RI - RY Surnames

History of Luzerne County, Pa.,

by H.C. Bradsby, 1893

HENRY J. RICHARDS, inventor and mining timberman, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Merthyr Tydvill, Glamorganshire, South Wales, November 14, 1845, a son of William H. and Martha (Jones) Richards. His father came to America in 1856, locating at Danville, Pa., where he remained about fifteen months, and returned home. In 1873 he came back, located in Plymouth, this county, and engaged in mining up to the time of his death, in 1882. His children were: Catherine (Mrs. John Davis), William, Jane, Henry J., Miriam (Mrs. John Evans), Arthur, Hiram, Jane (second) (Mrs. William Walters), Anna (Mrs. John W. James) and Frank. Our subject was reared in Wales, and educated in the public schools. He began life in the mines at six years of age in his native country, where he was employed sixteen years. He started for America in October, 1867, but three days out from Queenstown was shipwrecked, and was rescued by a ship sailing for Quebec, Canada, where he landed. At a later date he spent five months in Pittsburgh, and from there moved to Danville, Pa., in 1868, and to Kingston, this county, in 1869. Since that time he has been a ressident of Luzerne County, and of Wilkes-Barre since 1880. He has been in the employ of the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company twenty years, as timberman, and has worked for other companies. Mr. Richards is an inventor of note, having taken out inventions of particular interest for mining purposes the most important being miners' lamps, patented June 16, 1885; November 23, 1885; November 6, 1889; a drilling machine patented in 1886; and a safety gauze lamp patented May, 1892. All of these inventions are pronounced by competent critics superior to any others used. May 15, 1865, Mr. Richards married Miss Ann, daughter of Theophilus and Charlotte (Charles) Lloyd, of Merthyr Tydvill, South Wales, and by her has six children living: Martha A., Margaret, William H., Theophilus H., Arthur H., and Harry J., Jr. Mr. Richard's wife and sons are members of the First Welsh Presbyterian Church of Wilkes-Barre, and his daughter of the First Presbyterian Church. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., Mystic Chain, and I. O. R. M. In politics he is a Republican.

THOMAS E. RICHARDS, Baptist minister, Edwardsville, was born in South Wales, in 1860, and is a son of Evan and Elizabeth (Evans) Richards, also natives of Wales. He was educated in London, and at the age of eighteen began the ministry, preaching in both England and Wales. In 1886 he came to America, and embarked in his ministerial work in New York City, where he remained about two years. In 1890 he came to Edwardsville, this county, where he has since been pastor of the Baptist Church. Mr. Richards was married to Miss Elizabeth Steeksma, of England, and they have two children, Ruel and Mary Belmont.

J. H. RICKETTS, Pittston. This gentleman is well known in business circles as "Ricketts the Hatter," and he is not only the leader in his line in Pittston, but in Luzerne County. He was born in Danville, Montour Co., Pa., September 6, 1855, a son of Samuel and F. (Hacker) Ricketts, natives of England. His father came to America in 1853, and located at Danville, where he has since resided. Our subject is the fifth in order of birth in a family of six children. He was educated in the publicc schools of Danville, and at the age of twelve entered the employ of Waterman & Beaver at Danville, as a cash boy. A short time after he took charge of their shoe and hat departments, and remained with them seventeen years, when he came to Pittston and engaged in his present business, which consists of ladies' and gents' furnishing goods and hats. In 1885 he was united in marriage with Miss Mary E. Coxey, one of Danville's most accomplished young ladies. This happy union has been favored with three children: Howard, Mary and John. Mr. Ricketts is a Republican, and a member of the P. O. S. of A.

WILLIAM T. RIDALL, a prominent farmer of Huntington township, P. O. Waterton, was born in that township June 26, 1844, and is a son of William T. and Elizabeth (Robinson) Ridall, natives of Nottinghamshire, England. The father was a minister by profession, and came to America in 1842, settling in Huntington township, where he followed farming until his death, which occurred October 18, 1871. The subject of this memoir is the fifth in a family of twelve children, nine of whom are now living. He was educated in the common schools, and when twenty years of age enlisted in Company I, Second Pennsylvania Volunteers, Capt. R. J. Millard. He participated in the following battles: Wilderness, Cold Harbor, Spottsylvania, North Ann and Petersburg; he was wounded in the back by a piece of shell, in front of Petersburg, and received his discharge in October, 1865. On his return Mr. Ridall engaged in lumber business for one year; then worked rented land for four years, when he bought a farm on Buck Hill, which he sold one year later, and then purchased one at the foot of Knob Mountain, which he sold in 1876, and purchased his present farm of ninety acres on Huntington creek, one mile below Waterton post office. Our subject was married August 30, 1866, to Sarah A., daughter of William and Catherine (Delamater) Thomas, natives of Connecticut, and by her he has nine children, viz.: Cora M., born January 27, 1868, a dressmaker, at Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; John T., born January 18, 1880, at home on the farm; Jennie B. (Mrs. John Chapin), born February 14, 1872; Bertha L., born May 31, 1874; Robert B., born April 7, 1877; Walter C., born May 6, 1880; Harry S., born April 22, 1883; Myrtle, born January 23, 1886; and Maud L., born May 23, 1888. The family are members of the M. E. Church. Mr. Ridall is serving his third term as supervisor of his township. He is one of the sound men of his section, and politically is a Republican.

FREDERICK RIECHERS, retired, Miners Mills, was born in Hanover, Germany, August 16, 1822, and is a son of John and Louisa Riechers. The father, who was a farmer, reared a family of seven children, of whom Frederick is the second. Our subject came to America in 1847, and for thirtysix years was engaged in laboring, mining and mine contracting, in the anthracite coal region of Pennsylvania. He built his present large and beautiful residence in 1865. Mr. Riechers was married, February 28, 1853, to Miss Catherine, daughter of Conrad and Sophia (Herman) Killian, natives of Wurtemberg, Germany; three of her brothers served in the Civil War, viz.: John, Philip and Peter, the last named being killed in the battle of Bull Run. This happy union has been blessed with nine children, seven of whom are living, viz.: Martin, Mary (Mrs. Otto Kiel), Fred P., Jacob, Margaret (Mrs. Henry J. Stark), John and George. Mr. Riechers and family are members of the German Lutheran Church at Wilkes-Barre, and he is a Republican in his political views.

FRED P. RIECHERS, liveryman and contractor, Miners Mills, was born November 9, 1859, in a log house near his present residence, and is a son of Frederick and Catharine (Killian) Riechers. He was educated in the public schools and the German schools at Wilkes-Barre, and at the age of eight years began working about the mines, which vocation he followed till 1881. He then engaged in teaming for his father, and two years later, engaged in his present business, at first on a small scale, but now has twelve horses and two mules, and employs twelve men; besides his livery he does a general delivery and moving business, and furnishes sand and building stone from his sandpit and quarry. Our subject is unmarried and lives with his parents; he attends the German Lutheran Church at Wilkes-Barre; he is a member of the I. O. R. M. and the I. O. O. F., and is a Republican in his political views, but votes for the best candidates and principles, irrespective of party lines.

JOHN J. RIECHERS, merchant, P. O. Hudson, Plains township, was born in Miners Mills, August 10, 1865, and is a son of Frederick Riechers, of that place. He was educated in the common schools and the German school in Wilkes-Barre, and at the age of seven years began working about the mines, which occupation hhe followed chiefly for seven years, doing every kind of work about the mines except that of a foreman. He embarked in his present business in 1888. Mr. Riechers was married, April 4, 1889, to Miss Margaret, daughter of John and Catherine (Schaeffer) Adolph, natives of Germany; they have two children, viz.: Margaret Caroline Mary and John George Fred. Mr. Riechers and his wife attend the German Lutheran Church at Wilkes-Barre; he is a member of the I. O. R. M. and the P.O. S. of A.; politically he is a Democrat, but votes for the best candidates and the best principles, regardless of party lines.

MARTIN RIECHERS, mason, Miners Mills, was born in that place May 14, 1856, and is a son of Frederick and Catharine (Killian) Riechers. He was educated in the common schools and the German school in Wilkes-Barre, and began working in the breaker, following all the different stages of mining for nineteen years, after which he learned his trade, which he has since chiefly followed; he built his present residence, on part of the old homestead, in 1888. Mr. Riechers was married, October 15, 1884, to Miss Isabelle, daughter of Jackson and Elizabeth (McDonald) Faulkner, of Tioga Centre, Tioga Co., N.Y., natives of England, and of Scotch origin. They have three children, viz.: Mary, Frederick and Martin. Mr. Riechers is a member of the German Lutheran Church at Wilkes-Barre, and his wife of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Parsons; in his political views he is a Republican.

JACOB RIEG, musician and proprietor of restaurant, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, February 8, 1836, and is a son of Generos and Catherine (Bernthaler) Rieg. He was reared and educated in Germany, and served six years as a musician in the German army. In 1866 he came to America, and in July, 1867, located in Wilkes-Barre, where he has since resided. He was a music teacher, but for the last eight years has been proprietor of a restaurant on South Main Street, and this is the headquarters for the musical talent of the city. In 1866 Mr. Rieg married Miss Christiana Rieder, of Germany, and by her has had seven children: Fannie, Rosa, William, Nicholas, Mary, Doren and George. Mr. Rieg is one of the most prominent musicians of Wilkes-Barre. He is a member of the Catholic Church, his family of the Lutheran Church. Politically he is a Democrat.

E. RILEY, farmer, P. O. Dallas, was born in Morris County, N.J., September 13, 1817, and educated in Dallas township. He is son of Joseph and Jane (Doty) Riley, both of whom were also born in Morris County, N.J.; they moved to this county about 1813, locating in Dallas township, where they passed the remainder of their lives, dying in 1858; Joseph was at that time seventy-three years of age. He had nine children, four of whom are now living. Our subject is the fourth in the family. He came to Dallas when nine years of age, and has always confined himself to agricultural pursuits. He began life as a farmer, and has never left the plow nor turned back from his chosen vocation. On March 23, 1841, he married Miss Jane, daughter of Edward and Esther McCarty, and ten children were born to them, eight of whom grew to maturity: William J., Adeline D., Edward, Almond, Marvin, Julia, Esther, Mary E., Ida and Josephine. William J. married Miss Mary S. Nulton; Almond married Miss Clara Bisher; Marvin married Miss Emma Randall. In 1884 Mr. Riley moved from another farm in Dallas township on his present farm of seventyfive acres. He is a practical farmer, and possesses the entire confidence of his neighbors; he is a hardworking and honest man. In politics, our subject is a Democrat, and has been honored with several offices in his township.

GEORGE W. RIMER, county auditor, Kingston, was born in Wilkes-Barre, March 8, 1845, a son of John H. (an engineer and farmer) and Sarah J. (Ruggles) Rimer, both natives of Hanover township; Mrs. Rimer's parents were born in Connecticut. John H. and Sarah J. Rimer were the parents of thirteen children, as follows: George W., Jennie, Carrie, Louisa, Perlina, Sadie, Rhoda, Rettie, R. M., F. J., J. E., Rejenia and Flora J. George W. Rimer was educated in the public schools at New Columbus Academy, at New Columbus, Pa. He worked on his father's farm until his sixteenth year, when he enlisted in Company A, Fifty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, and later in Company F, One Hundred and Forty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, under Gen. Osborne, and was discharged June 29, 1865. After the war he engaged in the lumber business until 1884, when he had his spine fractured, since then he has had no particular occupation. He was confined to the house for three years. In 1887 he was elected county auditor, and has filled that office ever since. On September 13, 1868, he was united in the holy bonds of matrimony with Mary, daughter of George and Eliza (McSherry) Armstrong. Of this union there were eleven children, as follows: Elzora May (deceased), John A., Elsie, Flora D. and Warren J. (the latter being deceased). Mr. and Mrs. Rimer are members of the Christian Church. He is a member of the G. A. R., S. of V., P. O. S. of A., Golden Rule, Conclave No. 20, S. P. K., and politically he is a Republican.

JOHN RINGSDORPH, laborer in the employ of the Lehigh Valley Coal Company, at the Henry Colliery, was born in Columbia County, N.Y., October 20, 1818, and is a son of Simeon and Elizabeth (Coon) Ringsdorph, natives of New York and of Dutch origin. The family came to Scranton in 1831, where they remained three years and then removed back to New York State, where they remained four years, and then returned to Scranton. His parents resided there until their decease, except the time, between 1856 and 1862, when they lived near where the Plainsville Church now is. Simeon and Elizabeth Ringsdorph had five children, of whom John is the third. He was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and began life farming, which occupation he followed fifteen years. Our subject enlisted at Brooklyn, January 20, 1864, in Company K, Forty-eighth New York Volunteers; participated in the engagement at Lake City, Fla.; was on the skirmish line at Petersburg, and at Drury's Bluff; and was also in many minor engagements; he was mustered out September 1, 1865, since which time he has been employed around the coal works in the vicinity of Plainsville. Mr. Ringsdorph married, for his first wife, Miss Harriet, daughter of Jacob E. Everett, of Laurel Run, and by her he had four children, one of whom is living, Edgar Ringsdorph, of Plains. Mr. Ringsdorph married, for his second wife, Mrs. Rosella (Smith) Brownell, daughter of Robert and Harriet (Benedict) Smith, natives of Luzerne County and of Dutch origin, and widow of James Brownell, by whom she had five children, viz.: Charlotta, Anna, Edgar, John and George. By this union there is one child, John. In politics our subject has been identified with the Republican party.

E. RINGSDORPH, foreman of the Wyoming Breaker, Plains, was born in Jenkins township, this county, and is a son of John and Harriet (Everett) Ringsdorph. The subject of this sketch received a common school education, and at the age of sixteen began driving mules in the mines, and has worked himself up through all the different stages, doing Company work, and being then employed as assistant driverboss, and driverboss, until he received his present position, which is ample proof of his ability and trustworthiness as a workman. Mr. Ringsdorph was married, April 2, 1882, to Miss Helen, daughter of James and Rosella (Smith) Brownell, natives of Luzerne County, and they have two children, viz.: Harriet and Edith P. Our subject has always given his political support to the Republican party.

ABRAM RINKER, JR., farmer, Wyoming borough, was born November 25, 1839, in Eaton, Wyoming Co., Pa., son of Abram and Susanna (Young) Rinker, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German and English origin, respectively. They reared a family of eight children, seven of whom are now living, and Abram is the sixth in order of birth. Our subject was educated in the common schools and Wyoming Seminary, and, at the age of twenty, began teaching. He taught two terms, and September 26, 1861, enlisted in Company B, Fifty-second P. V., Capt. Jayn; he participated in the following battles: Fair Oaks, Seven Pines, Lees Mills, Williamsburg, Chickahominy, White Oak Swamp, and many other minor engagements. Mr. Rinker served nearly two years in South Carolina, and was in the siege of Fort Wagner. The flag of his regiment was the first hoisted over Fort Sumter, after it was surrendered; he served five months in the signal corps in Morris Island, and was discharged November 5, 1864. Returning home, he taught school one term, and then rented the Thomas P. Hunt farm, where he has since resided. Our subject was married November 22, 1865, to Miss Frances, daughter of Seth and Eliza (Allen) Burgess, natives of Pennsylvania, and of English origin. This happy union was blessed with two children, viz.: Eva M., born January 20, 1868, and Thomas H., born October 23, 1872. Mr. and Mrs. Rinker are members of the Baptist Church of Pittston; he is a member of the G. A. R.; in politics he is a sound Republican, and served as school director from 1879 to 1887.

William RITTEL, butcher and greengrocer, PIttston, was born in that town, August 7, 1863, a son of Jacob and Clara Hernman Rittel, the former a native of Germany, the latter of Luzerne county. His father came to America in 1841, locating in New York City, and was employed in boating on the Rondout Canal until 1857. He then came to Pittston and engaged in butchering most successfully until 1887, when he was succeeded in business by William. Mrs. Rittel died in 1875. Our subject is the fifth of a family of ten children, was educated in the public schools of Luzerne county, and in the meantime learned the butchering trade with his father. At the age of twelve he went to Syracuse, N.Y. where he worked at his trade, and soon after this entered the employ of the King Bridge Company of Cleveland, Ohio. He followed bridge construction for various companies in the United States and Canada until 1866, during which time he worked in nearly every state in the Union. He then came to Pittston and engaged in his present business. He was married, in 1887, to Miss Mary Kingan, of Pittston. They have two children, Clara and Mary. Mr. Rittel is one of Pittston's most highly respected citizens and in politics is a solid Democrat.

John Rittenhouse, retired, P.O. Sybertsville, was born in Sugar Loaf township, this county, may 21, 1824, and is a son of Charles and Rachel (Wenner) Rittenhouse, the former of whom was a son of Jacob Ritten house, formerly of Philadelphia, and a Revolutionary soldier. He (Jacob) was among the pioneers of Sugar Loaf township, where he died at the age of ninety-two years; his wife was Catherine Orner, and he reared a large family, of whom Charles, the father of the subject, was the eldest. The latter lived and died in Sugar Loaf township; his wife was a daughter of Christian Wenner, of that township, and their children were: Joseph, John,Charles (who died in the United States service during the Civil war), Maria (Mrs. James Kester), and Elizabeth (Mrs. Jacob Arrow). Our subject was reared in the Sugar Loaf township, where he has always resided, and for many years he worked at the carpenter's trade, after which he followed farming fifteen years, when he retired. His wife was Sarah, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Orner) Houseknecht, of Sugar Loaf townshiip and by her he had twelve children, as follows: Stephen, Marietta (Mrs. Nathan Spade), Maggie (Mrs. William Daubert), Sallie (Mrs. Henry Bohlander), John, Ella (Mrs. William Cogan, Aggie (Mrs. Francis Schaffer), Miranda (Mrs. Otto Beithaupt) and Lina (Mrs. Edward Heller). Mr. Rittenhouse is one of the oldest native-born residents of Sugar Loaf township. He is a member of the Reformed Church; in politics he is a Democrat, and was supervisor of his township two years, and school director three years.

Joseph W. Rittenhouse, farmer, P.O. Mountain Grove, was born in Black Creek township, July 26, 1838, a son of Amos and Anna (Wolf) Rittenhouse. His paternal grandfather, Martin Rittenhouse, formerly of Montgomery county, Pa, was a pioneer miller of Black Creek, and erected the mill now operated by Enoch Rittenhouse. His wife, Amelia, was a daughter of William Rittenhouse, who purchased land at Sheriff's sale in what is now Black Creek township, and who built the first gristmill in the township. He was a prominent miller of Briar Creek, Columbia Co, Pa., where he died. The children of Martin Ritten house were: Amos, William, Anna (Mrs. William Wolf), Sarah (Mrs. Jesse Johnson), Phoebe (Mrs. John Hauze), Nicholas, Mary (Mrs. Elias Smith), Susannah (Mrs. William Shellhammer). Of thesee Amos was a farmer and lived in Black Creek township, where he died in 1882. His wife was a daughter of Andrew and Louisa (Hassa) Wolf, of Black Creek and his children were: Mary A. (Mrs. Enoch Rittenhouse), Caleb, Joseph W., Jesse and Sarah. Our subject was reared in Black Creek township, where he has always resided, engaged in farming. He operated a sawmill up to 1886. In 1867 he married Eliza A., daughter of Henry P. and Catherine (Getting) Yost, of Sugar Loaf township, and has two children, Anna C. and Mary Etta. Mr. Rittenhouse is a member of the Reformed Church. In politics he is a Democrat, and has held the offices of supervisor, auditor and school director.

Martin J. Rittenhouse, telegraph operator, Shickshinny, was born in Fairmount township, Luzerne Co.,Pa., and is a son of Peter and Susan (Wyant) Rittenhouse, natives of New Jersey and Luzerne county (Pa.), respectively. His father came to this county in 1845, and has been a resident of Shickshinny since 1872. His children are: D. Edward, Elizabeth (Mrs. W.J. Enke), Frances (Mrs. C.W. Bulkley), Evaline (Mrs. D.H. Jones), and Martin J. Our subject was reared in Shickshinny from six years of age, was educated in the public schools of the borough, and has been telegraph operator for the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company. Since 1888 he has been shipping clerk for the West End Coal Company. Socially, he is a member of the I.O.O.F., and in politics he is a staunch Republican.

William H. Rittenhouse, farmer, P.O. Prichard, was born in Nescopeck February 6, 1814, a son of Henry and Margaret (Dull) Rittenhouse, both of whom were born in this country, and were worthy farming people. Henry was a son of William Ritten house, an old pioneer in Columbia county, where he owned 300 acred of land and was a practical and extensive farmer in those days. His son Henry began life as a farmer, in which pursuit he was well experienced; he also owned and operated a carding, grist and sawmill. In fact, Mr. Rittenhouse was an energetic business man, always keeping ahead of the times. He was twice married, and by the two unions reared a family of ten children. He lived to be eighty years of age. William H. is the only son by the first marriage. He was reared and educated in Union township, and has always confined himself to lumbering and farming; he now owns a neat little place in Hunlock township. On April 3, 1837, he married Miss Ann, daughter of Adam Cragle, who bore him ten children, eight of whom are living: Samuel, Sarah, James, Emily, Frank, Harry, Mary J. and William. Mrs. Ann (Cragle) Rittenhouse was born in Hunlock township, August 15, 1821. Mr. Rittenhouse is an honest, upright and worthy citizen, and has the full confidence of his fellows.

John Roach, retired, Inkerman, was born in County Wexford, Ireland, August 13, 1818, and is the youngest in the family of eleven children of John and Mary (Doyle) Roach, natives of the same place. His grandfather, also named John Roach, was an extensive farmer, who in 1798, during the rebellion in Ireland, was one of the first to lay down his life at the famous battle of Vinegar Hill. The father of our subject, believing with the poet that "Whether on the scaffold high, or in the battle's van, the noblest place for a man to die is where he dies for man," also volunteered, and saw his country's hopes go down in defeat at the battle of New Ross. With such ancestry, no wonder that our subject is a fervent lover of this glorious Republic and its free institutions. He received his education in Ireland, and in 1836 was apprenticed to learn the trade of a carpenter, at which he labored until September 24, 1850, when, after having seen the hopes of the young Ireland party again destroyed, he sought a home and freedom in the land of Washington. He settled in Pittston, Pa., where he worked as a wagon builder until 1853, when he was employed as a car builder by the Pennsylvania Coal Company, until his retirement in 1885. He was united in marriage February 2, 1840, with Ann, daughter of Martin and Julia (Breen) Morris, natives of County Wexford, Ireland. She died January 28, 1882, leaving the following issue: John, born March 11, 1841; Mary E, born August 14, 1844, married August 21, 1865, to Michael O'Neil, a cooper of Sebastopol, this county; Kate, born February 15, 1847, married September 3, 1866 to Patrick Leahy, a tinsmith of Pittston, who died July 11, 1882 (she was again married, this time February 14, 1889,to Charles Swetland, agent, Pittston); Thomas, born December 30, 1850; Elizabeth, born December 6, 1854; James and Annie (twins), born July 9, 1856; Margaret, born June 29, 1858, married December 15, 1878, Michael Gilroy, a mine carpenter, of Pittston; Matilda, born July 9, 1861, married April 5, 1885, to Thomas Connell, livery stable proprietor at Duryea, this county. Our subject is a member of the Roman Catholic Church; in politics he is a Democrat.

Cyrus B. ROBERTS, a prominent lumberman of Shickshinny, was born in Sugar Loaf township, Columbia, Co., Pa., January 1, 1860, and is a son of Edwin and Eliza Jane (Kile) Roberts. His paternal grandfather, William Roberts, and maternal grandfather, James Kile were pioneers, respectively of Jackson and Sugar Loaf townships, Columbia Co., Pa. His father was a native of Jackson township, Columbia county, a carpenter by trade, and died in Plymouth, Luzerne Co., Pa., in April 1879, where he had located in 1874. Our subject was reared in Columbia county, educated in the common schools, and after attaining his majority, worked at farming and lumbering. He located at Shickshinny in 1886, where he has since been engaged in the lumber business. In January, 1889, he married Fannie A., daughter of Charles and Lydia (Adams) Dodson, of Salem township, this county. Mr. Roberts is a member of the M.E. Church; in politics, he is a Republican.

Jonah ROBERTS, farmer, P.O. Pikes Creek, was born in Union township, February 27, 1815. He is the son of Ephraim and Elizabeth (Fink) Roberts, the former born in Connecticut, the latter in Pennsylvania. Ephraim was a son of Stephen and Rebecca (Richards) Roberts; the latter was twelve years of age at the time of the Wyoming Massacre, and, in company with her mother and a child, escaped from the Indians after the death of her father, Elisha Richards. About 1810, Stephen Roberts, accfompanied by his wife and two children, removed from Connecticut to Plymouth, where he remained a few years, then removed to Union township, where he purchased seventy-five acres of unimproved land, most of which was under cultivation at this death. He was a man of marked influence in society, a leading spirit in politics and in religion, and held all the responsible offices in the town. He was seventy-five years old at the time of his death. He reared a family of eight children: His son, Ephraim, began life in Union township as a farmer, on seventy-five acres of land, on which he built and which he improved to a great extent. He was a man of industry and enterprise, and during his life did much for the advancement of agricultural pursuits. Ephraim Roberts died November 30, 1862, at the age of seventy-seven years. His family consisted of ten children, eight of whom grew to maturity, and four of whom are now living. Johah is the sixth in the family in order of birth, and has always confined himself to farming. In his younger days he was an inveterate hunter, and succeeded in killing as many as two hundred deer, on of which weighed two hundred and sixteen pounds with the hide on. In November, 1836, he married Miss Mary Ann, daughter of Stephen and Myra Evans. This union resulted in the birth of eight children who grew to maturity, six of whom are still living: Ephraim, Elizabeth, Evaline, Rachel A., Francis A. and Samantha L. Mrs. Roberts was born in Plymouth, October 23, 1815, and in early life was a competent school teacher. They removed from Union to Lake township, in 1839, on a lot of sixty acres of wild land which, by hard and honest toil, he brought under cultivation. He made many marked improvements then, which today attract attention. Mr. Roberts is a worthy citizen of his native county, who has served her well in various offices. Politically, he is a Republican.

Peter C. ROBERTS, justice of the peace, collector and real estate agent, Plymouth, was born December 5, 1832 at Bodfarry, Denbighshire, North Wales, and is the son of Robert and Ann Roberts, also natives of North 'Wales. This highly respected citizen was educated in Wales and in 1864 came to America and began mining in Luzerne county. This he followed until 1885, when ill-health compelled him to seek lighter work, and he accepted the position as janitor of the Plymouth high school, and discharged the duties connected therewith for the following three years. In 1889 Mr. Roberts was elected to the office of justice of the peace, on the Republican ticket, his term expiring in 1894. In 1890 he was appointed, by order of the court, burgess of Plymouth, and after the expiration of this time, he was elected to the same office on the Citizen's ticket in February, 1891, being re-elected in 1892. He also served three years on the school board. Mr. Roberts was married, in Wales, to Maria, daughter of Herbert and Mary (Walts) Herbert, natives of Breconshire, Wales. Four daughters were born to this union, all of whom are at present living at Whelling, W.Va., where three of them have married. His first wife died at Ironsdale, Ohio, in 1872. He was again married in September, 1875 to Elizabeth, daughter of Edward Bowen, a native of Cefn Mawr, Wales. One child was born of this union, but died in infancy. Mr. Roberts and family are members of the Baptist Church.

Silas ROBERTS, farmer, P. O. Muhlenburg, was born in Union township, February 5, 1831, a son of Stephen and Elizabeth (HARVEY) ROBERTS, the former born in Union township, the latter in Plymouth. Stephen was a son of Ephraim Roberts, who was also born in Union township. Ephraim was a son of Stephen Roberts, who removed from Connecticut in the very early history of the county. He first located in the Valley, making his residence there a number of years, finally removing to Union township, where he, with Mr. MARVIN, bought a tract of land, most of which is still in the possession of their descendants. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary army, doing good service in the cause of independence. He lived to a good old age, after rearing a family of eight children, who became prominent citizens of the county. His son, Ephraim, began life in Union township, on a tract of land adjoining his father's place. He was a hard-working man, of sober, quiet habits, whose life was uneventful, and had the honor of holding several township offices, having the full confidence of his fellow citizens. He owned 310 acres of land, and was a practical farmer. He died in 1862, at the age of seventy-seven years, and there were nine children in his family, who came to maturity. His son, Stephen, began life in Union township, on a farm of seventy acres. He was not only a practical farmer, but a practical man, whose goodness was exemplified in his life. He died June 22, 1891, aged eighty-six years. His family consisted of eleven children, nine of whom grew to maturity, and seven of them are living now. Silas, who is the eldest in the family, was reared and educated in Union township, of which he has been a life resident. He is an honest, hard working man, having begun life at the bottom round of the ladder, and by industry and perseverance has reached a commendable height, both socially and financially. He is a practical farmer, owning seventy-five acres of valuable land. In 1864 he was mustered into the United States service for the term of one year, and showed his heroism at the first battle of Fort Fisher. At the close of the war he was honorably discharged, and has since ingratiated himself into the good graces of his fellow citizens. In 1858 Mr. Roberts married Miss Elmira J., daughter of John and Eliza MARVIN, by which union were born eleven children, nine of whom are yet living: Rachel, Eliza, Elsie, Frank, Elmer, Harry, George, Laura and Mary. Mrs. Roberts was born in Huntington township, October 14, 1838, and is descended from the MARVINS, an old and prominent family of that county. Politically, Mr. Roberts is a Republican.

Peter ROBERTSON, miner in Shaft No. 14, Inkerman, Jenkins township, was born in Scotland, April 9, 1848, and is a son of James and Agnes (BLACK) ROBERTSON. The family came to America in 1854, resided one year at Port Griffith, and then removed to Inkerman, where the parents died. The family consisted of twelve children, eleven of whom came to America, seven of whom are living, and of whom Peter is the eleventh. The subject of this sketch was educated in the common schools, and at an early age began working about the mines, which occupation he has since followed; he has been mining since 1869. Mr. Robertson was married, March 27, 1872, to Miss Mary, daughter of Thomas and Martha (WILLIAMSON) HARVARD, natives of South Wales. The fruit of this union was ten children, five of whom are living, viz.: Thomas, Agnes, Martha, Marion, and Clarence. He has also adopted into his family William PETERS, an orphan boy, of Slatington, Pa. Mr. Robertson has always given his political support to the Republican party.

William ROBERTSON, who in his lifetime was a prominent citizen of Inkerman, Jenkins township, and who had worked in the mines in Scotland and America for forty years without receiving any injury, died at his residence, October 7, 1874, at the age of fifty-two years. He came to America in 1854, and followed mining till the time of his death. Mr. Robertson was married September 30, 1841, to Miss Barbara, daughter of Edward and Jane (BEVERAGE) LAIRD, natives of Scotland, and the fruit of this union was as follows: William; Jane, married to Alexander LATTA, a miner, of Inkerman; John, engaged in mining, and living at home; Barbara (Mrs. William JONES), who died at the age of twenty-six years; Marion, married to William F. McINTYRE, a boiler maker, in Ohio; Alexander, engaged in mining, and living with his mother; Edward, who died at the age of five years; Edward (second), engaged in gold and silver mining in Colorado; and David, living at home. This family have been identified with the Presbyterian Church, and are Republican in their political views. [Since the above was written, information has been received of the death of Mrs. Barbara Robertson. Ed.]

William ROBERTSON, miner, Inkerman, Jenkins township, was born in Scotland October 28, 1848, and is a son of William and Barbara (LAIRD) ROBERTSON. The family came to America in 1854, where they resided in Hazleton one year, and then removed to Inkerman. Our subject received a common-school education, and at the age of fifteen began working about the mines, which occupation he has since followed, including twenty-four years mining; he was never injured till March 23, 1892, when he was struck by a fall of rock and nearly killed. Mr. Robertson was married, March 19, 1875, to Miss Jane, daughter of Graham and Margaret (McFARLAND) SIMPSON, natives of Scotland, and they have seven children, viz.: William, Margaret, John, Nellie, Barbara, Agnes and Elizabeth. Our subject is a member of the I. O. O. F. and the K. of P., and in his political views is a Republican.

B. E. ROBINSON, outside foreman, No. 3 Colliery, Susquehanna Coal company, West Nanticoke, was born in the County of Durham, England, October 11, 1840, being educated and reared in his birthplace. At the age of fifteen years, he began working about the mines, doing general outside and inside work. He followed mining in England until the year 1879, when he came to America, locating at Pittsburgh, Pa., where he followed mining for one year. In 1880 he came to Nanticoke, and worked for the Susquehanna Coal Company about the breaker at No. 2 until 1887, when he was made foreman at No. 3, in which capacity he is at present engaged. He has about sixty men and boys to oversee, who work on the outside, and the daily output is 200 tons. Mr. Robinson was married in England, in April, 1862, to Anna PRINGLE. Three children have been born to this union: Mary, Jennie and Lilly. In politics Mr. Robinson is a Republican. He is a member of the American Legion of Honor, the Knights of Malta, and the Improved Order of Heptasophs. The family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church.

John ROBINSON, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Salem township, this county, November 2, 1837, a son of William P. and Elizabeth (RAUGHT) ROBINSON. He was reared in Fairmount township, educated in the common schools, and by occupation has always been a farmer. On June 13, 1861, he enlisted in Company F, Seventh Regiment, Pennsylvania Reserves; on July 26, 1861, was promoted to sergeant; on November 12, 1861, to first sergeant; on August 1, 1862, to second lieutenant; on March 1, 1863, to first lieutenant; on July 20, 1863 to captain, and on March 13, 1865, to brevet major. He was honorably discharged and mustered out of the service June 16, 1864. After his return from the war, he engaged in farming in Fairmount township until January 1, 1889, when he was appointed deputy sheriff, under his brother R. P. Robinson, for a term of three years. On January 22, 1865, Mr. Robinson married Sallie C., daughter of John and Rachel (CREVELING) BUCKALEW, of Farimount Springs, this county, and they have two children: Stewart E. and William B. Mr. Robinson is a member of the M. E. Church and G. A. R. He was twice elected to the office of justice of the peace of Fairmount township, and served eight years. Politically he is a Republican.

Robert P. ROBINSON, sheriff of Luzerne county, was born in Fairmount township, this county, October 17, 1849, a son of William P. and Elizabeth (RAUGHT) ROBINSON. His great-grandfather, William Robinson, came from Ireland to America in 1771, settling in Delaware, and his grandfather, John Robinson, was born during the voyage July 22, 1771, and married Jane STEWART April 3, 1800. William P. Robinson, father of our subject, was born in Delaware, January 29, 1805. Left an orphan at an early age, he went to live with his grandfather on a farm, with whom he remained most of the time until he became of age, and during this period he learned the book-binder's trade. He was well educated in the common branches of learning, having taken advantage of every opportunity to improve himself, both in and out of school. During the construction of the North Branch Canal, he came to Pennsylvania and held a position as bookkeeper in that enterprise, and about this time he married and settled in Salem township, this county, teaching in the winters and farming the rest of the year. A few years later he removed to Fairmount, where he cleared and improved a farm. For several years he taught school during the winter months, and his reputation as a teacher was such that he never wanted for a position as long as he was willing to follow this profession. He was a prominent member of the M. E. Church, and he filled the office of justice of the peace three terms. He died in Fairmount May 4, 1888. His children were fourteen in number, as follows: Susan J. (Mrs. A. S. RITTENHOUSE), Sarah (Mrs. Dennis WYANT), J. Stewart (killed at Benton, Columbia Co. Pa., by deserters in 1864), John, George (deceased), Mary E. (Mrs. W. J. ROBBINS, deceased), Jerusha (Mrs. J. S. KOONS), William F. (who enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Forty-Ninth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers August 22, 1862, and died at Belle Plain, Virginia, March 12, 1863), Thomas, Elizabeth A. (Mrs. B. F. POLLOCK), J. Downing (deceased), Robert P., Gilbert H. (deceased) and Edward F. Our subject was reared in Fairmount, and was educated in the common schools. He followed farming until twenty-five years of age, during which time he learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed to some extent, taught school winters and also clerked in a general store. He was married July 4, 1874, to Jessie E., daughter of John H. and Rachel B. (KOONS) SMITH, of Fairmount township, and they have two children, Lizzie and Robert B. In 1882 Mr. Robinson was mercantile appraiser of Luzerne county; the same year was appointed by the court county auditor to fill a vacancy, and served over two years. In 1885, at the expiration of his term of office, he was appointed commissioner's clerk, and held that position until September 1, 1889, when, having received the unanimous nomination of his party for sheriff, he resigned to look after the interest of his canvass, and was elected for a term of three years by a plurality of 1,292 votes. Politically, he is a Republican, and the first of that party ever elected to the office of sheriff in Luzerne county.

Lieut. James Stewart ROBINSON was born March 10, 1835, in Salem township, Luzerne Co., Pa., and was educated in the common schools and Pine Grove Seminary in Centre county, Pa., and followed farming. On June 13, 1861, he enlisted in Company F, Seventh Regiment Pennsylvania Reserves (Thirty-Sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers) as private; promoted to sergeant July 26, 1861, to sergeant-major April 1, 1862, to second lieutenant March 1, 1863, to first lieutenant July 20, 1863, mustered out with company June 16, 1864. He was wounded in the battle at Charles City Cross Roads, June 30 1862, also at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862 and was taken prisoner in the battle of the Wilderness, May 5, 1864. On the evening of July 30, 1864, less than two months after his arrival home, he went with a deputy provost-marshal to assist in arresting deserters and drafted men who failed to report, in Benton township, Columbia Co., Pa. (a locality strongly tainted with secession doctrines, a majority of the citizens having been led to believe that the Government had no business to interfere with their liberties by compelling them to take up arms against their wishes), and was shot and mortally wounded by one of a party of armed men whom they attempted to arrest, dying from the wounds November 3, 1864. Immediately after the occurrence a body of U. S. soldiers was sent into the locality, and a number of arrests were made, principally of persons who had aided and abetted the actual participants in the affair, and taken to Fort Mifflin, where they were confined for some time; but by reason of the near close of the war, and upon recommendation of loyal citizens, they were released without trial. Those who were suspected of doing the shooting left the country at once, and others who had been evading the draft immediately reported to the proper authorities, to excape arrest. At this time it seemed impossible to fix the crime upon the guilty ones, so no arrests were made by the civil authorities, and the matter was dropped for the time. On March 16, 1891, nearly twenty-seven years after the shooting, Elias YOUNG, of Jackson township, Columbia Co., Pa, was arrested for the crime and committed to the jail in Luzerne county without bail. He was indicted for murder April 7, 1891, and arraigned for trial September 16, 1891. The trial lasted three days, and the defendant admitted having been one of the party of three who did the shooting, but denied that his gun was loaded with the kind of bullets that made the fatal wound. The jury, probably taking into consideration the long time elapsed between the crime and the arrest, also the age of the accused as well as the fact that he had been urged on and encouraged by the people of the neighborhood brought in a verdict of "not guilty."

Isaac ROBSON, miner, Duryea, was born in the County of Durham, England, and is a son of Thomas and Mary (NIXON) ROBSON, natives of the same place. They reared a family of seven children, of whom our subject is the eldest. He received his education in the free schools of his native city, and in the year 1844 began work in the mines. In 1864 he came to the United States, settling in Pittston, where he remained until 1882, when he bought a house in Duryea, and removed hither. Mr. Robson was united in marriage June 16, 1870, with Margaret, daughter of Thomas and Margaret THOMAS, natives of Wales. Their union has been blessed with the following issue: Thomas, born March 15, 1871; Edward, born January 20, 1873; and Isaac, born June 17, 1875. In politics Mr. Robson is a Republican; he is a member of the I. O. O. F. and Sons of St. George.

F. V. ROCKAFELLOW, banker. The subject of this sketch was born near Somerville, Somerset Co., N. J., a son of Christopher and Mary (VOSSLER) ROCKAFELLOW. He was educated in his native county. In 1855 he came to Wilkes-Barre, and entered the employ of his uncle, C. B. FISHER, as clerk in his store, where he remained four years. He then entered the bank of Charles B. DRAKE, as cashier, with whom he remained two years. He subsequently formed a partnership with A. H. EMLEY, and they established a banking business which continued until 1869, when he established his present bank. Mr. Rockafellow is the oldest living banker in Wilkes-Barre. He married Miss Julia, daughter of Sylvanus AYRE of Boundbrook, New Jersey, and by this marriage they are the parents of two children: Charles Frederick and Grace Ferdinand. In his political views Mr. Rockafellow is a Democrat. He has served in the city council, has filled the office of school director, was treasurer of the borough of Wilkes-Barre four years, and has been city treasurer since its incorporation. Mr. Rockafellow is one of Wilkes-Barre's leading and progressive citizens, and has always taken a deep interest in its public and social development.

Richard RODDA, manager of hotel and drup-store at Glen Lyon, is a native of St. Clare, England, where he was born April 3, 1860. His parents were Benjamin and Mary (GROSWORETHEY) RODDA, also natives of England. The father of our subject was a machinist, and died December 27, 1874, at the age of fifty-three years. Richard is one of a family of eleven children----seven brothers and four sisters----of whom only seven are now living, the names of those living being as follows: Thomas, Richard, Albert, Frederick, Malenda, Mary Grace, and Eliza. The subject of this memoir is the second eldest living. He was educated at the common schools in England. Mr. Rodda was married July 7, 1881, to Mary GLUYES, daughter of Oliver and Elizabeth (ANDREWS) GLUYES, natives of Cornwall, England; Oliver Gluyes died in Scranton in 1866. To Mr. and Mrs. Rodda were born five children, of whom two are dead; the survivors are Frederick C., Richard E. and Sidney W. The wife of our subject was born at Port Orem, New Jersey, June 5, 1855. Mr. Rodda has, for a great many years of his life, been mining and traveling on the road. He has been engaged for six years in his present situation, manager of S. M. SUTLIFF'S hotel and drug store, in Newport township. He is a member of the M. E. Church. He came to this country in 1875, and in 1876 joined the J. H. P. A., which is now the L. K. of America; he belongs to the Sons of St. George, Knights of Malta, also the I. O. R. M.; in politics he is a Republican.

D. J. RODERICK, mine foreman, Stockton, was born in Cardiganshire, Wales, January 23, 1864, and is a son of Richard and Ellen (JENKINS) RODERICK, natives of Wales, who emigrated to America in 1865, settling at Wilkes-Barre. The children, seven in number, of whom David J. is third, were educated in Wilkes-Barre. When the subject of this sketch was fifteen years old the family removed to York county, where they spent three years on a farm. They afterward removed to Plymouth, where the father was engaged at contracting on rock work. During this time our subject acquired his knowledge of mining. Mr. Roderick remained nine years at Plymouth, and then went to Stockton, where he successfully worked rock contracts a year and a half. In 1891 he was appointed foreman at No. 5. Colliery, of Linderman, Skeer & Co., which position he still holds; he has 250 men under his charge, the ouptut of coal being 600 tons per day. Mr. Roderick was united in marriage, in November, 1886, with Miss Frisswith, daughter of David P. and Rachel (LLOYD) DAVIS, of Plymouth. Two children have been born to this union, Richard and Ida. In politics Mr. Roderick is a stanch Republican; he is a member of the Mystic Chain and Knights of Pythias; the family attend the Presbyterian Church.

James E. RODERICK, general superintendent for Linderman & Skeer, Stockton. Among the men who have had vast experience in the anthracite coal regions of Pennsylvania, none are more prominent than the subject of this sketch. James E. Roderick was born January 14, 1841, in Cardiganshire, South Wales, and is a son of Edward and Eleanor (EDWARDS) RODERICK, also natives of Wales. He was educated in the land of his birth, and in 1864 came to this country, settling at Pittston, where he engaged in mining for the Pennsylvania Coal Company, with whom he remained however, but a short time; then went to Wilkes-Barre and engaged with the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, mining coal for them until February, 1866, when he was given the position of mine foreman at the Empire Shaft. In June, 1870, he accepted a position as general superintendent under A. D. Davis & Company, Warrior Run, with whom he remained until June 1881, when he was appointed by the State to the position of mine inspector for the Fourth District of Pennsylvania; he served the term of five years, and at its expiration was re-appointed. At the end of three years of his second term, he resigned to accept a more lucrative position as general superintendent for Linderman & Skeer, which position he has held since May, 1889. He is in charge of six collieries, employing in all about 1,400 men, and mining 2.000 tons of coal daily. Mr. Roderick has been thrice married: first to Miss Sarah DAVIS, of New York, by which union were born four children, namely: Nellie, Edward, James and John. After the death of this wife Mr. Roderick was married in September, 1881, to Mrs. Mary LLOYD, who died in September, 1883, leaving no children. Mr. Roderick's third marriage was in October 1885, with Mrs. ULMER, of Hazleton. In 1879 Mr. Roderick was a candidate for county treasurer on the Labor-Greenback ticket, but at all other times he has been closely identified with the Republican party, and is at present an earnest worker in the ranks. He is a shrewd political worker, nevertheless one of those who believe that hard-fought political battles can be won without resort to unfair methods. With this principle for a foundation, Mr. Roderick has a very large following in this county, and his influence is of vast importance to the party which he represents.

Rees D. RODERICK, general merchant, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Carmarthenshire, Wales, May 29, 1850, and is a son of Daniel and Ann (LEWIS) RODERICK. He was reared and educated in his native country, where he began his business life in the lead mines. In 1870 he came to America and settled in Wilkes-Barre, where, with the exception of three years during which he lived at Scranton and Dunmore, he has since resided. He followed mining eight years, and for five years was a contractor in shaft sinking and tunnel driving, and since 1885 has been engaged in his present business. Mr. Roderick was married October 30, 1869 to Hannah, daughter of Thomas and Ann (WILLIAMS) THOMAS, of Wales, and has two children living: Daniel and Ariel. Mr. Roderick is a popular merchant; he is a member of the Welsh Presbyterian Church, and of the K. of P., and in politics is a Republican.

Richard RODERICK, contractor in shaft sinking and tunnel driving, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Cardiganshire, Wales, January 2, 1832, a son of Edward and Eleanor (EDWARDS) RODERICK. He was reared and educated in Wales, where he worked in the lead mines from twelve years of age. He spent three years in the same capacity in Spain, and came to America in April, 1864. He settled in Wilkes-Barre and worked in the coal mines until 1875, being for three years inside foreman of the Stanton Mine No. 7, Lehigh and Wilkes-Barre Company. He has since been engaged in his present business. On April 12, 1854, Mr. Roderick married Miss Ellen, daughter of David and Ellen (WILLIAMS) JENKINS, of Wales, and by her had nine children, seven of whom grew to maturity: Ellen (Mrs. David R. MORGAN), Edward, David J., Mary A. (Mrs. John E. HUGHES), John, Richard and Lizzie. Mr. Roderick and his family are members of the Welsh Presbyterian Church, and he is a member of the I. O. O. F. In politics he is a Republican.

Joseph RODGERS, engineer at No. 2, Delaware & Hudson Canal Company, Plymouth, was born January, 15, 1843, and is the youngest in the family of ten children born to John and Elizabeth (CASONN) RODGERS, natives of England. In early life our subject learned engineering and followed it in his native country until 1863, when he came to America, locating at Houghton, Mich., where he worked six years as a miner in the copper mines. He then came to Pennsylvania, locating at Jefferson, York county, where he remained a short time in the mines, and coming thence to Plymouth, engaged in firing at No. 12, which he continued for two years. He then fired at No. 3, Delaware & Hudson Canal Company for one and one half years, afterward going to No. 2, same company, as pumpman, and remained there two years, then taking charge of the hoisting engines, which he ran for seven years. At the end of that time Mr. Rodgers took a position at No. 1, Delaware & Hudson, where he was engineer for about one year, and then he accepted a similar position at No. 2, where he has since been employed. Mr. Rodgers was married, July 23, 1874, to Miss Isabella, daughter of James and Ann (HOPE) KENNEDY, natives of Scotland, to which union have been born four children: James A., Josiah H., Bessie and Harry. Mr. Rodgers is a Republican in politics, and a member of the Foresters. The family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Isaac M. ROGERS, farmer, P. O. Idetown, was born August 5, 1845, in Lehman township, where he was reared and educated. He is a son of David and Sarah M. (NEWMAN) ROGERS, the former born in Plymouth, the latter in Lehman township, on February 28, 1811, and June 7, 1821, respectively. David was a son of Joseph, who was a native of Connecticut, and who came to Plymouth soon after the Massacre; he was a mason by trade. He was married three times and reared twelve children, all of whom are now dead. He lived to be eighty-two years old. His son David, lived with B. REYNOLDS of Plymouth until he was twenty-one years of age, when he became a soldier and participated in the Indian war of 1832, being stationed at St. Anthony's Falls, Wis. He served three years and re-enlisted for three years more, serving his country with honor; he was wounded in the left hand, having part of it shot away. On his return in 1838, Mr. Rogers married Miss Sarah NEWMAN, by whom he had three children, two of whom grew to maturity and one of whom is now living. He first located in Jackson township, but did not settle permanently until 1854, when he bought a farm in Lehman township, southwest of Harvey's Lake, consisting of forty acres of land, which he cleared and beautified. He died August 16, 1885. His son, Isaac M., the subject of this sketch, was nine years of age when he came hither with his father, and has remained on the same farm ever since, beautifying and embellishing it year after year; at the same time adding acre after acre to the original forty until now it comprises seventy-five acres. He has built a neat little house and a commodious barn. Mr. Rogers is a thorough-going and practical farmer, energetic and thrifty. In 1862, at the age of seventeen years, prompted by that spirit of patriotism, latent in every true and loyal citizen, he become a member of Company G, One Hundred and Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania Militia, for nine months. After serving his time faithfully, he was honorably discharged and now enjoys a pension. His brother, Jacob Rogers, was a member of the same company and regiment, and after serving his time re-enlisted in Battery M, Heavy Artillery, serving to the close of the war. He was honorably discharged, but died from the effects of exposure six months afterward. On June 25, 1866, our subject married Eveline, daughter of Abijah BAIRD, and by her he has had twelve children, eleven of whom are living: William S., Enre J., Hester A., Mary E., Miranda D., James G., Dora R., Richard W., Apple I., Charles H. and George W. William S. is married to Miss Phoebe GARNETT; Hester is married to George GARNETT, her brother-in-law. Mrs. Rogers was born in Lehman township, January 15, 1845. Politically, Mr. Rogers is a Republican.

John W. ROGERS, farmer, P. O. Meeker, was born in Huntington township, August 13, 1825, where he was reared and educated. He is a son of Jonah and Mary (WHITMAN) ROGERS, both born in 1795, the former in Plymouth, the latter in Columbia county. Jonah was a son of Jonah, who was born in Connecticut, and removed to the Valley before the Massacre. One day, when he was a boy of thirteen summers, he and a man were making sugar at Nanticoke; the man was killed by Indians, while the boy was captured and taken in the direction of South Mountain; there were two other men, named PIKE and VAN CAMPEN, captured by the same Indians, and they, through the cunning of the boy and the oversight of the Indians, contrived to convey a knife to Pike, who liberated himself and his companion, who slew the Indians. They then made their way back, Pike swimming streams with the boy on his back. After this lad Rogers reached his majority, he settled in Plymouth, where he resided until 1825, when he removed to Huntington township, locating on a farm of 100 acres, some of which was improved, and here he lived until his death, which occurred when he was at an advanced age His family consisted of four children, all of whom are deceased His son, Jonah, lived on the old place ninteen years, when he removed to Lehman township, where he died in 1859, at the age of sixty-five years. His life was uneventful. He was a hard-working, honest man There were six children born to him, three of whom are now (1892) living, John W. being the fourth in the family. He always confined himself to farming, and has lived all his life in his present neighborhood. In 1849 he married Miss Susan Ann, daughter of Ezra and Sarah IDE, and eight children were born to them, six of whom are now living: Sarah L., Winfield S., Melville E., Franklin J., Edward B. and Emma, all married except the latter. In 1862 he entered the army, becoming a member of Company F, one Hundred and Forty-ninth P. V. I., for the term of three years. He served two years, and was then honorably discharged on account of disabilities. In 1850 he removed to his present residence, on a farm of one hundred acres. Mr. Rogers is a practical farmer, is a man of sound principles, and has served his term in various offices with credit. He has worked hard for his property, and has succeeded in accumulating sufficient for all needs, all by his own hands. On February 15, 1881, Mr. Rogers married, for his second wife, Mrs MONTGOMERY. Socially, he is a member of the I. O. O. F., politically, he is a Republican.

STEPHEN F. ROGERS, farmer, P.O. Outlet, was born in Huntington township, July 23, 1836. He is the son of Jonah and Mary (Whiteman) Rogers, the former of

whom was born in Plymouth, the latter in Fishing Creek, Columbia county. Jonah was a son of Jonah, a native of Connecticut, who was taken captive by the Indians at the age of thirteen years. Subsequent to the Wyoming Massacre, after his capture, there were two others (Pike and Van Campen) taken prisoners with him, and by the carelessness of the Indians and the watchfulness of the captives, they succeeded in escaping, after slaying all the Indians but one. He afterward settled in Plymouth, where he lived most of his life. Some time before his death he removed to Huntington township, where he lived until his death, which occurred in 1834. His family numbered six children. Jonah, Jr., was thirty years of age when he removed with his father to Huntington; in 1844

he removed to Lehman, where he bought a farm of fifty acres. Here he died at a ripe old age. His family consisted of six children, all of whom grew to maturity; three are now (1892) living: Jackson J., John W. and Stephen F.

The latter is the youngest of the family, and was reared and educated in Lehman township. He always confined himself to agricultural pursuits, though in his early life he was extensively engaged in the lumber business. On November 20, 1856, he married Miss Sarah A., daughter of Robert and Lucy Major, by whom he has had three children: Henry M., now aged thirty-four; Emogene A., now aged thirty-one; and May L., now aged twenty-three. The two former are married. Henry M. married Miss Amelia Huff; Emogene A. married John B. Crispell. Mr. Rogers removed from Lehman to Lake township in 1860, and, after working six years in a sawmill, he bought his present place of fifty acres, some of which was under improvement. The effects of years of incessant toil are seen in his well-planned fields and commodious outbuildings, for he is a practical farmer in the full sense of the term. In 1864 he entered the army for the term of one year, serving in Company E, Two Hundred and Third P.V.I., serving to the close of the war, when he was honorably discharged. He, with his wife and daughter May, are members of the Baptist Church. Miss May is an accomplished young lady who has been educated at Dallas high school; from thence, to Wilkes Barre. She is now attending the Wyoming Seminary; she has taught seven terms of school in her own and adjoining districts, where she has endeared herself to the pupils, and proved herself a proficient instructor, to the directors.

T.M. ROGERS, superintendent of Hollenback Cemetery, Wilkes Barre, was born in Broome county, N.Y., July 14, 1816, a son of Alexander and Nancy (Menn) Rogers, the former born in Massachusetts March 13, 1776. They settled at Forty Fort, this county, prior to 1820, and later at what is now Laflin, also in this county, where they were offered sixty acres of land, at $1.00 per acre, with ten years to pay for it without interest. There they remained six years, and then removed to Sullivan county, Pa., where the father helped to build the Delaware & Hudson Canal; then removed to Honesdale, Wayne Co., Pa., where they passed the remainder of their days. Our subject was reared in Pennsylvania, and his first business ventures were farming and lumbering in Wayne county; later he learned the boat-builder's trade at Honesdale, Pa., an occupation he followed from 1852 to 1870 in Wilkes Barre, in connection with carpenter work; from 1870 to 1873 he was superintendent of the Wilkes Barre City Cemetery. Mr. Rogers married, August 9, 1835, Rosanna, daughter of Samuel and Lois (Lilley) Corey, of Wayne county, Pa., and by her had ten children, of whom five grew to maturity: Mary E. (Mrs. John Fulton), Clementine L. (Mrs. Robert Nesbitt), Abi (Mrs. William A. St. John), Estella (Mrs. Hiram Montanye), and William. Mr. Rogers is a member of the M. E. Church, and in politics he is a Republican.

JOHN ROHLAND, superintendent of the machine and preparation department of the

enormous coal works of Coxe Bros. & Co., Drifton, is a native of New York City, born December 31, 1848. He is a son of Frederick and M. S. (Ficht) Rohland, both natives of Germany, the former born in Bremen and the latter in Worms. The father emigrated to America at the age of eighteen years, and died in 1876 at the age of fifty-five. Our subject's mother now lives in Wayne county, Pa. John Rohland was educated in the public schools of New York City, and in Bryant & Stratton's Commercial College. At the early age of fourteen, he engaged in the lumber business on the Delaware, which he followed for a period of twenty years. In 1880 he entered the employ of Coxe Bros. & Co., as outside superintendent at Deringer, shortly after accepting his present position, in which he has since been engaged. Mr. Rohland was married May 22, 1870, to Miss Ruth M. Skimer, an accomplished young lady of Wayne county, Pa. This happy union has been blessed with three children: Ida, Charles H. and William F. the family are members of the Lutheran Church, and in politics Mr. Rohland is a stanch Republican.

CALVIN D. ROHRBACH, hardware merchant, Freeland, is a native of Saegersville, Pa., and was born January 22, 1862, a son of A. G. and Rebecca (Wien) Rohrbach. When he was five years of age his parents removed from Pottstown, Montgomery county, to Butler township, this county, where he was reared and educated. At about the age of sixteen he began working around the mines, and filled several positions, following mining until he was twenty-five years of age, when he entered the employ of H. C. Koons, as clerk, at which he continued two years. He then engaged in the hardware business at Freeland, and he now commands a large public patronage. Mr. Rohrbach was married, August 20, 1885, to Miss Maggie Betterby, of Butler Valley, and they have had four children, viz: Thomas, Olive (deceased), Howard (deceased), and Bertha. Our subject is a member of the P.O.S. of A., and Jr. O.U.A.M.; in his political views he is decidedly a Democrat.

GEORGE ROHRIG, on e of the oldest residents of Ashley, was born in Prussia, Germany, August 14, 1826, a son of Martin and Mary (Hermann) Rohrig. The father, who was a miner, reared a family of four children, of whom our subject is the second. Mr. Rohrig was a miner, fireman and assistant engineer in his native country and emigrated in 1848, locating in Schuylkill county, Pa., where he followed mining for eighteen months. He then went to Eagle Harbor, Michigan, and worked in the copper mines two years, and in 1852 came to Ashley, working as stationary engineer until 1886, at which time he retired from active life. In 1854 Mr. Rohrig married Miss Ann, daughter of John Hart, of Scranton, Pa., and by her had four children, viz: Martin, who died at the age of thirty-two; Margaret (Mrs. Edward Brown); George, tinsmith, St. Joseph, Mr.; and Catherine (Mrs. Charles G. Baur). Mrs. Rohrig died in 1864, and our subject afterward married Mrs. Susan Shidal, daughter of Theodore and Catherine (Russhe) Deibel, natives of Germany, and widow of Martin Shidal, by whom she had two children, viz: John, a shoemaker of Ashley, and Elizabeth (Mrs. George Henry). Of this union were born two children, viz: Louisa and Frederick. Mr. Rohrig and wife are members of the German Lutheran Church, and he is a member of the I.O.O.F. and Encampment, and of the F.&A.M. In his political views he is a Republican.

ALVIN S. ROOD, carpenter, Bloomingdale, was born in Huntington township, April 10, 1837, a son of David and Sarah (Seward) Rood, the former of whom was born in Ross township in 1812, the latter in Huntington township. David is a son of Ira Rood, the first of that name and family to settle in this county, and who first located in Union township and then removed to Ross, where he owned ninety acres of farm land. He was a man of good judgment and moral habits. His family numbered twelve children, two of whom are now living. His son David began his business life as a farmer in Ross township, owning eighty acres of land which he improved and beautified during his lifetime. He was a worthy man of respectability. He was a strict member of the M. E. Church for fifty years, during which time he did some preaching; he died February 13, 1891, aged eighty-three years, after a life of recognized usefulness. His family consisted of six children, five of whom are living. Alvin S., who is the second in order of birth, in early life learned the carpenter's trade, he served his country when she needed the aid of all the loyal men. He was mustered into the service of the United States in March, 1864 (for the term of three years), as a musician and member of Company A, One Hundred and Eighty- eighth P.V.I., serving honorably and well to the close of the war, being discharged in December, 1865; he draws a pension. After his return to citizenship he worked at his trade, and is a first-class mechanic. In 1855 Mr. Rood married Miss Eliza Wolfe, who was born in Ross township in 1838, daughter of Peter and Lois Wolfe, and to them were born five children, all living: Josiah, Steward, Edward, Hattie and Minnie. Mr. and Mrs. Rood are members of the M.E. Church, in good standing. Mr. Rood owns the property of Peter Wolfe, a small farm of thirty-five acres which he works in conjunction with his trade. Politically he is a Republican.

LUDWIG ROOS, butcher, Wilkes Barre, was born in Bavaria, Germany, March 3, 1845, a son of Gottfried and Elizabeth (Stahl) Roos. He was reared and educated in Germany, where he served an apprenticeship of two years at the butcher's trade, and afterward worked nine years in that business. He served eleven months and twenty-four days in the Franco-Prussian war. In February, 1872, he came to America, located in Wilkes Bare, and embarked in the butcher's business, in which he has since continued with success. He was twice married: March 12, 1873, he married Miss Mary, daughter of John Henry, of Lehman township, this county, and by her he had one child, Mary (deceased). His second wife was Miss Margaretta Henry, sister of the first, and of this union have been born two children, yet living: Louisa and Frank. Our subject is a member of the German Catholic Church. In politics he is a Democrat, and has served one term as member of the city council.

EDWARD C. ROOT, was born in Wilkes Barre, July 25, 1866, a son of Chauncy C. and Mary P. (Kelley) Root. The fathr, who was a native of Wilkes Barre, and a brick mason and contractor by trade, died in 1870 leaving two children: Edward C. and Mamie (Mrs. Fred G. Smith). Our subject was educated in the public schools of Wilkes Barre, and at eighteen years of age entered the employ of W. D. White & Co., druggists, Wilkes Barre, with whom he remained two and one-half years. Then he entered the employ of J. H. Honch, of Pittston, at the West End Store, and after one year's service was promoted to manager and since 1887 he has been a registered pharmacist. He is a member of the West Pittston Presbyterian Church, and of the Y.M.C.A.; politically he is a Republican.

DAVID L. ROSS, physician and surgeon, Pittston. This gentleman, who ranks among the best of Luzerne county's physicians, was born in Newport, Rhode Island, May 27, 1845, and is a son of David and Mary (Ivison) Ross, the former of whom was born in the Highlands of Scotland, and became a sailor. David Ross immigrated to the United States many years ago, and served in the United States navy fifteen years as mate. He has retired from active business life, and resides at Lisbon, Conn. The mother was born in Carlisle, England. They had a family of three living children, viz: Annie, wife of W. W. Woodward, a druggist of Danielsonville, Conn.; David L.; and George I., a physician and graduate of the Washington University of Baltimore, and now practicing his profession at Canton, Mass. Our subject passed his boyhood in Connecticut, and was educated in the public schools of his native city. At the age of seventeen, on March 21, 1864, he enlisted in Company B, Tenth Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, and was discharged August 25, 1865, at Richmond, Va. He participated in the following battles: Drurys Bluffs, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains; at the last-named engagement he was wounded with a musket ball in the left thigh, and was sent to Portsmouth (Va.) Hospital, where he remained three months. After rejoining his regiment he was in the battle of Hatcher's Run, Fort Gregg, and at the surrender of Lee at Appomattox. After the close of the war he traveled for a short time in the West, finally locating in Chicago, where he secured a position in a drug-store as a night clerk, and at the same time entered Rush Medical College in 1868, graduating from there with the degree of M.D. January 17, 1872. He at once entered upon the practice of his profession in that city, and continued there one year; then removed to Danielsonville, Conn., where he remained one year, and then was one year at Moodus, same State. In 1874 the Doctor came to Pittston, and here remained six year; then removed to Scotland, Conn., and remained there until 1887, when he returned to Pittston, and has here since been in active practice. The Doctor has been a very successful practitioner, and has enjoyed the perfect confidence of his patients. He was united in marriage, October 12, 1873, with Nellie Underwood, a daughter of Jerome Underwood, of Pittston, which union has been blessed with two children, Mabel and Ada. The Doctor is a member and past commander of Nugent Post No. 245 G.A.R.

EDWARD E. ROSS, Luzerne, wa born October 17, 1855, at Tuscarora, Schuylkill Co., Pa., and is a son of John E. and Sarah (Davison) Ross, natives respectively of the counties of Northumberland and Durham, England. They emigrated to this country about the year 1852, and settled in Schuylkill county, Pa., where the subject of our sketch was born and spent his early childhood. He was educated in the common schools of his native county and, at the youthful age of fifteen, became a teacher, in which occupation he continued until 1885, when he established a drug business at Luzerne, which is in a prosperous and flourishing condition. In 1887 he was offered a position as outside foreman of a colliery, operated by the Northwest Coal Company (limited), located in Lackawanna county. In this position he accepted and faithfully performed the duties connected therewith until 1889, when he received the appointment as principal of the graded school at Kingston, a position he still occupies. Mr. Ross, in 1889, was a candidate for county superintendent of schools; he was unsuccessful, yet, if elected, he would have undoubtedly performed the trust imposed in him in that careful and highly commendable manner which has characterized his entire career. He was married, January 18, 1887, to Amy S., daughter of Joseph and Rosanna (Tylie) Blackman, and one child, a daughter, fourteen months old, who bears her mother's name, has blessed this happy union. In politics Mr. Ross is always found in the Republican ranks; and is a member of the F. & A.M., I.O.O.F., Imp'd O.R.M., and P.O.S. of A.

GILES ROSS, contractor and builder, Wilkes Barre, was born in Falls township, Luzerne (now Wyoming) county, Pa., March 18, 1845, and is a son of David and Charlotte (Olmstead) Ross. His paternal grandfather, who wa a native of England, born of Scotch parentage, came to America about 1790, and was one of the pioneers of what is now Moscow, Pa., where he resided many years; in later life he removed to Michigan, and died there. Of his family, David, father of subject, was born in Luzerne county in December, 1806, near Moscow, and lived in Luzerne county, dying there at the age of eighty-three years. His wife was a daughter of David Olmstead, of Falls township, and by her he had sixteen children, eleven of whom grew to maturity, viz: James N., Lydia (Mrs. Joseph Griffin), David, Delilah (Mrs. John Covert), Miles, Mary (Mrs. John Sites), Esther (Mrs. Charles L. Moore), Giles, John W., Wilson E. and Charlotte R. Our subject was reared in Ross township, this county, and was educated in the common schools. On September 24, 1864, he enlisted in Company A, Eighty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, participating in all the battles of the Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac, which took place after his enlistment, and was honorably discharged at close of the war. He then located in Wilkes Barre, where he learned the carpenter's trade, after which he worked as a journeyman from 1868 to 1876, when he embarked in business for himself. In 1879 Mr. Ross married Anna, daughter of John Bastoscheck, of Wilkes Barre, and has three children: John D., Charlotte M. and Giles G. Mr. Giles Ross is a member of the G.A.R., and in politics is a Republican.

JASON ROSS, farmer, P. O. Orange, was born March 23, 1856, in Franklin township, where he was reared and educated. He is a son of Joseph B. and Sarah M. (Hallock) Ross, the former born in Franklin in 1820, the latter in New Jersey. Joseph is a son of William Ross, who was born in New Jersey, April 11, 1793, and removed hither in 1800, with his father, James, when only seven years of age. James had five children at the time when he moved here by wagon from New Jersey, and two more were born after he settled. He located first in Hanover township, but after four years removed to what is now Dallas, and there purchased a lot of land on which he lived and which he cultivated. He was a hard-working man and patriotic in the extreme, serving his country faithfully for five years in her struggle with England for independence. He lived to a good old age. William, his son, remained on the homestead until having attained his majority; he followed the example of his faher by serving four years in the war of 1812. On his return to citizenship, he removed to what is now Franklin township on a farm of fifty acres. He marrie Miss Anna Brace, and by her had three children, one of whom, Sarah, is now living. William was an honest and industrious man, a Democrat who had influence with his party, a good citizen, and did much to improve the town in which he lived. He died in 1868, at the age of seventy-five. His son, Joseph B., began life on his father's farm, and was a man of sterling qualities, honest, faithful and industrious. Under his magic touch the farm of fifty increased to eighty- seven acres, and was improved and cultivated. He had five children, four of whom reached maturity and are now living: Ira H., Julia A., Homer S., and Jason. Our subject, the youngest of his father's children, has always confined himself to agricultural pursuits, and is now a practical farmer, living on the old homestead on which his grandfather settled. He is a

thorough business man of pure principles and fine ideas, and has filled various offices with credit. On January 13, 1880, he married Miss Carrie M., the accomplished daughter of David and Phoebe Barlew. Of this union one child, Augusta B., was born August 1, 1882. Mr. and Mrs. Ross are consistent and active members of the M.E. Church at Orange.

JOHN ROSS, miner in the Delaware Shaft, Miners Mills, was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, about three miles from the birthplace of Robert Burns, September 22, 1835. He is a son of William and Elizabeth (McGary) Ross; his father, who was a miner, reared a family of nine children, four of whom are living, viz: John, Jane (Mrs. Cornelius Beatty), Hugh, a mine foreman at Stauffer, Pa., and Mary, who married Elias Phillips, a mine foreman, at Lemont, Pa. Another son, William, was killed by an explosion of dynamite at Mount Lookout, Pa., in February, 1891. Our subject began life working in and about the mines in his native country, and came to America in 1866, locating at Blossburg, Pa., where he worked in the mines one year. He then returned to Scotland, remaining two years, during which time he was married. In 1869 he came to Renova, Pa., and after working about the mines there for a few months removed to Arnot, where he worked in the mines three years, and then embarked in the mercantile business in Blossburg for three years. He next removed to Plains, where he remained eleven years, thence in 1886 to Miners Mills. Since that time he has worked chiefly in his blacksmith shop during the summers, and in the mines during the winters. Mr. Ross was married March 20, 1868, to Miss Anna, daughter of David and Catharine (McGill) McNaughton, of his native town; they have had born to them nine children, five of whom are living, viz: Catharine (Mrs. George Tasker), who has two children, Anna and William; William, who works in his father's shop, building iron fence; Elizabeth, John and Hugh. Mr. Ross and wife attend the Primitive Methodist Church, of which she is a member; he is a member of the I.O.O.F., K. of P., and F. & A.M. In his political views he is a Republican, and has held the offices of assessor and tax collector in Plains; he is now justice of the peace in Miners Mills, and is serving his second term as burgess.

Miles ROSS, farmer, P.O. Kyttle, was born in Wyoming county , February 23, 1839. He is the son of David and Charlotta (OLMSTEAD) ROSS, the former born near Spring Brook, Lackawanna county, in 1806, the latter in Seboharie, Seboharie Co., NY, in 1810. David was a son of William ROSS, a native of Connecticut, who removed to this county in 1786, locating at Spring Brook, where he became engaged in farming. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and did honor to his country. He was an inveterate hunter, in those days, when game was in abundance. William Ross reared a useful and interesting family, and died at a good old age. His son, David, began his business life in Falls township, Wyoming county, where he farmed on a small scale. May 14, 1850, he removed to Ross township, this county, where he purchased a farm of 218 acres of unimproved land, part of which he brought under cultivation during his lifetime. He was an honest, industrious and hard-working man, and a consistent member of the M. E. Church. David Ross died October 19, 1889, aged eighty-three years. His family consisted of sixteen children, eleven of whom grew to maturity. Nine are now living. Miles Ross is the eighth of the family in the order of birth. He was reared and educated in Wyoming county, and lived with his father until after the outbreak of the Civil war. He was mustered into the U.S. service August 22, 1862, in Company F. One Hundred and Forty-ninth P.V.I., for the term of three years, participating in all the principal battles of the army of the Potomac. He was taken prisoner by the enemy while carrying provisions to a picket post a gap being left between two sentinels, he and his company passed outside the Union line. He remained nine months a prisoner, serving time in Andersonville, Augusta, Milan and Florence. At the close of the war he was honorably discharged, and has since been followed agricultural pursuits. November 16, 1865, he married Miss Mary E., daughter of Stephen H. and Ruth PARKS. To them has been born one child, La Roy. Mr. Ross owns eighty-five acres of land, the cultivation of which he oversees, his principle crop being grass. He is a member of the G.A.R., and in religion an adherent of the M.E. Church. Mrs. Mary E. Ross was born in Monroe, Wyoming county, March 2, 1841. The PARKes are old settlers who came from Connecticut about 1810; they are well-to-do farmers and worthy people. Several members of their family fought in the Revolutionary war and the war of 1812.

Nathan ROSS, engineer at Henry Shat, Plains, was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, July 12, 1847, son of Nathaniel and Janet (FRAZER) ROSS. The father, who was a mine foreman, reared a family of ten children, three of whom are living in America, and of whom Nathan is the seventh. Our subject came to America in 1870, and located at Providence, PA., where he was engaged in mining two years; then removed to Plains, where he worked as engineer, a position he had held in Scotland. He erected his present residence in 1874, and has since built other houses which he rents. Mr. Ross was married, July 13, 1865, to Miss Margaret, daughter of Donald and Mary (MINGES) McLELLEN, of Lanarkshire, Scotland, and they have five children, four of whom are living, viz.: Nathan; Nathaniel, who was educated in Plains high school, then served four years as drug clerk at Nanticoke, afterward entering Jefferson :Medical college, at Philadelphia, from which he graduated in 1892, and is now practicing in WilkesBarre; Mary, who is a seamstress, and resides with her parents; and Kate R., who graduated in the Normal and Manual Training courses of the Bloomsburg State NOrmal School in 1891 and at present teaching in Plains. Mr. and Mrs. Ross are members of the Presbyterian Church; he is a member of the I.O.O.F. and Encampment, and the Caledonian Club of Wilkes-Barre, in al of which Societies he is a past officer; in his political views he is a Republican.

Nathan ROSS, Jr., engineer, Plains, was born in Scotland March 9, 1866, and is a son of Nathan and Margaret (McLELLEN) ROSS. He was educated in the common schools, after which he fired for the Lehigh Valley Coal Company at the Henry Shaft four years, and then secured a position as engineer for the Sheldon Axle Works, Wilkes-Barre, which he at present holds, residing in Plains. Mr. Ross was married, December 31, 1888, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of William and Isabella (PORTER) KEIR, natives of Scotland; they have two children, a son named Nathan, and a daughter, Isabella. Mr. and Mrs. Ross are members of the Presbyterian Church; he is a member of the I.O.O.F. and Encampment, and the Caledonian Club of Wilkes-Barre; politically he is a Republican.

William Wallace ROSS, stationary engineer, Parsons, was born in Bush, Susquehanna Co., PA., November 5, 1850, and is a son of William W. and Malinda (MERICLE) ROSS, the father a native of Pennsylvania, of Scotch, and later of New England, origin, a grandson of Capt. Perrin ROSS, who was killed at the Wyoming massacre, the mother a native of Pennsylvania and of German descent. When Mr. Ross was about eighteen years of age his parents removed to Camptown, PA., where he was educated, and at the age of twenty he came to Parsons, where he has since been engaged in stationary engineering, at present employed at the Prospect Mine. Mr. Ross was married, July 16, 1876,to Miss Carrie, daughter of John and Catherine (HERUE) HINES, of Peckville, Lackawanna Co., PA, and the fruit of this happy union is five children, viz.: Charles, Harry, Gertrude, Oscar, and Sadie. Mr. Ross is a member of the Improved Order of Red Men; his political views are Republican, and is a member and president of the Parsons borough council.

William W. ROTH, outside foreman of Lattimer Colliery, No. 1, Drum’s. This competent foreman was born in Butler Valley, January 22, 1863, and is the eighth in a family of eleven children born to Samuel and Caroline (DAUBER) ROTH, early settlers of Butler Valley. William W. was reared and educated at his birhplace, and until hebecame of age worked at farming. After reaching his majority he learned the carpenter’s trade, and worked on the construction of breakers until 1886, when he was given the position of foreman of the carpenter gang at the Lattimer Colliery, No. 1. On 1887 he was promoted to the foremanship of the Lattimer Mines, Nos. 1 and 2,and has since held that position. HE has under his charge about 300 men, whose daily output of coal is 700 tons. Mr. Roth has had an extensive practical experience about the mines, and is well up in the business of running a colliery. Her was united in marriage, December 22, 1883, with Miss Sabina, daughter of Stephen CUNFER, of Carbon county, PA. To this union have been born four children, namely: Elmer, Blanche, Caroline, and Ellen. IN political matters, Mr. Roth is not wed to any party, but votes purely on principle, and for the best man. He is a member of the P.O.S.of A., and the family belongs to the Lutheran Church.

Ezra ROUGH, farmer, P.O. Briggsville, was born in Nescopeck township, April 22, 1846, a son of Samuel and Jerusha (BROWN) ROUGH. His paternal grandparents, Daniel and Anna (HENRY) ROUGH, were pioneers of Nescopeck township, and his maternal grandparents, John and Betsey (LINNEBERRY) BROWN, were natives of New Jersey, and pioneers of Mifflin township, Columbia Co., PA. Samuel Rough was born in Nesocpeck township in 1824. and died in 1881, leaving two sons, Ezra and John. Our subject was reared in Nescopeck township where he has always resided engaged in agricultural pursuits. His wife was Huldah, daughter of Joel and Mary (LUTZ) HONSINGER, of Black Creek township, and by her he has five children; Samuel R., Dallas W., Jordan E., Blanche M. and Lena E. Politically Mr. Rough is a Democrat.

Casper M. ROUSE (deceased) was born in Bennington, VT., December 15, 1832, and was a son of John H. and Clara (MOORE) ROUSE, natives of New York and Vermont, and of German and New England origin, respectively. The father, who was a wagon-maker by trade, reared a family of three children, of whom Casper M. was the eldest. He came to Pennsylvania in 1869, and located at Moosic, where he was employed as superintendent of the Powder Works at that place for four years; and then superintended the construction of the Powder Works at Laflin, in which he was superintendent and also a stockholder until his death, which occurred at his residence in Laflin, PA, April 6, 1890. Mr. Rouse was married, August 14, 1858, to Wealthy J., daughter of Joseph and Sarah (ST. CLAIR) VANANDEN, of Fair Haven, VT This union was blessed with four children, three of whom are living, viz,: John Franklin, "black-boss" at the Laflin Powder Works; Sarah Jane (Mrs. Thomas BARRETT), resides at Bennington, VT (she has one child, Edward) and Clara Belle, who resides with her mother. Mrs. Rouse and her daughter Clara Belle are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Plainsville.

W.C. ROUSHEY, farmer, P.O. Dallas, was born in Hope, Warren Co., N.J., November 27, 1812. He is a son of Peter B. and Rebecca (WOLF) ROUSHEY, both of whom were born in Warren county, N.J. His father was a tailor by trade, and moved to this country about 1816, after the death of his first wife, locating in Dallas on the property owned by William GOSS. He was married four times, and his family by the four wives numbered eleven children, five of whom are supposed to be living. William C., our subject, is the first child by the first marriage, and was reared and educated in Dallas, having been brought here when ten years of age, and after the death of his mother. He had very few educational advantages, but has studied men as well as books, and is thoroughly conversant with nature and art. He is a self-educated and a self-made man. In early life he learned the carpenter’s trade at which he worked a number of years and in 1837 purchased of W. BALDWIN a farm of eighty-three acres, which he cleared, and on which he put up buildings and added improvements until today it is a perfect farm. In his younger days, Mr. Roushey was a thorough business man and an extensive farmer, and the eighty-three acres of 1837 have increased to 177 acres. He is a general farmer, but gives to hay-making the preference. He was a leading man in the Republican party, and during the war was employed as enumerator preparatory to the draft. He was assessor and school director for eighteen years; was for ten years in the insurance business, at which he was very successful; and was postmaster from 1836-1837. May 1, 1834, in Dallas, Mr. Roushey married Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Christopher and Sarah RICE, who was born in Hope township, November 7, 1813. Of this union were born eight children, three of whom are living: Oliver L., Franklin A. and George W.; Oliver L. has thirteen children by his two marriages; Franklin A. is a widower with two children; George W. has one child. Mr. Roushey is in his eightieth year, his wife in her seventy-ninth year, but both enjoy good health. They are consistent members of the M.E. Church.

Evan M. ROWLAND, general merchant, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Monmouthshire, South Wales, April 22, 1842, a son of Morgan and Elizabeth (THOMAS) ROWLAND. He was reared and educated in South Wales, where at the age of eight years, he began life in the coal mines, and where he followed mining in different capacities unil 1867. The same year he came to America, locating in Carbon county, where he engaged in mining for eighteen months. In 1869 he located in Wilkes-Barre and mined until 1885, at which time he embarked in general merchandising, a business he still continues. In 1867 Mr. Rowland married Miss Mary, daughter of William and Rachel HERBERT, of South Wales, and has one daughter living, Mrs. John T. WILLIAMS. Mr. Rowland is a member of the Ivorites, of the K.of P., and also of the Welsh Baptist Church, in which he has been a deacon twenty years. In politics he is a republican.

M.J. RUDDY, merchant, Miners Mills, was born in County Mayo, Ireland, March 13, 1840, and is a son of John and Ann (RUDDY) RUDDY. John Ruddy, who was a farmer, reared a family of nine children, viz: Charles, in Ireland; Thomas, in England; Michael J.; James in England; John, who died at the age of fourteen years; Austin and John, both in Scotland; Bridget (Mrs. Michael MAYCOCK), in Miners Mills; and Constantine, a miner in Miners Mills. Our subject came to America in 1863, and worked at mining in Providence, PA., two years and at Olyphant fourteen years. In 1891 he built his store (with residence attached), which he purchased in 1886, and engaged in the mercantile business. Mr. Ruddy was married, May 13, 1886, to Miss Margaret, daughter of Thomas and Ellen (FERGUSON) GRADY, native of County Mayo, Ireland, and to this union have been born ten children, viz.: Patrick J., who taught school six years, and is now studying law with John T. LENAHAN, Wilkes-Barre; John, deceased in infancy; Mary E.; Anna; Michael, deceased at the age of six and a half years; Thomas; James; Nellie; Frank, and Harold. He and his family are members of the Catholic Church; he is a member of the C.M.B.A.; is a Democrat in his political views and has held the office of school director.

Anthony RUDEWICK, general merchant, South Heberton, P.O. Freeland, one of the enterprising business men of the county, is a native of Poland, born in 1854. He received his education in his native land, and at the age of nineteen came to America, locating at Shenandoah, PA., where he worked in the mines two years. He then removed to Mahanoy City, where he followed mining for one year, after which he went to Pittsburgh, whence after a short stay he came to Upper Lehigh, where he worked in the mines four years. In 1878 he came to South Heberton and engaged in the general mercantile business, which he has since continuously followed with the exception of two years that he was in business at Freeland, and a short time that he was engaged in farming. Mr. Rudewick carries on a very extensive trade. He is a well-known business man, and has many patrons. On January 10, 1882, he was married to Miss Wanda CZYZEWSKA, also a native of Poland, and they have four children, viz.: Josephina, Stella, Wanda and Anthony, Jr.

C.W. RUGGLES, merchant, Pike’s Creek, was born in Ross township, February 21, 1849, a son of Josiah and Mary Ann (NAUGLE) RUGGLES, natives of Hanover township, the former born in 1816, the latter in 1819. Josiah was a son of Lorenzo RUGGLES, a native of Connecticut, born in 1790, and who removed to this county about 1797, locating in Hanover township. During his lifetime he owned 140 acres of land, all of which were brought under subjection in his day, tangible evidence of his energy and pluck in those pioneer days. He was also a blacksmith, and in those early times was looked upon as a first-class mechanic. He was an expert in making ploughs for the breaking up of the new soil. He was an active politician, and in his party (Whig) had some influence--indeed, his political, social and religious influence was materially felt in his neighborhood; he was an active member of the M.E. Church. He lived to be about seventy-eight years of age, and reared a family of nine out of eleven children born to him. His son Josiah began life as a farmer in Hanover township, but soon removed to Pittston where he remained a few years when he came to Ross township, where he remained about twenty years. In 1860 he removed to Lehman township, where he purchased 800 acres of timberland, and engaged extensively in the lumber trade He built four sawmills, two steam, and two water power--one in Lake, one in Ross, and two in Lehman. He has been in partnership with J. J. SHONK, of Plymouth, in the lumber business at Ruggles, where they also built a tannery. He was the means of establishing a post office, which in honor of him was called Ruggles, and of which he was postmaster ten years. While he resided in Ross township, he was postmaster for about twenty years. He has been a very active man, one of much worth in society. Always ready to give to the needy. his home is ever open to the homeless, and his heart to the distressed; an active churchman, and a free and liberal giver in the support of the Gospel. His family consisted of twelve children eight of whom grew to maturity. He and his good wife are yet living at advance ages, and are in fair health. C.W. Ruggles, who is the seventh in the family, was reared and educated in Lehman and Ross townships, and spent two terms in Kinston Seminary. In his early life he followed the business of sawyer; afterward was clerk for Ruggles and Shonk, and in 1874 he removed to Lake township, where he engaged in mercantile business on a large scale. He has a commodious and well-stocked storeroom of general merchandise, and enjoys a large custom which has been brought to him mainly by his strict attention to business principles and his paying special attention to the "Golden rule," which is sure to bring success in the end. Mr. Ruggles was married August 1, 1872, to Miss Rosa ROOD, who was born in Ross township, November 9, 1852, a daughter of Thomas D. and Martha ROOD, and there were seven children born to them, six of whom are now living, viz.: Milton L., Jennie M., Torrance, Bertha L., Rosa B. and Eliza B. Besides his store, Mr. Ruggles has a neat farm of eighty-two acres. He is a Republican, and has held the office of postmaster fourteen years--ever since the establishment of a post office there.

W.O. RUGGLES, farmer, contractor and builder, Pike’s Creek, was born in Ross township, September 12, 1850, a son of Josiah and Mary A. (NAUGLE) RUGGLES, the former born in Hanover township, the latter, it is presumed a native of the same town. Josiah is the son of Lorenzo RUGGLES, who was one of the first of this family to come to the county, arriving about 1797, from Connecticut, and locating in Hanover township, where he purchased a farm of 140 acres. He was a blacksmith by trade, and, as well as clearing up his farm; he also made ploughs and axes by hand, and these ploughs and axes, although crude in appearance, were very effective practically. His family numbered eleven children, nine of whom grew to maturity. He died in 1868 in his seventy-eighth year. His son, Josiah, in early life, followed boating and other vocations, and, as he advanced in years and experience, entered mercantile business; he finally went into the farming and lumbering business extensively. At one time he owned about 1,000 acres of timber land. He is a man of large experience, and in his younger days of much influence and sterlng worth He had held the office of postmaster for about twenty years at one time, and for ten years at another, and he had other minor officers in the town which he discharged with credit. He and his good wife are now living and enjoying life in Lehman township at the age of seventy-six and seventy three years, respectively. They reared a family of eight, all of whom grew to maturity and are now (1891) living, W.O. being the eight in the family. Our subject was reared and educated in Lehman at the common school. In early life he confined himself to the carpenter’s trade, at which trade he became an adept, and has always followed it in conjunction with his farming. He contracts for all his work, bridges, building of various designs, etc. Mr. Ruggles is not only a master builder but an extensive and practical farmer, owning 120 acres on which he resides, fifty-six in another lot, besides building lots in the borough o Nanticoke. He has held several offices, and is a man of influence and ability. Last October he lost property to the extent of $800. At the age of twenty, September 12, 1870, he married Miss Mary A., daughter of Nathan and Emily J. IDE, and by her he had five children: F.L., C.M., Eugene, Emily J. and Grace, all of whom are yet (1891) living. Mrs. Mary A. (Ide) Ruggles was born in Lehman, December 20, 1851, and is a descendant of the first settler of Luzerne township. W. O. Ruggles is a member of the I.O.O.F. and Jr. O.A.U.M. Politically he is a Republican. He and his wife are consistent member of the M. E. Church.

Captain A. H. RUSH was born in Germany, September 26, 1836. He came to Wilkes-Barre in 1840, and as soon as old enough began work in the mines, where he was employed sevenyears. He then learned the marble-cutter’s trade, and followed that business until the breaking out of the Civil war, in which he served three years and eight months--one year as first lieutenant in the Fifty-second Pennsylvania Regiment, and two years and eight months as captain of Company E, Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry. Since his discharge he has been engaged as traveling salesman in the monument business.

Michael C. RUSSELL, merchant, Edwardsville, is one of the leading business men of this locality, having been engaged in the mercantile business here for over fourteen years. Previous to this time he was engaged at railroading as locomotive engineer. Mr. Russell was born in the parish of Rhine, County Clare, Ireland, and is a son of Timothy and Mary (MALLONEY) RUSSELL, who were both natives of Ireland. Whe he was a little over twelve years of age his parents emigrated to America, settling in Kingston, PA., in which locality he has principally remained ever since. Mr. Russell was married, December 19, 1863, to Miss Elizabeth daughter of Thomas KEATING, of Plymouth, PA; Mr. Keating was one of the first settlers in Plymouth township. the fruits of this happy union are nine children, viz.: Elizabeth, married to John H. RYAN, of Edwardsville; John J, married to Julia VAHEY, of Edwardsville; Thomas F.; Mary Ann; Michael C., Jr.; Joseph; Agnes, Matthew, and Paul. Mr. Russell and his family are members of the Catholic Church. His political principles are Democratic, and he has been borough councilman for three years.

John RUTLEDGE, laborer, Port Blanchard, was born January 14, 1832, in County May, Ireland, and is the youngest in a family of five children born to Michael and Mary (BURKE) RUTLEDGE, also native of County Mayo, Ireland. Our subject was educated in the Irish National Schools, and afterward worked with his father on the farm. He arrived in New York in August, 1847, and settled in Schuylkill county, this State, where he received employment as a laborer in the mines. He came to Pittston in 1849, and worked at general laboring work unil 1851, when he again went into the mines as laborer; one year later, in 1852,k he was employed as a miner by the Pennsylvania Coal Company, with whom he stayed until 1891, when he was again employed at outside laboring work. Mr. Rutledge was united in marriage May 14, 1856, with Bridget, daughter of Peter and Bridget (WALSH) NEALON, natives of Count May, Ireland. This union has been blessed with five children, namely: Kate T., born May 6, 1858, and married December 26, 1889, to Patrick J. MANLEY, a school teacher, in Sebastopol, this county; Mary A., born March 26, 1861; John P., born April 28, 1864; Belinda A., born July 2, 1866, was married August 6, 1890 to Edward J. Moran GIBBONS, a miner, of Port Griffith; and Elizabeth L., born January 2, 1872. The wife of our subject died July 6, 1882. He is a member of the Catholic Churchand of the Catholic Total Abstinence Union. In politics is a Democrat.

JAMES RYAN was born in Framingham, Mass., December 10, 1850, and is a son of William and Catherine (Lynch) Ryan. His father died in 1891; he was a farmer,a soldier in the late Civil war and a member of the Third Mass. V. He was the father of three sons: John, of Ellenville, N.Y., proprietor of a pottery; James; and William, proprietor of a pottery of Keene, N. H. Our subject was reared on a farm until seventeen years of age, then entered the employ of the Somerset Pottery Company at Somerset, Mass., with whom he remained three years. He continued in business in the eastern States until 1872, when he located in Pittston and entered the employ of Evan R. Jones, remaining there three years, after which he formed a partnership with his brother at Ellenville, which existed three years. He then returned to Pittston and again worked for Mr. Jones until his death in 1880, then continued in the employ of the estate until it was disposed of in 1887, and thereafter with the purchaser, Lewis Jones, until the building burned down in 1890. He then purchased the ground and erected the building he now occupies, and has since conducted a successful business. He married, March 30, 1882, Mary G., daughter of John Gahn, an old resident of Pittston, and has two children, Esther and Harry. He is a member of the Masonic Fraternity, is Past Master of St. John's Lodge No. 233, F.& A.M., and is present high priest of Pittston Chapter No. 242; a member of the Wyoming Valley Commandery No. 57, K.T., the Eastern Star, Chapter No. 1, and Gabonto Lodge, I.O.O.F., No. 314; in politics he is a Republican.

JOHN RYAN, foreman, Pittston, is a native of New York City, and was born December 15, 1850. He is a son of John Ryan, in whose family were three children, viz.: Michael, a reporter on the New York Sun, who died at the age of twenty-two; Bridget, a Sister of Charity in New York; and John. When our subject was about six years of age his parents died, and soon after he went to Monticello, N. Y., to live with Mr. J. Booth. He remained there two years and attended school, then went to Damascus, Wayne county, and worked for E. Beech & Son, where he learned the tanner's trade during the next three years. June 26, 1863, he enlisted in the U. S. Navy, on the gunboat, "Penobscot", but was taken out of the service by his sister who was his guardian, he being under age. He returned to the tannery, where he remained until 1878, when he came to Pittston, and has since been engaged in contract work in railroad building, chiefly through the anthracite regions. He was married in 1873 to Miss Sarah, daughter of John Morgan, of Wilkes Barre, and by her has had three children, viz.: John M., William W., and Sarah J. Mr. Ryan is a member of the Masonic Lodge and of the Knights of Pythias. In politics he is a Republican.

T. H. RYAN, merchant, Miners Mills, was born in Scranton November 16, 1856, and is a son of James and Ann (Smith) Ryan, natives of Counties Galway and Sligo, Ireland, respectively, and a grandson of James and Mary (Ford) Ryan, who came to America in 1847, and located in Philadelphia. In his father's family there were seven children, viz.: Thomas H.; James, who was killed in the Pine Ridge Shaft at the age of fifteen; John, employed in the Steel Works at Scranton; Catharine, who lives with her mother in Miners Mills; Mary A., deceased in infancy; Ann and Mary Agnes, also living with their mother. Our subject began working in the Iron Works at the age of fourteen, and later removed with the family to Miners Mills, where he mined twelve years, afterward returning to the Iron Works for one year. He then attended the Saint Francis College, Brooklyn, one year; and after working a few months in the Scranton Steel Works, came to Miners Mills, where he worked in the mines a year and a half. He built his present store in 1884, and a few months later devoted his whole attention to the business, which he has since conducted. Mr. Ryan was married, January 21, 1883, to Miss Margaret, daughter of Patrick Munday, of Miners Mills, a native of Ireland. They have six children, viz.:James R., Ellen, Anna, Mary, Leo and Regina. Mr. and Mrs. Ryan are members of the Catholic Church. He is a member of the A.O.H.; he is a Democrat in his olitical views, and has held the office of school director.

J.J. RYMAN, merchant, Dallas, was born in that town April 3, 1852, and is a son of Abraham and Jemima L. (Kunkle) Ryman, both of whom were also born in Dallas. Abraham was a son of Philip, a native of New Jersey, who came to this county in its early settlement, locating in Dallas, between that village and Huntsville, on a place which is now known as the "Ryman stock farm." He was a thorough-going business man, all his lengthy life; he lived to see many changes for the better in Dallas, many of which he helped to make. He reared a family of nine children. Abraham Ryman began life in Dallas, his native town. He was a man of large business capacities, and was extensively engaged in the lumber and mercantile business. In the former business he was in partnership with Joseph Shaver; they built a saw and planing mill south of Dallas, where they manufactured lumber; this mill was burned down, but another was built on its site with greater facilities for manufacturing purposes, and now has a capacity of from 12,000 to 15,000 feet per day. Mr. A. Ryman was a public-spirited man, and possessed great influence; he was very active in church matters, and a liberal contributor to the support of the Gospel, being a member of the M.E.Church. He died December 17, 1873, having been born August 21, 1817. He reared a family of eight children, seven of whom are living, viz.: Elizabeth, Ruth E., Theodore F., William P., John J., Fred S. and Leslie A. John J. received his education in Dallas, and at the Wyoming Seminary, Kingston, and has always confined himself to lumbering and mercantile business. Mr. Ryman is a striving business man, pleasant and genial with all. He was the prime mover in organizing the Dallas Broom Company, which is now incorporated and is doing a thriving business. He has been twice married, first, to Miss May, daughter of Charles Atwater, formerly of Providence, Pa., by whom he has two children: Edith and Edna. For his second wife he married Miss Jessie, daughter of E. C. Lynde, of Scranton, Pa., by whom he has one child, Lynde. They are both members of the M. E. Church and contribute largely to its support. The Ryman Stock Farm is owned and superintended by the Ryman Bros., who confine themselves principally to raising draught horses. The lumber business is carried on in Wilkes Barre under the name of Ryman Brothers.

WILLIAM P. RYMAN, attorney at law, Wilkes Barre, was born in Dallas, Luzerne Co., Pa., August 23, 1847, a son of Abram and Jemima (Kunkle) Ryman. The ancestry of the Ryman [originally spelled Reiman] family came from the vicinity of Warmbrunn, in the Government of Liegnitz, Province of Silesia, Kingdom of Prussia. The first ancestor in America was George Ryman, who came to America about 1750 and settled in New Jersey, near Easton, Pa., and there married Kate Motley. He was the great-grandfather of our subject, and his children were Peter, John, Jacob and Kate, of whom Peter (the grandfather of subject) was born in New Jersey in 1776, and married Mary Sweazy, who was born in 1780, a daughter of Richard Sweazy. Peter Ryman and his wife lived for a time near Hope, Warren Co., N.J., and in 1812 settled in Dallas, Luzerne Co., Pa., with their family of children, viz.: John, Joseph, Peter and Eliza (Mrs. J. R. Baldwin); two sons were born in Dallas: Abram and Richard. They settled on Lot 5, certified, Bedford township (now Dallas), which farm is still in the possession of the Ryman family, and a portion of four generations have been born there. Abram Ryman was born August 21, 1817, and his life was spent on the old homestead, whee he died December 17, 1873. His wife was a daughter of Philip and Mary (LaBar) Kunkle, of Dallas township, and by her he had seven children: Mary E. (Mrs. C. M. Maxwell), Theodore F., William P., John J., Ruth E., Fred S. and Leslie S. Abram Ryman began business as a lumberman and farmer, in 1834, and soon after embarked in the mercantile business, which he continued up to his death, the present firm of A. Ryman & Sons, of Wilkes Barre and Dallas, having been established by him. He was one of the most progressive and enterprising men of his day and place. He commenced life with nothing, took care of his parents, had a successful business career, and was honored and respected by all who knew him. An elder brother, John Ryman, was a distinguished lawyer of Lawrenceburg, Ind., where he was in the practice of his profession for twenty-five years, and during that time had charge of a large portion of the cases taken to the Supreme Court of the State. Our subject was reared on the old homestead in Dallas, was educated in the common school at Dallas, and at Wyoming Seminary; was graduated from Cornell University in 1871, and from Harvard Law School in 1872. In November, 1873, he was admitted to the bar of Luzerne county, and to the United States Court in 1882. Since 1873 he has been in the active practice of his profession at Wilkes Barre. He is president of the Wilkes Barre & Eastern Railroad, and Wilkes Barre & Williamsport Railroad, in process of construction. On December 17, 1879, Mr. Ryman was married to Charlotte M., daughter of George P. and Charlotte (Freeland) Rose, of Freeport, Ill., and has two children: Roselys and Emily. Our subject is one of the progressive citizens of Luzerne county; he introduced the first telephone put in practical operation in Wilkes Barre, and was the organizer of the Wilkes Barre Electric Light Company. In politics he is a Republican.

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