MC Surnames

History of Luzerne County, Pa.,

by H.C. Bradsby, 1893

C. W. McALARNEY, attorney at law, Plymouth. This successful and prominent lawyer was born in Mifflinburgh, Union Co., Pa., and is a son of John and Catharine (Wilson) McAlarney, the former a native of County Longford, Ireland, the latter of Lancaster county, Pa. Mr. McAlarney was educated in the common schools of his birthplace, and also at the Mifflinburgh Academy, taking a four years' course at the latter place. There were eight children in the family, four sons and four daughters, our subject being next to the youngest. Three of the sons are attorneys at law; the other, W. M. McAlarney, is a physician, now located at Philadelphia, Pa. Of the daughters, Mary C. and Rose reside at the old home in Mifflinburgh; Jane E. is the wife of J. C. Rocky, Du Bois, Pa., and Emma L. is deceased. After completing his education, our subject clerked in a general grocery store at Lewisburg, Pa., for the period of one year, at the end of which time he accepted a position as school teacher, which profession he followed six years. He then went to the city of Harrisburgh and began reading law with his eldest brother, J. C. McAlarney, and after two years of diligent study was admitted to the bar. After his admission to the bar, he remained with his brother until the fall of 1875, when he came to this county with the intention of opening an office. He was admitted to the Luzerne county bar, February 7, 1876, and in August, same year, he opened an office at Plymouth, where he has since practiced with remarkable success. Mr. McAlarney was married, March 27, 1886, to Clara R., daughter of John J. and Amanda (Davenport) Shonk, natives of Plymouth, to which union there have been born two children, John J., who died in infancy, and Amanda, born September 29, 1890. In politics Mr. McAlarney has always been closely identified with the Democratic party. As a lawyer he has made a success which has been due entirely to his own exertions.

Andrew Wilson McALPINE, real estate agent, Wilkes Barre, was born in Wilkes Barre June 4, 1849, and is a son of Frederick and Frances (Wilson) McAlpine. His paternal grandfather, George McAlpine was a native of Old Windsor, Conn., born in 1783, and died at what is now Avoca, this county. Three of his sons became residents of Luzerne County. Frederick McAlpine was a native of Tyringham, Mass.; he came from Winsted, Conn., to this county about 1840, settling at Wilkes Barre, where he engaged in the manufacture of tin ware and sheet iron stoves, and died there in 1856. His wife was a daughter of Seth and Rebecca (Yarington) Wilson, of Wilkes Barre. The paternal great-grandfather of our subject was in the Revolutionary war, and his maternal great-grandfather was in the Wyoming Massacre. Frederick McAlpine was the father of two children: Andrew W. and Lizzie M. The subject of this sketch was reared in Wilkes Barre Institute and Moravian College, Bethlehem, Pa. He began his business career as clerk for John H. Swoyer, of Wilkes Barre, and later became shipping clerk for the Lehigh Valley Coal Company. For three years he was connected with the "Wilkes Barre Record", and since 1887, has been engaged in the real estate business. May 22, 1879, he was married to Ida, daughter of Charles F. and Mary E. (Holtzman) Phillips, of Virginia, and has one daughter, Eleanor. Politically Mr. McAlpine is a Republican.

M. H. McANIFF, attorney at law, P. O. Plains, was born September 21, 1863. He entered the public schools of Plains at seven years of age and attended same until he was fourteen when he started to work around the coal breakers. Here he remained, however, but a little over a year, when he was apprenticed to the late Joseph K. Bogert, then proprietor of the "Union Leader", to learn the printers' trade. He advanced very rapidly and soon jumped from "devil" to assistant pressman, his being the hands that guided the first copy of the "Evening Leader" through the press. Although offered a journeyman's wages, he rejected the offer, and severing his connection with the paper returned to his books, graduating six months thereafter from the Plains high school. After passing a very creditable examination under the county superintendent, at the age of sixteen years he was offered a position as teacher in the schools of Plains township, which he accepted. This profession he followed three years, pursuing during this time a course of private study under G. H. Bodney, a graduate of Princeton College, finished the junior course at Bloomsburg State Normal School, and was admitted to the senior class in June, 1882. Returning to the school in the fall of 1883, he completed the course in June, 1884, and resumed teaching, being principal of some one of the Plains township schools for a period of six years. He registered as a student at law in 1887, under ex-District Attorney John McGahren, while teaching, and read with assiduity until December 21, 1891, when he passed the final examination--the committee taking just two hours to ascertain the fitness of himself and his colleague, Mr. M. N. Donnelly, for admission to the bar. Both were formally admitted January 11, 1892. Mr. McAniff has surrounded himself with a large and lucrative clientage, making a specialty of Orphans' Court and real estate practice. He is a ready and forcible speaker, and is often called upon to address public audiences.

Philip McANIFF, a prominent citizen of Plains, was born in County Cavan, Ireland, July 22, 1833, and is a son of Patrick and Ann (McCue) McAniff. The father, who was a school teacher, reared a family of three children, of whom Philip is the only survivor. Our subject received a select and national school education, and came to America in 1863, locating at Jersey City, where he worked about the freight depot for two and a half years; in 1865 he came to Wilkes Barre, worked on the railroad a few months, and then engaged in mining, which he followed until 1888, when he retired from active life; he built his present residence and removed therein in 1884. Mr. McAniff was married, November 17, 1858, to Miss Ellen, daughter of Michael and Ellen (Lilley) McGuire, and they have had four children, two of whom are living, viz: Michael H., a student of law with John McGahren, Wilkes Barre, and Hugh P., a druggist at the corner of South and Lincoln Streets, Wilkes Barre. Mr. McAniff and family are members of the Catholic Church; he is a Democrat in politics, and has held the offices of tax collector and school director in Plains township.

R. D. McCAA, engineer at the Oakwood Colliery, Plains, was born in Wilkes Barre, November 18, 1851, and is a son of Alexander and Mary (Dunn) McCaa. The father was born in Lanarkshire, Scotland, April 6, 1818, and is the third in a family of eight children born to James and Elizabeth (McCulloch) McCaa; his father, who was a miner, emigrated in 1837 to the island of Cape Breton, where he worked in the mines till 1848, and then removed to Beaver Meadows, Pa., where he died. Alexander began working in the mines at the age of seven years, and in 1844 came to Beaver Meadows, where he remained four years; then went to Jeansville, Pa., where he took the contract of sinking the first shaft at that place; later he contracted at Hazleton in company with his brother-in-law, Robert Dunn, and after a few months passed at Jeansville and Heckenville, he went to Egypt, N.C., where in company with Robert Dunn he opened the first coal mine in that State, in which his partner lost his life. Mr. McCaa remained there mining and exploring till 1865, when he returned to the coal field of Pennsylvania, where he dug the dusky diamond in many places, and where for many years he was foreman, and a well known coal operator; in 1868-70 he was employed at a large salary, to explore and prove the fertile coal field along the Black Warrior River in Alabama, where, with many others, he can regret unimproved opportunities that have produced handsome fortunes. Mr. McCaa was married, August 19, 1842, to Miss Mary, daughter of Robert and Elizabeth (Barrowman) Dunn, natives of Scotland, and they have had twelve children, eight of whom are living, viz: Elizabeth, married to William E. Colborn, an extensive coal operator at Simpson, W. Va. (they have six children: Mary, Frank C., Harry, Blanche, William and Florence); Rose A., widow of Thomas Newlin, a stationary engineer (she lives at Pleasant Valley, Pa. and has two children, George and Jennie); Margaret J., married to George Keanfer, outside boss at Smithville, Pa. (they had seven children, four of whom are living, Ursula, Lena, Barbara and Charles); Robert D., the subject of this memoir; William; Isabelle, married to M. M. Johnson, superintendent of the Erie Coal Company, at Blossburg, Pa. (they have one child, Louisa); Josephine, married to George Shiffer, and Carrie V., still living at home with her aged parents in Plains.

Robert D. McCAA was educated in the public schools of Plymouth, and at the age of seventeen began working in the mines; he ran pumps two years, and weighed coal eight years at the Enterprise Shaft. In 1883 he was promoted to engineer at the Prospect Shaft, where he remained two years, then worked at the Dorrance Shaft four years, and entered his present position in 1889. He has lived in Plains since 1870, except from 1883 to 1885, when he lived in Wilkes Barre. Mr. McCaa was married, September 20, 1876, to Millie M., daughter of Jeremiah and Mary A. (Sperring) Shiffer, and they have four children, viz.: Robert B., Ida M., Alexander J. and George S. Our subject, though not partisan in his political views, has always given his support to the Republican party.

William H. McCAA, outside foreman at the Prospect Colliery, Plains, was born in Egypt, N. C., April 4, 1855. He began laboring with his father in the Boston Colliery, Luzerne, at the age of fourteen, and remained there three years; he then loaded coal in the Enterprise Mine five years, and in 1871 engaged as helper in the blacksmith shop at the Prospect Colliery. He followed that occupation but a few months, and then ran the pumps for two years, when he was promoted to engineer, which position he held for eleven years. Mr. McCaa then acted as runner nine months, and outside foreman nine months, for the Fuller Coal Company, Wyoming; that mine caving in, it was abandoned, and he then went to Scranton, where he worked for the S. N. Stuller Coal Company as outside foreman four months, and engineer six months, when the company failed. Our subject then, went to the Dorrance Colliery, in North Wilkes Barre, where he was engineer for two years, and was then employed in the same capacity for the Wilkes Barre Electric Light Company for a year and a half, in 1888 accepting his present position, which he has since held. Mr. McCaa was married, June 20, 1878, to Miss Emma, daughter of Sydney and Catherine (McGinnis) Eicke, and they have five children, viz.: Pearn S., Ethel, Elizabeth, Mary and Millie M. Our subject and family attend the Presbyterian Church; he is a member of the K. of P., and in politics is a Republican.

WILLIAM McCABE (lately deceased) was born in County Monaghan, Ireland, June 8, 1822, a son of George and Rosa (Stockdill) McCabe, both natives of Ireland where they lived a life of respectability, and died at a good old age. George McCabe was married twice, and reared a family of seven children--four by his first, and three by his second marriage. The names of his children by the first marriage are James, George, William and Elizabeth. In 1836 they started for this country, but after leaving Liverpool, they were, after a lapse of twelve days, driven back by adverse and severe wind to their starting place. However, they finally reached the land of freedom and equal rights, where a man can, if he will, hew out for himself an unimpeachable character and a name that can be handed down to posterity without a blush. This, William McCabe did! The boys located in Philadelphia, where they resided two years; then removed to Bradford county, where they were extensively engaged in agricultural pursuits. William was tho younger male in his father's family, and was fourteen years of age when he landed in this country, from which time he followed farming. On December 8, 1842, Mr. McCabe took to wife Miss Ruth, daughter of Rev. Joseph and Amelia Towner, and by her had six children, two of whom are now living: Wesley T., born August 26, 1843, and James W., born November 9. 1860. Mrs. Ruth Towner McCabe was born at Rome, Pa., July 26, l821. Her father was a noted M. E. preacher of marked ability, who traveled on circuit work for thirty-one years. All the Towners of this line are noted for their literary qualifications. Mr. McCabe continued to prosper as a farmer in Bradford county, year after year adding to his .yearly income that which every thoughtful man lays up for the comfort of his family. Mr.. McCabe's perfect and practical knowledge of farming attracted tho attention of Mr. Mercur, the manager for the Lehigh Valley Coal Company, who induced him to take charge of their extensive farm of 1,200 acres. In March, 1871, he removed to Exeter with his two sons, to superintend the working of this vast farm, which, under his watchful eye proved successful beyond all' expectations. He brought about such a radical change thereon, and made it so profitable for the company, that he kept his position for over twenty one years, or up to the time of his death. He also acted as agent for the company in various capacities, often handling large sums of money. Mr. McCabe owned three lots in West Pittston, with coal under each, on which he has a royality; they are worth about $15,000. He built for himself a palatial residence, furnished in the natural wood, lighted by electricity, and equipped with all other modern improvements. He was a consistent member of the M.E. Church, and upright and honorable in all his dealings and relations with the world in which he lived. His sons, Wesley T. and James W., were assistant superintendents under him. Wesley T was born, reared and educated in Rome Pa., and married Miss Della B., daughter of Lewis and Janes Barnes, in 1866.

JAMES W. M'CABE (McCabe), the younger son, was born in Troy, Pa., and was reared and educated in Luzerne county, at Wyoming Seminary. Like his father, he always followed agricultural pursuits, with the exception of four years at Heidleherg, in which he was foreman in the colliery. At the age of twenty-two, January 31, 1883, he married Miss Laura A. Lance, who was born in Pittston, October 12, 1860, a daughter of Thomas B. and Eliza Lance, of Pittston, by which happy marriage there were born three beautiful girls: Nellie R., Mattie L. and Florence E. Mr. McCabe moved on the company s farm in 1885. He is a promising young man of bright intellect, large heart, and of an even temper. He is at present a member of the borough council.

PATRICK McCALL, grocer, Wilkes-Barre, was born at Greenock, near Glasgow, Scotland, April 28, 1846, and is a son of Cornelius and Eunice (Sharpe) McCall, natives of County Donegal, Ireland, who came to America in 1849, locating at Tamaqua, Pa., where the father followed the occupation of a miner up to 1866. They removed to Nanticoke, and later to Mahanoy City, where the father died in 1877, at the age of fifty-nine years. Our subject was reared in Schuylkill county. Pa., from three years of age, and worked about the mines there from 1854 to 1866, when he removed to Nanticoke, and one year later to Sugar Notch, where he was teamster for Conyngham & Skelding six mouths, and clerk for Conyngham & Paine five years. He then railroaded, two and one-half years, after which he was clerk at C. M. Conyngham s, five years. In 1884 he embarked in the grocery business for his own account, which he has since followed. Mr. McCall was married May 29, 1872, to Mary, daughter of William and Rebecca (Clements) Meehan, of Wilkes-Barre, and by her he has had ten children: William, John and James (twins), Charles, Rebecca, Eunice, George, Joseph, Edward and Raymond. Mr. McCall is a member of the Catholic Church; in politics he is a Democrat, and was collector for the First District school board in 1882; president of the board in 1883; and treasurer in 1884.

THOMAS F. MCCANN, proprietor of the "Hartford House," Ashley, was born in Wilkes-Barre, July 30, 1854, a son of John and Ellen (Hoy) McCann, natives of Counties Westmeath and Longford, Ireland, respectively. His mother came to Hanover township when she was a child, and was married in Ashley; the father was a miner. They reared a family of twelve children, three of whom died young, the others being Matthew, Thomas F., Mary (Mrs. John Flynn), James, Ellen (Mrs. Patrick Sullivan), Peter, Catherine and Christopher. Our subject was educated in the public schools of Ashley, and was then successively engaged in picking slate at the Hartford Breaker six years, laboring outside one year, oiling on the Plane two summers, and attending school winters two years. He then ran extra one year, and ran cars on the Plane from December, 1871, to April, 1878; he then braked on the B. & 0. R. R. at Pittsburgh, Pa., till December of that year, when he removed to Ashley, and braked on the Lehigh Valley Railroad till July, 1879. He next braked on the Central Railroad of New Jersey till July, 1884, when he was promoted to conductor, which position he held till April, 1889, at which time he embarked in his present business. Mr. McCann was married November 20, 1879, with Miss Mary, daughter of Martin and Mary (Brogan) Cuff, natives of Ireland. The issue of this union has been seven children, five of whom are living, viz.: John, Ellen, Frank, Gerald and Marie. He and his family are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a Democrat in his political views.

MICHAEL A. MCCARTY, proprietor of the "Ashley House," Ashley, was born in County Sligo, Ireland, February 1, 1836, and is a son of Eugene and Margaret (Anderson) McCarty. They reared a family of seven children: Mary (Mrs. James Gilligan), deceased; Betsy (Mrs. John Coyne); Catherine (Mrs. John Flaunery); Michael A.; Judith (Mrs. John McAstine); John, a farmer, in Ireland, and Patrick, a merchant, also in Ireland. The father was a contractor. Our subject was educated in his native country, and then worked on the farm till 1850, when he came to America and located in Boston, working there at the machinist trade for one year, when he came to Wilkes-Barre and followed the same business for another year. He then assisted in putting up the machinery at the Black Diamond Shaft, and worked there as engineer for two years, then seven years at the Empire, and afterward seven years at the Hartford. In 1870 he built his present place of business, first keeping a saloon and boarding house, but since 1876 has had the hotel. Mr. McCarty was married, May 11, 1854, to Miss Ann Conlan, daughter of Richard and Alice (Durkin) Conlan; she is a niece of Bishop Durkin and of Dr. Durkin, of Dublin. The issue of this union was five children, two of whom died young, and Alice, who died at the age of seventeen years; Elizabeth (Mrs. Thomas W. Hart), and Eugene, who was educated in the Harry Hillman Academy, St. Michael s College, Toronto, Canada, Seton Hall College, South Orange, N. J., and is now a student in the Commercial Department of the Wyoming Seminary. Mr. McCarty and family are members of the Catholic Church. He is a Democrat in his political views, and has held the office of school director in Ashley twelve years, also three years in Hanover township; he was a member of the council two terms when the borough was first organized, and was secretary one term; has also held the office of tax collector, and was deputy sheriff of Luzerne county from 1880 to 1883.

J. ,J. MCCAULEY, justice of the peace and burgess of the borough of Exeter, was born in County Donegal, Ireland, February 11, 1827, a son of James and Rose (Gallagher) McCauley, both of whom were born in Ireland. They took passage for the United States in the spring of 1845, but Mrs. McCauley died on the voyage out. The husband, on his arrival in this country, located for a short time in New York City, and soon thereafter removed to Carbondale, Pa. He had followed farming in Ireland, but on his coming to this country retired from active life. His family consisted of four children, two of whom are living: J. J. and Rose. The former was reared and educated in Ireland, and was eighteen years of age when he came to this country with his father. He confined himself to clerking and mercantile business, beginning this business at the age of eleven in his native country, and following the same more or less ever since. He removed to Pittston in 1850, where he has since resided. On August 25, 1858, he was joined in wedlock to Miss Catherine, daughter of Michael and Catharine Kieley. There were born to them fourteen children, twelve of whom are now (1892) living: Mary A., Rose E.. Catherine, Agnes, Josephine, Tressa, Madge, Jennevine, James J., William H., Alphonsus and Joseph, all of whom are single. Mr. McCauley has been honored with several offices during his residence in this country, serving as supervisor, street commissioner, tax collector and councilman. He is now serving his third term as justice of the peace, and has served as burgess for two years. He owns five houses in Exeter borough, and has accumulated his property by honest and upright dealing with his fellows. When, in the dark days of 1862, his country called for volunteers, he became a member of Company H, One Hundred and Seventy-seventh P. V. I., for the term of nine months. He is a member of the G. A. H. He and his family are members of the Roman Catholic Church. Politically he is a Democrat.

ANDREW TODD MCCLINTOCK (deceased) was born in Northumberland, Pa., February 2, 1810, a son of Samuel and Hannah (Todd) McClintock, and was of Scotch-Irish extraction. His paternal grandfather, James McClintock, was born in Raphoe, County Donegal, Ireland, as was also the father of our subject, both of whom settled in Northumberland county, Pa., and died there. The maternal grandfather was Col. Andrew Todd, of Trappe, Montgomery Co., Pa., and was a soldier of the Revolution. Mr. McClintock's early education was received in the public schools of his native county, and he then spent three years at Kenyon College, Ohio. Returning to Northumberland, he here spent one year as a student at law in the office of James Hepburn, after which he located in Wilkes- Barre, and completed his law course in the office of Hon. George W. Woodward. He was admitted to the bar August 8, 1836, at which time he formed a partnership with Mr. Woodward, which firm, known as Woodward & McClintock, existed until 1838. In 1839 our subject was appointed district attorney of Luzerne county, but resigned after one year, and resumed his private practice. He had been solicited to accept political favors of honor and trust, but persistently refused. In 1867 an Act of the Legislature gave Luzerne title to an additional law judge, and Mr. McClintock, irrespective of party, was by leading members of the bar, as well as many of the most prominent business men, requested to accept the honor; but his address to public life, and the fact that he had been counsel for many years, embracing a larger portion of the business and property of the county, he absolutely declined the use of his name for the office. When Governor Hartranft appointed, in 1867, the committee to revise the constitution of the State, Mr. McClintock was named a member of the committee, and actively participated in the important councils that followed. In 1870 the degree of LL. D. was conferred upon him by Princeton College. His practice embraced multitudinous interests of grave moment, and he conducted most responsible cases on the trial lists of the courts. He was counsel for the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, the Pennsylvania, the Delaware & Hudson, and other railroad and coal companies. He was president of the Wilkes-Barre City Hospital, and of the Wyoming Historical and Geological Society; a director of the Home for Friendless Children, and of the Wyoming National Bank; president of the Luzerne County Bible Society, of the Hollenback Cemetery Association, and of the Wilkes-Barre Law and Library Association. He was a member and elder of the First Presbyterian Church, and had been several times chosen as delegate to the general assembly of the denomination. Mr. McClintock was married May 11, 1841, to Augusta, daughter of Jacob Cist, of Wilkes-Barre, and by her he had five children, three of whom survive, viz.: Andrew H., Helen G. and Alice M. (Mrs. J. Vaughan Darling). Mr. McClintock died January 14, 1892.

ANDREW HAMILTON McCLINTOCK, attorney at law, was born in Wilkes-Barre, December 12, 1852, a son of Andrew T. and Augusta B. (Cist) McClintock. He was educated at Princeton College, where he was graduated in 1872, read law with his father, also with E. P. & J. V. Darling, and was admitted to the bar of Luzerne county, January 20, 1876, and has since been in the active practice of his chosen profession at Wilkes-Barre. On December 1, 1880, he married Eleanor, daughter of Charles F., Jr., and Elizabeth (La Porte) Welles, of Bradford county, Pa., and they have two sons: Andrew T. and Gilbert S. Mr. McClintock is an active memher of the Wyoming Historical and Geological Society, and is one of the trustees of the Osterhout Free Library. In politics he is a Democrat.

REV. DAVID B. McCLOSKEY, retired Methodist Episcopal minister, P. 0. Town Hill, Huntington township, was born January 20, 1835, in Clinton county, and is a son of James and Susan (Fegundus) McCloskey, natives of Pennsylvania, and of Irish and Scotch origin, the former of whom was a farmer and blacksmith by occupation, and died May 20, 1861, aged seventy-five years. Our subject is the seventh in a family of ten children, eight of whom are now living. He was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and Dickinson Seminary, at Williamsport, Pa., and began to preach the Gospel at the age of twenty-five (in 1861), in New Washington, Clearfield Co., Pa., and has since been pastor at the following places: Schellsburg, Bedford county; Cassville, Huntingdon county; Woodbury, Bedford county; Sherlesburg, Huntingdon county; Milroy, Mifflin county; Martinsburg, Blair county; Snydertown, Northumberland county; Hughesville, Lycoming county; Great Island, Clinton county; Miffiinsbnrg, Union county; Muncy, Lycoming county; Jamestown, Lycoming county; Salona, Clinton county; was supernumerary for a short time; was pastor at Town Hill, where he now resides, for three years, when, on account of failing health, he retired, purchased his cozy bouse, and now devotes his time to his family and little farm. On October 5, 1865, he married Miss Louzetta, daughter of Samuel and Mary (Fry) Savage, and this happy union is blessed with five children viz.: Howard E., telegraph operator at Mocanaqua, Pa.; Edward W., telegraph operator at Retreat, Pa.; and Clarence E., Nellie M. and Horace W., all at home. Mr. McCloskey is a member of the F. & A. M., and politically is a Prohibitionist.

JAMES McCLOSKEY, farmer, P. 0. Orange, was born in Londonderry, Ireland, July 6, 1827, and is a son of John and Ann (McCloskey) McCloskey, both of whom were also born in Ireland. John died in 1861, after which his widow Ann emigrated to this country with her family, which consisted of ten children, all of whom grew to maturity, and five of them are now living. James, the subject of this sketch, emigrated to this country in July, 1845, locating in New Jersey, where he remained two years. He then removed to Pittsburgh, where he resided a short time; from there he went to Virginia; and in 1849 he removed to Pittston, where he followed mining for the Pennsylvania Coal Company for forty-one years. Ia 1886 he removed to his farm of seventy acres of well-improved land. Since his residence on the place he has made many improvements in buildings, orchards and other needed repairs. Mr. McCloskey is an upright man, of good sound principles; he is. a Democrat politically, and a member of the Catholic Church. In 1854 he married Miss Mary Ann, daughter of John and Catherine Daily, of Pittston, and they have had nine children, five of whom are living: Henry, Catherine, Anna, Lizzie and James. Catherine is married to William Boner, a mining engineer; Anna is married to Patrick Welsh, a clerk; Lizzie is married to Frank Commisky, a clerk. Mrs. McCloskey was born in New York City in 1836. The family are much respected in the community, and move in high circles of society.

DANIEL McCORMICK, brick manufacturer and farmer, P. 0. Port Blanchard, was born June 10, 1834, in County Sligo, Ireland. His parents were Robert and Mary (0'Hara) McCormuick, of the same place; they reared a family of eight sons, of whom the subject of this memoir is the eldest. The family came to America in the year 1840, and settled in New York State, where they lived until 1856, when they removed to Pittston. Daniel, as well as the rest of the family, was educated in the common schools, and in 1844 went to work in a brickyard, where he stayed until 1853; he then went to Illinois, where he followed the same business until his removal to Pittston, when he went to work for Schooley, in the brickyard, which, through his industry and integrity, he now owns. Mr. McCormick was united in wedlock, November 29, 1856, with Miss Ann, daughter of Terence and Bridget (McGrath) Kelly, natives of County Roscommon, Ireland, which union has been blessed with the following children: Mary E., born November 10, 1857, was married, June 27, 1883, to James Duffy, a salesman, of Port Griffith; Annie L., born March 26, 1859, was married, July 14, 1887, to James C. Delaney, proprietor of the "Delaney House," Pittston; John J., born June 22, 1861; William F., born August 16, 1863; Bridget T., born December 29, 1864; Lucy V., born December 29, 1866; James T., born August 22, 1869; and Margaret C., born February 22, 1874. In religion Mr. McCormick is a Catholic; in politics he is a Democrat, and was assessor of Jenkins township from 1879 to 1882.

JAMES McCORMICK, blacksmith at the Henry Colliery, Plains, was born in England, April 15, 1861, and is a son of James and Elizabeth (Craney) McCormick, natives of Ireland. The father, who was a miner, reared a family of six children, three of whom are living, and James is the fourth. The family came to America in 1863, locating at Plains, where the father died in 1873, having been killed in the mines. Our subject received a very meager education at the common schools, and at the age of seven years began picking slate. He worked about the mines seventeen years, including one year during which he worked as second miner; and in 1885 began an apprenticeship of three and a half years, learning the blacksmith trade with Patrick Conahan. He then worked at the Port Browkley Colliery two years; in 1891 removed to the Henry. His mother and sister, Catherine, live with him; his sister, Elizabeth, married Michael Hughes, by whom she has three children: John, Margaret and James; Mary A., the second in the family, married, in 1879, John Dugan. and they have had three children, as follows: Mary, Mark (who died a short time ago) and Bessie; and his sister Catherine married Patrick Moore, by whom she has two children: Mary and Albert. Our subject is a member of the Catholic Church and the Board of Erin; politically he is a Democrat. His father and two brothers, John and Thomas, were killed in the mines. He built his present residence and removed therein in 1889.

THOMAS McCORMICK (deceased) was born in County Monaghan, Ireland, in 1822, and was a son of John and Mary (Sharkey) McCormick. He came to America in 1851, locating at Saratoga, N. Y., where he was employed in a papermill for three years, and then came to Luzerne county, where he was engaged in mining until a few years previous to his death, which occurred November 16, 1889, at his residence in Plains township. Mr. McCormick was married in 1849 in Dorsetshire, England, to Mrs. Mary O'Malley, daughter of James and Catharine (Stuart) Degnan, natives of Ireland, and widow of Patrick O'Malley, by whom she had had two children: John, of Plains, and William, of England. By her second husband she has had nine children, viz.: James; Mary; Charles, who died at the age of thirty-six; Kate; Elizabeth; Josephine; Thomas; Annie T., who lives at home, and Ella L., who also resides at home (she is one of the successful teachers of Luzerne county and is at present teaching in the Plains graded school, where her services are highly appreciated). The McCormick family are members of the Catholic Church, and in politics they are Democratic.

WILLIAM McCOMBS, M. D., was born in Philadelphia, January 20, 1861, a son of Rev. William McCombs, of the Philadelphia M. E. Conference. Our subject was educated in the public schools of Philadelphia, and studied medicine under the instruction of the late R. J. Levis, M. D., J. B. Roberts, M. D., and with his brother, R. S. McComhs, M. D., all of Philadelphia. He attended Jefferson College, where he graduated on March 30, 1882. During the remaining portion of the latter year, and until April, 1883, he was assistant in the surgical department of the Philadelphia Polyclinic. He then associated himself with W. R. Longshore, M. D., of Hazleton, and was stationed at the Lehigh and Wilkes-Barre Colllieries at Audenried, where he remained until April, 1886. On June 3, 1885, the Doctor was married to Miss Leah Pinto, of Philadelphia. During 1886 he returned to Philadelphia, where he established a drug business and practiced medicine. In 1890 he returned to Hazleton and again associated himself with Dr. W. R. Longshore. Dr. McCombs has always been a Republican, and is a prominent member of several secret societies. He served for a number of years in the ranks of the First Regiment of Infantry, First Brigade, N. G. P. He is a member of the Luzerne County Medical Society, and is also a member of the Hazleton City board of health, appointed to serve four years from April 1, 1892.

PATRICK McCoy, proprietor of the "Newtown House," Hanover township, was born in Ashley March 27, 1864, and is a son of a Patrick and Mary (McTigue) McCoy, natives of County Sligo, Ireland. They came to America as early as 1846 and settled in Hanover township, where the father died at the age of fifty-two. The mother lives with her son. The family consisted of seven children, viz.: Mary (Mrs. John Noll); Frank; Thomas; Margaret (Mrs. Nicholas Helfrick); Patrick; James; and John, who is a mute. Our subject was educated in the public schools. At an early age he picked slate in the breaker, for four years. He next worked in the mines, but was sick and, having some unwise surgical operations performed on him, was disabled for heavy manual labor. Consequently he opened a confectionery and tobacco store, which he carried on three years, and then engaged in his present business, which is a great success, owing to his temperate habits and good business principles. The family are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a member of the A. 0. H. In his political views he is a Democrat, and has rendered the party much valuable service.

A. S. McDANIELS, a prominent farmer of Huntington township.P.O. Waterton, was born, on the farm he now owns, May 11, 1841. He is a son of David and Permelia (Santee) McDaniels, natives of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, and of Scotch-Irish and English origin, respectively; the father was also a farmer. He came from New Jersey in 1839, and purchased the present McDaniels farm in 1840. He died March 6, 1890, aged eighty-five years. David was a son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Newman) McDaniels, natives of Connecticut. Our subject is the sixth in a family of nine children, six of whom are now living. He was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and, on August 18, 1862, enlisted in the United States army, in Company F, One Hundred and Forty-third Regiment, under Capt. Tubbs. He participated in the following engagements: Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, -Hatcher's Run, and various minor engagements; was wounded by a piece of shell at Gettysburg; he was made sergeant of his company May 6, 1864; was discharged at Hart Island June 12, 1865, and returning home, farmed four years for his father. He then rented the farm, and so worked until the death of his father, when he purchased the same from the other heirs, and today he is one of the prominent farmers of his section. Mr. McDaniels was married, August 5, 1865, to Miss Sarah E., daughter of Samuel and Mary (Scott) Masters, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German origin. This union was blessed with six children, viz.: Rush M., born July 11, 1866, a farmer of Slocum township (he is married to Ida Sutliff); Brice R., born August 6, 1868, died May 27, 1889; Ralph V., born August 9,1870, helping his father on the farm (he married Mary Bear); Mason B., born October 14, 1872; Bessie L., born April 3. 1875; and Harry B., born June 22, 1877. The family are members of the M. E. church. Our subject is a member of the P. of H., I. 0. 0. F., and K. of P.; politically, he is a Republican, and has held the offices of school director and supervisor. The McDaniels farm is one mile west from Waterton postoffice, amid contains sixty-eight acres of land.

JOSEPH R. McDANIELS, a prominent farmer of Huntington township, P. 0. Shickshinny, was born in Sussex county, N. J., June 8, 1837, and is a son of David and Phoebe A. (Carpenter) McDaniels, natives of New Jersey, and of Scotch amid Irish origin, respectively. The father, who was a farmer by occupation, died in February, 1890, aged eighty-six years. Our subject, who is the seventh in a family of fourteen children, six of whom are now living, was reared on a farm, and educated in the common schools. When twenty-one years of age, he began life as a common laborer, which he followed until 1866, when he purchased his present farm of eighty acres, where he resides, situated two miles southeast of Waterton postoffice. He also owns 140 acres in other parts of the township. He was married July 31, 1859, to Lauretta, daughter of Saverhill and Sophia (Monroe) Williams, and this union was blessed with four children, viz.: Seymour S., a builder at Shickshinny, married to Ida McDermot; Byron D., a blacksmith at Waterton, married to Rose Williams; Anna S. and Frank 0., both living at home. Mr. McDaniels is one of the sound farmers of his section, who, by strict attention and hard work, has accumulated a fine property, and won for himself a host of friends. Politically, he is a Prohibitionist.

PATRICK McDERMOT, miner in No. 6 Colliery, Port Griffith, was born in County Mayo, Ireland, October 27, 1846, and is a son of Thomas and Ann (Cauley) McDermot. The father, who was a miner, reared a family of four children, all but our subject being born in America, as follows: Thomas, in Edwardsville, Pa.; John, who died at the age of seventeen years, and Mary (Mrs. M. E. Defaney). The parents came to America in 1848, and our subject in 1851. He located with the rest of the family, who, after passing three years on the Erie Canal, had now removed to Port Griffith. Here he availed himself of all the public-school advantages, and at an early age began working about the mines, which he has since followed, in all thirty two years, including twenty-two years mining. Mr. McDermot enlisted at Trenton, N. J., April 7, 1865, in Company D, Thirty-fourth New Jersey Infantry, and was discharged September 9, 1865. In 1876 he purchased his present residence, the William Stocker homestead, where he has since resided. Mr. McDermot was married, April 7, 1879, to Miss Ann, daughter of Patrick and Ann (Bolan) Lynn, natives of County Mayo, Ireland. She died April 17, 1883, having become the mother of one child, Ann, who died at the age of three years. He was again married, the second time, on December 16, 1886, to Miss Bridget, daughter of Patrick and Ann (Cady) Tierny, natives of County Mayo, Ireland, and they have two children, viz.: John and Annie. Mr. McDermot and family are members of the Catholic Church. He is a member of the A. 0. H., is a Democrat in his political views, and has held the offices of assessor, tax collector and school director in Jenkins township.

JOHN McDONOUGH, blacksmith at the Hartford Mine, Ashley, was born in County Sligo, Ireland, March 26, 1846, a son of Patrick and Ann (McLaughlin) McDonough. His father, a sergeant of police in his own country at the age of seventy-eight years, and who has been on the retired list for twenty years, reared a family of two children, viz.: John, and Mary A., who lives with her father. Our subject came to America in March, 1864, and served five months as a waiter in the "Fifth Avenue Hotel," New York. From there he came to Ashley, loaded coal six months, drove a team six months, and then began working at his trade in the shop where he is now found. He built his present residence in 1868. November 26, 1868, Mr. McDonough married Miss Mary, daughter of Patrick and Margaret (McCall) Campbell, natives of Ireland, and by her had four children, viz.: Annie, wife of Michael O'Hara, of Ashley; Mamie, wife of Frank Misheau, of Hartford, Conn.; Elizabeth, who lives with her father; Margaret, who died at the age of six months. Mrs. McDonough died June 15, 1875. Our subject and his family are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a member of the A. 0. H. In his political views he is a Democrat.

C. J. McFADDEN, M. D., physician and surgeon, Pittston, was born in Lewistown, Pa., and is a son of Joseph and Frances (Caruthers) McFadden, both of American parentage, residents of Lewistown, where the father is now and has been for many years a merchant. They had a family of three children, viz.: Flora, married to C. W. Lind, a real estate broker of Roanoke, Va.; Howard, deceased, and C. J. Our subject was reared in Lewistown, and attended the public schools of that city during his boyhood; in 1883 he entered the Lewistown Academy, from which he graduated in 1886; he then spent one year studying in the Dickinson Seminary, Williamnsport, Pa. In 1887 he began the study of medicine under a preceptor, and after one year's tuition entered the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, graduating from that institution in 1891., with the degree of M. D. He then served as surgeon in the Presbyterian Hospital of Philadelphia until October 1, 1891, when he located at Pittston and began the practice of his profession. The Doctor has been a hard student, and has a love for his chosen profession that, together with his brilliant social qualities, is sure to soon place him at the head of his profession. He is a member of the K. of M., Holy Temple Commandery of Lewistown, Pa. He is a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Pittston, and of the Pittston Y. M. C. A.

JOHN McGAHREN is a native of the Empire State, having been born at Ellicottsville, Cattaraugus Co., N. Y., March 8,1852. His father, Patrick McGahren, came from Cavan, Ireland, in 1846, and locating upon a farm at Wysox, Bradford county, soon took position as one of the substantial citizens of the place. He married Catherine Masterson, daughter of the late Cornelius Masterson, a native of Trim, County Meath, Ireland, but who had emigrated to America and was living at Newark, N. J., when Patrick McGahren married his daughter. From this union came John McGahren who attended the schools of his native town, and was afterward sent to St. Bonaventure College, Allegany county, N. Y., whence he graduated in 1872. He soon after applied for a position as teacher in the public schools of Wilkes-Barre. His application was successful and he taught two terms, afterward entered upon the study of the law, in the office of Foster and Lewis. He was admitted to the bar February 14, 1876. For five years he was associated in a legal partnership with Hon. C. D. Foster, and for a still longer term sustained the same relationship to Ex-Judge Garrick M. Harding. In 1882 he was the Democratic candidate for district attorney, and was elected by a majority of about one thousand votes, and served the full term of three years in the office, acceptably to all parties. Since the expiration of his term of office, he has filled various positions of trust and confidence. He was appointed by the court, for the term of three years, on the board for the examination of law students, who seek admission to the bar. He has been chairman of the county convention, and served for several years on the county committee of the Democratic party. His advice and assistance have always been freely given to his party, and as an appreciation of his services he was at one time tendered the nomination for judge, and again the nomination for Congress, which he declined to accept. He has established an extensive and lucrative law practice, and by his legal attainments and industry occupies a leading position at the bar. In 1889 he was married to Mary E., a daughter of Matthew McVay, a resident of Philadelphia, who in his lifetime was a warm and intimate friend of the lamented Samuel J. Randall. Mr. McVay was well known throughout Philadelphia as the chief of the Democratic forces, in the Fifth Ward of that city. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. McGahren, John M. and Walter Ridgway, who are the cherished objects of their parent's love.

JOHN McGINNIS, assistant mine foreman at the Lattimer Mines. This skillful and experienced foreman was born at Paterson, N. J., October 31, 1857, and is a son of Thomas and Bridget (Donover) McGinnis, natives of Ireland. Our subject was reared and educated in Luzerne county, and early in life undertook, with an elder brother, the support of a large family, the father having died when the children were very young. He began work about the mines, doing general work for different collieries, and was for many years docking and driver-boss. In 1891 he was given the position of assistant foreman at Lattimer Mines Nos. 1 and 2, and has since occupied that position. Mr. McGinnis is well up in the art of mining, having, in his many years experience, closely observed the various methods by which coal could be most easily mined. He was united in marriage, June 3, 1886, with Miss Madge, daughter of Burnet Malony, a native of Ireland, and to their union have been born three children, namely: Thomas, James and Mary. In politics Mr. McGinnis is a firm Democrat, and the family are members of the Catholic Church.

JOSEPH J. McGINTY, recorder of Luzerne county, was born in the County of Durham, England, A. D., 1850, and is a son of Arthur and Isabel (Dunn) McGinty, natives of Ireland and England, respectively, who emigrated to America in 1864, locating near Hazleton, this county, where they reared their family of seven children, named as follows: Joseph J., William, John, James, David, Arthur and Edward. Our subject was reared in Luzerne county from fourteen years of age, and early in life began work in the mines, where he was employed until 1877; then was engaged in farming five years, at the end of which time he resumed work in the mines, which he continued until the fall of 1886. In that year he was elected recorder of Luzerne county, and was re-elected in the fall of 1889. In 1871 Mr. McGinty's father was killed in the mines, near Hazleton, and the care of the family devolved on our subject, whom assumed the charge with courage and determination, and by his industry and thrift he succeeded in giving some of his younger brothers a good education. In 1873 Mr. McGinty married Mary Ann, daughter of Thomas and Ann (Finley) McGivney, of Hazleton, and has six children: Arthur, Thomas, Edward, Annie, John and Joseph. Our subject has at all times enjoyed the confidence of the people who know him, and has taken an active interest in public affairs and labor organizations. He served three years as member of the school board of Hazle township, during which he was president of the board one year, and its treasurer one year. On several occasions he had the honor to represent his fellow workmen in their conventions. He was their representative at the great anti-monopoly convention held at Harrisburg in 1875; was also sent by District No. 87, Knights of Labor of Hazleton, to attend the general assembly held at Hamilton, Canada, in 1885, and to Cleveland, Ohio, in 1886. He is a popular official, and enjoys a reputation for honesty, faithfulness and integrity. In politics he is a stanch Democrat, and was a candidate for Congress in the Twelfth Congressional District of Pennsylvania, but was defeated by a small majority in the convention.

JOHN McGOLDRICK, a prominent citizen of Plains township, was born in County Fermanagh, Ireland, August 31, 1829, and is a son of Edward and Catherine (McCabe) McGoldrick. The father, who was a farmer, reared a family of four children, of whom the subject of this memoir is the eldest; he came to America in 1869, followed by his family in 1873, and located in Plains, where he worked about the mines until 1888, when he retired from active life; he built his present residence and removed therein in 1883. Mr. McGoldrick was married, in October, 1855, to Miss Bessie, daughter of Cornelius and Mary (McCallough) Shovlin, and they have had eight children, six of whom are living, viz.: James, a miner in the Prospect Colliery; Catherine (Mrs. Hugh Gildea); Edward, a miner in the Port Bowkley Colliery; Mary A.; Cornelius J., and Sarah, the three latter living with their parents; Cornelius J. is collector for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. Our subject and family are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a Democrat in his political preferences.

EDWARD FRANK McGOVERN, lawyer, Wilkes-Barre, was born at Darlington, County of Durham, England, September 10, 1860, a son of Frank and Fannie (Ray) McGovern, natives of England and Ireland, respectively. He received his education at the public schools of Wilkes-Barre, and in the law department of the University of Pennsylvania. graduating as Bachelor of Laws in the class of 1886. He then entered the law office of John T. Lenahan, and was admitted to the bar of Luzerne county, June 6, 1887. In 1881 he was elected an alderman in the second ward of Wilkes-Barre for a term of five years. Mr. McGovern belongs to a class of young men who—without the assistance of wealthy parents or a general college training, but by simple dint of natural wit and energy, and with the aid of only such educational advantages as are common to all boys and girls in this fair land have furnished many of the brightest ornaments of the several learned professions, and not a few of our ablest statesmen. Mr. McGovern is himself a young man of unusually keen intelligence, with a disposition for hard work, that proves very useful in every walk of life, and particularly in the legal profession. His record at the Law University was a good one, and it is safe enough to say, even thus early in his career as a lawyer, that he will not be among the hindmost in the race for patronage. In politics he affiliates with the Democratic party. Mr. McGovern is unmarried.

MICHAEL McGOVERN, watchman, Inkerman, was born November 13, 1835, in County Sligo, Ireland, and is a son of Andrew and Bridget (Martin) McGovern, natives of the same place. They reared a family of six children, of whom our subject is the fifth in order of birth. He received his education in Ireland, and in 1847 came to this country, locating in Susquehanna county, Pa., where he engaged in farming until 1880, in which year he removed with his family to Sebastopol, this county, since which time he has worked in the stone quarries and in the mines. He is at present engaged as watchman for the Pennsylvania Coal Company. Mr. McGovern was united in marriage, February 7, 1863, with Ann, daughter of Owen amid Catharine (Mulderick) Holmes, natives of County Sligo, Ireland. Their union has been blessed with the following issue: Mary, born December 3, 1864, married, on January 1, 1885, to William Hunt, a carpenter, of Inkerman; John, born January 1, 1866; Bridget, born March 14,1871; Edward, born August 7,1873; Michael, horn February 6, 187—; Annie, born July 29, 1878; Nellie, born January 6,1882, and Margaret, born May 3, 1887. Our subject is a member of the Catholic Church; in politics, he is a Democrat.

WILLIAM McGOWAN, conductor on the gravel train, with residence on Ridge street, Ashley, was born in County Derry, Ireland, August 3, 1857, and is a son of David and Mary J. (Blair) McGowan. The father, who was a farmer and baker, reared a family of five children, three of whom are living, namely: William; Elizabeth G. (Mrs. John A. Carr), and David H., conductor, Ashley. These three children came with their mother to America June 28, 1870, locating in Ashley. Our subject was educated in his native Ireland and in Ashley. He worked in the breaker for four months, after which he wiped engines in the round-house two and a half years, and after that did various kinds of extra work on the gravel train until 1879. For three years he was brakeman, and since that time has been conductor. He built his elegant residence in 1886. April 2, 1881, Mr. McGowan married Miss Bessie, daughter of Thompson and Jane (Anderson) O'Connell of Hanover township, natives of County Derry, Ireland, and of this union have been born four children, viz.: Mary J., Thompson W., David H. and Harry. Our subject and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church; he is a member of the I. 0. 0. F. and 0. R. C. In his political views he is a Republican.

PATRICK McGRANE, mine contractor, Sugar Notch, was born in Nesquehoning, Pa., May 14, 1846, and is a son of Bernard and Ellen (Carr) McGrane, natives of County Louth, Ireland, whence they emigrated to America in 1840, locating at Nesquehoning, Pa., where the father worked about the mines seventeen years; then eleven years at Hackle Barney, Pa.; one year at Upper Lehigh, and in 1869 removed to Sugar Notch. Bernard McGrane was killed in No. 9 Shaft June 14, 1879; his widow still lives in Sugar Notch, now aged seventy years. Their family consisted of eight chiildren: Two died young: Mary (Mrs. Hugh Brogan); Patrick; William, who was killed in Pittsburgh at the age of forty-two years; John, a miner, in Sugar Notch; Julia A. widow of Patrick Malone, by whom she had two children: Thomas and Ellen; and Thomas, a miner, at Sugar Notch. Our subject worked about the mines until 1868, when he went to Gratiot, Wis., where he worked on a farm five months, and then proceeded to La Salle, Ill., and worked in the mines there six months, at the end of which time he returned to Upper Lehigh, and thence to Sugar Notch, where and at Ashley he has since been engaged in mining and mine contracting. Mr. McGrane is a skillful and successful operator, and has probably mined as much coal as any man in Luzerne county. He was married, December 29, 1869, to Miss Ann, daughter of Michael and Catherine (Crossen) Boyle, natives of County Cavan, Ireland, and they have had nine children, eight of whom are living, viz.: Mary E., for five years teacher in the Sugar Notch schools; Katie, who taught one year in Ashley, and is now organist in the Catholic Church at Sugar Notch; Bernard, Annie, Michael, Elizabeth, John and Susan. Mr. McGrane and family are members of the Catholic Church; he is a Democrat in his political views, and has held the offices of burgess and councillor in Sugar Notch borough.

THOMAS McGRAW, general merchant, Beach Haven, was born in Salem township, May 2, 1832, and is a son of Patrick and Catherine (Corell) McGraw His father, a native of County Waterford, Ireland, settled in Salem township in 1827, where he began his career as a laborer, and later was a contractor and builder of railroads, etc. During the Civil war he was a member of the One Hundred and Thirty-second Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, and while in the service died of chronic diarrhea in 1863, at the age of sixty-four years. His wife was a daughter of Nicholas Corell, a pioneer of Salem township and a soldier of the Revolution. By her he had six children, viz.: Mary (Miss. Urich Van Pelt), Thomas, Elizabeth (Mrs. John Collins), Sarah (Mrs. David Brader), Maria (Mrs. Wesley Rabert), and Jennie (Mrs. Samuel Whitson). Our subject was reared in Salem township, was educated in the common schools, and after a varied career, during which he was engaged in boating, clerking and railroading, he embarked in mercantile business at Beach Haven in 1875, in which he has since successfully continued. He was twice married. His first wife was Rachel, daughter of Henry and Betsy (Rabert) Thomas, of Salem township, and by her he had one daughter, Adeline (Mrs. Stephen Meusch). His second wife was Rosanna, daughter of John Hoch, of Hollenback, by which union there are three children: Mattie (Mrs. John Heabner), Christian H. and Daniel. Mr. McGraw is one of the best-known citizens of Luzerne county, and his word is as good as his bond. He is a Democrat, and has held many of the local offices of Salem township; was mercantile appraiser of Luzerne county in 1891; is a member of the M. E. Church and of the F. & A. M.

JAMES McGREEVY, wholesale and retail liquor dealer, was born in County Roscommon, Ireland, March 12,1852. He came to America in 1873, locating in Wilkes-Barre, where he was employed in the mines for ten years. In 1876 he received private instruction under the tuition of Professor Reid. Since 1883 he has been engaged in the liquor business, and in 1889 erected the fine brick building he now occupies on Hazle street. Mr. McGreevy married, May 14, 1885, Mary Gilligan, a native of Wilkes-Barre. The issue of this union is three children: Mary E., James and Frances Josephine. In December. 1889, Mr. McGreevy visited Ireland, his journey occupying three months. He is a member of the Catholic Church; in politics he is a Democrat, and has served one term of three years as register of wills of Luzerne county, to which office he was elected in 1887.

WILLIAM McGREGOR, miner, Parsons, was born in London, England, and is a son of John and Sophia (Davis) McGregor, natives of Wales. He has worked in the mines since he was ten years old; in 1855 he emigrated to America, and located at Minersville, Pa., where he engaged in mining, remaining there but a short time. He removed to Freedom, N. Y., where he followed farming until 1861, and then came to Hyde Park, Pa., and resumed mining, where he remained until 1865. In this year he came to Parsons, where he has since been engaged in mining; he has held various positions of responsibility arounid the mines, having been foreman for five years. Mr. McGregor was married, in 1851, to Miss Anna, daughter of Thomas Phillips, of South Wales; they have had eight children, viz.: Mary, married to John Pew, of Brookside; John (deceased); Thomas, a miner in Parsons; Sophia, married to William Griffith, of Parsons; Hannah (deceased); William J. (deceased); Margaret (deceased), and William, a mason, of Parsons. Mr. McGregor and his family are members of the Baptist Church; in politics he is a liberal Republican.

HUGH McGROARTY, an aged and highly-respected citizen of Miners Mills, was born in the parish of layer, County Donegal, Ireland, November 12, 1806, and is a son of Cornelius and Nancy (Montgomery) McGroarty. His mother, a very beautiful woman, who eloped with her husband, was a grandneice of Gen. Montgomery, of Quebec fame. In his father's family there were nine children, five of whom reached majority: John, who died in Ireland May 21, 1891, at the age of eighty-seven years; Hugh, the subject of this sketch; Catherine (Mrs. Peter Scanlon), died in Newtown, Pa., in 1889, at the age of eighty years; Cornelius, who was a farmer in Plains township, and once treasurer of Luzerne county, died January 21, 1891, at the age of eighty years; Patrick, still living in Plains township. Nancy Montgomery married, for her second husband, Hugh Meehan, by whom she had six children. Our subject came to America in 1839, and located in Summit Hill, Pa., where he worked about the mines three years, and then removed to Buck Mountain, where he followed mining twenty-five years; he was then engaged by the Coal & Iron Company, driving a tunnel at Sugar Notch three years, after which he came to Miners Mills and built the hiotel now occupied by Michael Athey, which was the first house of public entertainment in the place. He carried on the hotel fifteen years and then built his present residence, where he has since lived in retirement. Mr. McGroarty was married in January, 1834, with Miss Mary, daughter of Brien and Margaret (McLoon) McGinty; she was a lady of rare intelligence and a very benevolent character; having but a common-school education, she was a great reader and thinker, and was very familiar with Irish history, as well as with the great questions in American politics. This happy union was blessed with twelve children: Five died in childhood; Bernard died September 17, 1883, at the age of forty-seven years; Mary (Mrs. John Gallagher) died in Buck Mountain, August 6,1876, at the age of thirty-eight years, leaving four children; Bridget married Michael Farrell (deceased), by whom she has four living children; Margaret married John Murrin, a coal operator, Carbondale, Catherine married Michael McHale, engineer for the Electric Light Company, Wilkss-Barre, with residence in Miners Mills; Hugh is conductor on the Lehigh Valley Railroad, Miners Mills; and John S. Mr. McGroarty and family are members of the Catholic Church; politically he is a Democrat. He had three cousins in an Ohio regiment in the Civil war: Gen. Stephen J. McGroarty, who was wounded eighteen times, and died in Cincinnati; Col Patrick McGroarty, who was killed at Lookout Mountain; and William B. McGroarty, whose father was drowned while in the army, and who lost both legs in the war, is still living.

JOHN S. McGROARTY, treasurer of Luzerne county, was born in Foster township, this county, August 20, 1862, the youngest son of Hugh and Mary (McGinty) McGroarty. He was reared at Miners Mills, educated in public schools, Harry Hillman Academy, and Carbondahe high school. At the age of sixteen years he began teaching in common schools, which profession he followed three years; was appointed deputy county treasurer of Luzerne county in 1882, for a term of three years; was again appointed in 1888, and was elected to the office in November, 1890, the term expiring January 1, 1894. In 1887 he was editor of the Wilkes-Barre Evening Leader; at the age of twenty-one years he was elected justice of the peace of Miners Mills, serving a full term of five years. On November 19, 1890, Mr. McGroarty married Miss Ida, daughter of Christian and Mary (Kreyscher) Lubrecht, of Wilkes-Barre. Socially, our subject is a member of the Elks, St. Aloysius Society and A. 0. of H. He is a memnber of the Catholic Church; in politics he is a Democrat.

HUGH McGROARTY, watchman at the Enterprise Mines, Plains township, was born at Buck Mountain, Carbon Co., Pa., in 1867, and is a son of Patrick McGroarty. Our subject began life as inside stable-boss in the Wyoming Mine, where he remained nine years; in March, 1890, he secured a position as outside stable-boss at the Enterprise Mine, which position he held until that mine shut down; and since that time he has been watchman. Mr. McGroarty was married, October 27, 1881, to Miss Josephine, daughter of Thomas and Mary (Degnan) McCormick, and they have three children: Mary, born March 19, 1883; Harry, born November 16, 1885, died June 15, 1886; and William, born October 1, 1888. Mr. McGroarty and family are members of the Catholic Church, and politically he is a Democrat.

JAMES McGROARTY, stable-boss at the Henry and Wyoming Mines, was born at Buck Mountain, Schuylkill Co. - Pa., February 18, 1856, and is a son of Patrick McGroarty. He was educated in the common schools, and began life for himself at the age of twenty, as inside stable-boss in the Henry Mine; he has continued in this line ever since, until he has been promoted to his present position. Mr. McGroarty was married, February 13, 1876, to Miss Kate, daughter of John and Belinda (Durgan) Howley, natives of Ireland; she came to America with an uncle, leaving her parents in Ireland. The following children are the fruits of this union: Belinda, born December 1, 1876; Anna, born September 22, 1878, died December 10, 1881; Rose, born July 23, 1880, died October 10, 1882; John, born November 22, 1883; William, born September 13, 1885; James, born September 20, 1887; and Charles, horn April 20, 1890. Our subject and family are members of the Catholic Church; he is an indefatigable worker in the cause of Democracy, and has held the office of school director.

PATRICK McGROARTY, farmer, P. 0. Plains, was born in the Parish of Inver, County Donegal, Ireland, April 14, 1814, and is a son of Cornelius and Ann (Montgomery) McGroarty. In his father's family there were seven children, of whom he is the youngest. He came to America in 1836, remained in New York two months, and then engaged in digging coal at Summit Hill, Pa., where he remained ten years; at this time coal was obtained from the earth by stripping the surface in the winter and removing the coal in the summer. He next removed to Buck Mountain, where he remained fourteen years, mining; then went to Wilkes-Barre, where he remained four years, and in 1865 purchased a farm in Plains township and removed thereon. In 1877 Mr. McGroarty engaged in the mercantile business, which he followed for five years, and was a victim to severe losses caused by the strikes of that time. Mr. McGroarty was married, July 10, 1842. to Miss Mary, daughter of Hugh and Catharine (McCue) Sweeney, and by her he had two children, one of whom is living, Cornelius, an engineer at the Wilkes-Barre Water Works. Mrs. Mary Sweeney died July 10, 1844, and Mr. McGroarty married, for his second wife, Mrs. John McAlune, nee Rose McAlune. To their union were born five children, viz.: Anna, who married for her second husband John Mahoney, of Wilkes-Barre; Patrick; James; Hugh, and William, shop carpenter for the Lehigh Valley Coal Company, at Port Bowkley. Our subject and family are members of the Catholic Church; he is a Democrat in politics, and has held the office of supervisor.

PATRICK McGROARTY, Jr., proprietor of "McGroarty's Restaurant," Plains, was born at Buck Mountain, Schuylkill Co., Pa., March 11, 1855, and is a son of Patrick McGroarty. Since beginning in life for himself, he has been successively engaged: in teaming, six years; mining, twelve years; as stable-boss for the Lehigh Valley Coal Company, nine years; supervisor of Plains township, two years, and engaged in his present business in 1890. Our subject was married, November 24, 1887, to Mary A., daughter of John and Elizabeth (Martin) McDonald. natives of County Cavan, Ireland, and they have seven children, as follows: William, born September 26, 1878; John, born December 9,1880; Patrick, born October 14, 1882; Bessie, born January 28, 1884; Rose, born April 7, 1886; May, born April 20, 1888; and Cornelius, born May 20, 1890. Mr. McGroarty and family are members of the Catholic Church; politically he has always been identified with the Republican party.

EDWARD McGuiness, propietor of restaurant, Wilkes-Barre, was born in County Mayo, Ireland, in 1835, a son of Edward and Ann (Flynn) McGuiness. He was reared on a farm in Ireland, and came to America in 1863. After passing one year in Scranton, he located in Wilkes-Barre, where he has since resided. He worked twenty-five years in the mines; and since 1884 has been engaged in the restaurant business. In 1865 Mr. McGuiness married Miss Margaret, daughter of Martin and Mary (Moran) Corcoran, of County Mayo, Ireland, and by her had nine children: Michael, Edward, Mary (Mrs. Patrick Monahan), Annie (Mrs. Thomas Scranton), Maggie, Bridget, John, Ellen, and Thomas. Mr. McGuiness and his family are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a member of the E. B. A. Branch, No. 33, Wilkes-Barre. In politics he is a Democrat.

EDWARD McGUIRE, miner, Plains, was born in Glasgow, Scotland, August 7, 1845, and is a son of Alexander and ,Jane (Ferris) McGuire, natives of Ireland and the Isle of Arran, respectively; the father came to America in 1864, followed in the years 1866 and 1870 by his family; they located in Northumberland county, Pa., where he died in 1877 at the age of forty-seven years. The family consisted of four brothers and one half-brother, of whom Edward is the eldest. Our subject began working about the mines at the age of ten years, which occupation he has since followed; he built his present residence and removed there in 1872. Mr. McGuire was married, September 4,1869, to Miss Delia, daughter of John and Catherine (Gherity) Gorman, natives of County Mayo, Ireland. This union has been blessed with nine children, eight of whom are living, viz.: James, Edward, Mary J., Delia T., Thomas F., Annie, Robert and Catherine. Mr. McGuire and his family are members of the Catholic Church; he is a member of the Emeralds, and politically, is a Democrat.

GEORGE F. McGUIRE, merchant, Luzerne, was born, December 10, 1841, a son of Peter and Mary E. (Keller) McGuire, natives of Pennsylvania. Mr. McGuire received a liberal education in the schools of his native county, and soon after, on May 1, 1861, enlisted as a soldier in the three months service. After serving out the three months, he re-enlisted in the three years service with the Fifty-seventh New York, Company I, Second Corps, and Second Division, which was under command of Sumner. Mr. McGuire was engaged in the following battles: Fair Oaks, Gaines Hill, Antietam, South Mountain, and Fredericksburg. In the last-mentioned battle, he was so severely wounded in both limbs that amputation of the right one was made necessary two weeks after the battle, an operation that compelled him to remain in the hospital four months after his time expired. After returning to Luzerne, our subject engaged in the mercantile business in which he still continues. There were fourteen children in the McGuire family; and when the war broke out, eight of the boys enlisted and fought bravely for their country, two of them being buried beneath Southern soil, while the other six returned to the old home, maimed and wounded—facts which tell a greater story of patriotic devotion than records can ever portray. Our subject was married, June 26, 1870, to Mehitabel, daughter of David and Sarah (Reese) Laphy, natives of Pennsylvania. Of this union have been born five children, viz.: Warren C. (deceased), Thomas L.; Alfred B. (deceased); Walter A.; and Minnie M. Mr. McGuire has always been a stanch Republican. He is a member of the G. A. R., and is also a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

MARTIN McGUIRE, watchman, Inkerman, was born February 24, 1850, in Carbondale, Luzerne Co., Pa., and is a son of Charles and Margaret (Armstrong) McGuire, natives of County Fermanagh, Ireland. - They reared a family of five children, of whom our subject is the youngest. His parents came to this country in August, 1836, and settled in Pittston, this county, about 1846. Martin was educated in the common schools, and in 1864 went to work in the mines, where he stayed until the early part of the year 1869, after which he worked as brakeman for the Lehigh Valley Railroad Company until 1875. He then accepted his present position, watchman of the L. V. R. R. Co. s No. 6 Breaker. Mr. McGuire was united in marriage, December 9, 1866, with Mary, daughter of Thomas and Catharine (Noon) Burke, natives of County Mayo, Ireland. She died September 26, 1887, leaving one son, Charles, born September 26, 1887. His present wife, to whom he was married June 3, 1890, is a daughter of Thomas and Mary (Carey) McNamara, of Port Griffith, natives of County Mayo, Ireland. The issue of this union is one son, Hugh, born November 12, 1891. In religious faith our subject is a Catholic; he is a member of the Father Mathew F. A. B. Society, and in politics is a Democrat. He is an extensive property owner in Pittston borough and Inkerman.

JAMES McHUGH, freight and passenger agent for the Lehigh Valley Division of the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad system, at Freeland, is a popular railroad man, born at Buck Mountain, Pa., September 13, 1861, and is a son of Edward and Mary (Gillen) McHugh, the former a native of Ireland, and the latter of Carbon county. His parents removed to this county when he was two years old, and his father died in Freeland in 1887, at the age of fifty-two years; he was a well-known citizen of this community, where he had many friends. When James was a youth be attended school and worked around the mines, chiefly in the employ of G. B. Markle & Co., at Highland. At the age of twenty he secured a position as agent for the Lehigh Valley Railroad, at Jeddo, where he remained about one and one-half years, being then transferred to Freeland, where he has since been employed. As a railroad man Mr. McHugh, by his honesty and integrity, has won the confidence of his employers, and by his genial disposition and obliging manners enjoys the esteem of the people with whom he comes in contact. He was married, September 11, 1884, to Miss Mary Brogan, of South Heberton, which union has been blessed with four children, viz.: Maggie, Katie, Edward and Maria. Mr. McHugh is a member of the American Legion of Honor; in national politics he is a Democrat.

JAMES J. McHUGH, proprietor of the Cleveland street restaurant, Hudson, was born in England, February 28, 1863, and is a son of James and Bridget (Sweeney) McHugh, natives of Ireland. The father, who was a miner, reared a family of five children, of whom James J. is the third; the father came to America in 1865, followed soon after by his family. The names of the children are as follows: Mary A., Frank, James J., Thomas and Anthony. After reaching America the family first located at Pittston, where the father worked in the mines for fifteen years, and then removed to Mill Creek, where the parents of our subject died. Mr. McHugh was unfortunate enough when he was twelve years old to lose his left leg by the cars. His education was limited to the common schools, but, at the age of fifteen, he secured a position as breaker-boss, which he held ten years; he built his present place of business and removed there in 1887. Our subject is a member of the Catholic Church, the A. 0. H. and the Board of Erin, and is a Democrat in his political views.

BENJAMIN McINTOSH, locomotive engineer, at the foot of the Plane, Ashley, was born in County Londonderry, Ireland, and is a son of Benjamin and Rebecca (Mackie) McIntosh. Our subject was educated in the public school at Summit Hill. At an early age he began picking slate in the breaker, and later was stationary engineer until 1869, when lie came to Ashley, fired seven years, and was then promoted to his present position. He built his present residence on Ashley street in 1884. In 1868 Mr. McIntosh married Miss Susan, daughter of Edward and Julia (Blackman) Jones, and by her had seven children, three of whom died young; Lula died at the age of twenty-two; Alberta, Clara and Etta live with their father. Mrs. McIntosh died in 1888. The subject of our sketch and his family are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is also a member of the I. 0. 0. F. and Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. In his political views he is a Republican.

STEWART McINTOSH, stationary engineer on the Ashley Planes, was born in County Derry, Ireland, May 25, 1843, and is a son of Benjamin and Rebecca (Mackie) McIntosh. In his father s family there were ten children, nine of whom are living, viz.: Rebecca, widow of Thomas McCalla and William Miller; John; Mary, widow of John Boyd; Nathaniel, who died in a hospital during the Civil war; Rachel (Mrs. John McKeever); Benjamin; Sarah (Mrs. Abraham Moser); Stewart; Martha, who lives with her youngest sister; and Margaret (Mrs. James Minnich). The mother, accompanied by some of the elder children, came to America in 1845, and located at Summit Hill, Pa., where they were joined in 1848 by the rest of the family; Thence removed to Chanceford, Pa., where they remained two years, and then to Summit Hill, where the parents died. Our subject was educated in the common schools, and at an early age began working about the mines, which occupation he followed till he enlisted at Wilkes-Barre August 22, 1861, in Company H, Eighty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers. During the year 1862 he served six months on the recruiting service in Luzerne, Carbon and Schuylkill counties. He re-enlisted December 23, 1863; was wounded at Reams Station August 25, 1864, which together with a relapse, disabled him till the spring of 1865, during which time he was home on a furlough of thirty days. He was promoted to second lieutenant February 7, 1865, and discharged June 29, following. He then returned to Wilkes-Barre, and was foreman at the Pine Ridge Breaker at Miners Mills four years, after which he removed to Ashley, and accepted his present position. Mr. McIntosh was married March 8, 1866, to Miss Anetta, daughter of Daniel and Christiana (Steel) Frederick, of Ashley. This happy union has been blessed with six children, four of whom are living, viz.: Anna R. (Mrs. Frank Dalley); Stewart T., brakeman; Frederick D., employed on the Planes with his father; and Benjamin S. Mr. and Mrs. McIntosh are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is a member of the G. A. R., and in politics is a Republican.

REV. THOMAS McKAY, pastor of the Puritan Congregational Church of Plymouth, was born in the city of Durham, England, February 28, 1855, and is a son of Jabez and Jane (Gordon) McKay, also natives of England. Our subject received his early education in the Blue-coat School, of the city of Durham, and from there entered Dr. Taylor's private school, where he took a very thorough scientific course. He then entered the Theological Seminary at Sunderland, Eng., where he was graduated in the class of ‘79. After graduating, Mr. McKay went to Spannymore as pastor of the Baptist Church, where he remained three years, and returning at the end of that time he took two years vacation. Later he came to the United States, locating at Hazleton, Pa., where for ten months he was connected with the Primitive Methodist Church, after which he went to Morris Run, Tioga Co., same State, where he was pastor of the Primitive Church for four years. He then came to Plymouth, and had charge of the Primitive Methodist Church until a dissension occurred respecting the creeds, when he cast his fortunes with what is now known as the Puritan Congregational Church, of which he is now pastor. Time marriage of Mr. McKay with Alice, daughter of George and Jane (Cooke) Clough, natives of England, occurred December 24, 1879, and to this union there have been born children, as follows: George, Elmo, Jabez, Raymond V., Thomas; besides these there is an adopted daughter, Cora Ellen Ward. Politically, our subject votes the Republican ticket, and he is a member of the 1. 0. 0. F.

CHARLES McKECHNIE, SR., retired minister, and a justice of the peace, Luzerne, P. 0. Box No. 36, was born in Scotland, August 1, 1818, a son of Alexander and Agnes (Wear) McKechnie, both of whom were natives of the North of Ireland, but removed to Scotland where they died, much respected by all with whom they came in contact. Their family consisted of five children, two of whom are now living, Charles and Alexander, both ministers in the same church. Charles McKechnie was reared and educated in Scotland, and in September, 1873, emigrated to this country, locating in Kingston, this county, on what is now known as "Scotch Hill." Mr. McKechnie was in active pulpit work up to 1888, when old age compelled him to retire. In his younger days he was a colporteur for eight years for the "Religious Tract and Book Society" of Scotland, in which work he proved himself worthy of his calling. The churches over which he presided are located in Plains, Wilkes-Barre and Pleasant Valley. His life has been one of usefulness in the Master s Kingdom, his great object being the saving of souls. On July 11, 1836, he was married to Miss Susan, daughter of Neil and Mary McMullen, of Scotland, and to this union were born thirteen children, six of whom are yet living: Mary, John, Neil, Susan, Charles and Jane, all married and in good circumstances. After he retired from his active ministerial labors he was chosen a justice of the peace, which office he is yet holding with eminent satisfaction. Mr. McKechnie is a stanch temperance man, working for the abolition of the liquor traffic with both vote and voice. He is a member of the K. of P., and of the Prohibition party in political matters.

GEORGE W. McKee, physician and surgeon, Plymouth, was born in Orwell, Bradford, Co., Pa., and is a son of Asa and Fannie (Chubbuck) McKee, natives of Hartford, Conn. The mother of our subject was a daughter of Ebenezer Chubbuck, body-guard to Gen. Washington during the Revolutionary war, and it is related of him, that on one occasion he received a deep wound on the hand in warding off a blow struck at his illustrious leader by British soldiers. He was commonly known as the "Big stout Englishman," although he was American born. His grandfather on his father s side was Robert McKee, who came from Scotland and settled near Hartford, Conn. It was said of him that he furnished a substitute in the Revolutionary war, owing to the fact that, in weight, he came above the requirement, weighing 300 pounds. The subject of this sketch was the youngest of six children, and was educated in the public schools of Bradford county. After completing his early education, he went to Elmira and read medicine under the tutorship of his cousin, Dr. H. S. Chubbuck, remaining three years. He then entered the medical department at the University of Michigan, where he was graduated in 1856. After completing his medical course, the Doctor located at Camptown, Pa., where he remained, however, but six months, removing from there to Franklin Centre, Luzerne county. Here he practiced two years; then located at Warren Centre, Bradford Co., Pa., where he practiced seven years, coming from there to Plymouth, Pa., where he has been practicing for the last twenty-five years. Dr. McKee was married September 25, 1856, to Miss N. A. Frantz, daughter of Solomon and Elizabeth (Young) Frantz, natives of Monroe county, Pa. Mrs. McKee has practiced pharmacy for twenty-six years, and holds a diploma from the State Pharmaceutical Examining Board. There were two children in the Doctor s family. Frank L. is a physician and surgeon at Plymouth, and was born May 20, 1860, in Bradford county, Pa., and received his early education there and at Wyoming Seminary, where he completed his course. He then entered the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York City, and there studied three years, locating at Plymouth at the end of that period, where he has practiced since. This young Doctor has taken special courses: first, with Frank H. Boswoth, of New York City, three years; then a course with Prof. Mittendol, of time New York Eye and Ear Infirmary; and, lastly, at the Deinill Dispensary. The other child of Dr. George W. and Mrs. McKee was born April 26, 1866, at Owego, N. Y., and died at Plymouth, November 30, 1871. The Doctor and his son, Frank L., both vote the Republican ticket.

ADAM STEPHENSON McKNIGHT, M.D. Freeland. This well-known and successful physician and surgeon, whose services the people of Freeland and vicinity highly appreciate, is a Philadelphian, and was born in the Twenty-first Ward of that city (Managunk) October 23, 1858. He is a son of Robert and Jane (Stephenson) McKnigbt, both natives of Ireland, the former of Downpatrick, County Down, and the latter of Enniskillen, County Fermanagh. The father when very young emigrated from his native country to Scotland, and in 1853, came from that country to America, locating in Philadelphia, where he has since resided and been chiefly engaged in paper-making. The Doctor's mother came to this country, alone in 1851, at the age of twenty-one, her parents having both died in Ireland. She was married to Robert McKnight, at Philadelphia, in 1854, and they were born unto them nine children, three of whom are living. Our subject attended the public schools of Philadelphia until he reached the age of eleven, when he engaged in mills and factories in various capacities, still keeping up his studies at night school, and by the time he was seventeen he was bookkeeper for a Philadelphia manufacturing firm. Six months later he left the manufactories, and was apprenticed to learn a trade and business. At the age of eighteen he matriculated at the Artisans Night School of Philadelphia. Shortly after he began a private course of Latin and Greek under the tutorship of the Rev. W. W. Cook, and about the same time he passed the preliminary examination was admitted as a student at law in Philadelphia county, and registered as such in the office of Senator Horatio G. Jones. In 1879 he relinquished the study of law, and entered the more philanthropic profession of medicine. He began his studies under the preceptorship of Dr. J. H. McManagle, and in 1880 entered Jefferson Medical College, and completed the first course. In March, 1881, he engaged in the mercantile business and from that time until 1885, he took a special course of medicine under Dr. J. H. McManagle, besides attendimig the clinics of the Pennsylvania Hospital, the Jefferson Hospital, and the Philadelphia Hospital. Mercantile life, although profitable, was not very agreable, so, in 1886, he abandoned it and re-entered Jefferson Medical College, where he was graduated April 4, in the class of 1888. In the following September he engaged in the practice of his profession, in the city of Philadelphia, where he remained a short time. He then removed to Bradford, McKean Co., Pa., where he was associated in practice with an eminent physician of that place. Later he removed to Smithville Flats, Chenango Co., N. Y., in which place he remained until early in 1890, when he returned to Philadelphia. He served as assistant to Dr. Henry Morris, who had special charge of the department of Diseases of Women in the Howard Hospital. The Doctor also was assistant in the Throat Department of the Jefferson College Hospital. In 1891 he was appointed assistant in the Out-Patient Medical Department of the Jefferson College Hospital. While in Philadelphia he was medical examiner for various insurance companies and beneficial orders. On March 11, 1892, he came to the anthracite coal regions, as successor to Dr. W. B. Nichols, and assistant to Dr. George S. Wentz, one of Luzerne county's most eminent physicians. Dr. McKnight was united in marriage March 1, 1881, with Miss Sarah L., daughter of Richard Patton, Esq., master-mechanic of the large plant of A. Campbell & Co., Philadelphia, and this happy union has been blessed with four children, viz.: Robert B., William A. P., Thomas S. and Richard P. The Doctor is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and an ardent worker in the cause of Christianity. He has held many offices of responsibility and influence in the church, and in various organizations. In everything that is in furtherance of the influence of Christianity, the Doctor is always ready and willing to lend a helping hand. He is a stanch Republican, and has held many political offices of trust and honor. He is at present secretary of the Freeland Board of Health. Lately he was honored by the appointment of deputy medical inspector to the State Board of Health of Pennsylvania, with jurisdiction over the townships of Foster, Hazle, Butler and Denison in Luzerne county.

PATRICK McLAIN, of the firm of Roach & McLain, operators of the "Bottle & Cork" Colliery, Pittston. The subject of this sketch was born in Lackawanna county, March 15, 1861, a son of Owen and Cecelia (Howley) McLain, natives of Ireland. His father was killed in the mines at Schuylkill county, in 1863, by a fall of coal, and his mother died in 1888. The family consisted of four children, two of whom are living: Alice (Mrs. Martin Haley, of Pittston) and Patrick. Mr. McLain began life as a slate-picker and at the age of nineteen became a miner. He has spent his life thus far in and about the mines, and has worked in every capacity from a slate-picker to a coal operator. He has worked at the "Bottle & Cork" Colliery since its opening in 1880, and in July, 1892, the present partnership was formed, he assuming control at once. In 1881 Mr. McLain married Miss May Kelly, of Pittston, and of this union have been born five children, viz.: Katie (deceased), Owen, Katie (II), Thomas amid Michael. In politics, Mr. McLain is a stanch Democrat.

JAMES McLAUGHLIN, Pittston. This gentleman, who is one of Pittston's leading citizens, was born at Poirt Griffith, July 18, 1854, a son of Thomas and Mary (Kennedy) McLaughlin, of Ireland. The father was killed in the mines by a fall of coal at Old No. 1 Slope, Port Griffith; the mother died in 1887. In the family there were three children: James and two daughters. Our subject was educated in the public schools of Luzerne county, and began working around the mines at the age of nine. He followed mining until 1885, when he came to Pittston and engaged in the hotel business. April 1, 1878, Mr. McLaughlin was married to Miss Mary Ann, daughter of Michael Murley, who was one of the early settlers of Jenkins township, and by her had six children, viz.: Mary, Thomas, Michael, Theresa, James and Agnes. Our subject is well known and very popular in the Democratic political circles of Luzerne county. He has been tax collector of Jenkins township; a member of the school board three terms; a member of the Fifth Legislative District; Committee twelve years; a delegate to the Democratic State Convention, and his name has been seriously considered on several occasions in connection with some of the highest political trusts of his county. He has been a member of the A. 0. H. seventeen years, and is a member of the Emerald Association.

WILLIAM SWAN McLEAN, attorney at law, Wilkes-Barre, was born at Summit Hill, Carbon Co., Pa., May 27, 1842, a son of Alexander and Elizabeth (Swan) McLean. His father was a native of County Derry, Ireland, a son of James McLean, who was a son of Gilbert McLean, a native of the Isle of Skye, who located in Ireland about the middle of the last century. His mother was also a native of County Derry, Ireland. The maternal grandfather of subject was James Swan, of Londonderry, Ireland, who emigrated to America in 1817, and lived and died at Mauch Chunk, Pa. Alexander McLean, father of subject, was born in 1800, came to America in 1819, settling in what is now Carbon county. Pa., where he had large interests in coal mines as a stockholder. Our subject was educated at the Wilkes-Barre Academy and LaFayette College, Easton, Pa., where he was graduated in 1865, taking the valedictory addresses; he also delivered the master's oration at LaFayette College in 1868. He read law with G. Byron Nicholson, of Wilkes-Barre, and was admitted to the Luzerne county bar August 19, 1867. From 1866 to 1869 he was a member of the board of school directors of the township of Wilkes-Barre, and was also secretary of the board for the same period. He has been city attorney of Wilkes-Barre since 1875. He is a prominent Democrat, and in 1879 was the candidate of his party for judge of Luzerne county, but owing to the formation of the Greenback Labor Party he was defeated. In 1883 he was chairman of the committee on resolutions in the Democratic State Convention of that year. For many years he was a director of the First National Bank of Wilkes-Barre, and Wilkes-Barre Deposit Bank, and is now president of the former. Mr. McLean married, November 23, 1871, Annie S., daughter of George H. Roberts, of Philadelphia, and they have four children living: George R., William S., Margaret S. amid Percy Craige.

H. F. McMANUS, blacksmith, Plains, was born in Scranton, Pa., March 17, 1856, and is a son of Michael and Bridget (O'Donnell) McManus, natives of County Mayo, Ireland. In his father's family there were three children, of whom he is the eldest; the family came to America in 1854, and located at Scranton. The subject of this memoir began life working at the carpenter's trade, which he followed for four years; he then worked in the mines for a short time, and has since made blacksmithing his chief occupation. Mr McManus was married, September 27, 1879, to Miss Celia, daughter of Thomas and Annie (Flynn) Brannand, natives of County Sligo, Ireland, and the fruits of this union have been three children, viz.: Thomas, Bridget (deceased) and Catharine. Mr. McManus and family are members of the Catholic Church, and in politics he is a Democrat.

JOHN McMENAMIN, outside mine foreman at Highland Colliery No. 2, P. 0. Jeddo, was born in Wilkes-Barre, October 22, 1864, and is a son of Hugh and Anna (O'Donnell) McMenamin, natives of Ireland. When John was about two years old his parents removed to South Heberton, where they now reside. He was educated at South Heberton until the age of thirteen, and at the same time attended night school. He had worked in nearly every capacity around and in the mines up to the age of sixteen, when he was appointed screen-boss at No. 1. Highland Breaker. He was there about five years, when he was appointed outside foreman of the colliery, where he has since been employed, and has filled the responsible position to the satisfaction of all parties concerned. He has constantly under his charge from seventy-five to eighty men. Mr. McMenamin was married May 7, 1889, to Miss Mary Ann Magill, of Highland, and they have two children: Mary Isabell and Peter John. Mr. McMenamin is a member of the American Legion of Honor. He has always worked for G. B. Markle & Co., and is regarded as one of their best foremen.

GEORGE D. McMORRIS, member of the Kellmer Piano & Organ Manufacturing Company, Hazleton. This intelligent amid ingenious young gentleman was born at Toronto, Canada, September 10, 1866, and is a son of Daniel and Arabella (Sanderson) McMorris, the former a Scotch-Highlander, and the latter of Canadian extraction. He was educated at Upper Canada College, Toronto, and after completing his college course learned the trade of piano making, which be followed in his native city until 1889, with the exception of two years spent in the city of New York, where he took advanced lessons in the art of constructing and tuning pianos. In 1887 Mr. McMorris was appointed superintendent of W. Doherty & Co's piano works, at Toronto, Ontario; this factory is one of the largest in Canada, and only men who have attained the highest degree of proficiency are capable of managing so large a concern. In 1890 he came to Hazleton, and became a member of the Kellmer Piano Company, where he has since been engaged. The works of this widely-known and enterprising firm are located at a very desirable point, near the Lehigh Valley depot, thus having easy shipping facilities, a very desirable item to any concern carrying on so extensive a business. These pianos are shipped to all parts of the world, and are noted for their sweetness of tone, artistic finish, and substantial construction. The company have two branch houses, one at Freeland and the other at Reading.

ALFRED McMURTRIE, farmer, P. 0. Conyngham, was born in Conyngham village, Luzerne Co., Pa., August 22, 1820, and is a son of John and Matilda (Horn) McMurtrie. His paternal grandparents were Joseph and Mary (Aten) McMurtrie, who settled in Sugar Loaf township in 1808. He is a great-grandson of John McMurtrie, and a great-great-grandson of Joseph McMurtrie, a native of Scotland, and a pioneer of Sussex county, N. J. The children of the latter were John, Joseph, Abraham, James, Agnes, Marie and Sarah. Of these, John, the great-grandfather of our subject, had children as follows: Joseph, John, Abram, Sarah, Margaret, Elizabeth and Nancy. Joseph, the grandfather of our subject, with his wife Mary Aten, settled in Sugar Loaf township in 1808, and cleared and improved the farm now occupied by Alfred and Joseph McMurtrie, where they lived and died. Their children were John, Peggy Ann (Mrs. William Wintersteen), Richard, Catherine (Mrs. Abram Smith), Henry, Sarah A. (Mrs. Henry Bowman), Mary A. (Mrs. Robert Swayze) and Joseph. John McMurtrie, the father of Alfred, was born in Sussex county, N. J., February 25, 1795; he came to Sugar Loaf township with his parents in 1808. For twenty-four years he was engaged as contractor at Mauch Chunk for the Lehigh Coal & Navigation Company. In 1848 John returned to Sugar Loaf township, and died on the farm now occupied by his son Alfred. His wife was a daughter of Casper and Mary (Roth) Welkenhom, natives of Germany, and pioneers of what is now West Hazleton, this county; their children were Alfred, Josiah, Elijah, Amanda (Mrs. H. C. Hartung), Mary (Mrs. Luther Hartung) and Matilda. Our subject was reared in Mauch Chunk from the age of four years. Since 1848 he has been a resident of Sugar Loaf township, occupying a part of the homestead originally settled by his grandfather, Joseph McMurtrie, where he has been engaged in farming. He married, October 21, 1852, Sarah, daughter of Simon and Lavina (Kutzler) Aten, of Upper Mount Bethel, Pa., and they have had four children: Sue (Mrs. Frank Horn), Mary A., Ella (Mrs. W. F. Snyder) and Asa P. (deceased). Mr. McMurtrie is one of the prominent farmers of Sugar Loaf township; he is a member of the Lutheran Church. In politics, he is a Democrat, and has held several township offices.

JOHN McMURTRIE, proprietor of the "Thistle Hotel," Wilkes-Barre, was born in Lanarkshire, Scotland, March 5,1845, a son of William and Elizabeth (Wilson) McMuitrie, and traces his ancestry to the invasion of the Normans in Scotland. He was reared and educated in his native country, where he served a five and one-half year's apprenticeship at the baker's and confectioner's trade. In 1867 he came to America, and worked as a journeyman in Scranton, Pa., three years. Later he located in Pittston, this county, where he remained six years, and in 1876 settled in Wilkes-Barre, where he has since resided. For nearly eight years he was foreman in a prominent bakery and confectionery establishment; from 1884 to 1889 he was engaged in the bakery and confectionery business on the Public Square, and since 1889 has been the popular proprietor of the "Thistle Hotel." On November 20, 1883, Mr. McMurtrie married Mary, daughter of Thomas and Catherine (McMunn) Black, and they have one daughter, Dollie. Mr. McMurtrie is a member of the Presbyterian Church, I. 0. 0. F., Caledonian Society and K. of H. He is a Knight Templar. In politics, he is a Republican.

JOSEPH M. McMURTRIE, farmer, P. 0. Conyingham, was born in Sugar Loaf township, this county, July 12 1812, and is a son of Joseph and Mary (Aten) McMurtrie, who settled in that township in 1808. His father leased the farm (now occupied by subject) for five years, and during that time purchased and cleared it, dying there in 1844, in his seventy-third year. The father of our subject was a native of New Jersey, and a son of John McMurtrie, who was a son of Joseph McMurtrie, a native of Scotland, and a pioneer of Sussex county, N. J. The wife of Joseph McMurtrie, Sr., was a daughter of John Aten, of Northampton county, Pa. Our subject was reared in Sugar Loaf township, and occupies the old homestead on which his father first settled, being probably the oldest native-born resident of fhe township. He married twice, his first wife being Margaret Hinton, of Easton, Pa., by whom he had three childremi: William H., Mahlon R., and Thomas A.; his secand wife was Sarah A., daughter of George and Betsey (Ochsreider) Klinger, of Sugar Loaf township, and by her he had seven children: Clara A. (Mrs. Boyd Smoyer), George K., Mary E. (Mm.s. John Stegner), Julia E. (Mrs. John Heller), Sarah C. (Mrs. Edward Hilliard), Minor S. and Calvin E. Mr. McMurtrie is one of the leading representative citizens of Sugar Loaf township, has held several local offices, and in politics is a Democrat.

WILLIAM N. McMURTRIE, farmer, P. 0. Sybertsville, born in Sugar Loaf town ship, this county, February 9, 1853, is a son of Elijah and Ellen (Engle) McMurtrie. His paternal grandparents were John and Matilda (Melkenhorn) McMurtrie, and great-grandparents, Joseph and Mary (Aten) McMurtrie, who settled in Sugar Loaf township in 1808. Joseph was a son of John, who was a son of Joseph McMurtrie, a native of Scotland, who was among the pioneers of New Jersey. Elijah, father of subject, was born in Mauch Chunk, Pa., October 30, 1826, and was reared and educated there. In 1848 he came to Sugar Loaf township, where for many years he was engaged in the milling and mercantile businesses. His wife was a daughter of William and Mary (Davis) Engle, of Sugar Loaf township, and his children were John W., William N., Mary E. (Mrs. Theodore Van Densen), Scott and Harry. Our subject has always resided in Sugar Loaf township, followed milling nine years, and since 1882 has been engaged in farming. In 1876 he married Savilla, daughter of Jacob Balliet, of Sugar Loaf township. They have an adopted daughter, Annie. Our subject is a member of the English Lutheran Church, and is a Democrat.

B. McNAMARA, miner, Pine Ridge Colliery, Miners Mills, was born near Ennis, Parish of Inch, County Clare, Ireland, in May, 1842, and is a son of Cornelius and Ann (McNamara) McNamara. In his father's family there were five children, of whom our subject is the only survivor; his younger brother, John, died in Miners Mills in 1874, at the age of thirty years. Mr. McNamara came to America in 1864, and after working in the lead factory in Brooklyn for three months, came to Sugar Notch, this county, where he worked about the mines till 1866; he then removed to Barclay, Bradford Co., Pa., where he worked in the mines till 1870, when he came to Miners Mills, where he has since followed mining. He buit his present residence, which was the third house on the street where it stands, in 1871. Our subject was married, May 3,1876, to Miss Bridget, daughter of Patrick and Susan (Bushnell) Murray, of Dunmore, Pa., natives of Tillygavin. near Ennis Diamond, County Clare, Ireland. They have had nine children, five of whom are living, viz.: John S., Thomas M., Margaret D., Elizabeth and Ann. Mr. McNamara and family are devoted members of the Catholic Church; he is a member of the A. 0. H., and in his political views he is a Democrat.

WILLIAM McNEAL, farmer and sawyer, P. 0. Sybertsville, was born in Black Creek township, on the farm where he now resides, November 3, 1826, a son of John and Rachel (Shiner) McNeal. His paternal grandfather, James McNeal, a native of Scotland, and by profession a surveyor, came to America prior to the Revolution. He was a pioneer of Luzerne county, and at the time of his death resided at Wapwallopen. His wife was formerly Sarah Webb. John McNeal, the father of our subject, was a native of Pennsylvania, and in 1814 settled on the farm now occupied by his son William, cleared and improved it, and died there May 10, 1804, at the age of seventy-four. He married Rachel, a daughter of Andrew and Margaret (Smith) Shiner, of Sugar Loaf township, and she bore him children as follows: Andrew, James, Isaiah, Eliza (Mrs. Samuel B. Jones), Amos, Margaret (Mrs. Henry M. Schwenk), Hannah (Mrs. Theodore Hauze), John, William, Mary (Mrs. Benjamin F. Budworth) and Wallace. William McNeal has always resided on the old homestead where he was born and reared. He married Mary, daughter of Harman and Catherine (Zang) Reinmiller, of Germany, and they have five children living: Rachel (Mrs. Henry Ringlaben), Eliza (Mrs. Johnson Yeager), Ulysses G. (married tc Miss Mary Frederick), William H. and George B. In politics Mr. McNeal is a Republican, and is a respected and enterprising citizen of Black Creek township.

HUGH McNELIS, outside mine foreman at No. 1, Highland Colliery, P. 0. Freehand, was born in Ireland April 1, 1849. When he was three years of age his parents returned to this country, having been here before, and located at Rockport, Carbon county. He was educated in the public schools, and at the age of eight years began picking slate in the breaker during the summers, attending school in the winter time. He entered the employ of the G. B. Markle Coal Company in 1862, and has remained with them ever since. In 1880 he was appointed outside foreman at No. 2, Highland Colliery, where he remained one year, when he was transferred to No. 1, where he has since been employed. He was married, November 24, 1871, to Miss. Bridget Logan, of Freehand. They have three children, viz.: John, James and Joseph. Mr. McNelis has been tax collector of Foster township, and is at present a member of the school board. He is a Democrat, and active in local political circles.

JAMES McNULTY, miner, Inkerman, was born in Inkerman, this county, January 7, 1861, and is son of Patrick and Ellen (Regan) McNulty, of the same place, and natives of County Galway, Ireland. The subject of this memoir is the youngest in a family of three children, and received his education in the common schools. At an early age he went to work in the mines, and since 1887 has been engaged as a miner by the Pennsylvania Coal Company. Mr. McNulty was united in marriage, January 22. 1887, with Bridget, daughter of Anthony and Mary A. (Horan) Brady, natives of County Mayo, Ireland, and their union has been blessed with the following issue: John, born December 2, 1887; Ellen, born July 13, 1889; and James, born September 12, 1891. In religious faith, our subject is a Catholic, and in politics is a Democrat.

JOHN M. McNULTY, miner, Inkerman, was born in Sebastopol, this county, August 2,1857, and is the eldest child of Timothy and Mary (O'Malley) McNulty, natives of County Mayo, Ireland, who came to the United States early in 1854, settling in Sebastopol, Luzerne Co., Pa. Our subject received his education in the common schools, and, in 1870, went to work in the mines where he drove until 1873. He then worked as a laborer until 1876, since which time he has been employed as a miner by the Pemmnsylvania Coal Company. On April 26, 1883, Mr. McNulty married Mary, daughter of James and Mary (McAndrews) McAndrews, also natives of County Mayo, Ireland. Our subject is a member of the Roman Catholic Church, of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, and Sons of Columbia. In politics he is a Democrat, and has held the following offices in the township: registry assessor, 1880—81; assistant assessor, 1884—85, and school director, 1886—89.

JOHN McSWEENY Jr, blacksmith at the Washington Mine, Plymouth, was born at Patterson, Pa., and is the eldest in a family of seven children—five sons and two daughters—born to Timothy and Margaret (Murphy) McSweeney, natives of County Cork, Ireland, who came to America in 1865. The subject of this sketch was educated in the public schools of Luzerne county, and in the year 1880 began to learn the blacksmith's trade. He worked at same four years, then took the wheelwright department of the work, and served nearly three years at that. He then worked at his trade in Elmira, N. Y., and Towanda, Philadelphia and Wilkes-Barre, Pa. In 1890 Mr. McSweeny came to Plymouth and took charge of the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre shops at Old Slope, Washington Mine No. 16, where he has since been employed. He is a Democrat in politics, and attends the Catholic Church. Our subject is unmarried, and resides with his parents.

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