years. Our subject is a member of the F. & A.M., of the B. of L.E. and the K. of H. He is a Democrat, and was once president of the school board in Wright township, this county.

ANTHONY SMITH, farmer, P.O. Sybertsville, was born in Monroe county, Pa., December 8, 1850, a son of David and Anne (Smith) Smith. His paternal grandfather ws Martin Smith, and his maternal grandfather was Manuel Smith--both pioneers of Monroe county, Pa. David Smith, father of our subject, was a native of Monroe county, and in 1862 settled in Sugar Loaf township, this county, where he still resides. He has two children living: Anthony and Mandus. Our subject was reared in Monroe and Luzerne counties, and cleared and improved the farm where he now resides, and on which he located in 1876. He has one of the finest farms in Sugar Loaf township. His wife was a daughter of Peter Zellner, and he has one daughter, Helen E. Mr. Smith is a member of the Reformed Church, and in politics is a Democrat.

BARTON T. SMITH, postmaster and merchant, West Nanticoke, was born in Ross township, Luzerne county, January 4, 1862, and is a son of Levi and Deborah (Edwards) Smith, the former a native of New Jersey, and the latter of Pennsylvanian extraction. The family were early settlers of this county. Barton T. is the second in a family of three children, and was reared and partially educated in Luzerne county, completing his education in Union Academy, Broome county, N. Y., where he took a three years' course. In 1887 our subject purchased the general store at West Nanticoke formerly owned by Solomon Hersch, where he has since enjoyed an extensive and lucrative trade. In November, 1888, Mr. Smith was appointed postmaster of West Nanticoke by William F. Vilas, and has since performed the duties of that office. He is also manager of the Barrall Lumber Yard, at West Nanticoke, and is an energetic, enterprising business man. He attends the Methodist Church, is a member of the F. & A. M., and politically is a loyal adherent of the Democratic party.

BERNARD P. SMITH, farmer and justice of the peace, Fairmount township, P. O. Fairmount Springs, Pa., was born in Delaware county, N. Y., October 26, 1844, and is a son of John H. and Rachel B. (Koons) Smith, natives of Delaware county, N.Y., and Luzerne county, Pa., and of German and English origin, respectively. John H. Smith was born November 15, 1817, a son of William and Aseneth (Park) Smith; came to Fairmount Springs, Pa., in 1846, and built the present Smith home--the only stone house in said township--where he farmed and conducted a hotel, and was also justice of the peace; during his term of office the license was in Rachel B. Smith's name; he died March 2, 1859. Our subject is the eldest in the family of seven children, five of whom are yet living. He was the only son, was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools and Eastman Business College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and when fifteen years old (was sixteen on October 26) enlisted September 18, 1861, in Company A, Fifty-second Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, Capt. G. R. Leonard, where he was known as "Pokey" Smith; a Dutch cook would call out very loud "Pokey Smit come and get your braid," so that all the officers and men knew him. He served with his regiment for eleven months; was in the battles of Williamsburg, Bottom's Bridge and Fair Oaks, where he was wounded by a rifle ball passing through his right ankle joint. He was discharged on account of this wound August 8, 1862, returned home and was obliged to use crutches for five years. In 1866 he opened a hotel and for about ten years conducted the same as a licensed house, and during "Local Option" was once fined by U. S. Revenue Collector Hoyt, his old colonel, afterward Gov. Henry M. Hoyt. He has ever since furnished meals and lodging for the traveling public. He also owns a fine farm of 180 acres. Mr. Smith was married February 2, 1870, to Lucy F., daughter of James M. and Malinda (Lakin) Twaddell, natives of Hancock township, Delaware Co., N. Y., and of Irish and English origin, respectively. She is the eighth in a family of eleven (two of whom are living), and was born December 4, 1843. This union was blessed with four children, viz.: Edwin G., born October 12, 1872; Roy D., born December 31, 1875; Helen R., born August 28, 1880; and Charles T., born October 8, 1886. Mr. Smith is a member of the G. A. R., and has always been quartermaster since the post was organized, about eight years ago; in politics he is a Republican, and has held the

offices of auditor and town clerk, and is justice of the peace at the present time. His great-grandfather on his father's mother's side, known as Bosen Park, came from near the headwaters of the Delaware river, in Hancock township, Delaware Co., N.Y., across the country on foot to the Susquehanna river, and procuring a skiff he floated down the river with the express purpose of warning the inhabitants that the Indians were coming. He called out as he floated past the houses: "flee to the mountains, ye long beaver tails, the Indians are coming;" this was just before the massacre. Reference as to authenticity: Orin Park, Plymouth, Pa., late of Fairmount Springs, Pa.; Mrs. Malinda Twaddell, Upperblack Eddy, Pa., late of East Branch, N.Y.; Edwin Twaddell, Upperblack Eddy, Pa., late of East Branch, N. Y.; Mrs. Rachel B. Smith, Wilkes Barre, Pa., late of Fairmount Springs, Pa.

CHARLES SMITH, farmer and justice of the peace, P. O. Rock Glen, was born in Black Creek township July 14, 1845, a son of Michael and Maria (Rupert) Smith, natives of Lehigh and Schuylkill counties, Pa., respectively. His father first settled in what is now Black Creek township about 1819, where, with the exception of four years spent in Lehigh county, he resided until his death. He was a shoemaker, but in later life engaged in farming. He was a son of Michael Smith, of Lehigh county. He married Maria, a daughter of Charles Rupert, a pioneer of Black Creek township, who cleared and improved the farm now occupied by our subject. The children of Michael and Maria (Rupert) Smith were Catherine (Mrs. Benaiah De Frain), Fiana (Mrs. Joseph Rittenhouse), Elias, Levi, Esther, Mary (Mrs. Elias Lamberson), Celinda (Mrs. Amos Johnson) and Charles. Our subject was reared in the old Rupert homestead where he has always resided. He married Sarah, daughter of Henry and Judeth (Brosins) Croll, of Black Creek township, and has four children living: Carrie, Gilbert, Ruth and Edna. He is a member of the Reformed Church; in politics he is a Democrat and in 1892 was an elected justice of the peace for a term of five years.

CHARLES B. SMITH, bookkeeper, Pittston, was born in Cymbran, Monmonthshire, England, a son of W. B. and Emily (Hall) Smith, both natives of England, who came to the United States, locating in Scranton, Pa., in April, 1868. They removed, in 1869, to Pittston, where the father is a salesman in the employ of Mr. Hitchner. The family consisted of seven children, of which Charles B. is the eldest. Our subject was reared in Pittston and educated in the public schools of that borough. At the age of thirteen he began as a newsboy in Pittston and distributed papers in that city for two years, when he secured a position as bookkeeper with the grocery house of J. L. Morgan & Company, a position that he held for two years. In 1886 he became assistant bookkeeper and correspondent for the Pittston Stove Company, and has continued to give perfect satisfaction to his employers up to the present day. Mr. Smith is a young man of more than ordinary ability, a fact that, coupled with his splendid moral character and industrious habits, is sure to win for him success in whatever line of business he chooses. He is a member of the Broad Street M. E. Church, of the Pittston Y.M.C.A., a member and N.G. of Gohonto Lodge, No. 314, I.O.O.F., and also a member of the Eagle Hose Company. Politically he is a stanch Republican, and, although a young man, has acquired a considerable political influence, being an earnest worker for Republican interests. In 1891 and 1892 he was a delegate to the Republican State Convention from the Fifth Legislative District, was the youngest member ever sent from that District, and is secretary of this District. He is a member of the Republican County Committee, and chairman of the Borough Republican Committee. Also the Pittston correspondent for the Scranton Republican, and his journalistic efforts show decided merits.

CHARLES H. SMITH, engineer at the Wyoming Shaft, Plains, was born in Plainsville, February 3, 1859, and is a son of Daniel and Sarah A. (Prutzman) Smith, natives of Monroe county, Pa., and of German origin. In his father's family there were thirteen children, seven of whom are living, viz.: Adam; William, a mine superintendent, at Gletson, Pa.; Frank, a mine-boss at Osceola, Pa.; Amanda, married to Lawrence Rogers, a farmer at Maltby, Pa.; Charles H., whose name opens this sketch; Ellen, married to Samuel Thompson, a miner of Forty-Fort; and Catherine, married to George Aitkins, a miner at Maltby, Pa. Our subject began picking slate at an early age, and, following the usual routine, did nearly all kinds of work about the mines, being promoted in 1889 to his present occupation, which he has since followed. He built and removed to his present residence in 1890. Mr. Smith was married, April 14, 1880, to Jennie A., daughter of Manuel and Mary J. (Fenstermacher) Smith, of Plainsville, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German origin. Mr. And Mrs. Smith have five children, viz.: Myrtle A., Raymond E., Viola M., Adam D. and Hazel A. Mr. Smith and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church; he is a member of the I.O.O.F., and the P.O.S. of A., and in politics is a Republican.

DALLAS J. SMITH, carpenter, Parsons, was born in Lycoming county, Pa., July 22, 1844. He is a son of John S. and Rachel (Taggat) Smith, both natives of Pennsylvania, the former of New England parentage, and the latter of Irish descent. Our subject was educated in the common schools, and at the age of eighteen began life for himself, working at the carpenter's trade, in Danville, Pa., where he remained about one year, when he enlisted in the Union army, March 20, 1864, in Company G, One Hundred and Eighty-eighth P.V.I. He participated in the following engagements: Drury Bluff, Fair Oaks, Petersburg, Cemetery Hill, Chapin's Farm, Fort Harrison and several minor skirmishes. He was mustered out with his regiment at Philadelphia, in December, 1865, when he returned to Danville and resumed his trade, remaining there until 1871. He then removed to Miners Mills, where he worked at his trade until 1877. He then went to Salina, Kans., where he resided three years, thence removing to Lawrence, same State, and remained seven years, having followed the carpenter work during his residence there and in Salina. He then removed to Ottawa, Kans., where he followed farming two years, when he removed to Parsons, Pa., and returned to his trade. Mr. Smith was married September 11, 1872, to Miss Annie, daughter of Thomas Burch, of Scranton, Pa. They have one child, Grace A., born March 11, 1879. He is a member of the G. A. R., and in politics is a Republican.

DRAPER SMITH, retired, Plymouth, was born November 7, 1815, in Wyoming county, Pa., and is a son of Newton and Deborah (Reeder) Smith, the former a native of New London, Conn., the latter of New Jersey. They were among the earliest settlers of this historic Valley, and the father, who was then a child, numbered among the little band of women and children who were sent to Connecticut for safety during the Wyoming Massacre period, as the depredations of the Indians and Tories at that time were of the most alarming and atrocious nature. Our subject was next to the youngest of the nine children in this pioneer family, and was educated in the pay schools of Wyoming county. After completing his education he clerked in a business house at Tunkhannock, Pa., for a short time, moving from there to Plymouth in 1832. He ws employed by Gaylord & Reynolds for nearly four years, at the end of which period he entered into partnership with Gaylord in the business and continued with him three years. In 1840 our enterprising subject entered into partnership with Mr. Little, of Kingston, where they successfully handled iron for two years. This firm being dissolved, Mr. Smith returned to Plymouth, the scene of his early business adventures, and engaged in coal traffic until 1847, when the mercantile fever again seized him and he embarked on the sea of commerce, this time opening a general store, which he successfully conducted for ten years. At the end of that time Mr. Shupp, one of Plymouth's most worthy and respected citizens, entered into partnership with Mr. Smith and the firm continued business until 1864, when Mr. Smith retired from active commercial life. He is still, however, at the head of many public concerns, and was appointed deputy collector of his district, a position in which he discharged his duties very creditably, but one that he found irksome, and he therefore resigned after a few months' service. He is at this time, and has been for the past twenty years, vice-president of the First National Bank of Plymouth, is president of the Light, Heat & Power Co., also of the Plymouth Water Company. Though Mr. Smith claims to have retired from business, yet the above facts will satisfy the reader that his business burdens are anything but light. He was first married January 7, 1840, to Miss Caroline, daughter of John and Frances (Halberton) Smith, natives of Connecticut. One child was born to this union, Elizabeth L. (Mrs. Hubbard B. Payne, of Kingston, Pa.). In 1846 Mrs. Smith died, and in 1847 Mr. Smith married Miss Louisa, daughter of John Myers, a resident of Marietta, Lancaster county, Pa. She passed away in 1865, and our subject, in 1874, was married in Middleton, Conn., to Mrs. Atkins. Mr. Smith is a stanch Republican, and he is a member of the Christian Church.

ELIHU SMITH, outside foreman at the Baltimore Colliery No. 2, Parsons, was born in Benton, Pa., August 19, 1886, and is a son of Samuel and Eliza (Sisson) Smith, natives of Rhode Island, of English lineage, and early settlers in the Wyoming Valley. The father, who was a carpenter and later a farmer, reared a family of four children, two of whom are living, viz.: Samuel, a farmer at Clark's Summit, Pa., and Elihu, the subject of this sketch. The last named was reared on the farm and educated in the common schools, and at the age of twenty, began working at the carpenter's trade on the Pennsylvania Gravity Railroad, and later was employed about the mines and railroad in and about Pittston. He was then inside and outside foreman at the Everhart Colliery near Pittston, for eighteen years, after which he removed in 1883 to Mill Creek, since when he has been employed as foreman for different companies, and has held his present position two years. Mr. Smith was married, November 25, 1855, to Miss Isabella, daughter of James and Mary (Hall) Nicholson, natives of England, which union has been blessed with ten children, viz.: James M., who died at the age of nineteen years; George R., who died at the age of two years; Mary E., who married Thomas Henshel, of West Pittston, by whom she has three children: James N., John W. and Thomas; Georgiana, married to Henry Frosey, of Mill Creek, by whom she has one child, Walter; Samuel, an engineer at the Delaware Breaker (he is married to Ella Gilmore; they have four children: Charles (died at the age of one year), Arthur, Wilson and Isabella); Elihu, engaged in company work at the Baltimore Colliery No. 2; John W., an engineer at the same mine, and Sarah A., Isabella and Wilson T., attending school, Charles Williams, a bright lad of twelve years, whose mother died when he was seven years old and whose father was killed in the mines two years later, has since found a home with Mr. Smith. Our subject is a member of the F. & A.M., I.O.O.F., and the K. of H.; he is a Democrat in his political views, but votes irrespective of party lines.

E.M. SMITH, hotel proprietor, Plymouth, was born at Old Forge, Lackawanna Co., Pa., March 10, 1889, and is a son of Erastus and Matilda (Howard) Smith, the former a native of East Haddam, Conn., the latter of New York State. They came to Old Forge when the subject of this sketch was three years of age, the county at that time being but sparsely settled. There were seven children in this family, of which Erastus M. is next to the youngest. The father was one of the leading citizens of Old Forge township, and for many years in the early days operated a foundry in which was cast one of the first iron ploughs ever manufactured in this part of the county. Our subject was educated in the public schools of his native county, and at Wyoming Seminary. After completing his course of study he went west, and commenced in the hotel business at Janesville, Wis., where he was proprietor of the first hotel on the European plan of that place. Here he remained on the farm with his father. Owing to ill health he went to Florida, and there engaged in the orange-packing business, operating on eof the largest establishments of the kind in the State. He then returned north and located at Scranton, Pa., where he was engaged in the real estate business six years; then coming from Scranton to Plymouth in 1890, he embarked in the hotel business, and is now proprietor of the "Frantz House," a commodious, first-class hostelry, where the genial proprietor spares no pains in making his patrons comfortable. Mr. Smith has been twice married: first time to Miss Elizabeth Ann, daughter of John W. and Elizabeth Choal, natives of Canada. Five children were born to this union, viz: Frank M., residing at Scranton, Pa., William E., a merchant also in Scranton; Nellie M., who married Frank m. Stewart; Frank, deceased; and Frank T., at home. The mother of this family died December 10, 1888, at Scranton, and Mr. Smith afterward married, December 9, 1890, Miss Mary, daughter of henry and Emeline (Gunning) Jones, natives of England, who came to this country about 1847, locating at Towanda, Pa. Politically Mr. Smith is a Republican, and he attends the Presbyterian Church.

Frank N. SMITH, principal of the West Nanticoke schools, was born in Kent County, Del., August 12, 1804, and is a son of William and Margaret A. (Baggs) Smith, also natives of Delaware. Our subject was educated in the public schools of his birthplace and at the Wyoming Seminary, Kingston, taking a four yearsí course at the latter place and graduating to the class of 1891. He then took charge of the school of West Nanticoke Methodist Episcopal Church. Politically, he votes the Prohibition ticket; he is a member of the O.U. A. M.

Fred L. SMITH, attorney, Hazleton, was born in that town December 5, 1864, a son of Sampson and Elizabeth (Landerburn) Smith, and is of English and German descent. He was reared in his native city, graduated from Dickinson College, in 1886, and studied law with C.W. Kline, of Hazleton. He attended Columbia Law School 1888-89, and in the spring of 1890 was admitted tot he Luzerne county bar. He has since been located in Hazleton, where he is building up a lucrative clientage. Politically, Mr. Smith is a Republican.

George SMITH, blacksmith and wheelwright, Wright township, P.O. Albert, was born in Hazleton, February 20, 1863, a son of George and Anna C. (Creesy) Smith, both of German origin. The father was a farmer, and reared a family of six children. George being the fourth in order of birth. He attended the common schools of Butler township till he was fifteen years old, when he went to work on his fatherís farm, where he remained four years. He then attended school one term, after which he was apprenticed to learn the blacksmithís trade, which he finished, together with that of wheelwright in 1883. He then came to Wright township, where he opened a blacksmith and wheelwright shop, and, one year later purchased a farm and erected thereon a shop of his own, which contains all of the most modern machinery. Mr. Smith was married in October, 1884, to Anna B., daughter of George and Elizabeth (Hoffman) Hildebrand, both of Wright township and of German descent. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have two children, viz: Charles A. and Walter L. Mr. and Mrs. Smith attend the Lutheran Church. In politics Mr. Smith is a Democrat.

George H. SMITH, brick manufacturer, Pittston, was born December 4, 1854, in Pittston, where he was reared, and learned the rudiments of the English language. He is a son of Harry and Caroline (Daniels) Smith, the former born in England, the latter in Wales. Harry Smith emigrated to this county in 1845, locating in Pittston, where he became an active coal operator, owning at one time about 400 acres of coal land. He was a man of keen perception and fine business qualities. His son, George H., is a part owner in and is the business agent for the company. Mr. Smith, the father of George H., was not only a coal operator, but he also entered into other enterprises. He owned and managed a brewery and was the founder of the Peoples Bank of Pittston, being chosen one of the first directors. His life was active and eventful. He died August 2, 1874, at the early age of fifty. Harry and Caroline (Daniels) Smith were the parents of four children, two of whom are living: George H. and Albert P. George H. is the eldest and, in his preparatory discipline, spent several terms at the Kingston school. He next went to Graylock College, Massuchusetts, thence to Europe, where he spent two years, and upon his return completed his studies in Philadelphia. May 11, 1876, he married Miss Minnie, daughter of Robert and Mary Loons, by whom he has had six children, four of whom are living: Harry E., Mabel, A. Lester and George, Jr. After his marriage Mr. Smith returned to Europe with his family, where he spent four years, making in all seven years spent abroad. In 1888 our subject embarked in his first personal enterprise, as a brick manufacturer in Pittston township. He has a 40,000 capacity plant, and employs fifty men. His brick is of superior quality, for which he finds a ready market all over the country. Mr. Smith is an enterprising and bustling businessman; he is a member of the Episcopal Church and a vestryman of that body. Politically he is a staunch Republican.

Hon. John B. SMITH, president of the First National Bank of Plymouth, with residence in Forty Fort, was born May 26, 1819, in Plymouth, where the Smith Opera House now stands (which was built by him in honor of his parents), and is a son of Abijah and Esther (Ransom) Smith, natives of Connecticut and Plymouth respectively. The father came to Plymouth in 1806, and in 1807 helped to open the first coal mine in the United States, at that place. He followed the coal business until his death, which occurred in 1826, when he was aged sixty-five years. He had been twice married, having in all nineteen children, seven by his latter wife, three of whom are living, viz: Louisa (Mrs. Samuel Davenport, of Plymouth); Levi M. (residing in Denver, Colo., and operating two large ranches a short distance from the city) and John B. Our subjectís education was limited to the meager facilities afforded by the Plymouth Academy at the time of his boyhood. He earned his first money, when but twelve years of age, digging potatoes, his payment being every eight bushel, and during the following two summers he worked on a farm for a Mr. Turner, for which he received a shilling per day. When he was sixteen years of age, he engaged with the firm of Smith & Wright, of Newark, NJ (of which his half-brother, Fitch, was the senior member), to learn the saddlerís trade; he stayed just nine days and then came by boat to Easton and from there walked to Plymouth. Next day he began an apprenticeship at cabinet-making, which he followed a year and a half, and then entered the employ of his brother-in-law, Samuel Davenport, in a general mercantile business. In this he remained until he was twenty-one, and then purchased a half interest in the stock, which partnership lasted till the death of Mr. Davenport in 1849. Mr. Smith continued in the business until 1870, admitting his nephew, Abijah Davenport, as partner in 1864. In 1852 he purchased the coal business of Heber & Crouse, of Plymouth, and in July 1864, sold it for fifty-one thousand dollars. He then refused, but secured for his son, Robert N., a position as coal operator with a salary of twelve thousand dollars a year, and organized the bank of which he has since been president. This gentlemanís brilliant success in life, which has been largely due to his own personal efforts, shows very clearly what may be accomplished in this great land of ours by honest and untiring industry, backed by good common sense; he embarked in life working by the the day for very meager wages, but now his consolidated estates would constitute quite an Empire. He owns five large farms in Pennsylvania, and a tract of 3,680 acres in one of the best gold districts of Colorado, which, apart from its fertile soil, has been pronounced by experts as an unusually good gold field. Besides these vast estates, he owns and deals in town property to a great extent in Nanticoke, Plymouth, Forty Fort, and adjoining towns. He has been president of the Kingston & Dallas Turnpike Road Company since its organization. He built his present beautiful residence in Forty Fort borough, and removed therein in 1868; for the past few years a large portion of his time has been given to traveling. Mr. Smith was married, February 8, 1848, to Miss Liva, daughter of Robert Davenport, of Plymouth, and they had born to them three children, two of whom are living, viz: Robert N., teller in the First National Bank at Plymouth, and married Eveline Keeler, daughter of Asa and Elizabeth Keeler, and this union has been blessed with nine children, two of whom are living, viz.: May Virginia, residing with her parents, and Margaret Ransom Eveline (Mrs. Harvey Yeager, of Forty Fort). Our subject is a member of the Christian Church of Plymouth, of the board of trustees of which he is a president; his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a member of the I.O.O.D, Shawneee Lodge No. 225, at Plymouth; of the Farmersí American Congress, which he was appointed by Governor Pattison to attend at Sedalia, Mo., in November, 1891; is also a member of the Farmerís State Board. In his political views, Mr. Smith has always advocated the principles of the Republican party, and represented his District in the Legislature at Harrisburg from 1876 to 1880.

Joseph SMITH, retired, Forty Fort, is a son of Thomas and Mary (Grant) Smith, natives of England, who in 1834 came to America, where the father was engaged as a farmer in Lackawanna county, Pa., and later as butcher in Wilkes-Barre, this county. Our subject, who is third in a family of nine children, seven of whom are now living was born June 23, 1823 in Cambridgeshire, England. He was educated in the common schools of America, and in 1853 started in life for himself as broom-maker, which trade he followed until 1870, when he moved on his present farm known as the "Forty Fort Berry Farm," purchased in 1868. Mr. Smith was married in 1858 to Sarah Pugh, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth (Drecher) Pugh, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German descent. Their union has been blessed with two children: Samuel T., born November 20, 1859, and Elmer T., born May 25, 1866. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in politics he is a Democrat.

Thomas SMITH, county commissioner, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Shillbottle, County Northumberland, England, August 31, 1830, a son of Thomas and Isabel (Smith) Smith. His father was a miner and a native of England, where he lived and died. His paternal grandparents were John and Bessie (Askel) Smith, and his maternal grandfather was John Smithóall natives of England. Our subject was reared in England, where he received a limited education in the common schools. He began work in the mines at nine years of age, and was employed in the mines fifty-one years in England and Pennsylvania. In 1864 he came to America and settled in Luzerne county, Pa., where he has since resided. Twenty-seven years of the time were spent at Milnesville, where hew as engaged in mining, and since 1891 he has resided in Wilkes-Barre. *In 1858 Mr. Smith married Mary Beadling, daughter of Thomas and Isabella (Shields) Beadling, of County Northumberland, England, and by her eight children living, viz.: John, William, Thomas, Luke, Isabella (Mrs. Robert ruthford), Mary A., Robert andJames. Mr. Smith is a prominent member of the Knights of Labor, and for three years was treasurer of the Order at Milnesville; was also for two years vice-president of the W.B.A. Minerís Union. In 1890 he was elected one of the commissioners of Luzerne county for a term of three years, which he is now serving. In politics he is a stanch Republican.

Thomas SMITH, miner, Inkerman, was born in Harrisburg, Pa., March 22, 1827. His parents Jonathan and Sarah (Teal) Smith, natives of Lancashire, England, reared a family of five children, of whom our subject is the youngest. He received his education in the common schools, and when about twenty years of age came to Pittston, where he was employed as an out-door laborer until 1850, when he went to work in the mines. On the breaking out of the Rebellion our subject enlisted in Company C, Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Infantry, and served with distinction during the war, being entitled to the rank of sergeant. On being mustered out of the close of the war he retired to Pittston, and has since been employed as a miner by the Pennsylvania Coal Company. Mr. Smith was united in marriage, July 4, 1856, with Annnie, daughter of Frederick J. and Annie (Foster) Steward, natives of Durham, England. They have no children of their own, but have adopted, many years ago, the son and daughter of Mr. Smithís brother. Our subject is a member of the M. E. Church, the I. O. O. F., U. A. M., and I. O. R. M. He is a Republican in politics.

Thomas G. SMITH, truck farmer, Forty Fort borough, is a son of Thomas and Mary (Grant) Smith, who came to America in 1834, the father following farming in Lackawanna county, Pa., for a time, and, later, the butchering business in Wilkes-Barre. Our subject, who is second in a family of nine children, seven of whom are now living, was educated at the common schools in this country, and commenced life at broom-making, and at the age of twenty-five embarked in truck farming in Kingston township, which he carried on nine years. He then went to Boston Ohio, and was there engaged in same business, one year; thence proceeded to Medina county, same State, and was there eight years, when he moved to Sanford Station, Ill., thence to Bloom, same State, remaining at each place one year. He then returned to Pennsylvania, and spent one winter in Scranton at general work, after which in 1860, he came to Forty Fort and purchased his present property, whereon he has since resided. Mr. Smith was married November 10, 1845, to Rhoda Gunton, daughter of Matthew and Margaret (Barron) GUNTON, natives of England, who came to America in 1831, the former of whom was a stencil worker by occupation. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have had six children, of whom the following is a brief record: Charles B., a bottler in Scranton, married Elizabeth Motzonbacher, and has four children: Bertie, Maud, Flora, and Artie; Mary J. married James Gardner, a bookkeeper in Scranton and has five children: Frank, Lettie, Belle, Artie, and Goldie; Margaret S. married Zeno Whitebeck, a carriage timmer in Scranton, and has five children: Giles, Bessie, Frank, Gracie, and Warren; Florence married Daniel Ruple, a carriage maker of Scranton, from whom she was divorced, and she afterward married Robert Albertson, of Wilkes-Barre (by her first marriage she had one child, Naomi Ethel); Martha A. married William Menich, a dentist of Nanticoke, and has two children, Grant and Austin; Rhoda (deceased) married Harper Pettibone, a farmer of Dorranceton, and had one child, Warren H. Mrs. Thomas G. Smith is a member of the Baptist Church of Abington; in politics Mr. Smith is a Democrat.

THOMAS H. SMITH, Nescopeck township, was born in Butler township, September 20, 1843, a son of William and Elizabeth (WASHBURN) SMITH. His paternal grandfather, Samuel SMITH, a native of New Jersey, settled in Nescopeck township about 1814, making improvements on a large farm, part of which is owned by our subject. While on his way to Philadelphia, to make his last payment on the tract of 428 acres, he was thrown from his horse and killed within a short distance from his home. His wife was Christina ROBINSON, and his children who grew to maturity were: William, Samuel, Phineas, Josiah, Jane (Mrs. George FORTNER), John, George, Sarah and Mary (Mrs. Peter STAHR). The father of our subject was born in New Jersey in 1810, and was reared in Nescopeck township from four years of age. He cleared a part of the old homestead, where he died in 1871. His children were: Uriah, Albert, Samuel, Thomas H., Joseph, A.R., John W. and Elizabeth, by his first wife. His second wife was Susan WRIGHT, and his children by her were: William, Benjamin, Ann (Mrs. LUTZ) and Walter S. Our subject was reared in Nescopeck township from infancy, and has made farming his chief occupation. He enlisted in the Civil war December 23, 1864, in Company G, One Hundred and Ninety-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers; he took part in several skirmishes and the battles at Fort Gregg and Appomattox, and witnessed Lee's surrender. He was honorably discharged from the service June 28, 1865. Mr. Smith was married, February 2, 1868, to Lydia A., daughter of Michael and Sarah (HESS) RABER, of Nescopeck, and by her he has had three children: George W., Albert W. (deceased) and Lloyd E. Mr. Smith is a member of the Senior ORder of United American Mechanics; in politics he is a Democrat, and served as school director of Nescopeck township for twelve years.

U. R. SMITH, farmer, P.O. Harding, was born in this county, July 27, 1851, and is a son of Thomas and Louisa (DRIESBACH) SMITH, the former born in New Jersey, the latter in Monroe county, Pa. Thomas was a sawyer by occupation and an expert lumber manufacturer. He removed to this county about 1840, locating in Exeter township, where he owned a farm, now the property of Jacob KINTZ. At one time he was a hotel-keeper at what is now known as Harding, on the Susquehanna river. In 1864 he entered the Civil war, serving faithfully and courageously to its close, and was honorably discharged. He previously served three years under General Scott in the Mexican war. Mr. Smith was a man of varied experience. He died in May, 1887, at the age of sixty-seven years. His family consisted of five children, four of whom grew to maturity, and three of whom are now living. U.R. is the second of the family; he was reared and educated in Exeter township and has always confined himself to agricultural pursuits. In September, 1875, he married Miss Dora, daughter of A.J. and Emma VANTINGLE, and to this union were born two girls: Jessie and Emma. Mr. Smith removed to his present place of seventy acres which he purchased in 1891, formerly known as the "Oliver DRIESBACH" place. Mr. Smith is an expert gardner, raising all kinds of "truck", supplying the needs of the Pittston market. His hot-house is supplied with all the modern improvements for conducting that business. He is also an extensive dealer in milk, having forty cows of superior breed. Mr. Smith is a striving man of sufficient force of character to make his mark in life; he is gentlemanly in conduct, and amiable in disposition.

WILLIAM E. SMITH, farmer, P.O. Rock Glen, was born in what is now Black Creek township, May 3, 1824, a son of John and Eve (ENGLE) SMITH. His paternal grandfather, Phineas SMITH, a native of New Jersey, was a pioneer of Black Creek township, where he cleared and improved a farm, and there died. His children were James, Samuel, Phineas, Abram, Benjamin, Jesse, Mary (Mrs. John CAWLEY), Patty (Mrs. John MILLER), Kate (Mrs. Daniel SHELLHAMMER), Hannah (Mrs. Philip COOL), Sally (Mrs. Abram COOL) and John. The father of our subject was a native of New Jersey, but spent most of his life in Black Creek township, where he cleared the farm now owned by Peter RINGLABER, and died there. Hie wife was a daughter of John ENGLE, a pioneer of Sugar Loaf township, and by her he had nine children: Phineas, Joseph, John, William E., James, Mary (Mrs. John SINA), Kate (Mrs. Amos MCNEIL), Rebecca (Mrs. Cyrus YOUNG), Jane (Mrs. Frederick HILL). Our subject was reared in Black Creek township, and cleared most of the farm where he now resides. His wife was Catherine, daughter of Abram and Elizabeth (MARTZ) SHELLHAMMER, of Black Creek township, and his children are Charles, Abram, Asa, Ariel, Dennison, Lizzie (Mrs. James HAUZE) and Della. Mr. SMITH is a representative of one of the oldest families in Black Creek. In politics hs is a Democrat, and has held the offices of supervisor, overseer of the poor, auditor and school director.

JOHN SMOULTER, JR., president of the First National Bank of Nanticoke, was born in Wilkes-Barre, December 26, 1853. His parents, John and Elizabeth (HOCHREITER) SMOULTER, came from Germany and settled in Wilkes-Barre in 1847, where the mother died in 1863. His father, at the venerable age of eighty-three, now resides at Nanticoke, and is comparatively hale and active for a man of his age. He reared a family of five children, of whom our subject is the youngest. After receiving a good business education in the schools of Wilkes-Barre, he was employed around the mines for a time, when he engaged as an apprentice at the tinner's trade, which he followed for seven years. In 1886 he came to Nanticoke and engaged in the hardware mercantile business in various forms, such as plumbing and tinning. He devoted his entire attention to the business, in which he was very successful, until 1888, when he received the nomination for county treasurer of Luzerne county by the Democratic party. He was also successful in politics as well as in business, being elected to the office by a large majority. Mr. SMOULTER was also elected and served as a delegate to the National Democratic Convention held in Chicago, in June, 1892, which nominated Grover Cleveland for the Presidency. On January 14, 1889, at the organization of the First National Bank of Nanticoke, of which he was one of the leading promoters, he was elected its vice-president, and one year later became president, which office he now holds. Mr. SMOULTER was married, January 24, 1883, to Miss Ellen SHEA, of Nanticoke, which union has been blessed with four children, viz.: Lizzie (deceased), John (deceased), Gertrude and Lizzie. Mr. and Mrs. SMOULTER are members of the Catholic Church at Nanticoke.

WILLIAM J. SMURLS, carpernter, Parsons, was born in Nanticoke, Pa., August 22, 1843, and is a son of John and Christiana (STUCKEY) SMURLS, the former born on board ship, on the high seas, between Ireland and Scotland. His parents were from Scotland, and he was a native of Pennsylvania and of Holland origin. Our subject was educated in the common schools, also in the Wilkes-Barre high school, and began life for himself at the age of eighteen, working at the carpenter's trade for the firm of GODSHAW & DIVENPECT, constructing breakers at Scranton. He remained there about a year and then came to Parsons in the employ of the same firm, remaining with them here about three years. He then worked in various places for about a year, when he was employed by the Delaware & Hudson Coal Company, and has since been in the employ as a mine foreman. He enlisted October 17, 1864, in Company I, Fifteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry (One Hundred and Sixtieth Pennsylvania Volunteers), and, June 21, 1865, was transferred to Company A; he was assigned to Stanley's Division, cavalry of the Cumberland, was on scout duty near Chattanooga, and removed to Decatur, Ala.; was in a skirmish at Dalton, Ga., and also in the following engagements: Decatur, Pond Springs (Ala.); capture of Hood's pontoon and wagon trains, Mavoo (Ala.); Tuscaloosa road and rout of the H, Alabama Cavalry, Thorn Hill, Mt. Hope, Reel Hill, Paint Rocks, Stoneman's raid, Wilkesboro (on the Yadkin river), destruction of the Tennessee Railroad (Boone, N.C.); Wyhterville (Va.); New London (Va.); Greensboro (N.C.); Jamestown, destruction of the bridge and depot at Deep River; also the capture of the money of the Macam Bank, near forks of the Appalachee, and was mustered out July 18, 1865, at Nashville, Tenn., and reutned home. On January 9, 1866, Mr. SMURLS married Miss Kate, daughter of Peter MURRY, of Wilkes-Barre, Pa., foreman for the Baltimore Coal Company, and they have had children as follows: Anna (deceased), William E., Doris (now Mrs. W.G. GATES, of Lake View), Hazel, Joseph A.M., Abram V., Kate and Winifred. Mr. SMURLS is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and of the G.A.R., and P.O.S. of A., in politics he is the slave of no party.

SAMUEL B. SNELL, farner, P.O. Orange, was born in Exeter, July 17, 1830. He is a son of Samuel and Susanna (VAN LOON) SNELL, the former born October 25, 1782, at Tioga Point (now Athens), Bradford Co., Pa., the latter in Plymouth about 1794. (The VAN LOONs were very early settlers in the Valley). Samuel SNELL was a son of George, who was of Holland origin, and settled in Bradford county, near Athens, where he owned a large tract of land. He lived to be fifty years of age, and reared a family of seven children, all of whom are now dead. Samuel began life at Athens, and was by trade a hatter, owning a shop in partnership with his brother. He removed to this county in 1822, and in 1840 removed to Franklin township, where he purchased fifty acres of land, here passing the remainder of his days. He was a soldier in the war of 1812; Abraham, his brother, was a major in the same regiment. Samuel died in 1869, at the age of eighty-seven. His family consisted of eleven children, eight of whom grew to maturity, five living. Samuel B., is the fifth, and was reared and educated in Franklin township. In early life he learned the carpenter's trade, but is now practically a farmer, owning a farm of 120 acres, well-improved, which he has acquired by economy and hard labor. On January 1, 1860, he was married to Miss Fannie, daughter of Henry and Eliza ANTHONY. There were ten children born to them, all of whom are living: Flora, John, Susan (wife of Charles C. DILCER), S.B., Capitola, Maude, Harry, Fannie, Pansy and Mildred. In 1862 he enlisted in Company I, P.V.I., for nine months. He received a wound at the battle of Gettysburg, the bal, passing through his right cheek and lodging in his throat, where it remained six months, when in a fit of coughing one day he coughed it up. Mr. Snell is a worthy man, a good neighbor and is much respected in the community.

EBENEZER HAZARD SNOWDEN, retired clergyman, Forty Fort borough, was born June 27, 1799, at Princeton, N.J., and is a son of Samuel FINLEY and Susan (BREESE) SNOWDEN, natives of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, and of Scotch and English origin, respectively. Our subject is the third in a family of ten children. He was educated in a select school at New Hartford, N.Y., Hamilton College and Princeton Theological Seminary. He was admitted to practice law in the supreme court of New York, at Utica, in 1821, and was licensed at Newtown, L.I., in 1825, and ordained at New York City in 1826. His first charge was at St. Augustine, Fla., where he remained three years; was then pastor at Brownsville, near Sacket's Harbor, three years. He then came to Kingston, where he was pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, eight years; thence went to Warren, Bradford Co., Pa., as pastor for two years, after which he moved to Plymouth, and established a church, remaining five years, after which he went to Larksville, where he founded a church known as the "Snowden Memorial Church", and was there five years. He then moved to Forty Fort, where he now resides, his home being known as "Snowden Cottage". Our subject was married May 15, 1826, to Elizabeth, daughter of Waters and Mary (ALISON) SMITH, natives of New York, and of English descent. This happy union was blessed with six children, four of whom are now living, viz.: Mary C., wife of John METCALF, a farmer of Huntington township, Luzerne county; Susan B., married to Desba PATTON, of Cleveland, Tenn.; James G., married to Maria SMITH, and residing in Castalia; Matilda B., married to James M. WILLIAMSON, a merchant of Oakland, Cal. The mother of these dying, Mr. Snowden married, for his second wife, Caroline ADAMS, daughter of Ebenezer and Rebecca (SNEDIKER) ADAMS, of Newburgh, N.Y.; she died in January, 1892. Mr. Snowden is a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Wilkes-Barre; in politics he is a Republican.

ADNEY SNYDER, farmer, P.O. Meeker, was born (May 28, 1848), reared and educated in Dallas. He is a son of William and Mary Ann (FLEMMING) SNYDER, the former born near Frenchtown, N.J., the latter in Luzerne county. William is a son of Christopher, also a native of New Jersey, who moved to this county about 1828, locating in Dallas township on a farm of unimproved land, where he lived for a number of years, clearing, improving and building. He finally moved back to New Jersey, where he married his second wife, and then moved back to Dallas township again, where he remained the rest of his life. He died in 1882 at the age of ninety years. He was a hard-working man, honest and upright to a fault; his family consisted of five sons and one daughter. William, his son, began life in Dallas township as a farmer, with very little to work with. Each had an ox, out of which they made a team, with which they plowed, logged, and did all their hauling. His farm consisted of 115 acres of land, which he cleared, and on which he built, until his home is a place to be coveted. He is at present, at the age of seventy-two, a resident of Dallas, and a prosperous man. His wife, Mary Ann, is also living, at the age of seventy. He is a man of influence, and has held several offices in his own township with credit. He reared a family of ten children, none of whom grew to maturity, and six of whom are now living. Adney is the fifth, and in his early life worked at the carpenter's trade, and at one period followed it for four years, after which he worked at various vocations. At the age of twenty-two, on May 12, 1870, he married, at Wyoming, Miss Esther, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth WARDEN. By this marriage there were eleven children, eight of whom are now living: Edith M., George W., Olive K., Mary E., Leafie M., Clara E., Charles A. and Frank L. Mrs. Esther A. (WARDEN) SNYDER was born in Dallas, October 1, 1848. Mr. Snyder lived in Wilkes-Barre for six years, then moved back to Dallas, township, where he remained seven years; and in 1883 bought a farm in Lehman township, on which he moved and is now living; it consists of 107 acres, formerly owned by D. GORDON. Mr. SNYDER is a thorough farmer, well posted in agricultural pursuits and well up with the times. His surroundings show him to be a prosperous and industrious farmer. He has been honored with the election to the office of assessor for two terms. He is a member of the Sr. O.U.A.M.; politically he is a Democrat.

ALBERT C. SNYDER, physician and surgeon, White Haven borough, was born in Carbon count, Pa., May 30, 1854, a son of David and Lucinda (CRAMER) SNYDER, natives of Carbon and Columbia counties, respectively, of German origin, the former of whom was a blacksmith and lumberman, and died June 6, 1885. His family consisted of five children, three of whom are now living, our subject being third in order of birth. Albert C. Snyder was educated in the common schools, also at Wyoming Seminary, and in the spring of 1874 began the study of medicine with M. G. LESH, M.D., of East Stroudsburg, Pa., and March 12, 1877, graduated from the University of Pennsylvania. He then opened an office at Lizard Creek, Carbon Co., Pa., where he remained one year, at the end of which time he moved to White Haven. Mr. SNYDER was married, June 11, 1876, to Miss Mary A., daughter of Levi and Julia (MEERCUM) HARLEMAN, of Carbon Co., Pa., and to this union were born four children: Myrtle E., born June 30, 1878; Joletta A., born January 8, 1880; Lee D., born February 11,1882; and Lloyd, born June 21, 1882. The family attend the Presbyterian Church. Mr. SNYDER is a member of the I.O.O.F., P.O.S. of A., the Luzerne County Medical Society, and the Lehigh Valley Medical Society. He has been president of the town council for three years; is one of the sound men of his borough, enjoys a large practice, and is a good Republican.

ELIAS SNYDER, proprietor of the Empire Mills, Nescopeck, was born in Union township, Schuylkill Co., Pa., May 9, 1825, a son of Michael and Mary (GOTSHALL) SNYDER. The father was a native of Berks county, Pa., a wheelwrig1ht by trade, and died in Schuylkill county. Our subject was reared in Schuylkill county, began life as a lumberman, later built a gristmill in Catawissa Valley, and afterward operated mills in Beaver Valley, Muncy, Orangeville, Numidia, and in 1880 purchased the Empire Mills in Nescopeck, which he has since successfully conducted. In 1855 he married Catherine, daughter of George and Rebecca (KLINGAMAN) FAUST, of Rush township, Schuylkill Co., Pa., and they have five children: Linda J. (Mrs. Dr. W.E. GROVER), Samuel W., George M., Ella R. (Mrs. J.M. NUSS) and William H. Snyder, D.D.S. Mr. Snyder is a member of the M. E. Church; in politics he is a Republican, and has served as school director of Nescopeck six years.

GEORGE SNYDER, retired, P.O. Larksville, was born in Kingston borough, June 27, 1804, a son of Peter and Margaret (NACE) SNYDER, both born in New Jersey, the former, March 2, 1729, the latter, October 17, 1732. They were industrious farmers, and removed to this county about 1805, locating in Plymouth township, and after a few years removed to Larksville, where they purchased a valuable lot of coal land containing 100 acres. Not knowing the value of the land in those days, it was sold at a sacrifice, and the heirs now own only the surface. Mr. SNYDER was a man of retired nature, whose life was uneventful. He was honest and industrious in the extreme, and died July 1, 1850, at the age of one hundred and twenty-one years. His wife, Margaret, died April 25, 1848, at the age of one hundred and sixteen. Their family consisted of eleven children, all of whom grew to maturity, seven living at the present time. Our subject, the second of the family, received his education at Plymouth. In his younger days, he was engaged in what they then called "digging" coal, but soon folowed farming, which proved to be his natural vocation. With the exception of four years spent in Eaton, Wyoming county, he has passed his life, one of usefulness, in this county, and now lives a retired life on a farm of fifty acres of valuable land in Larksville. Mr. SNYDER married in Plymouth, April 20, 1828, Miss Rhoda, daughter of Daniel and Martha LAMAREUX, and of this union were born six children, five of whom reached maturity, and three are now living, viz.: Jemima, Harriet and Mary. Of these, Jemima married H. NESBIT; Harriet married Charles LANSON; and Mary married Henry SCHOOLEY. Mrs. Rhoda (LAMAREUX) SNYDER died September 6, 1891, at the age of eighty years. Mr. Charles LANSON was born in Scotland, November 5, 1839, and his wife, Harriet, February 25, 1840. They were married in February, 1867, and have two children, Mary and James. Mr. LANSON is a first-class stationary engineer; he has held several township offices.

JOHN F. SNYDER, merchant, Fairview township, P.O. Mountain Top, was born in Lehigh county, January 4, 1851, a son of Nathan and Esther (MOSIER) SNYDER, both natives of this country, and of German and French descent, respectively. John SNYDER, grandfather of Nathan SNYDER, took part in the Revolutionary war. Nathan, the father of our subject, was a gunsmith and blacksmith, but worked most of the time on his farm in Lehigh county. He reared a family of seven children, of whom John F. is the eldest, and he worked as his father's helper in a blacksmith shop until sixteen years of age, working all summer and going to school in the winter. He then entered the employ of the Lehigh & Susquehanna Railroad Company as a laborer, and remained with that company for one year and four months, during which time he was promoted to chargeman. He then resigned his position on the railroad and went to work for the Parryville Iron Company, Parryville, Pa., where he worked for two and one-half years. Our subject then entered the State Normal School, Bloomsburg, attending same on eyear, when he came to Fanklin, Pa., and taught school during the years 1872 and 1873. He again returned to school, this time going to the Keystone State Normal School, Kutztown, Pa., graduating from that institution in 1875. Returning to his home in Franklin township, Mr. SNYDER taught another term of school, during which time he studied the languages under Prof. T. M. Balliet, of Carbon county. In 1876 he again entered the Keystone Normal School, commencing a scientific course, but attended only a short time, when he accepted a position as teacher in the Parryville schools, Parryville, Pa., and in 1877 was appointed principal of school in Weissport, Carbon county, whcih position he held for ten years. During the summer months Mr. SNYDER opened a school in Carbon county to prepare students for teachers, and in this he was very successful, having at times nearly one hundred students in his classes. During the time Mr. SNYDER was principal of Weissport schools, he was a candidate for superintendent of school in Carbon county, but was defeated by the present incumbent by one vote. In 1888 he was forced to give up teaching on account of impaired health. He came to Fairview township and bought a half interest in a general store run by his brother-in-law, Daniel GRAVER, remaining in partnership with him two months, when Mr. SNYDER bought out Mr. GRAVER, and he now owns the entire stock and runs the store himself. On July 15, 1880, Mr. SNYDER was married to Angelina, daughter of Peter and Salinda (DREISBACH) KRUM, of Weissport, Carbon Co., Pa., both natives of this state and of German descent. Their union has been blessed by one child, Asher F. Mr. SNYDER is a member of the German Reformed Church and Mrs. SNYDER is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics Mr. SNYDER is a Republican, and has been elected to several offices by that party.

JOSEPH SNYDER, farmer and dairyman, P. O. Sybertsville, was born in Roaring Creek township, Columbia Co., Pa., and is a son of Peter and Lydia (Stenger) Snyder. He was reared in his native county, and served an apprenticeship of three years at the plasterer's trade, in which business he was a contractor for twenty-five years. In 1878 he located in Hazleton, where he was a contractor ten years, and in 1888 he settled in Sugarloaf township, where he has since been engaged in farming, and, since 1889, has carried on a dairy business in connection. His wife was Ann Elizabeth, a daughter of John and Charlotte (Kahler) Bonz, of Tamaqua, Pa., and his children are: Charlotte (Mrs. George Buck), Savilla (Mrs. John Hofsomer), Anna, Alice, Lydia, and William. Mr. Snyder is a member of the Evangelical Church; and in politics he is a Republican.

JOSEPH SNYDER, farmer, P. O. Pike's Creek, was born in Ross township, October 2, 1847, and reared and educated in Lake and Lehman townships. He is a son of George and Nancy (Smith) Snyder, both of whom were born in Ross township, Monroe County. George was a son of Henry, who came to this county about 1845 and located in Ross township, where he lived about ten years; he then moved to Lake township where he remained ten years, renting farms in each township. In 1865 he moved to Lehman township with his son George, who bought a farm of fifty acres, and with whom he lived until his death, which occurred in 1865, in his seventy-fourth year. His family consisted of eight children, all of whom grew to maturity. His son George was a farmer and lumberman. He died at the age of seventy-three, in 1890. His family consisted of seven children, three of whom are living: Edward, Lydia and Joseph. Joseph, like his father, has confined himself to farming and lumbering. At the age of twenty-four, he married, September 24, 1871, at Lehman Centre, Miss Mary J., daughter of William and Effie McNeel. No children have been born to this union. Mrs. Mary J. Snyder was born in Wyoming County April 15, 1850. Politically, Mr. Snyder is a Democrat.

SAMUEL SNYDER, retired, Plymouth. This hale, energetic gentleman was born in Plymouth township, Luzerne Co., Pa., March 31, 1826, and is a son of George and Sarah (Robison) Snyder, natives of New Jersey who came to the Valley when it was but sparsely settled. Samuel, who is the third in a family of four children, was educated at the public schools and, until 1851, followed the vocation of a farmer. He then removed to Lehman, this county, where he engaged in lumbering, in which he continued five years, returning at the end of that time to the old homestead, where he remained three years. He then went to Poke Hollow, and engaged in mining for about six years. In 1868 he came to Plymouth and built a tin shop near what is now known as the Bull Run crossing, and successfully carried on the business of tinsmithing for three years, selling out at the end of that period. He has not engaged in active business since. He did, however, in 1884, do some prospecting in the Nescopeck Mountains, which resulted in a large expenditure, but no coal. Mr. Snyder has, as a man of business, succeeded well, and is an extensive property owner in Plymouth, being the possessor of several brick blocks. He was united in marriage, April 22, 1848, with Miss Susan, daughter of Nicholas Rittisbaugh, a native of Germany. To this marriage have been born five children, namely: George R., Charles P., John T., Stella M. (widow of Reese Williams) and Cora H. Mr. Snyder in politics is a Republican. The family attend the Christian Church.

J. T. SNYDER, hardware dealer, Luzerne, was born at Plymouth July 17, 1856, son of Samuel and Susan (Rittisbaugh) Snyder, the former a native of Pennsylvania, the latter of Germany. Mr. Snyder was educated in the common schools of his native county and also at the Wyoming Commercial College, graduating from the latter institution in 1873. In 1878 Mr. Snyder engaged in tinsmithing and the general hardware business at Luzerne, where he has succeeded well. He is also interested in the Luzerne Manufacturing Company, manufacturers of the Electric Lightning Rotary Coal and Rock Drilling Machine.

EDWARD SODON, laborer, Henry Shaft, Plains, was born in Warwickshire, England, and is a son of George and Elizabeth (Hancock) Sodon, the former of whom died when Edward was very young. Our subject came to America in 1869, and began working at the Henry Shaft, where he has since been engaged, doing various kinds of Company work. Mr. Sodon was married in August, 1858, to Miss Charlotte, daughter of William and Jane (Simmons) Thomas, and they had born to them a family of eight children, two of whom are living, viz.: Mrs. William O. George, in Plains, and William, a carpenter at the Henry Shaft; he has three children, Hannah M., Charlotta, and Ralph E. Mr. Sodon is a member of the I. O. O. F., the A. O. K. of M. C., and the F. & A. M. He is allied to no political party, but always votes for the best man and the soundest principles.

THOMAS J. SOLT, physician and surgeon, Fairview township, P. O. Mountaintop, was born November 2, 1856, in Franklin township, Carbon Co., Pa., a son of Solomon and Eliza (Ash) Solt, both natives of this state, and of German descent. The farmer was a farmer. He reared a family of twelve children, all of whom are yet living, Thomas J. being the third eldest. He attended the common schools of the vicinity of his birthplace until he was seventeen years of age, when he entered the Keystone State Normal School, and remained there one year; then returned home and taught school for six years in his native town. Afterward he accepted a similar position in Penn Forest, Carbon Co., Pa., and taught there one term, at the same time studying medicine under Dr. W. G. M. Seiple. Next year (1881) he took the special science course at the Danesville (Indiana) Central Normal College, and in 1882 entered the Central College of Physicians and Surgeons. In 1884 he graduated as an M. D., and soon afterward came to Fairview township, where he commenced the practice of medicine, and has since remained. On June 12, 1880, the Doctor married Julia A., daughter of Tilghman and Mary (Kreamer) Dreisbach, of Franklin township, both natives of that township, and of German descent, and this union has been blessed with one child, Mabel E. Dr. Solt is a member of the Luzerne County Medical Society and of the Lehigh Valley Medical Association. In politics he is a Republican.

CHARLES F. SORBER, carpenter, Plains, was born in Union (now Hunlock) township, Luzerne Co., Pa., March 12, 1857, and is a son of William and Elizabeth (Brader) Sorber, natives of Luzerne County, and of German origin. The father, who is a farmer, reared a family of nine children, eight of whom are living, and Charles F. is the eldest. Our subject passed his boyhood on the farm, and was educated in the common schools and in the select school of Prof. Coughlin, at Muhlenburgh. At the age of twenty-two he began life teaming for his uncle, Asa Brader, of Plains, for whom he worked three years, and then learned his trade, which he has since followed, working ten successive years for M. S. Harding, of Plains. He built his present residence and removed therein in 1889. Mr. Sorber was married, November 24,1881, to Minnie W., daughter of James and Ann (Newth) Tilley, native of England. They are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he is a member of the P. O. S. of A., and the Carpenters' and Joiners' Union of America; in politics he is a Republican.

GEORGE W. SORBER, furniture dealer, Shickshinny, was born in Newport township, August 29, 1841, a son of Adam and Sarah A. (Hank) Sorber. His paternal grandfather, George Sorber, was a lifelong resident of Hanover township, this county, where he died at the age of ninety-three years. Adam Sorber was born in Hanover township, and lived for some time in Newport township, but died in Union township. His wife was Sarah, a daughter of George Hank, of Northampton County, Pa., and by her he had fourteen children, of whom nine grew to maturity: George W., Harriet (Mrs. Alfred Hubber), Lavina (Mrs. John Kester), William, John, Peter, Arminda (Mrs. Monroe Williams), Phoebe a. (Mrs. John Harrison) and James. Our subject was reared in Luzerne County and educated in the common schools, and began his business career as clerk. He was in the Civil War, having enlisted August 9, 1862, in Company F, One Hundred and Forty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was honorably discharged in June, 1865. He was wounded at Gettysburg July 1, 1863; he was taken prisoner at South Ann River, Va., May 27, 1864, and spent six months in Libby, Andersonville, Savannah and Millen prisons. In 1866 he engaged as clerk with G. W. & L. Search, of Shickshinny, for one year and a half, and then with N. B. Crary, nineteen years and a half; since 1886 he has been engaged in the furniture business. November 15, 1867, he married Arminda, daughter of Samuel and Mary (Scott) Masters, of Union township, by whom he had two children, Lennie M. and Mary B. After her death he married Mrs. Diantha (Sutliff) Roberts, daughter of Stiles Sutliff, of Huntington township, by whom he has two children, Lizzie and George B. Mr. Sorber is a member of the M. E. Church; also of the G. A. R., Union Veteran Legion and P. O. S. of A.; in politics he is a Republican, and has served as councilman and school director of Shickshinny nine consecutive terms.

WILLIAM H. SORBER, farmer, P. O. Hunlock Creek, was born in Union (now Hunlock) township, April 2, 1835, where he was reared, receiving his education at the common schools. He is a son of Abraham and Esther (Cragle) Sorber, both to whom were born in Hunlock township. They were worthy people, and mush esteemed. Abraham Sorber was born May 17, 1808, and died January 4, 1891, aged eighty-two years. His wife, Esther, was born May 10, 1811, and died October 7, 1873, aged sixty-two years. There were ten children born to them, nine of whom grew to maturity, and six are now living, William H. being the third of the family in order of birth. Abraham is a son of Jacob Sorber, a German by birth, who emigrated to this country, locating in Union township, where he purchased some land, on which he lived to a ripe old age. His life, like that of other pioneers, was full of toil and adventures. William H. Sorber chose for himself a farmer's life, and had always lived on the farm where he was born, and which he inherited on the death of his father. In 1869 he married Miss Minda, daughter of Henry Apture. To them have been born three children: Frank W., William W. and Rebecca. In 1862 he enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Forty-third P. V. I., for the term of three years. He served part of his time, returned, and reenlisted in the Fiftieth New York Engineer Corps, where he served one year and six months. He was honorably discharged, but draws no pension. Politically he is a Democrat, and has served his township in various offices. His farm comprises sixty acres of land.

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