MI - MO Surnames

History of Luzerne County, Pa.,

by H.C. Bradsby, 1893

Thomas J. Miers, retired, Kunkle, was born in Chemung county, N.Y., September 20, 1830, and is a son of Jacob and Sarah (Wilcox) Miers, both of whom were also born in New York State. They came to this county in 1834, locating in Dallas township, on the place where William Goss now resides, and here they remained until they died. Jacob was a hard-working man and a worthy citizen. His farm contains seventy-five acres, which ws well looked after by its owner. He was postmaster for several years, and after his decease his wife succeeded him, with much credit. He die at the age of forty-three, in the year 1838. His family consisted of seven children, all of whom came to maturity. Thomas J. is the fourth in the family, and was reared and educated in Dallas township, at the common schools. In early life he learned the carpenter's trade, at which he has worked for over forty years. On November 27, 1853, our subject married Miss Hannah J. Ferguson, who was born in Orange county, N.Y., July 7, 1834, a daughter of Isaac and Eliza Ferguson, by whom he has had seven children: Frederick; George, married to Miss Lydia Wilson; Elizabeth, married to A. A. Shultz; Ida, married to M. W. Herdman; Miles C., and two deceased. In 1863 Mr. Miers went to New Jersey, and there became a member of the Fourth New Jersey Light Artillery, to serve for the term of three years. He served to the close of the war, and participated in several well-contested battles. At the battle of Deep Bottom he was wounded in both hands by the explosion of a shell. He was honorably discharged, and now draws a pension. Mr. Miers is a member of the G.A.R. He has lived in Kunkle for thirty years, and in his present residence for sixteen years. Politically he is a Democrat, and has held several township offices, having served as supervisor, poor master and assessor, with much credit.

Samuel F. Mifflin, farmer, P. O. Beach Haven, was born in Nescopeck township, this county, April 18, 1844, and is a son of Francis and Hannah (Croll) Mifflin. The paternal grandfather, Samuel Mifflin (whose wife was Elizabeth Davis), died in Harrisburg, Pa., in 1829. He was president of the Union Canal Company, and in his day was a prominent and wealthy citizen of Pennsylvania. The parents of subject were natives of Philadelphia, the father being born February 20, 1807. He settled in Nescopeck township about 1836, and in 1855 removed to Salem, where he died in 1872. His wife was a daughter of Adam and Sarah (Pettit) Croll, and by her he had five children: Charles H., Jane (Mrs Adam Smith), Samuel F., Sarah E. (Mrs. J. A. Fenstermacher), and John T. Our subject was reared in his native county, and has resided in Salem township since 1855. His wife was Maria D., daughter of Michael and Susan (Fenstermacher) Hess, of Salem township, and has one son, Archie N. During the Civil war Mr. Mifflin was employed six months by the U. S. Government on a boating expedition, was shipwrecked, lost boat and cargo, and narrowly escaped with his life. In politics he is a Democrat.

Even M. Miles, clerk in Batterton's store, Laflin, was born in Llanharan, Glamorganshire, South Wales, July 14 1853, and is a son of John and Mary (Morgans) Miles. His father, who was a carpenter, and, later, hotel-keeper, reared a family of four children, viz.: John, who died in Wales at the age of twenty-eight years; Ann, married to Thomas Davies, a nephew of ex-Lieutenant- Governor Davies, of Pennsylvania (he lives at Hafod where he has one of the finest hotels in South Wales); Evan M., who is the subject of this memoir; and Thomas, a plasterer by trade, who has been in America since 1886, and resides with his brother. Our subject, who was educated in the Eagle School, at Cowbridge, South Wales (as was also his brother Thomas), came to America in 1879, and has been engaged in clerking successively at the following places: Sharon, Ohio, six months; Akron, Ohio, six months; Nanticoke, Pa., one year; Scranton, five years; Plymouth, four years, and in 1889 removed to Laflin. Mr. Miles was married, May 30, 1885, to Miss Mary, daughter of David J. and Rachel (Roberts) Williams, natives of Aberdare, South Wales, now residents of Dallas, Pa., and they have four children, viz: John, David, Walter and Thomas. He is a member of the K. of P. and the Philanthropics. He is a Republican in his political views, and is at present secretary of the borough council.

John Miles, engineer at Parrish Slope, Plymouth, was born August 12, 1861, and is the eighth in a family of twelve children born to Edward and Gwynnie (Lewis) Miles, natives of Wales. The family came to America in 1872, locating at Plymouth, Pa., where the children were reared and educated. After leaving school John began working about the mines, as an inside hand at the Parrish Slope, until 1885, when he became a miner, following that occupation, however, but seven months, when he accepted the position of fan engineer, in which he continued for seven months, taking charge, at the end of that time, of the large pair of slope engines, which he has since run. Mr. Miles was united in marriage, January 21, 1884, with Miss Gwynnie, daughter of John H. and Gwynnie (Williams) Williams, natives of Wales, and now residents of Saint Clair, Pa. Two children have been born to this union: Richard, born April 26, 1886, and Jeanette, born September 17, 1890. Mr. Miles is a member of the Knights of Pythias, Star lodge No. 178; he is independent in political matters, and the family attend the English Baptist Church.

William H. Miles, of the firm of Kern & Miles, merchant tailors, Wilkes Barre, was born in that city February 15, 1865, a son of William and Emeline (Gruver) Miles. His father was a native of Columbia county, Pa., and in early manhood located in Wilkes Barre, where for upward of thirty years he has held the position of foreman in a brickyard. His wife was a daughter of Michael Gruver, a native of Northampton county, Pa., who settled in Newport, this county, in 1812. His parents have five children: George E., Hattie (Mrs. Harry Speece), William H., Charles, and Daisy E. Our subject was reared in Wilkes Barre, educated in the common schools, served an apprenticeship of three years at the wire-drawers trade, which he followed eight years as a journeyman. In July, 1891, he embarked in the merchant tailoring business as a member of the firm of Kern & Miles, one of the leading and most popular firms of the city.

Archibald Miller, dental surgeon, Pittston, was born in that town April 15, 1866, and is a son of Jacob M. and Caroline (Sultz) Miller. His father was born in Germany, where he was educated, and served several years in the Imperial army, at the age of twenty-one coming to the United States and to Pittston, where he has since been engaged in mining. The mother was a native of Tunkhannock, Pa.; the parents are both living and reside in Pittston. They had a family of eight children, viz: George, a potter, residing in Elmira, N.Y.; Edward, a telegraph operator at the Lackawanna & Bloomsburg Junction, Pittston, Pa.; Peter, a coal dealer, of Bloomsburg, Pa.; Archibald: Joseph, a telegraph operator at the same station as his brother Edward; Barbara, Carrie and Jacob, the three last named being students in the public schools of Pittston. Our subject was born and reared in Pittston, and attended the public schools of that city until his fourteenth year; he worked in the coal mines for two years, and then secured a position as telegraph operator for the L.V.R.R., serving in that capacity until the fall of 1889, when he entered the Dental Department of the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia, from which he graduated in the spring of 1891. On September 7, 1891, he opened his office in his native city, and having a host of friends soon secured a large practice, which the excellence of his work is constantly increasing. He worships at the First Presbyterian Church of Pittston. Mr. Miller has numerous friends in Pittston, some of whom have known him from childhood; his prospects are bright, and a brilliant, successful career is assured him.

Benjamin L. Miller, assistant postmaster, and merchant, Dorrancetown, was born in Dorrance township, January 11, 1861, a son of Jonas P. and Mary (Davis) Miller, the former being a native of Germany, and the latter of Pennsylvania. Mr. Miller was educated in his native county, and has, since finishing his course, been largely engaged in the manufacture of cider and vinegar at what is known as the Koseck Mills. This mill was formerly known as S. b. Vaughn's Cider and Vinegar Mills, and was also operated by Benjamin L. Miller. Mr. Miller has the largest store in Dorranceton, and is doing a thriving business, carrying a stock of general merchandise. The dorranceton postoffice, which this gentleman has charge of, is located in the store, making it an official as well as a trading point. Mr. Miller was married December 26, 1882, to Miss Mary, daughter of Samuel and Mary (Miller) Welsh, natives of Pennsylvania. One child, a son, was born to this union, October 12, 1883. The subject of this sketch has always been a staunch Republican, and he is a member of the Presbyterian Church. He belongs to the I.O.O.F. and Patriotic Order Sons of America.

Prof. Clarence B. Miller, superintendent of public schools, Nanticoke, is a native of Tunkhannock, Pa., born September 8, 1860, a son of Horace S. and Alice (Sleight) Miller, both natives of Pennsylvania, the former of New England origin, and the latter a descendant of some of the early Quaker families who settled near Philadelphia. Horace S. Miller was a member of Company E, Forty-first P.V., and was killed at Fort Fisher, leaving a widow (who still resides at Tunkhannock) and two children, viz: Clarence B. and Helen (Mrs. P. Asheld, of Tunkhannock). The subject of this memoir received his preliminary education at the Soldiers' Orphan School, at Mansfield. He then entered the State Normal School, at Mansfield, where he was graduated in the class of 1878. After teaching one year at Blackwalnut, Pa., he returned to the Normal School and took a post-graduate course of one year, after which he came to Tunkhannock, and served as principal of the public school there for one year. He then went to Plains, Pa., where he was also principal of the public schools one year. In 1884, Prof. Miller removed to Northumberland, where he was also appointed principal of the public schools, remaining there until 1885, when he came to Nanticoke and accepted his present position, which he has since occupied. He was married March 6, 1886, to Miss Gertrude Harder, of Bloomsburg. This union has been blessed with two children, Horace S. and Clarence L. Mr. Miller is a member of the Sons of Veterans, Nanticoke Commandery, and in his political views he is a Republican.

C. R. Miller, furniture dealer, Plymouth, was born at Espy, Columbia county, August 26, 1864, and is the only child of John and Mary (Case) Miller, also natives of Pennsylvania. Mr. Miller was educated in the public schools of Columbia county, where he received a thorough training. After completing his course he engaged with J.W. Campbell, contractor and builder, as carpenter, working with him until 1889, when he engaged in the furniture business. His finely equipped store, at No. 37 Main street, is ample proof of his success as a business man. Mr. Miller was united in marriage, November 11, 1889, with Miss Amelia, daughter of Charles and Maggie (Abbott) Troop, residents of Espy, Pa., and one child has blessed this union: Thomas B., born November 18, 1890. Mr. and Mrs. Miller are members of the Methodist Church, and in politics Mr. Miller has always been closely identified with the Republican party. Our subject is pleasant and courteous to all with whom he comes in contact, whether in a business or a social way, and it is safe to predict that the furniture enterprise, in which he embarked, will in a short time be one of the foremost enterprises in the borough.

C. W. Miller, foreman, Stone Quarries, Shickshinny, was born in Union township, this county, March 22, 1841, a son of Daniel and Rachel (Miller) Miller. The paternal grandfather, George Miller, of German descent, was a pioneer of Plains, this country; was a farmer, residing in Union township for years, and died in Wilkes Barre. The maternal grandfather was Jacob Miller, a farmer of Union township. Daniel Miller, father of subject was born in Plains, and for many years was a resident of Union township, where he died. His children were Conrad W., Sarah J. (Mrs. John Bierman), Anna M. (Mrs. J. Swicher), Frances E. (Mrs. John Tucker), Eliza (Mrs. Charles Shaffer), Moses, Marian (Mrs. Byron Davenport), Helen C. (Mrs. Joseph Harrison), and Charles S. Our subject was reared in Union township. On April 24, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Fifteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was discharged August 7, 1861. On January 15, 1862, he joined, as sergeant, Company G, Fifty-sixth Pennsylvania Regiment, and was discharged February 12, 1864; he re-enlisted in same company, same regiment, as veteran, and January 7, 1865, was transferred to the One Hundred and Fifth Reserve Corps, Second Battalion; he was discharged from the service May 11, 1865, on account of wounds received at Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864. Since the war Mr. Miller has resided at Shickshinny, and has been foreman of the Shickshinny Stone Quarries eighteen years. He married on September 22, 1867, Sarah McCloskey, of Montour county, Pa., and has two children living: Charles and Maggie. Mr. Miller is a member of teh M. E. Church, and of the G.A.R.; in politics he is a Republican.

Daniel Miller, miner, Plymouth, was born September 7, 1855, at Fairmount, Luzerne Co., Pa., and is the fifth in a family of ten children born to Jesse and Elizabeth (Rude) Miller, natives of Luzerne county. Daniel was reared on a farm, and at the age of seventeen, began working about the mines at Parsons, where he did general work for seven years, when he went to "cutting coal" and continued there as a miner for three years. At the end of this time he returned to the farm, and tilled the soil for two years. At the end of this time he returned to the farm, and tilled the soil for two years, coming at the end of that time to Plymouth, where he engaged in mining at the Parrish Mine, where he has since been continuously employed. Mr. Miller wa united in marriage, August 24, 1880, with Miss Josephine Quick, of Great Bend, Pa. To this union have been born six children, as follows: Charles F., born January 27, 1882; Harry, born September 10, 1883; Jessie, born January 8, 1885; Daniel, born August 29, 1886; John, born March 10, 1888; and Hugh, born October 20, 1889. Mr. Miller is a Prohibitionist in politics, and in 1881 was elected constable for three years, but, removing from the ward, he only served one year. He is a member of the O.U.A.M. The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Elijah F. Miller, dairyman, Fairview township, P.O.Mountain Top, was born in Wright (now Fairview) township, this county, February 20, 1855, and is a son of Peter and Syble (Richards) Miller, both natives of Pennsylvania, and who were among Fairview (formerly part of Wright township) township's earliest settlers. They reared a family of nine children, of whom Elijah F. is the third eldest. He attended the common schools in his native town until he was sixteen years old, when he entered the Wyoming Seminary and took a commercial course. After attending the seminary, he came home to work in his father's store, which he did until his father quit business, when he went to work on the railroad as a brakeman, continuing there two years, or until the strike commenced. He then commenced work in a dairy in Wright township, in which he remained about one year; he next went to Chester county, this State, and followed the same work for a shirt time, when he returned home, on account of sickness which resulted in the death of his oldest brother. In his native place he worked for a time, and then went to work in the Penobscot yard for the Central Railroad of New Jersey. After a year he engaged with a Philadelphia publishing house, and in the following year he commenced braking on the railroad again, continuing that occupation until 1883, when he embarked in the milk business. In 1884 he operated a farm at Glen Summit for the Glen Summit Hotel and Land Company, still following the milk business. The next year he gave his whole attention to his dairy in Fairview township, and still follows that industry. In 1881 Mr. Miller was married to Mary V., daughter of A. J. and Phoebe Meeker, both natives of this State, of Irish and French descent, respectively. Mr. and Mrs. Miller have three children, viz: Max A., Forsythe E. and Walter. Mr. Miller is a member of the I.O.O.F. and of the Royal Arcanom at Mountain Top. In politics, he is a Democrat, and has held several township offices. Under Cleveland's administration he was postmaster at Mountain Top.

George H. Miller, farmer and lumberman, P. O. Dupont, was born in Bavaria, Germany, March 22, 1834, a son of John and Hannah Miller, both also natives of Germany, in which country they died, the former at the age of fifty-two years, the latter at the age of sixty-two. Their family consisted of four children, all of whom grew to maturity, and three of them are now living, George H. being the second in the family. In 1857 he emigrated to this country, locating near Stroudsburg, Monroe Co., Pa., where he resided about eighteen years, a successful farmer and lumberman, in both which occupations he is well versed. In 1858 he married Miss Mary B., daughter of Joseph Wagner, and by her he had twelve children, of whom are living John, Catherine, Anna, Fredrick, Josiah and Andrew. In 1869 he removed to this county, locating in Pittston township, where he now resides on a fifty-acre farm which he has improved in various ways. Besides this small farm he has 120 acres of valuable land, and he is a practical agriculturist and business man. Politically, he is a Democrat, and has held several offices in other counties, thus showing that he was as popular elsewhere as he is here. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., Lodge No. 721.

G. P. Miller, proprietor of the "Central Hotel", Nescopeck, was born in that village November 4, 1853, a son of Peter and Elizabeth (Hufnagle) Miller. His paternal grandfather, Peter Miller, a native of Germany, in the early part of the present century settled in Lancaster county, Pa., and died there. His maternal grandfather, George Hufnagle, a farmer and carpenter, was a resident of Nescopeck, where he died, and he is buried in Mifflin township, adjoining. He ws the first man to erect a building in Nescopeck township by square rule. Peter Miller, father of our subject, was a native of Lancaster county, Pa., was a carpenter by trade, and settled in Nescopeck about 1849, dying there August 18, 1862. His children were three in number: Harriet H. (Mrs. Benjamin Eddy), George P., and Lewis H. (deceased). Our subject was reared in Nescopeck, and learned the carpenter's trade which he followed four years. Since 1882 he has been the proprietor of the "Central Hotel", which he erected himself, and he is a popular landlord. On December 15, 1885, he married Laura H., daughter of Peter and Elizabeth (Creasey) Creasey, of Mifflin township, Columbia Co., Pa., and they have one daughter, Blanche L. Politically Mr. Miller is a Democrat.

Irvin D. Miller, fireman and engineer, Ashley, was born in Rockport, Carbon Co., Pa., December 29, 1856, a son of George E. and Elizabeth (Whitebread) Miller, natives of Pennsylvania and of English and German origin. His parents had four children, viz.: Ellen, who died at the age of twelve years; James E., liveryman, White Haven; Irvin D., and Minnie (Mrs. Jacob Schetzel). In 1861 the family removed to White Haven, where the father engaged in lumber contracting. Our subject worked at rafting on the Lehigh river three years, and then in the woods at Williamsport one summer, and on the West Branch one year. He was then brakeman on the Lehigh Valley Railroad three years, fired three years, and in 1876 was promoted to engineer. In the strike of 1877 he was discharged and arrested, but was cleared. In 1878-79 he was in Colorado, and worked on the D.R.G. and at various kinds of business. He then went to hiladelphia and worked for the Knickerbocker Ice Company until January, 1882, when he became brakeman on the Central Road, a place he filled six year. He has since been fireman and extra engineer, and has never been suspended or called into the office. Mr. Miller was married November 17, 1880 to Miss Emily Sherer, daughter of Samuel Sherer, of Hawley, Pa., and by her had eight children, five of whom are living, viz: David C., Margaret E., James E., Florence and Hazel K. Our subject is a member of the B.L.F.K. of H., and is a Republican in his political views.

Irwin Miller, farmer, P.O. Exeter, was born at Tunkhannock, Pa., May 9, 1833, and is a son of George and Mary (Jenkins) Miller, both of whom were also born in Tunkhannock. George was a son of John, who was one of the early settlers of that section, a man of large experience, and respected for his intrinsic worth. He lived to a good old age, and reared a family of four children. His son George began business in Tunkhannock, and although he was naturally a farmer, and the son of a farmer, he varied in his pursuits in life. He was for some years a hotel keeper, and also engaged in other enterprises. He was a thorough going business man, and had some local influence in the Republican party. He removed to this county in 1840, locating in Exeter township on a farm of 200 acres, upon which were very few improvements; but, through a thorough knowledge of agriculture and a close attention to those principles always underlying successful effort, he caused the primitive forest to give way to the golden harvests, and the modern mansion to succeed the rude log cabin. He died in 1885 at the age of eighty-three years. His family consisted of five children, all of whom grew to maturity and are now living. Irwin is the second in the family, and was reared and educated in Exeter township, spending several terms in the Kingston school. He always confined himself to agricultural pursuits. In 1862 Mr. Miller married Miss Falla, daughter of Peter and Elizabeth Sharp, by whom he had four children: A. D.(married to Miss Ida Fitch), George, Maude and Martha. Since his marriage Mr. Miller has lived on the property formerly owned by his father, it being divided between himself and his younger brother. He is a practical an general farmer. Politically he is a Republican, and has held various offices in the township, and is at present postmaster at Exeter.

Jacob H. Miller, grocer, Wilkes Barre, was born in Canton Schaffhausen, Switzerland, February 18, 1843, a son of Samuel and Verona (Bollenger) Miller. He was reared and educated in his native country, and in 1864 came to America, locating in Allentown, Pa., where he learned the trade of marble-cutter. In 1867 he settled in WilkesBarre, where for ten years he was foreman in the marble works of H. C. Hirner. In 1877 he embarked in the grocery business, in which he has since continued. On February 4, 1869, Mr. Miller married Anna D., daughter of Henry C. and Fredericka (Hiller) Hirner, of Wilkes Barre, and seven children have been born to this union, viz: Marie J., Sarah, Harry, Otelia, Frank, Fred and Verona. He is a member of the German Reformed Church and of the K. of P. and Saengerbund; in politics he is a democrat.

Jeremiah Miller, farmer, P. O. Sybertsville, was born June 6, 1841, in Sugar Loaf township, on the farm where he now resides, a son of Abraham and Mary (Yost) Miller. His paternal grandfather, Abraham Miller, formerly of Upper Milford, Northampton Co., Pa. settled in 1818 in Sugar Loaf township, where he took up five hundred acres of land, cleared and improved the farm now occupied by subject, and died there. By his wife, Mary, he had six children: John, Abraham, Andrew, George, Polly (Mrs. Jacob Minnich), and Elizabeth (Mrs. John Turnbach), of whom Abraham (father of subject) was born in Upper Milford, Northampton Co., Pa., came to Sugar Loaf with his parents, in 1818, and lived and died on the homestead. His wife was a daughter of Philip Yost, of Sugar Loaf, and his children were: Sarah (Mrs. David Lindner), Henry D., Eliza (Mrs. Reuben Balliet), Jeremiah, Maria (Mrs. A. William Santee), William S., Rachel, John A. and Lucetta (Mrs. George D. Pettit), Our subject was reared on the old homestead where, with the exception of one year, he has always resided. He was educated in the common schools, and has always followed farming. He married, September 3, 1865, Lanah, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Sipe) Wagner, of Black Creek township, and has two children, Laird E. and Ada M. Mr. Miller is a member of the English Lutheran Church; in politics he is a Democrat, and has held the offices of school director and overseer of poor.

John Miller, farmer, P.O.Conyngham, was born in Nescopeck township, this county, September 24, 1841, a son of George and Catherine (Nuss) Miller. His paternal grandfather, Adam Miller, was a pioneer of Nescopeck township, and his maternal grandfather, Jacob Nuss, a pioneer of Mifflin, Columbia Co., Pa. George Miller, father of our subject, was a farmer of Nescopeck township, where he died. His children were Nathan, Caroline (Mrs. Jacob Lebison), Polly (Mrs. John Kisbauch), Sally A. (Mrs. John Whitnicht), Adam, William, John, Jacob, Henry and Maria (Mrs. Levi Kisbauch). Our subject was reared in Nescopeck township; he has always been a farmer, and has resided in Sugar Loaf township since 1890. He married Susannah, daughter of David and Elizabeth (Miller) Hunsinger, of Black Creek township, and they have thirteen children: William J., Almira C. (Mrs. Milton Naugle), Anna L. (Mrs. George Haycock), Harvey E., Mary E. (Mrs. John Kile), Charles F., Ernest E., Caroline A., Daniel A., John R., Lillie A., Hattie M. and Herbert W. Mr. Miller and family are members of the Lutheran Church; in politics he is a Democrat.

Leonard W. Miller, furniture dealer and undertaker, Plains, was born in Plainsville, March 9, 1854, and is a son of John and Catherine P. (Aten) Miller, the former a native of Plymouth, Pa., and of Dutch origin, the latter a native of Pittston, Pa., and of Jersey Dutch and Scotch lineage. In their family there were six children, of whom Leonard W. is the fifth. When our subject began in life for himself, he worked at the plastering trade for four years, and then at the carpenter's trade for six years, and engaged, in 1886, in his present business. Mr. Miller was married, September 27, 1883, to Miss Mollie Wintersteen, and they have three children, viz: Philip J., born November 8, 1884; Eleanor W., born September 28, 1888; and Jackson S., born September 10, 1891. Mr. Miller is a member of the I.O.O.F. and Encampment, the P.O.S.of A., the Improved Order of Red Men, and the Pocahontas degree of Red Men, and the Undertakers' Association of Luzerne county. He is a Democrat in politics, and was the first tax-collector elected in Plains township; he has also acted as county committeeman.

Thomas T. Miller, contractor for painting, Wilkes Barre, was born at Petersville, Northampton Co., Pa., January 21, 1849, a son of Samuel P. and Rebecca (Gross) Miller. His paternal great-grandfather, Peter Miller, was one of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence. Our subject was reared and educated in Northampton and Carbon counties, and served an apprenticeship of four years at the painter's trade, in Carbon county, Pa., following the business as a journeyman twenty years. He has been a resident of Wilkes Barre since 1872, and in 1892 engaged in business as a contractor. In September, 1868, he married Anna Maria, daughter of Lewis and Rebecca (Sleiger) Roht, of Slatington, Carbon Co., Pa., and has eight children living, viz: Lewis, Lizzie (Mrs. William Winter), Rebecca (Mrs. Wellington A. Grover), Eugene T., Estella, Herbert, Emma and Walter. He is a member of Improved Order of Red Men, and in politics is a Republican.

Thomas F. Mimford, mine foreman, Diamond Colliery No. 3, Hazleton. Among the many mine foremen who have charge of the large mines throughout Luzerne county, none are more genial or popular than the one whose name heads this sketch. Thomas F. Mimford was born in Hazleton, December 31, 1860, and is a son of Thomas and Margaret Fatkin Mimford, also natives of Luzerne county. The father of our subject laid down his life for his country at the fierce fight before Richmond. The mother with her little family, now left fatherless, removed to Philadelphia, where she remained until our subject was five years of age; the family then returned to Hazleton, where Thomas, by perseverance, energy and hard study under private tutors, received a fair common-school education. At the age of nine years he began work about the mines, doing almost everything that pertains to mining. At the age of twenty- two he was appointed assistant mine foreman under Peter Watson (now deceased) at Hazleton Mine Colliery, where he served four years. In 1887 he was promoted to foreman of the Hazleton Mines Colliery, where he was foreman, in all about three years. In 1890 Mr. Mimford accepted his present position at the Diamond Colliery No. 3, where he has since been employed. He has under his supervision 100 men, who mine about 700 tons of coal daily. Our subject was united in marriage, August 30, 1883, with Miss Bessie, daughter of Henry and Alice (Harvey) Polgrean, natives of Cornwall, England. Two children have blessed this union, viz.: Wilbert Henry and Geneva. In political matters Mr. Mimford is an ardent Republican; he is a member of the Sons of America. The family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Charles Abbott Miner comes of a family that traces its lineage back without a break in, or a doubt of the authenticity of the line, to Henry Miner who was knighted by King Edward III, "for valorious deeds done", and died in 1359. Descendants of this man were among the earliest comers to America, Thomas Miner landing in Connecticut in 1643. A great-great-grandson of Thomas, named Seth, born at Norwich, Conn., in 1742, was one of the earliest of the officers commissioned for service in the Revolution. His son, Charles Miner, came to the Wyoming Valley to look after land interests which his father, as a member of the Connecticut Delaware Land Company, had acquired therein. Asher, another of Seth's sons, also came to the Valley shortly afterward, and began the publication of the Luzerne county "Federalist" in Wilkes Barre, January 5, 1801. He subsequently took his brother Charles into partnership, and in 1804 relinquished his interest to Charles (afterward the historian of the county), and went to Doylestown, Bucks Co., Pa., where he established what is now the "Intelligencer", the leading Republican paper of its vicinity. He was postmaster at Doylestown for several years. In 1818 he sold his paper to Philadelphia parties, and going to West Chester published there the "Village Record", which is still issuing, and is a recognized power in the journalistic world. In 1834 he sold the publication, and returned to Wilkes Barre, where he died March 13, 1841. His wife was Mary, a daughter of Thomas Wright, who was born in Ireland, and was a wealthy merchant and landowner in Wilkes Barre. Mr. Wright was the founder of Wrightsville, now the borough of Miners Mills. He built a mill there in 1795, which has been in the possession of his descendants ever since. Of this union were born thirteen children, of whom Robert (the father of the immediate subject of this sketch) was the third child and second son. He married Eliza Abbott, a daughter of Stephen Abbott, a well to-do farmer and a descendant of an early Wyoming family, representatives of which served gallantly and suffered severely in its defense against the incursions of the Indians.

Charles Abbott Miner is a son of Robert and Eliza (Abbott) Miner, and was born in Plains township August 30, 1830. He was educated at the Wilkes Barre Academy, and at the academy at West Chester, Pa. Since coming of age he has been engaged in the milling business on the site of the mill first built by his maternal grandfather in 1795. Mr. Miner has been prominent in nearly all of Wilkes Barre's industrial enterprises. For nearly a quarter of a century he has been a director of the Wyoming National Bank, and is now its vice- president. For fifteen years he was president of the Coalville (Ashley) Passenger Railway Company, and was always in its directory. He has been president of the board of directors of the Wilkes Barre City Hospital, excepting one year since its organization; president of the Harry Hillman Academy; president of the Luzerne Agricultural Society; president of the State Millers Association, and an officer or stockholder in many other State and local institutions. He attended the Vienna (Austria) World's Exposition in 1873, as an honorary commissioner of the State. Has been a member of the Geological State Survey since 1877. He represented Wilkes Barre in the State House of Representatives for three terms, from 1875 to 1880, inclusive. In 1881 he was the Republican candidate for State Senator, but the district was Democratic, and he was defeated by Hon. Eckley B. Coxe. On January 19, 1853, Mr. Miner married Eliza Ross Atherton, a daughter of Elisha and Caroline Ross (Maffet) Atherton. Both the Ross and Maffet families have been conspicuously identified with the history and interests of the Valley. Mr. and Mrs. Miner have four children: Asher Miner, in partnership with his father in the milling business; Elizabeth Miner; Sidney Robie Miner, a graduate of Harvard, and a member of the Luzerne bar; and Charles Howard Miner, a graduate of Princeton and a student at the Medical University of Pennsylvania. Mr. And Mrs. Miner are members of the Episcopal Church, of which he has been for a number of years a vestryman.

William Penn Miner, retired editor and farmer, Plains township, P. O. Miners Mills, was born in Wilkes Barre, September 8, 1816, and is a son of Charles and Letitia (Wright) Miner, the former a native of Norwich, Conn., and of English origin, and the latter a native of Luzerne county, Pa., and also of English lineage. Charles Miner was an editor and historian of much learning and fame in the early history of Luzerne county; he represented the county in the State Legislature, at Harrisburg, and was twice elected to Congress, while residing in Chester county, Pa. In his family there were six children, of whom William P. was the youngest, and of whom there are two living, viz: Mrs. Jesse Thomas, of Wilkes Barre, and William Penn Miner, the subject of this memoir. Our subject was educated chiefly in the common schools and in a printing office, and in 1832 came from Chester county to Wilkes Barre, and entered the printing office of Miner & Butler, publishers of the Wyoming Herald, where he remained one year, and then returned to school, and soon after returned to Wilkes Barre. He took some interest in farming, in caring for the coal lands that were his, and in 1849, in company with Joseph W. Miner, purchased the Wilkes Barre "Advocate", of which he was editor until 1876, when he was obliged, on account of poor health, to retire from the active newspaper world to the quiet solitude of the farm where he now lives. Mr. Miner was married, April 11, 1842, to Miss Elizabeth D., daughter of John and Emily F. (Remington) Ligget, of Chester county, Pa., which union has been blessed with four children, viz: Emily R., born April 4, 1845, residing with her brother William; Caroline T., born February 5, 1847, died April 8, 1870; Anna L., born June 17, 1852, married to Dr. A. H. Oliver, formerly of Wilkes Barre, Pa.; and William, born June 20, 1854, editor of the Grant county "Herald", at Lancaster, Wis. Mrs. Miner, who died March 26, 1871, was a member of St. Stephen's, at Wilkes Barre, as is also her daughter. Our subject has always been a worthy supporter of the Republican party; he was prothonotary of Luzerne county from 1846 to 1849, during which time he was also clerk of the several courts.

Edward Minick, outside foreman, Deringer Shaft No. 2, P. O. Sugar Loaf, was born in the village of Conyngham, this county, November 15, 1857, a son of Jacob and Susan (Beisel) Minick. His paternal grandparents were John and Polly (Klase) Minick, formerly of Northampton county, Pa., and pioneers of Sugar Loaf township; and his great-grandfather was Abram Minick. The children of John and Polly Minick were: Charles, Elizabeth (Mrs. Mordecai Hatten), Jacob, Maria (Mrs. Daniel Weaver), and Abram, all natives of Sugar Loaf township. Jacob Minnick was a carpenter by trade, and resided all his life in Luzerne county, dying in May, 1892, at the age of seventy-two years. His wife was a daughter of John Beisel, of Butler township, and his children who grew to maturity were: William H., Frank L., George, Edward and Henry. Our subject was reared in Conyngham village, and educated in the public schools. He served an apprenticeship of three years at the carpenter's trade, and has been in the employ of Coxe Bros. & Co. since 1883. On July 17, 1880, he married Mary E., daughter of Solomon and Mary (Fetler) Klinger, of Sugar Loaf township, and has four children: Claude, Grace, Ethel and Edward. Mr. Minick is a member of the Reformed Church, and of the I.O.O.F., and P.O.S. of A.; in politics he is a Democrat.

Joseph Mitchel, farmer, Wyoming borough, was born, March 24, 1819, in Warren county, N.J., and is a son of William and Mary (Hawk) Mitchel, also natives of New Jersey, of English and German origin, respectively, and farmers by occupation. Our subject was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and began life for himself at the age of twenty-one as mail driver. He drove mail coach out of Wilkes Barre, for many years, on all roads leading out of that city. He then returned to New Jersey, and worked his father's farm for four years; also worked one year at Mauch Chunk, and one year on the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad. He then moved to West Pittston and carried on farming for thirteen years, and in 1869 purchased his present farm in Wyoming, whereon he has since resided. Mr. Mitchel was married, May 2, 1850, to Miss Matilda, daughter of George and Mary (Smith) Oyster, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German and English origin, respectively. Mr. Mitchel is a member of the F.&A.M., and in politics is a good strong Democrat.

George W. Mitchell, farmer and contractor, Plains, was born in Jenkins township, July 8, 1949, and is a son of John and Isabel (Smith) Mitchell, the former a native of Scotland and the latter of Nova Scotia; they came to Luzerne county in June, 1849, and settled at Port Griffith, in Jenkins township. In 1854 they removed to Plains, thence, in 1858, to Plymouth, and in 1860 returned to Plains, where they lived at Plank Road; in 1864 they located on the farm now occupied by George W. Mitchell. The father was a man of excellent business qualities, and accumulated a handsome fortune; he was an extensive coal operator and spent the last few years of his life speculating in coal lands, in which he was one of the foremost in the Vally; he died December 6, 1884, at the age of sixty-seven years. John and Isabel (Smith) Mitchell reared a family of seven children: Anna L., who married B. F. Courtright, a prominent farmer at Clark's Green, Pa.; Robert C.; Elizabeth, who married T. W. Courtright, of Newark, Ill.; Mary H., who married W. W. Amsbry, of Germantown, Pa.; George W.; James L., a coal operator, at Tyrone, Pa.; and Isadore, who married Dr. James Brooks, of Plains. Our subject was educated in the public schools and remained with his father until the death of the latter, when he became sole proprietor of the homestead estate; he was in the livery business in Plains from 1875 to 1885, and has also been an extensive and successful contractor. Mr. Mitchell was married, March 25, 1885, to Miss Anna D., daughter of Elwood and Mary (Doron) Worrell; the former died soon after returning from the army, and the latter is still living at Mount Holly, N.J. This happy union was blessed with three children: Ralph D., born February 5, 1886; Donald W., born February 7, 1888, and Jean M., born June 14, 1891. Mr. Mitchell and family usually attend the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which his wife is a member; he is a Republican in his political views.

Robert c. Mitchell, contractor and builder, Plains, was born in Nova Scotia, December 23, 1840, a son of John Mitchell. He was educated in the common schools and the select school of Prof. Woodhouse, of Wyoming, and began life for himself at farming, which he followed ten years. He enlisted in the Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and was at Gettysburg and Antietam when the militia was called to active duty. In 1872 he engaged in contracting and building,which he has since followed. Mr. Mitchell was married, April 24, 1866, to Miss Celia Alexander of Burlington, by whom he had seven children, two of whom are living, viz: Irene, born February 29, 1868, and Pearl, born August 17, 1872. Mrs. Celia Mitchell died March 10, 1881, and on January 13, 1887, Mr. Mitchell was married to Miss Helen Augusta, daughter of James and Aurelia (Schoonover) Wilcox, of New Albany, Pa.; her ancestors came from Connecticut, and were very early settlers in Albany township. Mr. Mitchell has always given his political influence to the Republican party.

William Mitchell, merchant, Inkerman, Jenkins township, was born in Inkerman December 22, 1861. He is a son of John and Jane (Laird) Mitchell, natives of Scotland, whence they emigrated to America in 1854. Their family consisted of ten children, nine of whom are living, viz: Edward, in Pittston; John, in Arizona; Jane (Mrs. Gilbert S. Jones, in Pittston); Alexander, in Inkerman; William: Ellen; James, in Inkerman; Robert, in Australia, and Barbara (Mrs. Harvey S. Shoemaker, in Ashlena, Colo.). William Mitchell passed his boyhood on the farm, and attended the public schools till he was eighteen years of age, when he engaged in mining, which he followed six years. He then took charge of the mercantile business which wa established by his father in 1877, and which his mother continued after the death of her husband, which occurred November 21, 1879. Our subject built his present place of business, with residence attached, in 1887. Mr. Mitchell was married, April 12, 1888, to Miss Mary, daughter of Henry and Ann (Adamson) Joplin, natives of England and Scotland, respectively. By this union there is one child, Joseph. Our subject has always given his political support to the Republican party, and in 1890 was appointed postmaster at Inkerman.

William R. and Henry H. Monroe, farmers, Huntington township, P. O. Huntington Mills, were born December 25, 1840, and January 2, 1851, respectively. They are sons of Samuel F. and Sylvina (Brandon) Monroe, natives of Pennsylvania, and of Scotch and Irish origin, respectively. Samuel F. Monroe was a farmer by occupation; he died February 10, 1886, aged sixty-eight years. He was a son of Truman and Kezirah (Franklin) Monroe, natives of Connecticut. Truman Monroe came to Huntington valley in 1795, followed farming, and died May 14, 1854, aged seventy-two years. He was a son of Nathan and Mehitable (Seymour) Monroe, also natives of Connecticut. Samuel F. Monroe, father of our subject, reared a family of four children, viz: George C., a farmer in Montana; William R.; Sarah K. (Mrs. Charles Wilson, of Huntington Mills); and Henry H. William R. Monroe, the second in this family, at the age of twenty, enlisted in Company F, Thirty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Capt. Speece commanding, and was in the following engagements: Mechanicsville, Gaines Hill, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, Fredericksburg, and the Wilderness, in which battle he was taken prisoner and held in Andersonville, five months, also at Florence, D.C., for the same length of time. He wa discharged April 1, 1865. Returning to his home, he has since conducted the homestead farm in partnership with his brother, Henry H. William B. Monroe was married September 26, 1885, to Miss Mary A., daughter of James and Jemima (Culver) Brandon, natives of Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Monroe are members of the P. of H. He is a member of the G.A.R., and politically is a Republican. Henry H. Monroe, the youngest in his father's family, has spent his whole life on the farm where he was born. He was married, November 9, 1873, to Eliza J., daughter of Sydney and Clarissa Telle. They have eight children, viz.: Robert C., born July 26, 1875; Charlotte I., born December 28, 1877; Oscar F., born January 30, 1879; Ruth A., born April 18, 1882; Sydney H., born May 23, 1886; Grant E., born May 15, 1888; Geraldine J., born March 30, 1890; and Florence H., born February 1, 1892. This family attend the M.E. Church. He is a member of the P.O.S. of A., I.O.O.F., and P. of H.; he is a Republican in politics, and has been auditor for one term.

Alpheus C. Montanye, funeral director, Wilkes Barre, was born at New Vernon, Orange Co., N. Y., March 21, 1835, a son of Samuel C. and Margaret (Smiley) Montanye. The father, who was also a native of Orange county, N.Y., was a son of Benjamin F. Montanye, a son of Thomas Montanye, a native of France, and both were pioneers of Orange county. Thomas carried dispatches for Gen. Washington, was captured by the British, and expected to be executed, but was retaken by the Continental forces. Samuel C. Montanye settled at what is now Parsons, this county, in 1844, where he carried on the business of manufacturer of woolens for many years, in later life removing to Wilkes Barre, where he died in 1875. He was twice married, his first wife being Margaret Smiley, by whom he had five children, three of whom grew to maturity, viz: Jane E.(Mrs. G. W. Hoover), Juliett (Mrs. Eugene Adams), and Alpheus C. His second wife was Julia Silvins, by whom he had five children: Thomas B., J. Henry, Samuel L., Mary (Mrs. Daniel Pursel), and Charles O. Our subject was reared in Luzerne county from ten years of age, and from eleven until seventeen was employed in his father's woolen factory. He then served an apprenticeship at the furniture finisher's trade, which he has followed more or less since, and for twenty-two years has been in the employ of Voorhis & Page and Voorhis & Murray, since 1890 as funeral director. In 1859 he was married to Helen, daughter of Robert and Eliza (Eicke) Kilmer, of Wilkes Barre, and they have two daughters: Olive A. (Mrs. F. B. Forbes) and Elenor E. Mr. Montanye served four months in the Civil war as a member of Company F, Eight P.V., receiving an honorable discharge at expiration of his term of service. He is a member of the M.E. Church, of the I.O.O.F. and G.A.R., and in politics is a Republican.

James Montanye, justice of the peace, Pittston. The Montanye family of which our subject is a representative, is one of the old pioneer families of Luzerne county. The grandfather, in all probability a native of Orange county, N. Y., moved in early times to what is now Exeter township. His name was Andrew, and the great portion of his life of over eighty years was passed in that township. He was a farmer by occupation, and had a large family of children, all of whom have passed away. The father, Stephen Montanye, was born in Exeter township, and followed the occupation of farming, and after an eventful life died in 1842, at the age of forty-four. The mother was, before her marriage, Sarah Harding, a daughter of Israel Harding, a soldier of the Revolution, and was born in what is now Wyoming county, but at that time Luzerne county. The family consisted of the following children: Lydia (Mrs. J. N. Van Tayle, Wyoming county); Charles, constable of West Pittston; Isaac, plaster mason, of West Pittston; James; and John (deceased). Mr. Montanye was born and reared on a farm and educated in the common schools of his neighborhood. At the age of fourteen he entered the general store of Brown & Thompson, of Exeter, as clerk, and from there went with the same firm to Orange. After that firm dissolved he was with their successor, Benjamin Sailor, and about the year 1850 entered the Wyoming Seminary, and was for a year a student in that school. Leaving there he clerked for R. McD. Shoemaker, a year, returned to the farm for a short time, and later entered the general mercantile business at Exeter. In 1857 he removed his business to Pittston, and after a short time formed a partnership with B. C. Hurd and Charles H. Flagg under the firm name of James Montanye & Company. He continued in business there until July, 1863, when he enlisted in Company E, ---- Regiment P.V.I., and served 100 days. At the close of his service he secured a position as commercial salesman, and removed to New York City, where he lived about fifteen years. Returning to West Pittston, he has since made that city his home. He continued his business of commercial salesman until 1882. In 1880 he was elected burgess of West Pittston, serving six consecutive years; in 1882 was elected to the office of justice of the peace, and re-elected in 1887. He still fills that office. August 23, 1860, Mr. Montanye married Miss Caroline Baldwin, daughte of John Baldwin, a prominent farmer of Exeter township. Our subject is a member of the F. & A.M., St. John's Lodge, No. 213, Pittston. He is an active member of the Republican party, has for years been a great worker for his party's interests in this county, and has filled many offices of trust in New York City. He has always been a citizen of Luzerne county, and has been prominent in all enterprises leading toward the advancement of the community in which he lived. As a business man he has been successful, and has fulfilled the duties of the office of justice of the peace in a manner hightly creditable to himself and perfectly satisfactory to his constituents, and enjoys the confidence and respect of the people of his native county, an honor of which any one might be justly proud.

W. H. Moon, surgeon dentist, Pittston. This gentleman, though young in his profession, has met with a success and obtained a practice of which many an old practitioner might be justly proud. He was born in Pittston January 6, 1865, and is a son of Philander and Sarah (Benjamin) Moon; the father is a carpenter, and has been a resident of Pittston for many years. The parents had a family of three children, viz.: Rhuea A.; W. H. and Nellie M. Our subject passed his boyhood in Pittston, and was educated in the public schools of that town and West Pittston, in 1883 entering Wyoming Commercial College, Kingston, Pa., from which institution he graduated February 1, 1884. He was then engaged for a short time in driving a team in Pittston, after which he began the study of medicine in the office of Dr. C. S. Carey, of Pleasant Valley, Pa., where he remained for about eighteen months. He next entered the New York College of Dentistry, New York City, and graduated from that college March 11, 1889; April 10, 1889 he opened his office in Pittston, and began the practice of his profession. Dr. Moon was united in wedlock December 25, 1888, with Amanda F. Angenstein, a daughter of Charles Augenstein, a farmer of Pike county, Pa., and a native of Germany. Dr. Moon is a member of the Broad Street M.E. Church, and an active worker for the good of the cause of Christianity; he is also a member of the Y.M.C.A. of Pittston. Politically he is identified with the Republican party. Dr. Moon, in seeking a location in which to practice his profession, located among those who had known him from childhood, and the fact that his practice is already large enough to employ almost all of his time, shows that he was wise in so doing. Dr. Moon has a host of friends and no enemies, and he is assured of a successful and brilliant future.

C. E. Moore, M. D. and pharmacist, Alden Station, was born in Schuylkill county, Pa., December 1, 1861, and is a son of William H. and Mary A. (Dalab) Moore, natives of England. Our subject is the sixth in a family of eight children, and was reared and educated in his native county. After finishing his public school education, he entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Baltimore, Md., where he was graduated in the class of 1883. The following March he came to Alden Station, and engaged in the practice of his profession, in which he has been eminently successful. In 1886 he opened a drug store, where with the assistance of a clerk, he commands the patronage of the community in connection with the practice of his profession. Dr. Moore was married, September 30, 1891, to Miss Carrie, daughter of Jacob and Frances Vandemark, descendants of early pioneers of this Valley. Dr. Moore is a member of the school board; he is a Republican in politics, and in religion is a member of the Episcopal Church.

C. L. Moore, farmer, P. O. Kyttle, was born in Dallas township in 1840, and was reared and educated in Ross township, a son of Archibald and Mary (Ransom) Moore, both of whom were born in England. Archibald emigrated to this county when a young man and single, locating at Wilkes Barre, where he remained for several years, working at this trade, that of wheelwright. He removed to Vernon, Wyoming county, where he owned a farm, but sold this, and removed to Dallas, where he remained ten years. He finally removed to Ross township, living on a lot of 300 acres, which was afterward owned by his children. He was a hardworking man, of pure moral principles, a staunch Republican, and a conscientious member of the M.E. Church; he died in 1888, aged eighty-four. He was deeply interested in educational matters, and helped to organize the first school and church in what is known as Mooretown. His family consisted of ten children, nine of whom reached maturity, and seven or whom are now living, Charles L. being the fifth in the family. Our subject has always confined himself to farming, and is now a practical agriculturist. When ou country was in peril, Mr. Moore shouldered his musket and entered the front rank. he was mustered into the United States service, September, 1862, as a private in Company F, One Hundred and Forty-third P.V.I. for three years. He participated in the battles of Gettysburg and the Wilderness, in which latter his left eye was destroyed by a buck shot. He was honorably discharged from the service, and now enjoys a pension. In 1865 he married Miss Esther, daughter of David and Charlotte R. Ross, and to this union were born five children, all of whom are living: F. W., Giles, Ida, Anna, and Lilly. Mrs. Esther Moore was born in Falls township, Wyoming county, in 1842. Mr. Moore owns a farm of ninety-five acres, on which he has lived since his marriage, and is a worthy man, a practical farmer, and a good citizen. In politics he is a Republican, and has held several township offices with credit to himself; he is a member of the G.A.R., and he and his wife are members of the M.E. Church in good standing.

Elijah Moore, farmer, P. O. Irish Lane, was born in Union township, this county, December 18, 1828, a son of Walter and Mary (Hobbes) Moore, both of whom were born in Berks county. Walter Moore was a son of William Moore, who was a native of Ireland, whence he emigrated to this country before the Revolutionary war, locating in Union township, Luzerne Co., Pa. He was a large land owner, and was recognized as an upright man of pure principles. He lived a long and useful life; reared a family of six children. His son, Walter, began his business career in Union township on the old homestead, or on seventy-five acres of it. He was a practical farmer and a worthy neighbor, one whose life was uneventful but useful. He reared a family of fourteen children, ten of whom are now living, Elijah being the sixth in order of birth. Our subject received his education at the common schools, and in early life worked at the carpenter's trade. In September, 1864, he was mustered into the United States service as a private in Company H, One Hundred and Ninety-eighth P.V.I. for one year. He served his country faithfully during the remainder of the war, at the close of which he wa honorably discharged. He now draws a pension. In 1859 he married Miss Ellen Fink, who was born in Union township, a daughter of Joseph and Mary A. Fink, and to this union were born seven children, all of whom are living: May Annie, Florence L., Estella, Maggie, Kimber Cleaver, Alice, and Emma J. Mr. Moore is a practical agriculturist, owning a neat farm of sixty-three acres, which through his faithfulness in the discharge of his farming duties, returns him compound interest in heavy crops of various kinds.

Rev. James Moore, pastor of the Second Primitive Methodist Church of Plymouth, was born December 13, 1859, in Monmouthshire, South Wales, and is the seventh in a family of eleven children born to Elijah and Martha (West) Moore, natives of England. He received his educational training partly in England and partly in America, coming to the latter place when but a young man. After completing his general education, he took private instruction in theology under the tutorship of the Primitive Methodist Conference, composed of eight of the leading ministers of that body. After completing a four years' course, our subject was ordained in 1889, at Shenandoah, Pa., and was immediately appointed to the Pine Ridge charge, in Lackawanna county, where he remained three years. In 1891, he responded to an urgent call from the congregation in Plymouth, where he has since labored. The Second Primitive Methodist Church was established in 1878, the present house of worship being built in 1882. The membership has increased so rapidly since Mr. Moore took charge, that it will be necessary to enlarge the church in order to accommodate the large congregation. Our subject was married, in Perry county, Ohio, to Miss Susan, daughter of Peter and Mary (Pork) Lindsay, natives of Scotland, and children have been born to this union as follows: William P. (deceased), Alfred Eugene and James E.

John T. Moore, contractor, Parsons, was born May 26, 1825, in Durham, England, and is a son of Richard and Ann (Barrass) Moore, also natives of England. Our subject was educated in his native land, and in 1854 came to America, locating in Frailey township, Schuylkill Co., Pa., where he engaged in mining thirteen years, at the end of which time he came to Mill Creek, where he also followed mining about a year, and then removed to Miners Mills, where he was mine foreman and superintendent, twenty-two years. On February 24, 1890, he came to parsons, and is now engaged in general mine contracting. Mr. Moore was married March 28, 1849, to Miss Isabella, daughter of Joseph Smiles, of Durham, England. She died September 23, 1886, at Miners Mills, leaving a family of twelve children, viz.: Sarah Ann, married to George Adams, a miner at Miners Mills; Richard, a merchant in Parsons; Joseph, an attorney at law in Miners Mills; Atby Ann, married to William Hilburt, of Plains; Mary, married to John Bath, a Methodist minister at Irwin, Pa.; Elizabeth (now deceased); Alice, married to George Skidmore, of Plains; Robert, Edward, John and Isabell (all four now deceased), and Margaret. Mr. Moore is a member of the Primitive Methodist Church, is a member of the I.O.O.F., and in politics is a Republican.

Samuel Moore, farmer, P. O. Prichard, was born in Union township, this county, March 26, 1820, son of Walter and Mary (Hobbs) Moore, the former born in Long Island in 1798, the latter in Northampton county, Pa., in 1796. Walter was a son of William Moore, who was a native of Ireland, and his wife was a native of Scotland. William emigrated to this country early in the eighteenth century, and during the Revolutionary struggle did good service in the American army. He was a man of education, and taught school for a number of years. He owned 200 acre of land in Union township, where he died in 1822, an old and highly-respected man. He reared a family of nine children, all of whom are now dead. Walter Moore, father of the subject of this memoir, began his business career in Union township, having removed hither early in the history of Luzerne county, and was an honest and industrious pioneer of his day. His farm consisted of eighty acres of land, which he worked to perfection, for his knowledge of farming was extensive. He held several township offices, and died in 1854 at the age of fifty-eight years. He married Mary Hobbs, and to them were born fifteen children, fourteen of whom grew to maturity, and nine of whom are now living. Samuel, the eldest in the family, was educated at the common schools of his native township. In his early life he learned the stone mason's trade, at which he worked for a number of years. On November 9, 1843, he married Miss Rachel, daughter of William and Susanna Church, and to them were born nine children, seven of whom are living, viz: Alexander, Susanna, Avery, Elizabeth, Julia A., Jacob F., and Walter, all now married. Mrs. Moore was born in Union township, June 26,1829. Mr. Moore removed to his present farm near "Rock School House", in 1854. He has always been a resident of teh county. His farm lies in the track of that fearful cyclone which visited Wilkes Barre in 1890, destroying for him much valuable timber. Mr. Moore is a practical man, a good citizen and a lover of liberty and independence. Politically he is Republican.

Thomas J. Moore, proprietor of "Moore's Restaurant", Freeland, was born at Coaldale, Schuylkill Co., Pa., and is a son of Patrick and Hannah (Morter) Moore. When Thomas was a youth his parents removed to this county and located at Highland, where he attended school until he reached the age of eighteen, working in summer around the mines. He then entered the employ of H. C. Koons as clerk, where he remained four years, and in 1890 embarked in his present business. in 1889 Mr. Moore was married to Miss Kate McHale, and they have two children, viz: Hannah and Rose. Our subject is a Republican in politics, and has been tax collector of Freeland borough one term.

William S. Moore, farmer, P. O. Slocum, was born in North Moreland township, Wyoming Co., Pa., November 30, 1833, a son of Archibald and Mary (Ransom) Moore, both of whom were born in England. The father emigrated to the United States when a young man. He was a wheelwright by trade, at which he worked at Plains for several years, where he first located in this county; later he removed to Wyoming county, where he bought a farm of fifty acres, which he afterward sold. He then removed to Ross township, this county, and here passed the rest of his days, dying June 5, 1889, at the age of eighty-four years; his wife died November 19, same year, aged eighty-three years. In religious faith they were Methodists. Their family consisted of nine children, seven of whom are living, William S. being the third by birth. Our subject was reared and educated at various points in this county, and has always confined himself to agricultural pursuits and lumbering, at both of which he has proven himself an adept. On February 11, 1860, he married Miss Elizabeth Lutsey, who was born in Slocum township September 16, 1837, the handsome and accomplished daughter of William and Anna Lutsey, and she has borne him six children, five of whom are living: William E., Charles D., Lilly A., Anna M., and Arthur C. Mr. and Mrs. Moore removed from Ross township to Slocum in 1869, and in 1873 came to their present farm of 138 acres, which is well under improvement. Mr. Moore is well thought of in his own township, where he is best known, and has held several township offices. He and his worthy and estimable wife are Christian people, members of the Evangelical Church of Slocum. The Lutseys were prominent people in Newport (now Slocum) township, in the very early settlement of the county. William Lutsey, the father of Mrs. Moore, is a credit to his county; he was a pioneer school teacher, and a man of more than ordinary intelligence. His family numbered thirteen children, eight of whom grew ot maturity. Mrs. Moore, his daughter, is a woman of marked intelligence and refinement, and in her younger life taught school two terms in Slocum and Newport townships. William is a son of Josiah Lutsey, who in company with his brother, William, obtained a Connecticut title to a large tract of land in Newport township, which is now the property of some of the descendants. Josiah was a son of John Lutsey, a native of Germany, who took an active part in the war of the Revolution.

M. D. Moot, station agent for the Delaware & Hudson Railroad, Miners Mills, was born in Tunnel, Broome Co., N. Y., September 19, 1868, and is a son of David and Adeline (Sanders) Moot, natives of New York, and of German and Yankee origin respectively. The father, who was formerly a carpenter, and who is now a merchant at Tunnel, reared a family of six children, three of whom are living, of whom he is the youngest. He was educated in the common schools and the Afton Seminary, after which he began the study of telegraphy. In February, 1889, he was stationed at Laflin, Pa., where he remained two months, and then two months more at Waymart, and in June, 1889, came to his present position. Mr. Moot was married September 22, 1890, to Miss Stella, daughter of William and Marie (Smith) Coon, of Miners Mills. He is a member of the K. of P., and has always given his political support to the Democratic party.

Michael Moran, butcher, Plains, was born in Ireland in 1856, and is a son of Patrick and Bridget (Sweeney) Moran, of Pottsville, Pa. They emigrated to America in 1861. The father, who was a butcher by trade, reared a family of six children, two of whom died in infancy; the others were: Michael; Margaret, who married Michael Hammond (the latter was killed while conductor on the D. & H.R.R.); Edward, who was killed in 1886 by a blast while working in the mines, and Mary, wife of Michael Sweeney, a carpenter. Michael was educated in the public schools at Wilkes Barre, and commenced business for himself at the age of twenty-two, butchering at Parsons, where he remained four years, and in 1882, removed to Plains, where he has since done a thriving business. Mr. Moran was married, January 10, 1882, to Miss Catherine, daughter of Edward and Mary A. (Howley) Sheridan, natives of Ireland. This happy union has been blessed with six children: Mollie, born February 20, 1883; Rose, born April 10, 1884; Margaret, born September 24, 1885, died July 25, 1886; Ann, born June 18, 1887, died May 26, 1891; Josephine, born October 28, 1889, died May 19, 1891; and Belinda born November 25, 1891. This gentleman and his family are members of the Catholic Church; he is a member of the K. of L., and a Democrat in his political preferences.

William Mordon, farmer, P. O. Outlet, was born January 28, 1833, a son of John and Nancy (Stanton) Mordon, the former of whom was a son of George Mordon, who was of English descent on both sides, and served in the war of 1812. John Mordon removed from New Jersey to this county before it was divided and here passed the rest of his days, dying at the age of fifty-eight. His family consisted of six children, three of whom are now living. William being the eldest in the family. Our subject began life as a farmer in Abington, where, April 28, 1852, he married Miss Ruth A., daughter of James P. and Anna Ferguson, and to this union were born five children, three of whom are now living: Nancy E., Argie E. and Lillian E., the latter being yet single. Mrs. Mordon was born in Orange county, N.Y., August 27, 1832. Mr. Mordon removed to this county in 1855, and in 1856 he occupied his present residence. His farm consists of thirty-one acres of prime land, and he gives his attention to small fruit and berries, having Harvey's Lake as his market. Mr. Mordon is a prosperous man of pure life and sound principles. He and his good wife are members of the Free Methodist Church. Politically he was originally a Republican, but now votes the Prohibition ticket.

Charles Morgan, Wilkes Barre, was born in Whitpain township, Montgomery Co., Pa., October 31, 1814, a son of Benjamin and Tacie (Stroud) Morgan, and is of Welsh descent. The paternal grandparents were Morgan and Ann (Roberts) Morgan, and the great-grandparents were Edward and Margaret (Rittenhouse) Morgan. In religious belief they were members of the Society of Friends, and for many years were residents of Montgomery county, Pa. The maternal grandparents were Edward and Hannah Stroud, of Murderkill, Del. Our subject was reared in his native county until twenty years of age, received a limited education in the common schools, and served an apprenticeship of four years at the shoemaker's trade. From 1834 to 1839 he resided in Philadelphia, and then came to Wilkes Barre by railroad and packet, via Harrisburg, consuming two days and two nights in making the journey. He worked at his trade as a journeyman until 1843, and then embarked in the shoe business for himself, in which he successfully continued until 1878. He founded the hardware business now conducted as C. Morgan's Sons and wa connected with same until 1885, when he retired. On April 2, 1842, he married Ellen, daughter of Philip and Margaret (Wirts) Hann, of Huntington township, this county, and has nine children living: Tacie S. (Mrs. Benjamin O. Loxley), Edward S., Jesse T., Anna L. (Mrs. Dunning Sturdevant), William P., Ellen H. (Mrs. W. L. Poet), Charles E., Benjamin F. and Mary E. Mr. and Mrs. Morgan celebrated their golden wedding, April 2, 1892. He is a member of the Society of Friends, and his family of the M. E. Church. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., and in politics is a Republican.

Evan J. Morgan, fire boss, Plains, wa born in South Wales in 1844, and is a son of John and Mary (Davies) Morgan; in his family there were seventeen children, eight by the mother of our subject, two of whom are living. Evan J. Morgan began work in the mines at the age of six years, where he has always been employed. He came to America in 1869, and after remaining at Plymouth without work on account of the strike, he was successively engaged in mining at the following places: Johnstown, two months; St. Clair, three months; Jeansville, two years; Newport, four years; Plymouth, three years; and in 1877 removed to Plains, where he has since been engaged as fire boss. He built his present residence, and removed therein in 1878; he also has a store near his residence, which is attended to chiefly by his wife. Mr. Morgan was married, March 6, 1867, to Miss Margaret, daughter of George and martha (Williams) Harrison, natives of Wales, and of Scotch and Welsh origin, respectively, and they have two children, viz: Mary and John E. (the latter lives at home and teams with his father's team). Our subject and family are members of the Welsh Methodist Church, in which he is treasurer of the board of trustees; in his political views he is a Republican.

Jacob A. Morgan, mine foreman, No. 2 Shaft, Susquehanna Coal Company, Nanticoke, was born at Rhymney, Monmouthshire, South Wales, a son of Abram and Elizabeth Morgan. When our subject was nearly one year old his father came to this country, leaving his family in Wales. He remained here twenty-seven years, and died, in 1879, in San Francisco. In the family there were five children, namely: Elizabeth (deceased); Mary Ann (deceased); Hanna, now Mrs. Thomas Elicha; John, who died November 30, 1891, at Nanticoke, from a slight injury which developed into blood poisoning (he left a wife but no children); and Jacob A. Jacob A. Morgan was engaged in mining during his youth and early manhood in Wales, and came to Nanticoke in 1879, entering the employ of the Susquehanna Coal Company as a laborer. He was soon employed as a miner, which occupation he followed five years, and accepted a position of fire-boss with the same company. In 1889 he was appointed assistant foreman of No. 2 Shaft, in which position he remained until August 16, 1892, when he was appointed mine foreman. He was married in 1871 at Rhymney, Wales, to Miss Helen Webb, and they have six children: Mary, Alice, Jane, David Abram, Lizzie and Annie. Mr. Morgan is a member of the I.O.R.M., S.P.K's, American Legion of Honor, and Knights of the Golden Eagle. He is a Republican, and in religion is a member of the First Welsh Congregational Church.

Llewelyn Morgan, fire-boss, Lehigh & Wilkes Barre Coal Company, Wilkes Barre, was born at Ystradgynlais, Wales, February 14, 1841, a son of Evan and Margaret (Williams) Morgan. The father came to America in 1865, settled at Bellevue, near Scranton, and died there. Our subject came to America in 1860, locating at Pittsburgh, Pa., and for one and a half years traveled about the country, after which he removed to Scranton, Pa., where for five years he engaged in mining. In 1867 he located in Wilkes Barre, where he has since resided. During the greater part of this time he has been in the employ of the Lehigh & Wilkes Barre Coal Company, and since 1886 has held the position of fire-boss of Hollenack Shaft No. 2. In 1863 Mr. Morgan married Miss Jane Williams, of South Wales, and has three living children: Margaret, John and William. Mr. Morgan is a member of the F.&A.M., and in politics is a Republican.

Thomas D. Morgan, butcher, Wilkes Barre, was born in Carmarthenshire, Wales, September 1845, son of David and Elizabeth Morgan. He was reared in Wales, received a limited education in the common schools, and began life in the lead mines at the early age of twelve years. At the age of fifteen, when his father died, he bacame a miner and worked in the lead mines until 1866. In that year he came to America and settled in Wilkes Barre, Pa., where he has since resided. He worked in a coal mine until 1889, and in 1891 embarked in the butcher's business, in which he has since continued. His father's family consisted of nine children, seven of whom grew to maturity: Elizabeth (Mrs. James James), of Wales; Mary (Mrs. Williams Williams); Rachel (Mrs. James T. Jones); Blanche (Mrs. John Davis); Thomas D.; Maggie (deceased), and Morgan D. In 1870 Mr. Morgan visited in Wales a year and returning brought his mother and her six children to Wilkes Barre. Mr. Morgan is a well-known Welshman of Wilkes Barre, and in politics is a Republican.

Thomas J. Morgan, outside mine foreman, Edwardsville. This gentleman wa born in Wales, June 22, 1859, and is a son of Thomas T. and Hannah (Jones) Morgan, also natives of Wales, and who came to America, locating at Catasauqua, when Thomas J. was an infant. The father was there engaged as blacksmith for the Thomas Iron Works, remaining about two years, at the end of which time he came to Kingston, where he at the age of seventeen became foreman for the Kingston Coal Company, which position he filled four years, and was then promoted to outside foreman, an incumbency he has held ten years. Mr. Morgan was married, in 1878, to Mary Jane, daughter of John Jones, of Edwardsville, Pa., and they have had five children, viz: Margaret J., Thomas C. (deceased), Stanley, Daniel, and Horetia. Our subject is a member of the K. of M. and the K. of P., and in politics he is a Republican.

Thomas M. Morgan, engineer at No. 1 Deep Shaft, Susquehanna Coal Company, is a native of Gloucestershire, England, born January 14, 1869, and is a son of Isaiah and Mary A. (Morgan) Morgan, also natives of England. Our subject was reared and educated in his native land, and in 1887 emigrated to America, locating at Nanticoke, where he was employed as locomotive engineer for a short time at No. 4 Shaft. He then was fan engineer at No. 1 Deep Shaft for a time; then was hoisting engineer at the Dirt Planes one year, and in 1889 took charge of the ponderous engines at No. 1 Deep Shaft, where he has since been employed. These engines are among the largest of their kind in the anthracite coal regions. The cylinders are thirty-two by seventy-two inches, attached to a fourteen foot drum. Mr. Morgan was married, in 1891, to Sarah, daughter of Reuben Courtright, a fire-boss. Our subject was reared in the faith of the Episcopal Church, and he is a Republican.

Thomas W. Morgan, inside foreman, Red Ash Coal Company, Wilkes Barre, was born in Carmarthenshire, Wales, September 16, 1838, a son of William and Elizabeth (Williams) Morgan. He was reared and educated in his native country, where he followed farming, also lead, coal and iron ore mining until 1866, in April of which year he came to America, locating in Wilkes Barre, and entering the employ of the Lehigh & Wilkes Barre Coal Company, where he served as miner and fire-boss thirteen years. On March 15, 1879, he was transferred to Sugar Notch, where he remained over eleven years as inside foreman for the same company, and then spent one year in Chesterfield county, Va., as superintendent of the Midlothian Mines, in that county. In August, 1890, he returned to Wilkes Barre, where he has since resided, and since 1891 has held the position of inside foreman of No. 1 Mines, Red Ash Coal Company. Mr. Morgan married, March 4, 1869, Jeannette, daughter of David and Catherine (Price) Elias, of Spring Brook, and has two children living, Arthur E. and Alice. He and his wife are members of the Welsh Presbyterian Church; in politics he is a Republican.

John L. Morgans, bratticeman at the Wyoming Colliery, Plains, was born in Glamorganshire, South Wales, August 15, 1839, and is a son of David and Sarah (Lewis) Morgans. The father, who was a blacksmith, reared a family of six children, three of whom are living, and our subject is the third, and the only one now living, in America, whither he came in 1864, locating in Hyde Park, Pa. Having worked in the mines since he was six years old, he sought employment in that line and found it; he loaded coal a few weeks, and then mined three years; then removed to Maryland, where he worked in the mines sixteen years; in 1882 he came to Plains, where he has since been employed at company work. Mr. Morgan was married, June 11, 1864, to Miss Mary, daughter of Charles and Margaret (Jones) Price, and they have had seven children, viz: David J. (deceased); Elias (deceased); Sarah A., married to Augustus Covart, a painter in Jersey city; Charles (deceased); Margaret; Mary L. and David. Mr. and Mrs. Morgans attend the Welsh Congregational Church; he is a member of the I.O.O.F., the Anthracite Castle, the A.O.K. of M.C., and in politics he is a Republican. He has lived in his present residence since 1885.

Morgan R. Morgans, superintendent of the Lehigh & Wilkes Barre Coal Company, Wilkes Barre, was born in Carmarthenshire, South Wales, June 24, 1848, a son of Morgan and Margaret (Williams) Morgans, also natives of Wales. Our subject was educated in Wales, and came to America in 1867, locating in Luzerne county and working as miner in the different mines about Wilkes Barre and vicinity until 1877, when he was given the position of mine foreman under the Lehigh & Wilkes Barre Coal Company at the Wanamie and Stanton Mines. He was foreman at these mines for about one year, when he was transferred to the Washington Colliery at Plymouth, where he was mine foreman for three years. At the end of that period he took charge of the inside work at the Nottingham No. 15, and wa foreman there four years. He was appointed assistant superintendent of the Lehigh & Wilkes Barre Coal Company, and continued as such until March, 1891, when he was appointed general superintendent of the company's entire coal works, which consist of the following mines: Hollenback and Empire, at Wilkes Barre; Wanamie Nos. 18 & 19; Maxwell No. 20, South Wilkes Barre; No. 3 and No. 5; the Stanton No. 7; Jersey No. 8; Sugar Notch No. 9. At Plymouth are operated by the company the Nottingham No. 15, the greatest anthracite coal mines in the world, the Washington No. 16 and Lance No. 11. The subject of our sketch was married, October 3, 1871, to Miss Margaret Williams, daughter of Thomas M. and Ann (Morgans) Williams, natives of Wales. Mr. Williams is superintendent of the Lykens Valley Coal Company. Five children have been born to this union, namely: Maggie, Annie, Edith, Elmer and Irving. In political matters Mr. Morgans is a Republican. The family attend the Congregational Church.

REES W MORGANS, foreman at the Avondale Mine. This experienced mine foreman was born, December 25 1850, in Carmarthenshire, South Wales, and is the forth in a family of eight children born to Morgan and Margaret (Williams) Morgans, natives of Wales. Our subject was educated at this birthpace, and, until twenty years of age, followed the vocation of a farmer. In 1870 he came to America, locating in Wilkes Barre, and immediately began work at the Empire Mine, where he did general work for about one year, when he began mining, working at it for seven years under the Lehigh & Wilkes Barre Coal Co. In 1879 he was given the position of fire-boss at the Stanton Mine, subsequently being transferred to the Empire, where he remained about one year; at the end of that time he was promoted to assistant foreman, which position he held for two years. He then removed to Plymouth and took the position of mine foreman at the Lance, where he served four years, afterward occupying this position at the following places: The Nottingham, two years; Shamokin Mines, operated by C.A. Langdon & Co., one year; Halstead Mines, under Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, six months; and thence to the Avondale, where he has occupied the position of mine Forman ever since. There are 280 men employed inside at this colliery, and the daily output is about one thousand tons. Mr. Morgans has been twice married: First, on April, 19, 1878, to Lizzie S., daughter of Jon and Mary (Roberts) Williams, natives of Cardiganshire, Wales. Three children were born to this union: Edwin D., Agnes and Lizzie. Lizzie S., the wife and mother, died May 14, 1885. Mr. Morgans was again married. June 22, 1887, to Miss Mary A., daughter of Richard E. and Ann Jones (Evans), natives of Montgomeryshire, Wales. The family attended the Welsh Presbyterian Church; in politics Mr. Mongans is a Republican.

Samuel R. Morgans, inside superintendent, Hollenback Mine No. 2, Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company. Wilkes-Barre. Barre, was born at Ystradgynlais, Wales, September 1, 1855, a son of Samuel R. and Margaret (Williams) Morgans. His father came to America in 1867, settling at Plymouth, this county, where he was employed by the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Coal Company. He sent for his family in 1868, and was smothered in the disaster at Avondale, September 6, 1869. His children were Samuel R. and Gwinnie (Mrs. Morgan B. Lewis). Our subject was reared in Whales until eleven years of age, and began life in the mines there at the age of eight. He came to America in 1867, locating in Plymouth, where he was employed in the breaker one year and then for six years as clerk in the store of William Davis & company. At eighteen years of age he entered the employ of the Lehigh & Wilkes Barre Coal Company, at Nottingham Colliery, where he was fire boss for years. He was promoted to foreman, October, 1889, and sent to Wanamie, where he served in that capacity seven months. He then accepted a position of inside Forman for John German & Company, near Taylorsville, and remained there one year and a half, after which he again entered the employ of the Lehigh & Wiles-Barre Coal Company, accepting his present position of inside superintendent of Holllenback Mine No. 2. In 1878 Mr. Morgans married Miss Marian, daughter of John O. and Martha (Evans) Jones, of Scranton, and by her had six children: Anne, John H., Oliva, Osborn, Edna and Lewis. Mr. Morgans is a member of the Puritan Congregational church, of the I.O.O.F., and K. of H. In politics, he is a Republican, and served as councilman of Plymouth five times, during one of which he was president.

John C. Morris, MD, Orange, was born in Philadelphia, October 29, 1816, a son of Issachar and Elizabeth (Coronas) Morris, both of whom were born in Montgomery county, Pa. Issachar was a merchant of Philadelphia, a thorough man of business, and a reputed lineal descendant of Robert Morris, of historic fame. His family of ten children all reached maturity. Our subject, the ninth of the family, was educated at Philadelphia and at Bloomsburg, where he studied medicine under Dr. J. Ramsay. He attended several coursed of lectures at Jefferson College, and began the practice of medicine October, 1839, in Wyoming county. In 1854 he removed to Orange, where he has a large practice, and enjoys the full confidence and love of his patients. Dr. Morris is a congenial companion, an man of refinement and wide experience, a good judge of human nature, and he is also gentle and sympathetic to a marked degree. Politically, he is a Republican. On June 7, 1842, he married Miss Caroline Fuller, who was born in Centre Moreland, Wyoming county, a daughter of Henry and Lucy Fuller, and of this union have been born five children, three of whom are living: John C., Jr., Frank T. and William H. John C., Jr., married Miss Lillie King; Frank married Miss Shafer: William H. married Miss Caroline Cooper.

William Grant Morris, physician and surgeon, West Nanticoke. The gentleman whose name appears at the head of this memoir is a native of Liverpool, Perry Co., Pa., and is the only child of Dr. Thomas G. and Sarah (Thompson) Morris, both natives of Pennsylvania. He received his education in the public schools and in the New Bloomfield Academy. During the years 1875 and 1876 he attended Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, and in 1877 entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, where he was graduated in the class of 1878. He immediately began the practice of his profession at Beach Haven, Luzerne Co., Pa. where he was engaged three years, when he moved to Shamokin Dam, Snyder Co., Pa. where he also practiced three years. He then came to Nanticoke, where he has since been successfully engaged in his profession, enjoying a large and lucrative practice. In connection with his general practice, the Doctor was surgeon for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company during the years 1883-84-85. He also was the physician in charge of the Central Poor District for the year 1884. Dr. Morris was married April 14, 1878, to Miss Anna M., daughter of George W. and Caroline (Wolfe) Fisher, natives of Pennsylvania. He is a member of the Jr. O.U.A.M, Knights of Malta, Sons of Veterans and Daughters of America, a branch of the Jr. O.U.A.M. Although not a politician he is always ready to lend a helping had to the success of the Democratic party.

Dennis Morrissey, justice of the peace, P.O. Wilkes-Barre, was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, November 2, 1842, and is a son of Dennis and Julia (Maloney) Morrissey. He came to America in 1855, landing at New York City., where he remained until eighteen years of age. He then located at Mahanoy City, Pa., and was engaged there in mining until 1868, when he removed to Sugar Notch, this county, and from there in 1876 to Wilkes-Barre township (where he has since resided), and worked in the mines until 1883. He married, Mary 19, 1867, Catherine, daughter of Jon and Mary (Murtha) Quinn, of Wilkes-Barre, and has nine children living: John, James, Dennis, Jr., William, Charles, Harry, Thomas, Katherine and Margaret. Mr. Morrissey is a member of the Catholic Church, and of the A.O.H.; in politics he is a stanch Democrat, and was elected justice of the peace of Wilkes-Barre township in 1883, and re-elected in 1888.

John F. Morrow, one of the Morrow Bros. proprietors of the "Hotel Morrow," Wilkes-Barre, was born in that city October 26, 1856, and is a son of James and Sarah (Gorman) Morrow, natives of County Sligo and County Mayo, Ireland, respectively. His father landed in America in June, 1846, settling in Wilkes-Barre, where he worked as a miner for thirty-three years, and died December 14, 1891, at the age of sixty-five years. His children were: Bridget (deceased), John F., Catherine, James H., Margaret (deceased), Sarah, William and Eugene. Our subject was reared in Wilkes-Barre, receiving his education in the public schools, and followed mining fourteen years. He afterward was employed as a railway brakeman, and in 1885 embarked in the hotel business in Wilkes-Barre, in which he has since successfully continued. He is a member of the Catholic Church, and politically he is a Democrat.

Rev. Allen J. Morton, Baptist minister, Kingston , was born in the County of Montgomery, Wales, March 14, 1836, and is a son of Mary (James) Morton, both natives of Wales, the former of whom was a nephew of John Morton, one of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence. Our subject was graduated at Pontypol College in the class of 1861, the celebrated Dr. Fred Evans being a member of the same class. Mr. Morton was practically engaged in the ministry two years before he had completed his college courses, and after graduating the was, for three years, located at Brinmour, Wales, engaged in the ministry, whence he proceeded to Glasbury, same county, where he remained two years. Mr. Morton then came to America, .locating in Upper Lehigh, Pa, for about thirteen years, engaged in his professional work; he organized churches at Lansford, Drifton, Upper Lehigh, and Shenanodoah. In 1879 he removed to Pittsburgh, where he was engaged in the ministry three years, at the end of which time he came to Kingston, where he has since resided, although he is engaged in his ministerial work at Mahanoy City and New Pottsvillle, Pa. In 1860 Mr. Morton was married, kin England, to Miss Mary Ann Morgan, a native of Wales, and this happy union has been blessed with seven children, viz.: Allen, Jr., a very successful student at Brown University; Mary, a graduate of Adder College, and now a medical student at the Brooklyn Hospital: Winifred, a graduate of Garfield College; Lizzie, a bookkeeper for James Evans, Edwardsville, and Jennie and Anna, both now attending the Wyoming Seminary. Mr. Morton is a member of the F. & A. M., and is past guard of the I.O.O.F.; in politics he votes from a rational independant standpoint.

Joel MORTON, proprietor of the "Berwick House," Berwick, was born in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, and December 6, 1839. He was reared in his native country, and in1863 came to America, locating at Mabonoy City, PA, and for a time worked in the mines. Later he kept hotel there seven years; was in the same business at Rock Glen, Luzerne County, and ten years and since 1891 he has been the successful proprietor of the "Berwick House" at Berwick. He was made many improvements on this popular house, making it one of the leading hostelries in Columbia county. The wife of Mr. Morton was Mary Fisher, of Sheffield, England, and by her children was born: Sarah A. (Mrs. William T Huntzinger), Frank, William, Mary A. (Mrs., John Tresea), Lizzie, Benjamin D., George H., Thomas and Florence. Mr. MORTON is a through "Boniface". He is a member of the Episcopal Church, and in politics is a Republican.

A B MOSS retired, Plymouth, was born in Ross Township, Luzerne Co., November 30, 1833, and is the sixth in a family of eleven children born to Joseph and Amelia (Sutliff) Moss, also natives of Luzerne county. Mr. Moss Is a descended from one of early pioneer family of this Valley; he was educate in and reared on a farm, where he resided until forty-seven years of age. He ten Came to Plymouth and worked at the carpenterís trade about three years, retiring at the end of that time from active labor. Our subject held the position of justice of the peace for five years, being elected on the Citizenís ticket; at the expiration of his term of office he was elected constable, which position he now holds. Mr. Moss was united in marriage, January 14, 1856, with Eliza, daughter of Alvin and Emma (Harrison) Wilkenson, the former of Connecticut origin; and the latter of Pennsylvanian descent. Three children have been born to this union, viz.: Alvin W principal of the Wilkes-Barre Business College; Amy E. A., and George A at home. Mr. Moss is a Democrat in politics. The Family attends the Christian Church.

C E MOTT, bookkeeper, Luzerne, Was born is Ross township, Luzerne September 25, 1859, son of Lorenzo D. and Mary E. (Harrison) Mott, natives of Pennsylvania. He was educated in the public schools of his native county, and is a graduate of the Wyoming Business College. Shortly after receiving his education he was employed by the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company as a car inspector at the Northumberland, PAS., a position he held for 10 months. HE then engaged in photography for three years, was employed in a grocery store as a clerk and bookkeeper and finally obtained position with Mr. Raub. Mr. Mott was married May 4, 1886, to Miss Anna, Daughter of George and Sarah (Teel) Wilson, natives of New Jersey, and by her he has one child, Floyd Eugene aged five years. Mr. Mott is a member of the P. O. S of A. and of the M. E. Church. In politics his interests are with the Republican Party.

Levi MOWERY, farmer, P. O. Hobbie, was born in Hollenback township, April 25, 1851, a son of Philip and Lydia (Andress) Mowery, both of whom were born in what now Conyngham township. Philip was the son of Peter Mowery, native of Northhampton county, who removed this county in its early settlement, locating in what is now Hollenback township, where he owned 400 acres of land, where he built and which improved as long as he lived. He was a sturdy pioneer in his time. He lived to be seventy-one years of age, and reared a family of eight children, only one of whom is now living. His son Philip began his business career as a farmer in Hollenback Township, where he has always resides as a well-to-do agriculturist. He owed 118 acres, 100 of which were cleared during his lifetime. He was honored with several township offices and his wife were members of the Lutheran Church; he died at the age of seventy-one years. Their family numbered twelve eight of whom are living, Levi being the seventh in the order of birth. He was reared and educated in the Hollenbuck township, and is a promising young farmer, with bright prospects before him eighty-five acres of well-improved and valuable land, on which he removed in 1889. On September 20, 1878 he married Miss Mary W. Eroch, who was born in Hollenback township, September 19, 1856, a daughter of John And Abbie Eroch, to whom were born two children, one of whom is living, Carrie M. Mr. and Mrs. Mowery are both members of the Lutheran Church in good standing.

Noah MOYER, the junior member of the above-mentioned firm, was born November 20, 1846, in Lehigh County and is the youngest in the family of eleven children of Peter and Catherine (Gerrerd) Moyer, natives of Pennsylvania. He was educated in his native county and commenced his career by enlisting in Company K; Ninth Pennsylvania volunteers, under Col. Nelson. Mr. Moyer took part in a great number of battles, and was twice wounded at the battle of the Wilderness, and at Farmville. He served until the close of the war, and after returning home entered school again, and continued until 1866, when he came to Hazleton and was engaged as clerk by A. Pardee & Co., remaining with them seven years. At the end of that time he engaged with J.A. Schlepp in the flour and feed business. Two years later he represented Lester & Co., of Binghamton, N.Y., in the capacity of traveling salesman. With them he remained until the present business was established by himself and Mr. Knox. In his political preferences, Mr. Moyer votes the Republican ticket; he is a member of the G.A.R. and Sons of America. In church connection, he is an Episcopalian. The block owned and occupied by these gentlemen is in every way equipped with all modern appliances for the carrying on of the large business which their establishment enjoys; and the members of the firm are familiarly known as business men of progressive methods and strict reliability, enjoying the highest esteem of all in this locality. (Note: This Name was in with the K surnames in the book.)

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