MA - MI Surnames

History of Luzerne County, Pa.,

by H.C. Bradsby, 1893

DAVID MacFARLANE, general mine superintendent, Spring Mountain Colliery, Jeansville. Among the men who are skilled in the mining industry, and who are thoroughly conversant with all its details, none are more prominent than he whose name opens this sketch. Mr. MacFarlane was born at Coatbridge, near Glasgow, Scotland, May 22, 1852, and is a son of John and Jean (Johnson) MacFarlane, who emigrated to America and settled at Jeansville, this county, in 1866, where their children, six in number, were reared and educated. Our subject, when quite young, was employed at No. 1 Colliery, working at the different branches of the coal industry until 1870, when he commenced work as a practical miner, in which occupation he continued until 1874. At that time he was promoted to the position of inside foreman at No. 4 Colliery, where he remained until 1881, and was then appointed to his present position with J. C. Hayden & Co., Spring Mountain Coal Company. Much responsibility devolves upon him; he has charge of two breakers and three slopes, employing in all about seven hundred and sixty men, and mining on an average 1,200 tons of coal daily. Mr. MacFarlane is a typical Scotchman, possessing that firmness and rectitude of character which even in the fiercest battles of life is sure to win. He was united in marriage, in December, 1874, with Miss Alma, daughter of William and Emma (Wilson) Hamer, natives of England, and to this union have been born eight children, namely: John W., Maggie L., Jean L., Emma M., Pen B., David S., Alma L. and Isabella J., of whom John W., Jean L., Pen B. and Isabella J. are deceased. In political views Mr. MacFarlane is a Republican, at the same time a strong believer in Prohibition, giving zealous support to the Sons of Temperance. The family are consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Jeansville.

CAPTAIN OWEN B. MacKNIGHT, a prominent citizen of Plains, was born in Lancaster county, Pa., July 15, 1839, and is the only child of John and Maria (Bruner) MacKnight. The father, who was of Scotch-Irish lineage, was a school teacher in early life, and later a Methodist Episcopal clergyman; he went to Ohio to preach, and thence to Missouri, where he died in 1870 at the age of sixty-five years. The mother, who belonged to a family of noted physicians of German origin, and early settlers in Pennsylvania, was a native of Lancaster county, and died when our subject was but seven months old. Young Owen then found a home with his grandmother, Mrs. Jacob Bruner, also a resident of Lancaster county, with whom he remained until he was sixteen years of age, when he secured a position as clerk in Paradise, Pa. On August 25, 1861, he enlisted at Lancaster, in Company F, Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry, Ninety-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, Capt. John Wise, who was a noted aeronaut; Gen. E. C. Williams, who acquired much fame in the Mexican war, was colonel. This regiment was organized by special order of Simon Cameron, and was honored by receiving the name of his daughter, being known as the "Lochiel Cavalry;" Company D, Capt. Jacob Bertals, was from Luzerne county. They entered the United States service, were fully equipped at Harrisburg in the following September, and were then sent by rail to Pittsburgh, thence by boat to Louisville, Ky., where they went into camp on the Indiana side of the river, camp "Andrew Johnson," in the latter part of 1861; in the spring of 1862 they went forward, met the main army, and advanced to Green river. The regiment was then divided, and detached to protect the citizens of the State from raiders, and later went to Perryville, where they assisted Gen. Buell in his attack upon Gen. Bragg, after which, with other cavalry, they went on an extended raid through eastern Tennessee, burning bridges on the Eastern Tennessee & Virginia Railroad, in order to prevent reinforcements from reaching Gen. Bragg, who was then in conflict with Gen. Rosecrans at Murfreesboro and Stone River. The summer of 1863 found them with Rosecrans' army, advancing to the Tennessee river in the campaign which ended in the battle of Chickamaugua; they went to the relief of Knoxville, which was surrounded by Gen. Longstreet, whom they followed through eastern Tennessee, and went into winter quarters at Mossy creek with no tents except such as could be made with rails and blankets, arid scarcely any provision except what they obtained from the surrounding country. In January, 1863, about 600 men and officers reenlisted, expecting to receive a veteran furlough at once, but they were detained till April, when they were furloughed for thirty days; they arrived in Harrisburg in May, and were disbanded with orders to report in thirty days, which they did about June 1, when the regiment was recruited to 1,200 strong; upon the resignation of Gen. Williams, Thomas J. Jordan assumed the colonelcy of the regiment. They were sent by rail to Indianapolis, thence to Louisville, Ky.; and being thoroughly equipped were ordered thence to join the main army, but owing to the number of raiders in the State, were retained as protection for the citizens till the fall of 1864, when they were ordered to join the main army at Marietta, where Gen. Sherman was preparing for his immortal march to the sea. The chief duty of the cavalry was to protect the infantry and wagon trains from being harassed by the rebel cavalry, and so effectually did they do this that no such inconvenience whatever was experienced till the army reached Savannah, which Gen. Hardee had fortified; but as soon as Gen. Sherman began to prepare for an attack, he quietly evacuated on a dark and windy night, which news Gen. Sherman telegraphed President Lincoln by way of a Christmas present, as he expressed it at the time. The army then went into camp near the sea-shore, time men, horses and mules living chiefly on rice and rice straw until the supply-ships could land after the reduction of Fort McAllister; then after refitting, recruiting and re-shoeing the horses, the gigantic work of devastation was carried on, 0n nearly the same plan as before, through Georgia and South Carolina till North Carolina was reached, when orders were given to cease the destruction That State, being somewhat loyal, was saved; the campaign ended at Mount Olive, North Carolina; the regiment participated in the battle of Waynsboro with severe loss. After this, the army was re-organized and concentrated to meet Gen. Johnson in a final encounter; he was stationed at Raleigh, which he had made extraordinary effort to save, but which he surrendered without an engagement, Lee having surrendered at Appomattox. The infantry then went to Washington and were discharged; but the cavalry were retained till July 15, 1865, when they were mustered out at Lexington, N. C. Capt. MacKnight was continuously with his regiment, and was never wounded or taken prisoner; his only hospital experience was in a private house in Louisville, Ky, during an attack of measles; his valor as a soldier and his knowledge of military tactics were shown by time fact that in August, 1862, he was promoted to second lieutenant of Company B; in April, 1863, to first lieutenant of Company M; and in June of the same year, to captain of Company I; at Savannah he was assigned to the staff of Gen. Thomas J. Jordan, commanding time First Cavalry Brigade of the army of the Cumberland, as acting assistant inspector general, and served in that capacity till the close of time war. In 186Q Elisha A. Hancock, who had lost a leg while doing duty as major at Waynsboro, but remained in the service till the close of the war, and our subject (two army comrades) again joined hands and engaged in a large general mercantile business in the building now owned and occupied by the latter, and then by John Mitchell. In 1887 Mr. Hancock, who is now residing in Philadelphia, sold out his entire interest in the store to his partner. We have Capt. MacKnight a shining example of the success that will crown the wise and untiring efforts of an honest man; he came to Plains with a very small capital, and is now one of the wealthy men of the county; besides his very numerous estates in his own State, he owns a half section of farm and coal land, forty miles north of Bismark on the Missouri river in McLean county, N. Dak.; he is also director of the Wilkes-Barre & Suburban Railway; the People's Bank of Wilkes-Barre and the Newell Clothing Company of Wilkes-Barre; he is a licensed insurance broker, agent for the Hancock estate, and first vice-president of the Life and Reserve Association of Buffalo, N. Y. Capt. MacKnight was married, October 5, 1868, to Miss Annie Gray, of Brick Meeting House, Md. Her father, Rev. Valentine Gray, was a Methodist Episcopal minister in the Wilmington Conference. This happy union is been blessed with nine children, viz.: John S., Horace B., Martha A., Owen G., Henry V., Mary L., Taylor N., Donald D. and Elisha Hancock. Capt. and Mrs. MacKnight and three of their children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he is trustee and steward; he is treasurer of the society of the Ninth Regiment of Pennsylvania Calvary; is a member of the Loyal Legion of Philadelphia, the G. A. R., the I. 0. 0. F., the A. 0. K. of M. C., and the Society of the Army of the Cumberland. He is a Republican in his political views, and was appointed postmaster when Plains postoffice was established in 1867, which he held till 1885; he has been director of the central poor district for fifteen years, and is now president of the board.

DAVID MacDONALD, mine foreman, Parsons, was born in Nova Scotia February 14, 1836, a son of John and Ann (McMillen) Macdonald, natives of Ayrshire, Scotland. His parents removed to Pottsville, Pa., when he was about a year old, where his father worked in the mines for about eight years, afterward living at Beaver Meadow, Brockville, Tuscarora, Jonesville, Clifford, Middle Creek, New Mines, Forestville, Jeddo, Olyphant, Old Forge, Forest City and German's. The subject of our sketch began life for himself at twenty-three, mining at Black Heath. He worked in Thomson, Plymouth, Jeddo, and in October, 1870, came to Parsons and had charge of the Laurel Run Slope for two years, after which he went to Olyphant, and from there to Old Forge, where he was inside foreman for about a year. He next moved to Forest City, in the same capacity, working for the Hillside Coal & Iron Company, where he remained about a year, and afterward to Mayfield, where, as inside foreman, he remained about three and a half years. He then came to Parsons, where he has since been inside foreman for the Delaware & Hudson Coal Company, at the Cunningham Shaft. He was married, December 31, 1858, to Sarah Jane, daughter of Richard Cobly, of Thomson, Pa. Of this union were born five children: John, a miner in Wilkes-Barre; Richard, a miner in Parsons; Hugh (deceased); Anna, wife of Robert E. Wallace, a miner in Parsons, and Bennett James (deceased). Mr. Macdonald is a member of the Memorial Presbyterian Church at Wilkes-Barre, a member of the Masonic Lodge and of the Sovereign Patriotic Knights. A Republican of an independent cast, lie has served as school director two terms; was elected justice of the peace at Parsons, but did not take out his commission, and was at one time the Republican candidate for the Legislature from Lackawanna county, and was defeated by only 200 votes, although he was about two thousand ahead of his ticket. Mr. Macdonald's father was the inventor of the well-known blasting barrel.

EDWARD MACKIN, mine superintendent, Delaware & Hudson Canal Company, Wilkes-Barre, was born in that city February 27, 18—, and is a son of Dennis and Catherine (Huffman) Mackin. The father, who is a native of County Longford, Ireland, came to America in 1835 and settled in Wilkes-Barre, where he was employed in the mines until his death in 1879. His children were six in number, who grew to maturity, viz.: Edward, Ellen (Mrs. James Dowling). Mary (Mrs. Peter Frey), Ann (Mrs. Parsons), Jennie (Mrs. Charles Bray) and Thomas. The mother was a daughter of Mathias and Margaret (Billings) Huffman, granddaughter of Caleb and Ellen (Fisher) Billings, and great-granddaughter of Ruloff Fisher, who settled in Hanover township, this county, in 1752. Our subject was reared in Wilkes-Barre, and educated in the public schools and at Wyoming Seminary, Kingston. When eleven years of age he was breaker-boy at the mines, and later learned the machinist's trade. In the Civil war he was a musician in the Fifty-second Pennsylvania Regiment Band, enlisting in September, 1862, and was honorably discharged after nineteen months service. In 1864 he was appointed mine superintendent for the Delaware & Hudson Canal Company, in which capacity he has served ever since, a period of twenty-eight years. On December 19,1862, he married Mary, daughter of James and Sarah (Naugle) Dowling. and has six children: Charles, Dennis, Sarah, Florence, Thomas and Kate. He is a member of the Catholic Church; in politics is a Democrat, and has served as member of the city council seven years, and as member of the board of education seven years; he is a member of the G. A. R.

Mrs. ELIZABETH MACKIN, hotel-keeper, Pittston, was born in County Monaghan, Ireland, in 1838, and is a daughter of Thomas and Mary Burns, both of whom were born in Ireland, where they lived and died, respected and honored by all who knew them; their family consisted of six children, four of whom are living. Mrs. Mackin was reared and educated in Ireland, and emigrated to this country in 1864, locating in Pittston. Four years previous to her coming to this country she was married, in 1860, to Owen Mackin, by whom she had eight children, five of whom are living: Edward, Mary Ann, Bridget, Elizabeth and Owen F. Mr. Mackin was suffocated in the mines, May 27, 1871, when he was aged forty-four years. Mrs. Mackin owns her own house, a fine modern building, and has kept hotel since 1885. She is a member of the Roman Catholic Church.

JOHN MAGEE, stationary engineer, No. 12 Slope, Susquehanna Coal Company, Nanticoke, was born in Yorktown, Pa., and was employed around the mines in various capacities until he reached the age of sixteen, when lie was employed as stationary engineer by James Taggert, a coal operator of Yorktown. He filled this position until 1862, when he enlisted in Company F, Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, under Capt. Haskins, and participated in the following engagements: Second Bull Run, Chantilly, Fredericksburg, Antietam, South Mountain, and several minor engagements and skirmishes. He was mustered out of service at the close of the war at Black s Cross Roads, Tenn. He returned to Yorktown and remained a short time, then removed to Wilkes-Barre, remaining two years, and then removed to Nanticoke, where he has simice remained. Mr. Magee was married, mi 1879, to Miss Margaret Clark, of Nanticoke. They have five children: James, Frank, John, Nora and Mary. Mr Magee has made engineering the chief occupation of his life. In politics he is a loyal Democrat.

Michael A MAGEE, general outside foreman for the Susquehanna Coal Company, Nanticoke, is a native of Nesquehoning, Carbon Co., Pa., born March 29, 1844, a son of John and Elizabeth Magee, who came to America in 1833, and settled in New Jersey, subsequently removing to Nesquehoning, Pa. Our subject was reared and educated in his native village, and was engaged at general work about the mines until 1857, when he went to Yorktown, Pa., and engaged in farming for James Taggert & Son, where he remained about two years. He then ran engines about the mines until 1860, when he took charge of the hoisting engines for them, which he ran three years. Mr. Magee then went to New York City, where he was engaged at stationary engineering about one year, when he came to Wilkes-Barre and worked with the machinist's repair gang for the Consolidated Coal Company, being employed there one year. He next worked at his trade in the D. L. & W. Shops at Kingston, about six months, when he returned to the mines at Wilkes-Barre and worked as a laborer about one year. Then, in 1866, he came to Nanticoke and engaged as breaker and hoisting engineer for Brodrick & Conyngham, remaining there until the Susquehanna Coal Company succeeded his employers, which he continued in the employ of the latter company. He was engineer at the first opening of the first mines by the Susquehanna Coal Company, and was the first engineer who ran a mine locomotive under ground in this Valley. It was built at Philadelphia by Girst & Long, and he ran it for two years for the Susquehanna Coal Company in tunnel No. 1. In 1872 he was appointed master mechanic for the company, and served in that capacity until 1885, when he was promoted to his present position. Mr. Magee was married, April 30, 1870, to Miss Anna, daughter of De Grasse and Sarah (Womlesdorf) Daily, natives of Pennsylvania. This union has been blessed by seven children, viz.: Anna, a teacher; Bessie; and John, George, Sarah, Mary and John, all five of whom are deceased. Mr. Magee is a member of the Catholic Church. and politically is a Democrat.

WILLIAM R. MAGRAW, proprietor of the Hazleton Portrait Company, Hazleton, was born July 25, 1856, in Cecil county, Md. He is the eldest in a family of three children—two sons and one daughter—born to William and Elizabeth (Reed) Magraw, natives of Maryland. He was reared and educated in his native county, and started in life as a clerk for the Philadelphia Portrait Company, which occupation he followed for five years. He then became interested in the harness business, which, together with his other enterprises, he has since conducted. In 1882 he engaged in the portrait business, and at present he has charge of the extensive gallery located at Hazleton. In political matters he is a Democrat, and in religion a Presbyterian. Mr. Magraw is sociable and pleasant, and has made a host of friends during his residence in Hazleton.

JOHN J. MAHEDY, proprietor of restaurant, Duryea. was born in Ballina, County Mayo, Ireland, November 1, 1847. He is a son of Thomas and Winifred (Swift) Malhedy, also natives of the same place, who reared a family of ten children, of whom our subject was the eldest. The family went to England when John J. was but two years old, and settled in Leeds, Yorkshire, where he received his education in the common school, and was employed in the iron works until 1865, in which year he came to America, settling in Plains, this county, where he learned the trade of a blacksmith. In 1882 he removed to Port Griffith, Jenkins township, and in 1884 to Pittston, thence 1891 going to Avoca, where he went into the hotel business, and the latter settled in Duryea. Mr Mahedy was united in marriage December 23 1868, with Jane, daughter of Edward and Ellen (Brown) Devlin, natives of County Kilkenny, Ireland and Wales, respectively. Their union has been blessed with the following children: Ellen, born October 3 1879, married July 1 1891, to William Barret, an engineer in Genesee County, N.Y.; Mary, born November 18 1871; Samuel born July 7 1873; Winifred, born October 3 1879, and George, born October 18 1883. Our subject is a member of the Roman Catholic Church, and of the A.O.H.; in politics he is a Democrat.

William T. Mahon, M. D., Nanticoke, who ranks among the skilled physicians and surgeons of Luzerne county, was born December 25, 1851, a son of Alfred and Perlinda A. (Shippey) Mahon, the former a native on New York, the latter of Pennsylvania. The father of our subject was born in 1809, and is now living in Wyoming county, where his wife died in 1888. In the family there were twelve children besides William, eleven of whom are now living. Dr. Mahon received his preparatory education at the Keystone Academy, Wyoming county, and in 1880 entered Jefferson Medical College, where he was graduated in the class of 1883. After practicing a short time in Philadelphia, he located in Moscow, Lackawanna county, where he remained two years, commanding a large practice. He then went to Scranton, where he remained a short time, coming thence to Nanticoke, where he has been engaged in the practice of his profession since 1885, and has built up a remarkably large and lucrative practice for the length of time he has been there. The Doctor is a genial gentleman and an interesting conversationalist, well informed in all branches of science and letters. Possessing the degree of skill he does in the profession, he is well worthy of the large public patronage which he receives. He is a member of the Knights of Honor, the American Legion of Honor, and his political views are Democratic.

JOHN MAHONEY, a well-known contractor of Wilkes-Barre, is a native of Connecticut, and a son of Michael and Helen (Collins) Mahoney, natives of County cork, Ireland. He is the third child in a family of eight children, and began life as a farmer in Bradford county, Pa., which occupation he followed ten years, after which he acted as foremen of the North Branch Canal for several years. He later engaged in the wholesale liquor business with his brother-in-law, John Lafferty, on Northampton street, Wilkes-Barre; continuing in this nineteen years, and now gives his attention to his present business of contractor. Mr. Mahoney was twice married; his first wife was Miss Ophelia L. Lafferty, of Camptown, Pa., by whom he had two children: Willis H., of the firm of Mahoney & Co. Wilkes-Barre, and Lulu B. His second wife was Mrs. Annie (McGroarly) Kearney, widow of Michael Kearney, the second mayor of this city, who died February 11, 1877, leaving two children: Rose H. and Michael A. Kearney, Jr. Mrs. Mahoney and children are members of the Catholic Church. Mr. Mahoney is a member of the Masonic Fraternity and the K. of H.; in politics he is a democrat, and is now serving his third term as member of the city council.

SAMUEL MAIDEN, engineer, Wyoming Colliery, Plains, was born in Shropshire, England, August 4, 1843, and is a son of John and Elizabeth (Allen) Maiden, the former of whom was an engineer. They reared a family of four sons and one daughter, all of whom are living except one son. Our subject learned the engineering trade of his father, as did all his brothers, and came to America in 1865. He has been successively engaged as follows: At Scranton, on coal breaker, two months; Beaver Meadow, engineering, six months; Mr. Pleasant, engineering, eleven months; Mr. Hall, engineering, three months; Waverly, N. Y., building railroad fence, five months; Horseheads, in machine ship, three months; Mill Creek, firing, two months, and engineering, fourteen months; Port Bowkley, digging coal, six months; since which he has followed engineering exclusively, and has operated the engine he is now running since June 6, 1874. Mr. Maiden was married, July 3, 1878, to Miss Julia, daughter of Fuller and Sarah (Beisecker) Milligan, natives of New York and Pennsylvania, and of Irish and German origin, respectively. Mr. and Mrs. Maiden have four children, viz.: Jesse E., married to David C. Morgan, a miner in Plains, (they have three children, Julia, Thomas and Samuel); John, engaged in packing cars for the Lehigh Valley Railroad Company at Port Bowkley; Sadie and Annie, both living with their parents. Mr. Maiden and family usually attend, and contribute toward the support of, the Methodist Episcopal Church; he is a member of the I. O. O. F. and Encampment, and in politics is a Republican.

ABLE G. MAJOR, farmer, P. O. Plymouth, was born in Lehman township, February 5, 1843. He is the son of William and Syble C. (Brown) Major, the former of whom was born in Yorkshire, in May, 1813, while the latter is supposed to have been born in Connecticut in the same year. William was a son of Thomas Major, a native of England, who emigrated to this country in 1821. He and his family landed at Baltimore, where they purchased wagons by which they could travel overland to Ohio, but, on account of sickness, they returned and located in Wyoming, where he resided one year. He purchased 100 acres of land in Wyoming, which he sold, not knowing there were vins of coal there. From the latter place Thomas removed to Lehman, where he purchased 300 acres of land in its primitive state, or nearly so. There was an old log cabin on his lot, but, in a few years, that gave way to a more pretentious dwelling, and the forest gave way before the sturdy pioneers axe, fields of golden grain taking its place. All this tract was cleared during his lifetime. He was a man of education and refinement, whose life was spent in usefulness. Thomas Major was a strict member of the Baptist Church. He married Miss Mary Britton, who bore his thirteen children, twelve of whom were born in England, and one in this country, the last mentioned being George. One of the family, David, is now (1892) living, and resides near Lehman Centre. William, his son, began his active life in Lehman, as an industrious farmer. He was also engaged in the lumber business, and, at one time, kept hotel but, the latter business not being congenial to his tastes, he abandoned it. Like his father, he was a pious man, and lived an uneventful though useful life. He was a member of the M. E. Church, in god standing. He was one of the first postmasters of Lehman Centre. He died in 1891, at the age of seventy-five years. His family comprised six children, all of whom are living. Able G., is the third in order of birth, and was reared and educated in the common schools in Lehman. He confined himself to agricultural pursuits, residing in his native town till 1870, when he removed to Plymouth borough, during which time he also followed farming. In 1880, he purchase 170 acres of first-class land, which he has been improving year after year. He also built two tenement houses. In the fall of 1867 he married Miss Helen, daughter of John and Rebecca Santee, and to them were born five children, three of whom are living: Rilla, who married R. B. Vanghney; Edith L., who married J. B. S. Rickard, son of the late Dr. Rickard, of Plymouth, and Leslie, who is yet unmarried. Mr. major and family are consistent members of the Plymouth Presbyterian Church.

CRANDALL MAJOR, contractor and merchant, Forty Fort borough, was born June 13, 1837, at Lehman, Luzerne county, a son of John and Ann (Case) Major, natives respectively of Yorkshire, England and Pennsylvania, and respectively of English and French origin. The father came to America about1820, and here engaged in farming. Our subject is the eldest in a family of seven children. He was reared on a farm and educated in the public schools and at Wyoming Seminary. At the age of eighteen he engaged to learn the carpenters trade at Lehman, teaching school during the winter until 1869. He then went to Carroll county, Ill., and worked at his trade two years; then to Plainsville for one year; then to Forty Fort where he now resides. Mr. Major was married April 14, 1864, to Mable R., daughter of Charles and Olive (Ransom) Curtin. This union was blessed with five children, three of whom are now living: Fredrick, a conductor of the Delaware, Lackawanna, & Western Railroad (he is married to Etta, daughter of Thomas and Rhoda A. (Dodson) Major); Ollie A., aged seventeen, while skating on the river just below her home broke through the ice and was drowned, January 5, 1854; Charles C., principal of the Forty Fort high school; Ray, who lives at home; and Willie C., who died of diphtheria, September 21, 1885, at the age of eight years. Mrs. Major is a member of the Methodist Church. Mr. Major has been auditor, school director, and a member of the first borough council, serving one term in each office. He is a stanch Republican in politics.

THOMAS H. MAJOR, subject of this sketch, was born in Lehman township, Luzerne Co., Pa., June 4, 1841, and is a son of Robert and Sarah (Aldeman) Major, the former of whom was a native of Yorkshire, England, and of English origin; the latter a native of Luzerne county, Pa., and of Dutch lineage. The father, who was a farmer, reared a family of eleven children, seven of whom are living, Thomas H. being the fifth. He received a common school education, and assisted his father on the farm until the age of twenty-five, when he embarked in life for himself. He followed farming one year, and then went to Princess Ann, Md., where he purchased a farm, which he operated two years; then went to Plymouth, Pa., and here worked at the carpentry trade seven years; then purchased a farm in Jackson township, Luzerne county, whereon he lived seven years, and in 1881 came to Forty Fort where he worked at his trade till he engaged with the Wilkes-Barre & West Side Traction Company. Mr. Major was married February 22, 1866, to Rhoda A., daughter of Obadiah and Mary (Cease) Dodson, natives of Pennsylvania, and of Scotch and German origin respectively, and to this union have been born four children, viz: Marietta, married to Fred Major, a conductor on the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, with residence at Forty Fort (they have tow children, Olive A. and Cora); Alice, married to L. Bruce Campbell, formerly a druggist at Luzerne, but now of Binghamton, N. Y.; Estella and Arthur, living with their parents. Mr. and Mrs. Major are members of the First Baptist Church of Wilkes-Barre, and in his political views he is a Republican.

THOMAS N. MAJOR, merchant, Lehman township was born in Lehman, February, 4, 1848, a son of George and Margaret (Deremer) Major, the former of whom was born in Forty Fort, the latter in Dallas. George was a son of Thomas Major, who was native of Yorkshire, England, and came to this country about 1821 with a family of ten children, having buried two in England, and had one born after his settlement in this country. George, the father of Thomas N., making his family number thirteen, eleven of whom reached maturity. David is the only survivor of the family. Thomas located first at Kingston, where he lived about two years and then moved to Lehman township where he purchased two tracts of land, which he divided among his sons at his death; he died in 1844 at the age of seventy-five ears. His son George occupied the old homestead, and lived there all his life. He was a man of integrity, and was honored by his fellow men and citizens; he died on October 15, 1891, at t age of sixty-nine years. His family consisted of five children, three of whom are yet living: Thomas N., Emma and Francis. Thomas N. Major was reared and educated in Lehman township, and has confined himself to farming and lumbering. At the age of twenty-one, he married Miss Delphine, daughter of Stephen and Derinda Edwards, and by her he had four children: Bertha E., Arthur M., Alice G. and Emma C., all of whom are unmarried. In 1886 he entered mercantile business at Lehman, where his store is the center of trade. His stock is large and of the finest qualityBindeed, everything about the premises shows that a man of taste and refinement superintends the whole. By his gentle, manly deportment and courteous manner, Mr. Major attracts and holds a trade both extensive an solid. He owns his store, an extensive store-room and dwelling house combined. Since the death of his father, he has fallen heir to his farm consisting of 170 acres. He and his wife are consistent members of the Baptist Church. Politically he is a Republican, and has held several responsible town offices which he filled with honor and ability.

REV. GEORGE NATHAN MAKELY , Pastor of the Presbyterian Church, Avoca, was born at Albany, October 24, 1855, and is a son of Peter and Catherine (Proper) Makely, both natives of Columbia county, New York. His father resided in Columbia

county, and afterward in Albany and Schoharie counties until 1876, when he died at the age of seventy years. The mother is now residing with one of her sons in Albany county, New York. Our subject was reared and educated in the public schools of Albany, N. Y., and at the age of nineteen began teaching, which he pursued during portions of three years, during which time he was preparing to enter college, and also taking a special course in literature and science. Then he attended the state Normal School at Albany, N. Y., for eighteen months. At the age of twenty-four he entered William College, Massachusetts, graduating therefrom in the spring of 1883, taking the degrees of B. A. and M. A. During the fall of the same year he entered the Princeton Theological Seminary, at Princeton, N. J. and graduated in the spring of 1886. Mr. Makely now received a call to supply the pulpit of the Presbyterian Church at Burlington, N. J., which he filled eighteen months; afterward he was engaged in Evangelistic work for several months. On February 1, 1888, he came to Avoca, and has filled the pulpit of the Presbyterian Church ever since. Our subject is a member of the Masonic Fraternity. His courteous bearing and exemplary life, together with his manifest ability as a clergyman, have won him many friends among the citizens of Avoca.

HUGH MALLOY, merchant, Freeland, is a native of Ireland, whence at the age of fourteen he emigrated to this country, and locating at Hazleton, this county, entered the employ of A. Pardee & Co., as driver of in the mines. Here he remained until 1868, when he moved to Upper Lehigh, and obtained employment with Leisenring & Co., He was in the employ of this company nineteen years, but during the strike of 1887, on account of his activity in the AKnights of Labor, of which he was master workman, he was compelled to resign his position. He then returned to Europe, and traveled through England, Ireland and France one season, spending the larger part of his time in Paris and London. Returning to Freeland, he engaged in the boot and shoe business, later adding a stock of clothing and gents furnishing goods, and has since continued to enjoy a liberal patronage, doing well. Mr. Malloy was married December 25, 1876, to Miss Catharine Connahan, of Upper Lehigh, and they have children as follows: Hugh, Dennis, James, Frank, Neise, Daniel and Bernard. Mr. Malloy is a Democrat, and has been tax collector of Foster township, four years.

JOHN J. MALONEY, associate editor of the News Dealer, Wilkes-Barre, was born in St. Louis, December 23, 1857, a son of Michael and Julia (McCarthy) Maloney. In 1860 they came to Lancaster, Pa., where John J. Maloney received his education at the public schools, and at the age of seventeen entered the office of the Lancaster Examiner as a printers apprentice. While in the employ of that paper he, in connection with Henry Hartmyer, published a weekly paper in the interests of the charitable organizations of the city. In 1881 he came to Wilkes-Barre, and accepted the position of telegraph editor on the Daily Record. Later he was promoted tonight editor, which position he filled until he severed his connection with that paper to become one of the publishers of the News Dealer. On August 27, 1890,he was united in marriage with Miss Catherine McDade. Mr. and Mrs. Maloney are members of the Catholic Church. In politics he affiliates with the Democratic party.

HENRY E. MANDEVILLE, proprietor of the Hazleton Plumbing and Steam Fitting Company, Hazleton. This popular and energetic young business man was born at Beach Haven, Pa., April 10, 1859, and is a son of Ira O. and Ellen K. (Welch) Mandeville, the former a native of Luzerne county, the latter of Maine. Our subject, who is the elder of two children, was reared at Hazleton, and received his education at the public schools of that borough, and at La Fayette College, Easton, Pa. After completing college course he went to Philadelphia and engaged in the manufacturing of tin ware. There he remained two years, when, in 1880, he came to Hazleton and established a large hardware store, which he, in partnership with his younger brother, Ira J., ran for ten years. In 1890 the partnership was dissolved, and our subject opened his present business, which consists of plumbing, steam-heat fitting, and work pertaining to electric lights, etc., in which he employed ten skillful plumbers, kept constantly busy. Mr. Mandeville is pleasant in all his relations with men, and those who meet him either socially or in a business way are treated with the utmost consideration. He was united in marriage October 9, 1884, with Miss Lizzie, daughter of John A. and Elsie Tubbs, natives of Luzerne county, to which union have been born three children: Helen, Wilber and Elsie. In political matters our subject is a Republican, and the family attend the Presbyterian Church.

IRA O. MANDEVILLE, father of Harry E., was born March 24, 1834, in Jackson township, Luzerne county, and is the seventh in the family of eleven children of Ira and Eliza (Deremer) Mandeville, the former a native of Connecticut, the latter of New Jersey extraction. Ira O. was reared and educated in the public schools of his native place, and began life as a clerk in the Kingston stores serving four years for Judge Reynolds. After six years service as a clerk, he began railroading on what was then known as the Lackawanna & Bloomsburg Railroad. Under that company he served in that capacity of passenger brakeman, conductor and section-boss; then served in the capacity of conductor of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad. In 1861 he went South, and had charge of the construction of a railroad in Maryland. In 1861 he went South, and had charge of the construction of a railroad in Maryland. During the winter of 1861 he returned, and in the following spring engaged with the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad in the capacity of conductor, in which position he remained several years, returning after his services there, to the Lackawanna & Bloomsburg as a conductor of passenger and freight. He then went to Scranton and again engaged with the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad as conductor, continuing with them until 1864, when he came to Hazleton and took charge of the Lehigh & Luzerne Railroad, on which he served tow years, and then was given charge of both the Lehigh and Luzerne, including the Hazleton Railroad. He was with that road until the entire system was merged by the Lehigh Valley in 1868, and he has held the position of roadmaster through all the various changes. Mr. Mandeville is one of the pioneer railroad men of Pennsylvania, and is well up in everything pertaining to the successful manipulation of a road. He was united in marriage in 1857 to Ellen K. daughter of George Welch, of Springdale, Me., and two children have been born to this union, namely: Harry E. and Ira J. In political matters Mr. Mandeville is a Republican, and he is a member of the F. & A. M. The family attend the Presbyterian Church.

Orzo Mandeville, contractor and builder, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Dallas township, this county, February 12, 1830, a son of Ira and Eliza (Deremer) Mandeville, the former a native if Plymouth, this county, the latter of Asbury, N.J. The father was a carpenter and joiner by trade, but afterward engaged in farming in Jackson township; he was born in 1801, and died in 1885. His children were: Samuel, Charles B., Orzo, Ira O., Virgil A., Jasper J., Maria, Margaret and Delphine. Our subject was reared in Luzerne county, served an apprenticeship of three years at the carpenter's trade, and worked as a journeyman until February, 1886. He then engaged in business as a contractor and builder, in which he has since successfully continued. He served in the Civil war three months in Company F, Wyoming Artillery; six months in Company B, One Hundred and Sixty-Fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and twenty-one months in the One Hundred and Ninety-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers on provost guard duty, and was honorably discharged at the close of the war. He is a member of the G.A.R. and in politics is a Republican. He married Miss Ann, daughter of Patrick Burke, a native of Ireland, and by her has six children: Charles, Kate, Harry G., Delphine, Maurice and Bessie.

Martin Mangan, who was in his lifetime a prominent citizen of Plains, died at his residence in that place, February 26, 1883, of enlargement of the liver, caused by injuries he had received in the mines. He was born in County May, Ireland, and was a son of Michael and Ellen (Gravey) Mangan. In their family there were seven children, of whom Martin was the third. The subject of this memoir came to America in 1861, and located at Plains, where he assisted in sinking the Henry Shaft, at which he was head-man, and subsequently docking-boss; in 1879 he engaged on the saloon business which he followed until his death. His wife then continued the business with remarkable success until 1887; she built her present beautiful residence at Midvale, and removed therein in 1891. Mr. Mangan was married May 15, 1860, to Miss Bridget, daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Lines) Kinney, of County Mayo, Ireland, and to their union were born ten children, six of whom are living, viz.: Mary A. (Mrs. J.J. O'Donnell); Michael J., a brakeman, in Philadelphia (he completed his education in the Bloomsburg State Normal School); John A., an insurance agent and collector, resides with his mother; Bridget T., a teacher in Luzerne borough, is an organist in the Catholic Church at Plains (she is an artist of marked ability); and Patrick P. and Martin, both attending school and residing with their mother. Of those deceased, Thomas F. died in February 25, 1891, in the twenty-fourth year of his age (he had completed his education at the Bloomsburg State Normal School); Sarah E. married John McDonald, of Plains, and died in 1888 at the age of twenty-six, leaving two children, Annie and John. This family are all adherents of the Catholic Church; they are Democrats in politics.

Charles H. Marcy, clerk, Duryea, was born in that town December 15, 1854, and is a son of Joseph and Ellen D. (Helme) Marcy, both natives of Luzerne county. They reared a family of eight children, of whom Charles H. is the eldest. Our subject received his education in the common schools and in Wyoming Seminary, and assisted his father on their farm until 1879, when he received employment as a weighmaster at the Hillside Colliery, Avoca. In 1881 he was engaged as a clerk in the store of Stiteler & Co., and afterward for Connell & Co. Mr. Marcy was united in marriage January 19, 1878, with Bertha E., daughter of John S. and Mary E. (Coolbaugh) Marcy, natives of Luzerne county. Their union has been blessed with the following issue: Sydney A., born November 9, 1878; Stella I., born October 4, 1880; Clara, born November 2, 1882; and Mary E., born October 12, 1884. Our subject is a member of the M.E. Church, of which he is one of the trustees. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias; in politics he is a Republican, and is at present serving as school director.

Jared E. Marcy, contractor and builder, Ashley, Hanover township, was born in South Wilkes-Barre, December 7, 1849, and is a son of Avery and Lucinda (Blackman) Marcy, the latter a granddaughter of Elisha Blackman, who took part in the Wyoming Massacre. His father, who was a carpenter, reared a family of thirteen children, viz.: Almina (deceased wife of David Hill), Cyrus (a tinner in Sayre, Pa.), Henry B. (served three years and four months in the Civil war, in which he was killed), Sarah (Mrs. Stacy Doan), Melissa (Mrs. William Klaprothe), Ira, Jared E., William, Araminta (Mrs. Daniel Ide), Annie (Mrs. William Roudenbush), Albert, and two that died in infancy. Our subject was educated in the public schools of Hanover township, and then learned the carpenter's trade, which has been the chief occupation of his life. From 1870 to 1873 he lived in Chicago. In 1886 he engaged in his present business, and in 1889 built his shop and added al umber trade. His present residence he erected in 1874. Mr. Marcy was married December 2, 1874, to Emma J., daughter of Benjamin and Emma (Muelhler) Gregory, of Muhlenberg, Pa., and of Irish and German origin. The issue of this union has been nine children, six of whom are living, viz.: Daisy, Ray, Amy, Lela L., Clyde and Nina. Mr. and Mrs. Marcy are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and Baptist Church, respectively. He is a member of the P.O.S. of A., and in his political views is a Prohibitionist.

John S. Marcy, retired farmer, and a justice of the peace at Duryea, was born in Marcy township, this county, November 1, 1821, and is a son of Ebenezer and Susannah (Adams) Marcy, natives of the same place, of New England origin. They were among the earliest settlers in Wyoming Valley, and reared a family of twelve children, of whom our subject is the eleventh in order of birth. He received his education in the common schools, and worked with his father on the old homestead farm until the year 1839, when he accepted a position as clerk in a store in Wilkes-Barre; but only stayed there one year, returning at the expiration of that time to his home, where he remained until 1860. He then went into the grocery business, but in September, 1861, sold out and joined, as a lieutenant, Company G, Fifty-second Pennsylvania volunteers. He was at the battle of Fair Oaks, and at the siege of Charleston. Returning home in October, 1864, he has since then lived peacefully on his farm, which has been in possession of the family since the year 1770. Mr. Marcy was united in marriage August 7, 1843, with Mary E., daughter of Lieutenant Peter and Eleanor (Jacobs) Coolbaugh, natives of Bradford county, Pa., and their union has been blessed with the following children: Sarah A., born march 4, 1844, died December 2, 1889; Martha Rose, born January 26, 1846, died April 30, 1872; Joseph W., born April 9, 1848; Edwin B., born January 4, 1850, died August 11, 1883; Charles S., born March 19, 1852, died August 10, 1855; Gertrude J., born June 9, 1854; Hannah F., born July 20, 1856, died December 13, 1879; Bertha E., born March 13, 1859. Our subject is a Democrat, and has served at various periods as constable of his township, assessor, supervisor, and school director, and at the present time holds the offices of auditor and justice of the peace, having held the latter office nine years.

William H. Marcy, lumberman, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Wilkes-Barre, October 1, 1836, and is a son of Ira and Mary A. (Teeter) Marcy. His paternal grandfather, Jared Marcy, son of Ebenezer Marcy, descended from an early New England family, were among the pioneers of Pittston, and were both (as was also the father of our subject) carpenters by trade. The father was a native of Pittston, but spent most of his life in Wilkes-Barre, where he died on 1873 at the age of sixty-five years. His wife was a daughter of Conrad Teeter, a harness maker by trade, who resided in Wilkes-Barre for many years, and he was the first mail carrier between Wilkes-Barre and Elmira, making his trips on horseback. The children of Ira Marcy were William H., Rufus W., Sarah E. (Mrs. Charles B. Stout) and Ira T. Our subject was reared in Wilkes-Barre, educated in the common schools, and began life at the carpenter's trade which he followed seven years. He then embarked in mercantile business at Ashley, following same for five years. Since 1875 he has been engaged in general merchandising in Plymouth, at the same time carrying on a lumber business at Wilkes-Barre. Mr. Marcy married March 9, 1858, Susan A., daughter of Ira B. and Content (Ryan) Stone, of Salem, Wayne Co., Pa., and they have three children: Harry G., Cora A., and Leonard I. Mr. Marcy is a member of the Episcopal Church, and of the F. & A. M. and I.O.O.F. In politics he is a Republican.

John Markle, a son of the late G.B. Markle, was born in Hazleton, December 15, 1858. His father was pre-eminent in the development of the coal industry in the anthracite region. Since his death the work has been taken up by his son, and is being pushed with the same consummate energy and intelligence that characterized in so marked a degree the founder of this house. The father was the head of the firm G.B. Markle & Co., colliery operatives, and this branch of the concern has fallen to the lot of his son - the subject of this notice- and of him it may well be said, that in many respects he has given evidence that progress is as distinct a factor in his constitution now, as it was of his father in his palmiest days. The father conceived in his busy mind the coal breaker as we now have it; the son is now pushing the bold scheme of tunneling the mountain, and thereby opening the way to vast coal fields heretofore practically shut out from man's endeavors, by the waters that percolate these hills. The tunnel is being made at a vast expense, and when completed will be the most important advance in the matter of mining that has marked the decade of late rapid improvements. Mr. Markle attended private and public schools in his native town until he attained his twelfth year, when he entered the boarding school at White Plains, N.Y., known as Alexander Military Institute, remaining there three years. At this time his parents removed to Philadelphia, and for the next two years the youth attended Laudabach's Academy, in that city, afterward entering Lafayette College, in the class of 1880. He was graduated in the Mining Engineering course, after which he was appointed general superintendent of the extensive mining interests of his father's firm, in the region of Jeddo, in time succeeding his father, who was compelled to retire on account of ill health. During the entire period of his management of the affairs of the concern, he has shown talent and executive ability of a high order. At the present time he is a partner in the firm. Mr. Markle was married in January, 1884, to Miss Mary. E. Robinson, of New York City.

James Marshall, mason, in the employ of the Sheldon Axle Works, Plains, was born in Lanarkshire, Scotland, May 9, 1853, son of James and Mary (Glass) Marshall. The father, who was a mason by trade, reared a family of ten children, six of whom are living, and of whom James is the eighth. Our subject received a moderate education, and took up his father's trade as the occupation of his life. In 1888 he came to America, locating at Plains, where he has since worked at his trade; he built his present residence and removed therin in 1890. Mr. Marshall was married, June 26, 1874, to Miss Maggie Porter, who had been adopted and reared by her grandfather, James Porter. They have six children, viz.: James, John, Maggie, Isabella, Robert G., and Marion C. Mr. and Mrs. Marshall are members of the Presbyterian Church, in which he is a deacon and trustee.

Norman Marshall, contractor and builder, Wilkes-Barre, was born in that city, July 23, 1854, and is a son of Nelson and Rachel S. (Brown) Marshall. His paternal grandfather, a native of New Jersey and a farmer by occupation, was a pioneer of Stroudsburg, Pa.; and the maternal grandfather, Jacob K. Brown, a native of London, England, was for many years a resident of Wyoming county, where he engaged in a lumbering business, and there died. Nelson Marshall, father of subject, and a native of Monroe county, Pa., was engaged in lumbering many years, and for forty-five years was a resident of Luzerne county, dying in Wilkes-Barre in 1889. His children were seven in number who grew to maturity: Mary S. (Mrs. Charles Labar), Hettie (Mrs. G. A. Baird), Benjamin f., William H., Jerome B., Norman and Walter S. Our subject was reared in Wilkes-Barre, and educated in the public schools and at Wyoming Seminary. He served a three years' apprenticeship at the carpenter's trade, afterward worked as a Journeyman, fourteen years, and in 1881 embarked in business for himself as a contractor and a builder, in which he has since continued with marked success. Mr. Marshall was married February 3, 1892, to Minnie L., daughter of John Norton, of Allenwood, Union Co., Pa. Mr. Marshall is a member of the K. of P. and Jr. O. U. A. M.; in politics he is a Republican.

Preston Marshall, farmer and blacksmith, P.O. Maple Run, Fairmont township, was born in that township January 22, 1843, and is a son of Job and Abigail (Dodson) Marshall, natives of Pennsylvania, and of English and German origin, respectively. Job Marshall was a farmer by occupation, and died November 2, 1876. He was a son of Lloyd and Abigail Marshall, natives of Connecticut. Our subject is the eighth of a family of nine children, five if whom are now living. He was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and at twenty-one years of age enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Ninety-ninth P.V.; he was in all engagements with is regiment until the close of the war, and was discharged July 8, 1865. He then returned to his native place and worked three years on his father's farm, then two years as a laborer, after which he went to Wanamie, this county, and was employed as a blacksmith for the Lehigh Coal & Iron Company for four years. He then returned to Fairmont township and worked ten years at the same business, when he purchased his present farm, containing fifty acres, one-fourth mile west of Maple Run postoffice. He was married march 15, 1868, to Miss Susan Haganbaugh, by whom he has two children, viz.: Hattie (Mrs. Charles Miller of Shickshiny) and Mary, who is still at home. The family are members of the P.M. Church. He is a member of the G.A.R. and P. of H.; politically he is a Democrat, and has held the office of school director.

Ira Walton Marstellar, M.D., White Haven, was born in Broadheadsville, Monroe Co., Pa., November 13, 1859, a son of Simpson and Julia (Weiss) Marstellar, natives of Pennsylvania, of German origin. They reared a family of fourteen children, of whom our subject is the third in order of birth. He was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, Muhlenburg College, Orangeville Academy, and Columbus College, Columbus, Ohio. He taught school from the age of fourteen, to pay his way through these several institutions of learning, and in 1882, began the study of medicine with D.G. Long, M.D., of Reading, Pa. The Doctor graduated from the University of Vermont, was examined at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, and holds a certificate from said college. In the fall of 1884 he began the practice of medicine at White Haven, and has since enjoyed a large and lucrative practice, making a specialty of skin diseases. Dr. Marstellar was married December 25, 1883, to Miss Elmira, daughter of Charles and Levina (Shankweiler) Weiler, natives of Berks county, Pa., descended from German origin. This union was blessed with one child, Ashbel S., born September 25, 1889. Dr. Marstellar is a member of the Methodist Church, Mrs. Marstellar of the Lutheran. Socially he is a member of the K. of H., and politically he is a Republican.

Henry Martin, alderman, Hazleton, is a native of Obervarschutz, Germany, born February 22, 1846. He received his education in the public schools of his native village, and, at a tender age of sixteen, cast his loving lance at his native land and embarked for America, locating at Tamaqua, Schuylkill co., Pa., where he learned the baker's trade, which he followed for two years. He was afterward engaged at the same business in Philadelphia and New York for about two years, and in 1867 came to Hazleton, where he has since resided. Here he was engaged in bakery business for a number of years. He was elected borough assessor, serving four years; he was then elected constable five times in succession; in 1891 he was elected justice of the peace, which office bears the title of alderman since the incorporation of the city of Hazleton. Mr. martin was married at Hazleton, June 18, 1868, to Miss Elizabeth Erbe, of Hazleton. This union has been blessed with one child, Anite. This gentleman is a member of the Mystic Chain, Seven Wise Men, Good Brothers, Royal Arcanum, and the Workingmen's Beneficial Association, and in politics he is a Democrat.

James Martin, foreman at the Delaware and Mill Creek Breakers, Plains, was born in Schuylkill county, Pa., August 26, 1851, and is a son of George and Mary (Maysmith) Martin, natives of England. In his father's family there were eight children, seven of whom are living, viz.: Robert, John, Maggie A. (Mrs. John Wall), James, Mary J. (Mrs. Joseph Goss), Rebecca (Mrs. George Hilbert), and Elizabeth (Mrs. M. A. Swaze). Our subject was educated in the common schools, and at the age of nine years began working in the breaker; he worked himself through all the graduations, was twelve years a miner, and had been mine foreman nine years. He built his present beautiful residence in 1891, and removed therein in January, 1892. In 1877 our subject made a trip to Texas, where he picked cotton for a few months, and then returned home; in 1880 and 1882, he made mining and prospecting tours through the silver regions of Colorado, remaining fifteen months the first time, and four the last. Mr. Martin was married, December 15, 1873, to Miss Catherine, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Apple) Stark, natives of Germany, and they have seven children, viz.: William R., Charles, Roy, Elizabeth May, James A., Anna and Fred. Mr. martin and wife attend the German Lutheran Church of Wilkes-Barre, of which she is a member; he is a member of the I. O. O. F. and Encampment; he is a Republican in his political views, and has held the office of school director.

Peter Martin, farmer, P.O. Reyburn, was born in Germany, December 14, 1817, son of Adam and Mary Martin, both of whom were born in Germany, where they lived and died. Peter emigrated to this country about 1837, locating first in New York City, where he worked at various occupations. He removed to this county about 1840, locating in Union township in 1879, where he now owns a farm of sixty-one acres, which he has improved to a great extent. He married Miss Jane, daughter of John and Nancy Garthwaite, to whom were born nine children, five of whom are living: John, Nancy, Mary, Joseph, and James. Joseph is a farmer and lives with his father. In 1874 he married Miss Rachel, daughter of Evan and Elizabeth Jones. To this union were born three children, two of whom are living, Harry and Roy. Peter Martin is a man much respected by his neighbors. He is a consistent member of the Baptist church. Mrs. Martin died April 25, 1887. Peter is fifth in order of birth in his father's family, and the only surviving member. Politically he is a Democrat.

Thomas Martin, of the firm of Martin & Nemeth, is a native of Nesquehoning, Carbon county, Pa., born August 19, 1856, and is a son of Patrick and Mary (Donahoe) Martin, natives of Ireland, in whose family there were three children, Thomas being the youngest. At the age of nine years our subject engaged in picking slate, and he continued to work around the mines in various capacities until he reached the age of twenty, when he became a miner. In 1885 he abandoned mining, and came to Hazleton, embarking in the tea business, gradually changing his stock into a general line of groceries. In 1887 he sold out the grocery and went to work at Nesquehoning, but remaining there a short time returned to Hazleton, and engaged in his present business. He was united in marriage January 1, 1882, with Miss Mary Ann Miner, of Honey Brook. In politics Mr. Martin is a staunch Democrat, and has been a member of the school board one term; he can always be depended upon to support any worthy public enterprise.

W. H. MASTERS, carpenter, Shickshinny, was born in Union township, May 14, 1843, a son of Samuel and Mary (Scott) Masters. His paternal grandfather, Adam Masters, was formerly of Easton, Pa., and a pioneer of Union township where he owned and operated a gristmill for years, and there died. His wife was Mrs. Sarah Simons, by whom he had seven children: William, Wesley, Peter, Samuel, Adam, Polly (Mrs. David Benscoter) and Sarah (Mrs. James Benscoter). The father of subject was also a miller, and rebuilt on the site of his fathers old mill in 1861, which he conducted up to his death, September 8, 1891. His wife was a daughter of Garrett Scott, of Union township, and by her he had six children: Elizabeth (Mrs. A. S. McDaniels), William A., Arminda (Mrs. George W. Sarver), Evaline (Mrs. Jacob Hobbs), Lafayette and Gwynn. The subject of this sketch was reared in Union township where he learned the carpenters trade. On August 22, 1863, he enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Forty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was honorably discharged from service in June, 1865, since when he has been a resident of Shickshinny. In February, 1866, he married Margaret, daughter of William Labar, of Lake township, and has two children: Lacey E. and E. Wilfred. In politics Mr. Masters is a Republican, and has served one term as justice of the peace of Union township.

THOMAS REBAUGH MARTIN is a native of Washington county, Md., having been born near Hagerstown in that county, May 26, 1849. His preliminary education was secured at the college at Mercersburg, and he afterward graduated from Franklin and Marshall Colleges at Lancaster. The Martins are an old family in the section of Maryland where Thomas Rebaugh was born, members thereof having been leading citizens there for many years. Our subject read law in Lancaster, Pa., and afterward in Hagerstown, Md. He was first admitted to practice in Maryland, but very shortly afterward (in January, 1876), he was admitted to the Lancaster (Pa.) County bar; a few months later he came to Wilkes-Barre, where he was admitted to the Luzerne county bar April 10. He has established a large and lucrative practice. Mr. Martin is a Democrat in his political preferences, and has probably made more democratic speeches in various parts of the county than any other man in the party. He has been presented by his friends on several occasions as a candidate for district attorney, and for Congress, and though in every convention, in which his name has been mentioned, he has had a large following, the combinations have always been against him, and others have carried off the prizes. Mr. Martin married June 28, 1877, Anna F. Stirk, daughter of Isaac Stirk, of Lancaster, Pa., and they have one child, Florence Virginia Martin.

WILLIAM J. MARVEL, commission merchant, Wilkes-Barre, is a native of Sussex county, Del., and a son of William P. and Sally A. (Turpen) Marvel. He is of English and Welsh descent, and was reared in Delaware, where he received a limited education in the common schools. In early manhood, he located in Wilkes-Barre, where for six years he clerked in a grocery and market, and for three years drove an ice wagon. In 1874 he located in Pittston where he spent nearly a year in the butcher business, and then returned to Wilkes-Barre, where he worked in a butcher shop until 1879, at which time he embarked in the commission business for himself on a small scale. He has succeeded in building up a large and successful trade, and to accomodate his customers, and give him better facilities for conducting his immense business, he erected, in 1892, a large brick building on East Market street, three stories high, forty feet by one hundred and thirty feet deep, a building used solely for his business. In 1874 Mr. Marvel married Miss Sallie L., daughter of William Neiall, of Delaware, and has two children living: William D. and Cora B. Mr. Marvel attends the services of the M.E. Church.

A.M. MARVIN, farmer, Muhlenburgh, was born December 1, 1841, in Union township, where he was reared and educated. He is a son of John and Eliza (Monroe) Marvin, the former born in Union township, April 18, 1810, the latter in Huntington township, July 28, 1813. John was a son of Zerah Marvin, who was born in Plymouth April 11, 1775. He was a son of Uriah, who was one of three brothers who emigrated to this country from Ireland, prior to the Revolutionary struggle, and in which Uriah took a conspicuous part. These brothers were residents of Connecticut, where they settled on their arrival in this country. Uriah, however, removed to the Wyoming Valley, where he became a prominent character in its history. He was there during, and took part in, the massacre. He died of small pox two years subsequently, while yet in the army of the United States. His family consisted of two sons, who in their turn became sturdy pioneers, helping materially in the advancement of agricultural pursuits in Luzerne county.

Zerah Marvin removed from the Valley to Union township when twenty-two years of age, at which time he married Miss Rhoda Williams, who bore him eight children, six of whom grew to maturity. He owned about 200 acres of land, which he tilled to some purpose. He was a man of deep piety, a practical philanthropist, whose deeds live after him. His life was one of usefulness, devoted to the good of mankind. By craft, he was a cabinet maker; by necessity, a merchant; by choice, a farmer; and by the grace of God, a preacher of righteousness in the Baptist Church. His heart always beat in sympathy with the needy; and his hand was always ready to help. Mr. Marvin held the first postoffice in Union township, then called Union. He died September 28, 1857, aged eighty-two years, after a life of toil and usefulness. His wife died March 11, 1857. His son, John Marvin, began his active life in Union township, on part of the old homestead, where he lived a brief but prosperous life. He held several township offices, and was a man of education far in advance of his days and position. He died March 4, 1859, his wife Eliza, December 27, 1841. Their family consisted of nine children, seven of whom grew to maturity, and six of whom are now living.

A.M. Marvin is the third of the family in order of birth, and has always confined himself to agricultural pursuits; he has spent all his life in the county. He was mustered into the service of the United States as a private in Company E, Two Hundred and Third P.V.I., in 1864. He displayed patriotism in the battle of Fort Fisher, at which place he received a scalp wound. He served to the close of the war and was honorably discharged, returning to his chosen occupation of farmer. April 24, 1867, he married Miss Sophia, daughter of John and Rebecca Santee. To this marriage there were born five children, four of whom are now living: A.W., M.E., S.R. and F.S. Mrs. Marvin was born in Union township, November 30, 1841. Mr. Marvin is a practical farmer, owning seventy-five acres of valuable and fertile land. He has held various offices.

ISAAC M. MASK, machinist and master mechanic, for the Delaware & Hudson Canal Company, machine department, Plymouth division, Plymouth. This highly-respected gentleman was born at Baltimore, Md., January 22, 1825, and is the second in the family of ten children born to Isaac G. and Mary (Crowl) Mask, natives of Pennsylvania. He was educated at Baltimore, and at an early age developed remarkable mechanical genius, which he utilized by entering the employ of Savage & Laural, manufacturers, for the purpose of learning the machinists trade. There he remained four and a half years, after which he traveled throughout the South for the following three years, working in some of the principal cities while there. Returning to Baltimore, he was at once employed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company as machinist, working in that capacity for two years, at the end of that time being promoted to the foremanship of the Wheeling (W. Va.) Slope, in which capacity he acted for three years. In May, 1855, Mr. Mask was sent to Plymouth, by the company, with the first locomotive that was ever handled in this county. It was brought here and used by the Baltimore Coal Company, to take the place of mules in transporting the coal for shipment. There were only seven mines opened at this time between Nanticoke and Pittston, and these were imperfectly worked, transportation being so difficult. After getting this engine in working order, Mr. Mask was retained by the company as master mechanic of machinery, and held that position until the transfer was made to the Delaware & Hudson Canal Company, when he accepted the same position under that company, which he has since retained. Mr. Mask was united in marriage, March 2, 1848, with Mary C. Neigh, of Baltimore, Md., and six children were born to this marriage, viz.: Amelia; Isaac G., now road foreman of the Norfolk & Western Railroad; Mary C., deceased; Emma Kate; Josephine and John J. Mrs. Mask died in August, 1885. The subject of this sketch is a Democrat in politics; he is a member of the F.& A.M.; the family attend the Presbyterian Church.

COLONEL ADDISON G. MASON, superintendent of Exeter Colliery, Lehigh Valley Coal Company, Pittston, was born in Monroeton, Bradford Co., Pa., October 16, 1839, a son of Gorden F. and Mary A. (Mason) Mason, both of whom were born in Bradford county. Gorden F. Mason was a prominent member of the Bradford county bar, and at one time was an extensive banker. He was honored by his fellow citizens to fill the office of State Senator for several years, an office which he fitted and filled with much credit to himself and the entire satisfaction of his constituents. He also held the office of county surveyor for some time, and was at one time colonel of a regiment of militia. He was a prominent politician and a successful financier. Politically, he was a Democrat until the formation of the Republican party, which cause he espoused till his death, which occurred in 1886, when he was at the age allotted to man - three score and ten years. His family consisted of eight children, seven of whom grew to maturity, of whom are now living: Maria, widow of Col. Guy H. Watkins; Irene, now the wife of Judge Searls, of Lackawanna county; Newton E., a lieutenant in the United States navy; Edwin M., in business in Towanda; and Addison G. The subject of this sketch was reared in Towanda, where he received a rudimentary education fitting him for the Susquehanna Collegiate Institute, which he entered and from which he departed with high honors. He completed his studies in Worcester, Mass. His purpose in fitting himself for business pointed to that of civil engineer, but after he graduated he abandoned the idea, not because of his unfitness, but because of a change of taste. After leaving school he entered a bank in Scranton, where he remained till 1859. He then went to Towanda, where he was engaged in similar business, and left it only when his country called to arms. When that call reverberated through the land by the fall of Fort Sumter, A.G. Mason was one of the first to respond. In 1861 he helped to raise 250 men, entering the ranks as a private, but before the command reached Harrisburg he was promoted to second lieutenant of the Fifth Pennsylvania Reserves, Company F. He was made adjutant the same year, a rank he held till the battle of South Mountain, where he displayed a heroic courage that brought eulogies from several officers of the line. After the action his service was demanded at Division Headquarters, when he became a member of Gen. Meades staff, on which he remained up to the close of the war. He soon received his commission as first lieutenant, was subsequently made captain and recommended for the rank of major, and finally was made lieutenant-colonel by brevet, a rank he held at the close of his army career, which was an eventful one. He had participated in all the battles of the army of the Potomac, excepting that of Five Forks. At Charles City Cross Roads, in June, 1862, he was wounded. On his return to civil life he again engaged in the banking business with his father. On October 15, 1868, Col. Mason married Miss S. Adelaide, daughter of H.S. and Sarah A. Mercur, and to them were born four children: Sarah A., Charlotte I., James G. and Elizabeth M. (the latter being deceased). Mr. Mason remained in Towanda till 1872, when he removed to Elmira for a brief time; in 1873 he came to Luzerne county, locating in Wilkes-Barre, where he entered the service of the Lehigh Valley Coal Company; in 1874 he moved to Exeter, where he superintended the erection of the Exeter Colliery. Col. Mason has held several offices since his residence in Exeter, among which may be mentioned those of president of the board of councilmen, four years; councilman, six years; and is now school director of the borough. Politically, he is a Republican.

DR. D.J.J. MASON, Wilkes-Barre, the subject of this sketch, was born in Monmouthshire, Wales, in 1854. His musical education began when quite young, under the instruction of his father, from whom his musical genius was inherited. When only eight years old the Doctor had become a very proficient sight reader of vocal music. The cleverness of the boy called forth many bright predictions for his future, which have all been verified, for to-day Dr. Mason is known, not only to all Welshmen, but to every American musician. In 1869, in company with his parents, he came to this country, first locating in Ashland, Schuylkill Co., Pa., where, however, they only remained about six months. The following Christmas, at a large Eisteddfod held at Mahanoy City, he attracted considerable attention by winning several prizes, and assisting his father in the choir which won all the principal prizes. Afterward, with his parents, he came to Parsons, where they made their homes. In 1872 he entered Mt. Pleasant Seminary, Boyertown, Berks Co., Pa., where he pursued his studies, upon the completion of which he was employed as teacher of vocal and instrumental music in the same institution. He then proceeded to Danville, Pa., and resumed his musical studies under the able direction of Dr. Joseph Parry, subsequently becoming his assistant. When Dr. Parry went to Wales in order to assume the professorship in the University of Aberystwyth, young Mason took his place in Danville, when he also became organist of the Grove Street Presbyterian Church. During his stay in Danville he won a prize for a composition at Cincinnati. In Scranton, in 1875, he defeated Gwilyn Gwent, and some of the noted composers of Wales. This composition, AThe Young Musicians, was published by Schirmer, of New York. Locating in Wilkes-Barre in 1876, in the early part of 1877, the Mendelssohn Society was organized, and he became its leader. Under his direction the society produced many of the great oratorios, and was in existence until 1882. During this period he was for a short time organist of the Memorial Church, and subsequently of the First Presbyterian Church. In the summer of 1882 he went to Europe, and became a noted student of the Royal Academy of Music, London. Here he remained four years, diligently pursuing his studies under Duvivier, Fitten, Holland, Davenport and MacFarren. Besides music he also took up sciences, classics, etc. In 1886 he took the degree of Mus. Bac. at Trinity College, Dublin, his cantata, AO Be Joyful in God, being performed at the University chapel, at the same time his composition for Mus. Doc. was also accepted at the same institution. In July, 1886, he returned to this country and again settled in Wilkes-Barre. Two years later he was granted the degree of Doctor of Music in Toronto, Canada, on the merits of his compositions. In the fall of 1886, the Wilkes-Barre Oratorio Society was organized, with him as director. Until recently Dr. Mason was the director of the famous Welsh Baptist Church choir, of Scranton, Pa., comprising some 200 voices. This choir also, under his direction, rendered a number of the great oratorios. His compositions are many, most of which are still in manuscript form. Two elaborate choruses of an oratorio, AFrom Out of the Depths, were published three years ago, and were the subject for the $1,000 prize given at the great Eisteddfod held in Wilkes-Barre. The sacred cantata, AO Be Joyful in God, was published about a year ago. One of the numbers of this work, a quintette, was in competition at an Eisteddfod held in Wilkes-Barre, seventeenth of March, and also to be at the Worlds Fair Eisteddfod in 1893. The Welsh version of the cantata was adapted by William Apmadoc. Altogether, Dr. Mason, as a student, has been under the following eminent masters: Dr. Parry, Dr. Louis Maas, Eugene Thayer, Wheeler, Holland, Duvivier, Fitten, Davenport and MacFarren. His success as a teacher has been great. Some of the noted singers and musicians of northeastern Pennsylvania have been his pupils. At present the Doctor is director of the Oratorio Society, The Klara Schumann Club, and St. Dominics choir. At Chicago, during August, 1893, one week is to be devoted to a great International Eisteddfod, it having been decided to give to the Columbian Worlds Fair a favorable exhibit of Welsh music - a music born of the harp. Dr. Mason has been selected to furnish the music of a three-act serious or grand opera, the libretto of which has been written by Prof. Apmadoc, of Chicago, under the title of AThe Maid of Cefn Ydfa. Dr. Mason is at work on the opera, and hopes to have it ready for presentation in August, 1893. If his success in the past is a criterion, the Worlds Fair Eisteddfodic committee can feel assured they have placed the work in able hands. It will doubtless reflect credit upon their judgment, as well as win fresh laurels for a man who to-day stands with few peers among his countrymen in the ranks of musicians.

JOHN MASSMAN, outside foreman at the Henry Mine, Plains, was born on the Mozelle, Germany, July 25, 1848, and is a son of Michael and Catherina (Kisner) Massman. Our subject came to America in 1871, and located at Scranton, Pa., where he worked at mining, blacksmithing, and puddling for two years, and then removed to Plains, where he followed mining nine years, and has since held his present position. Mr. Massman was married, July 4, 1881, to Mrs. Margaret McCarty, widow of James McCarty, and daughter of Joseph and Ellen (Wilson) Cherry, natives of Ireland. Mr. and Mrs. Massman are members of the Presbyterian Church, in which he is an elder and trustee; he is a member of the I.O.O.F. and Encampment, and politically is a Republican.

CORNELIUS MASTEN, farmer, P.O. Plains, was born in Dutchess county, N.Y., May 2, 1822, and is a son of Henry and Rachel (Maxfield) Masten, also natives of Dutchess county, and of Irish and English origin, respectively. The father, who was a miller by trade, reared a family of seven children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the fourth. He came to Wilkes-Barre in 1852 and worked on a farm one year, and then removed to Plains, where he was employed on the farm of James Searle for seventeen years. He then rented the farm for eight years; he built his present home in 1866, and removed therein in 1868. Mr. Masten was married, November 10, 1846, to Miss Harriet, daughter of Charles and Mary (Kilmer) Salmon, natives of Dutchess county, N.Y., and of early English and Dutch origin, respectively. They have seven children, viz.: Mary E. (Mrs. Jacob Egge, Plains); Lavina R. (Mrs. Edmund Brader, Plains); Charles, a carpenter, in Taylorsville; James H., a machinist, in Wyoming; John S., a machinist, in Kingston; Carrie L. (Mrs. James Barnes, Plains); and William, a blacksmith, in Kingston. Though not partisan in politics, our subject upholds the principles of the Republican party.

JOSIAH MASTERS, farmer, P.O. Town Line, was born in Union township, March 15, 1837, son of Peter and Rachel (Meeker) Masters, the former born in Union, the latter in Huntington township. Peter was a son of Adam Masters, who was a native of Northampton county, whence he removed hither in the very early history of that county. He located in Union township, where he purchased land, on which were water privileges, and on which he built a mill, for he was by occupation a miller. This he operated as long as he lived. He was an honest hard-working man, and led a pure, upright life, dying at the age of eighty years. He reared a family of seven children, but one of whom is now living. Peter Masters began his career as a farmer in Union township, on a lot of 100 acres of unimproved land, which by hard labor and a perseverance he succeeded in reducing to a state of fertility. He was a man of worth and influence, holding by the wish of the people several township offices. He died in 1878, aged sixty-eight years, his wife, Rachel, dying March 7, 1892, aged seventy-five years. They reared a family of eight children, seven of whom are living. Josiah is the eldest of the family, and is a farmer from choice and birth. He lived at home till he reached his majority, when he married on December 2, 1858, Miss Tacy, daughter of Joseph and Matilda Monroe. They had two chidren, George H. and Charles M. Mrs. Tacy Masters died in September, 1863. In 1864 Mr. Masters married, for his second wife, Miss E.A., daughter of Abraham and Mary Wheeler, and to them were born six children, all of whom are living: Frank W., Mary E., Cora A., Della B., Clarence B. and Beulah G. He removed to his present residence in 1859, where he has since resided. Mr. Masters is a practical farmer, a sociable companion and a Christian man. He has made many needed improvements on his place, which is now a cheerful and cozy home. He has held several township offices. He and his wife and three children are members of the M.E. Church.

WILLIAM A. MASTERS, farmer, P.O. Town Line, Huntington township, was born June 16, 1843, in that township, and is a son of Wesley and Margaret (Miller) Masters, also natives of Pennsylvania. Wesley Masters followed farming, but is now retired; he is now residing at Shickshinny, at the age of eighty-three. Our subject is the fourth in order of birth in a family of nine children, six of whom are living. He was reared on a farm, and educated in the common schools. He enlisted, September 29, 1861, in Company D, Ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Capt. Burtles; was in the battle of Perryville, Ky., and many other engagements; he was taken prisoner December 12, 1864, at Marysville, Ga., and held four months in the prison at Florence, Ala. He was discharged from the service June 12, 1865, at Annapolis, Md. He then returned to his native township, and worked at the carpenters trade until 1886, when he purchased his present farm of fifty-five acres, and has since followed farming. He married, February 21, 1867, Miss Josephine Sutliff, daughter of Barnard and Elizabeth (Walton) Sutliff. This union was blessed with two children: Dana B., born January 8, 1868, died August 12, 1880; and Verna, born August 29, 1881. The family attend the M.E. Church; Mr. Masters is a member of the G.A.R., and in politics is a Repulican.

W.H. MASTERS, carpenter, Shickshinny, was born in Union township, May 14, 1843, a son of Samuel and Mary (Scott) Masters. His paternal grandfather, Adam Masters, was formerly of Easton, Pa., and a pioneer of Union township where he owned and operated a gristmill for years, and there died. His wife was Mrs. Sarah Simons, by whom he had seven children: William, Wesley, Peter, Samuel, Adam, Polly (Mrs. David Benscoter) and Sarah (Mrs. James Benscoter). The father of the subject was also a miller, and rebuilt on the site of his fathers old mill in 1861, which he conducted up to his death, September 8, 1891. His wife was a daughter of Garrett Scott, of Union township, and by her he had six children: Elizabeth (Mrs. A.S. McDaniels), William A., Arminda (Mrs. George W. Sarver), Evaline (Mrs. Jacob Hobbs), Lafayette and Gwynn. The subject of this sketch was reared in Union township where he learned the carpenters trade. On August 22, 1863, he enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Forty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was honorably discharged from the service in June, 1865, since when he has been a resident of Shickshinny. In February, 1866, he married Margaret, daughter of William Labar, of Lake township, and has two children: Lacey E. And E. Wilfred. In politics Mr. Masters is a Republican, and has served one term as justice of the peace of Union township.

MICHAEL MATEY, hotel-keeper, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Austria, June 4, 1858, a son of Michael and Elizabeth Matey. He came to America in 1879 settling at Nanticoke, this county, where he was employed in the mines six and a half years, and kept a hotel for the same length of time. He has been a resident of Wilkes-Barre since 1888, kept the ABrookside Hotel three years, and opened his present hotel in April, 1892. In 1880, Mr. Matey married MissAnnie, daughter of John Echnat, of Austria, and has four children living: John, Michael, Lizzie and Andrew. He is a member of the Hungarian Protestant Church of Nanticoke, and of the I.O.R.M. In politics he is a Democrat.

J.O. MATHERS, farmer, P.O. Orange, was born January 24, 1844, in the borough of Luzerne, where he was reared and educated. He is a son of Charles and Syrinda (Raub) Mathers, the former born in Luzerne borough, the latter in New Jersey. Charles was a son of James Mathers who was a native of Ireland, and came to this county when it was in its infancy. He was at one time foreman in the old papermill that was formerly in Luzerne borough, or what was then called AMill Hollow. He reared a family of seven children, one of whom is yet living. His son Charles began business in Luzerne borough as a millwright, which trade he followed all his life, and was recognized as a first-class mechanic. He built several mills in his day, which have not yielded to the ravages of time nor the decay of old age. His property is now the site of Thomas Waddles breaker. He died in 1881, at the age of sixty-three, after an honest life of hard work. His family consisted of twelve children - eleven sons and one daughter - six of whom grew to maturity and are now living, James O. being the third in the family. In early life our subject learned the millers trade, which he followed continuously up to 1891, when he moved from Lockville to Franklin. On August 24, 1869, he was wedded to Miss Emma George, who was born at Nanticoke (East) in 1850, a daughter of Hiram and Armanda George; the Georges, who are of Dutch descent, removed from Northampton county to Nanticoke at a very early date. By this union there were born six children, four of whom are now living: Jesse, Charles, Howard and Pearl. In 1869 Mr. Mathers removed from Nanticoke to Eaton, Wyoming county, where and at other places in that county he remained until the spring of 1891, when he bought of J. Schoonover a farm of fifty acres, all of which is improved.

JOHN MATTIMORE, proprietor of restaurant, Ashley, was born in Lancashire, England, June 30, 1853, a son of Michael and Catherine (Grady) Mattimore, natives of Galway, Ireland. In his fathers family were four children, two of who are now living, viz.: Mary (Mrs. John Mitchel, in Australia) and John. Our subject worked in the mines in England and came to America in 1879. He located first at McKeesport, and mined one year, after which he came to Ashley and worked in the mines. He established his present place of business in 1891. November 25, 1878, Mr. Mattimore married Mary Ann, daughter of John and Maria (Nolan) Larner, natives of Ireland, and of this union have been born nine children, viz.: Maria, who died at six years; Margaret, who died at one year; Michael who died at three months; James, Susan, Catherine, Mary Ellen, John, and James, who died when two months old. Our subject and family are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a member of the A.O.H. and the E.B.A. In his political views he is a Democrat.

MICHAEL MATEY, hotel-keeper, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Austria, June 4, 1858, a son of Michael and Elizabeth Matey. He came to America in 1879 settling at Nanticoke, this county, where he was employed in the mines six and a half years, and kept a hotel for the same length of time. He has been a resident of Wilkes-Barre since 1888, kept the A Brookside Hotel three years, and opened his present hotel in April, 1892. In 1880, Mr. Matey married Miss Annie, daughter of John Echnat, of Austria, and has four children living: John, Michael, Lizzie and Andrew. He is a member of the Hungarian Protestant Church of Nanticoke, and of the I. O. R. M. In politics, he is a Democrat.

J. O. MATHERS, farmer, P. O. Orange, was born January 24, 1844, in the borough of Luzerne, where he was reared and educated. He is a son of Charles and Syrinda (Raub) Mathers, the former born in Luzerne borough, the latter in New Jersey. Charles was a son of James Mathers who was a native of Ireland, and came to this country when it was in its infancy. He was at one time foreman in the old papermill that was formerly in Luzerne borough, or what was then called AMill Hollow. He reared a family of seven children, one of whom is yet living. His son Charles began business in Luzerne as a millwright, which trade he followed all his life, and was recognized as a first-class mechanic. He built several mills in his day, which have not yielded to the ravages of time nor the decay of old age. His property is now the site of Thomas Waddles breaker. He died in 1881, at the age of sixty-three, after an honest life of hard work. His family consisted of twelve childrenC eleven sons and one daughterC six of whom grew to maturity and are now living, James O. being the third in the family. In early life our subject learned the millers trade, which he followed continuously up to 1891, when he moved from Lockville to Franklin. On August 24, 1869, he was wedded to Miss Emma George; the Georges, who are of Dutch descent, removed from Northampton county to Nanticoke at a very early date. By this union there were born six children, four of whom are now living: Jesse, Charles, Howard and Pearl. In 1869 Mr. Mathers removed from Nanticoke to Eaton, Wyoming county, where he bought of J. Schoonover a farm of fifty acres, all of which is improved.

JOHN MATTIMORE, proprietor of restaurant, Ashley, was born in Lancashire, England, June 30, 1853, a son of Michael and Catherine (Grady) Mattimore, natives of Galway, Ireland. In his fathers family were four children, two of whom are now living, viz.: Mary (Mrs. John Mitchel, in Australia) and John. Our subject worked in the mines in England and came to America in 1879. He located first at McKeesport, and mined one year, after which he came to Ashley and worked in the mines. He established his present place of business in 1891. November 25, 1878, Mr. Mattimore married Mary Ann, daughter of John and Maria (Nolan) Larner, natives of Ireland, and of this union have been born nine children, viz.: Maria, who died at six years; Margaret, who died at one year; Michael who died at three months; James, Susan, Catherine, Mary Ellen, John, and James, who died when two months old. Our subject and family are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a member of the A. O. H. and E. B. A. In his political views he is a Democrat.

CHARLES MAURER, butcher, Wilkes-Barre, was born in that city May 20, 1864, a son of George and Margaret (Fleischaran) Maurer, natives of Wurtemberg and Rhein Pfalz, Germany. His father came to America about 1855, settling in Wilkes-Barre, where he worked at the butchers trade two or three years. He then embarked in business for himself, in which he continued until his death, in 1874, since which time the widow has continued the business, assisted by her sons, William and Charles. Their children were five: Anna (Mrs. Henry Eckhardt), William, Charles, Minnie, and Kate. The Maurer family are members of the Zion Reformed Church. Our subject is a Democrat, and has taken active part in local politics, having served six years (three terms) as a member of the Wilkes-Barre City Democratic Committee.

FREDERICK MAY, contractor and builder, and proprietor of the City Lumber Yard, Hazleton, was born in Saxony, Germany, May 17, 1852, and is the oldest in the family of four children of Christopher and Elizabeth (May) May, also natives of Germany. He was raised and educated in the Fatherland, and in 1869 came to America, settling in Hazleton, Pa., where he worked in the mines for a short time. Afterward he secured work in the Lehigh Valley shops, where he worked two years, and at the end of that time he engaged in carpenter work, at which trade he worked eighteen years, when he associated with him Jacob L. Wagner, and they commenced business as contractors and builders. In April, 1892, the partnership was dissolved, Mr. May continuing the business formerly conducted by the firm. He has an extensive trade, and at present employs sixteen men. In 1875 Mr. May was united in marriage with Miss Dora, daughter of George Suessman, of Hazleton, to which union seven children have been born: Gustav A., Dora C., Lizzie M., Willie F., Emma C., Arthur B. and Harry C. The family are supporters of the German Reformed Church. Mr. May, in political matters, is guided entirely by his own judgment, not by party or any other influence. He is a member of the Working Mens Society, and of the Shield of Honor.

ARIO P. MAYBERRY, instructor of band music, Freeland. This gentleman is a native of Butler township, and is a son of William and Levina (Rauch) Mayberry, the former a native of Montgomery county, and of English and German origin, the latter a native of Tamaqua, and of Scotch and German lineage. They now reside in Hollenback township. The subject of this memoir was educated at Conyngham. In his boyhood days he showed great musical talent, and at the age of seventeen he took up music and has since made it the study of his life, and it may well be said that it has not been in vain. His line of study and practice has been chiefly in band music, more particularly those instruments that are most difficult to masterC and he has mastered them. In 1880 he removed to Sandy Run, when he resided two years, and then came to Freeland, where he has since resided. Since 1880 he has devoted his entire attention to instruction in band music, and during that time he has trained many bands to a remarkably high standard, and as an instructor in this line he has established a reputation well known to every one in Luzerne county. Mr. Mayberry was united in marriage, March 25, 1884, with Miss Harriet Lore, of New Philadelphia, Pa., and this union has been blessed with two children: Emerson Edward and Harry Liberato. Our subject is a member of the P. O. S. of A. and Jr. O. U. A. M. He is a cornet soloist of the famous De Pierro Orchestra, of Freeland. In politics he is the slave of no party, but casts his ballot with his best judgment.

JOHN MAYOCK, merchant, Miners Mill, was born in County Mayo, Ireland, July 15, 1845, and is a son of Peter and Mary (Martin) Mayock. He began life on the public works; he came to America in 1865, and located in Scranton, where he worked on St. Peters Cathedral for a short time, then in the mines there two years, and afterward in the mines at Wilkes-Barre six months. He then went to Des Moines, Iowa, and worked on the supply train on the construction of the railroad from that place to Council Bluffs, for two years. He then returned to Mill Creek, where he worked in the mines till 1878, when he engaged in his present business; he built his present residence in 1871, and added his store in 1878. Mr. Mayock was married, October 26, 1873, to Miss Ellen, daughter of Thomas and Margaret (Loughtus) Kane, native of County Mayo, Ireland, the fruit of which union has been ten children, seven of whom are living, viz.: Peter T., a student in the Holy Cross College, Worcester, Mass.; Margaret and Mary F., students in the Nazareth Academy, Rochester, N. Y.; and Isabella, Rose, Elizabeth and Florence, at home. Mr. Mayock and family are members of the Catholic Church; he is a member of the C. M. B. A.; he is a Democrat in his political view, and has held the office of school director of Miners Mills.

MICHAEL MAYOCK, merchant, Miners Mills, was born in County Mayo, Ireland, September 27, 1840, and is a son of Peter and Mary (Martin) Mayock. His father who came to America in 1873, reared a family of eleven children (six of whom are living), viz.: Bridget, married to Anthony McGowen, a farmer in Ireland; Mary, married to Patrick Maloney, also a farmer in Ireland; Michael, who is the subject of this sketch; Patrick, who was killed in the Prospect shaft, at the age of thirty-four; John; Margaret, married to Anthony McHale, foreman, Pine Ridge Colliery; John; Margaret Sarah is a Sister in the Convent of the Visitation, at Georgetown, D.C. Our subject began life farming; he came to America in 1866, and located at Scranton, Pa., where he worked in the mines eleven years; in 1868 he removed to Plains, where he also followed mining; and in 1877 engaged in the mercantile business, in 1879 building his present store, with residence attached. Mr. Mayock was married, February 17, 1864, to Miss Bridget, daughter of John and Ann (Ruddy) Ruddy, natives of County Mayo, Ireland, and they have had nine children, viz.: Mary E., a student in the St. Joseph school, Philadelphia; John F., a student in the Holy Cross College, Worcester, Mass.; Patrick (who died at the age of twenty-three months); and James C., Michael, Peter, Thomas, Anna and Frank, still at the paternal fireside. Mr. Mayock and family are members of the Catholic Church; he is a member of the C. M. B. A., of which he is a treasurer; he is also a member of the Columbia Club, at Wilkes-Barre, and is a Democrat in his political views.

W. S. MEARS, superintendent of the Peoples Street Railway Co., Scranton. This gentleman, who is one of the best known and most active business men in this part of the State, was born in Scranton, Pa., September 27, 1862, and is a son of Sidney C. and Jeanette (Affleck) Mears, the former of whom is an American of English parentage, the latter a native of Scotland, but now deceased. Sidney C. Mears was a butcher by occupation in his early life. During the Civil war he was in the service as a contractor on railroads and fortifications, and after the close of the struggle he became superintendent of the stone works of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad. At present writing he is inspector of the stone work of the city building being erected in the city of Scranton. He had a family of seven children, of whom W. S. is the youngest. Our subject was reared in that portion of Scranton known as Hyde Park, at the public schools of which place, and at the high school of Scranton, he received his education. When eighteen years old he began work in the coal mines of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, first as pump runner, afterwards as engineer, and continued in the employ of that company until the spring of 1889, when he was made superintendent of the Newton Coal Mining Company, upon the organization of that company, of which he is a stockholder. On February 15, 1892, he accepted his present position in Scranton. Mr. Mears is a member of Hyde Park Lodge No. 339 F. & A. M. Politically he is identified with the Republican party.

P. A. MECK, physician and surgeon, Nanticoke. This gentleman is a native of Schuylkill Haven, Pa., and was born October 23, 1856, a son of Charles A. and Priscilla (Hartman) Meck, who are still residing in his native town where the father is an extensive lumber manufacturer and dealer. In the family there were six children, viz.: Jennie, married to M. F. Novel, a manufacturer in Shamokin, Pa.; Hattie, married to A. D. Hesser, coal operator and lumber dealer, Schuylkill Haven; Kate, married to John Smith, a manufacturer in Pottsville, Pa.; and Thomas E., a fancy grocer in Shamokin, Pa. Dr. Meck received his early education in the high school of his native town, and at Latinett College at Myerston, Pa., where he was graduated June 7, 1876. He then returned home, and assisted his father in the store until 1878, when he went to California, and there remained two years, at the end of which time he returned home, and was engaged in business about a year afterward. In 1881 he entered the Jefferson Medical College, where he graduated in 1884, and he immediately thereafter commenced practice in Philadelphia. There he remained, however, but a short time, and then came to Nanticoke, Pa., where he has since been actively engaged in the general practice of medicine and surgery. Dr. Meck was married in 1882 to Miss Margaret Brinnan, of Freemont, Pa., and they have had born to them four children, viz.: Maria Lucretia, Charles Paul (deceased), Florence Priscilla (deceased), and Charles Francis. In politics the Doctor is a republican.

SEBASTIAN C. MECKEL, pastor of the Reformed Church, Plymouth. This gentleman was born February 7, 1826, in Coblenz, on the Rhine, in the Kingdom of Prussia. He received a thorough educational training in Europe, and completed the English branches in America, whither he came about the year 1851, locating in Newark, N. J., where he followed the occupation of a coach trimmer (the trade having been taught him by his father in Europe) for four years, during which time he was preparing himself for the position of a minister of the Gospel. In June, 1856, he was ordained by Bishop Simpson, at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and was appointed to take charge of a Methodist Episcopal Church at Schenectady, N. Y., where he preached the Gospel for three years. At the end of that time he was transferred to Albany, N. Y., where he was pastor for three years; from there proceeded to Buffalo, N. Y., and there preached two years. He then returned to Albany, where, owing to ill health, he was compelled to abandon his regular work, and only did local preaching, working in the meantime at his trade in that city till the Civil war broke out, when he enlisted (in 1864) in Company H, Ninety-first New York Veteran Volunteer Infantry, and served as a non-commissioned officer until the war closed. He was engaged in battle near the Weldon Railroad, Harpers Ferry, Fredericksburg, receiving a sabre wound while in the fierce battle at Harpers Ferry. At the close of the war he came to Wilkes-Barre, and resumed his old occupation, that of coach trimmer, doing local preaching at the same time, until 1878, when he was urged to assume the pastorship of the Reformed Church, which was about to be established at Plymouth. Accordingly he came here and, by perseverance and hard labor, has founded and built the imposing edifice where his congregation meet. In the morning he preaches in German, in the evening in English, and this he has done for fourteen years. Mr. Meckel deserves much credit for what he has accomplished for his people, and which could only be attained by the most patient toil. In 1874 he was married to Louisa H. Joline, daughter of Henry and Susan Joline, natives of Easton, Pa. In politics Mr. Meckel is a republican, and at present is chaplain of the G. A. R. at Plymouth. He has located at Wilkes-Barre, at No. 51 Hollenback avenue.

MICHAEL MEEHAN, hotel-keeper, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Kilrush, County Clare, Ireland, in December, 1848, a son of Andrew and Sabina (Hursley) Meehan. His parents came to America in 1884, settling in Wilkes-Barre, where the father died in 1890, and is buried in the Catholic cemetery in Hanover township. They had five children: Patrick (of England), Thomas, Michael, John (deceased), and Bridget (Mrs. John Rushton). Our subject was reared in England, and at ten years of age began life about the mines of Derbyshire, and later engaged in mining in Yorkshire. In 1870 he came to America, settling in Wilkes-Barre, where he was employed in the mines until 1882, though, in 1881 he embarked in the hotel business, in which he has successfully continued. In November, 1864, Mr. Meehan married Miss Ann, daughter of Thomas and Margaret (Fitzpatrick) Dougherty, of Ireland, and by her has one son, Andrew. Mr. Meehans family are members of the Catholic Church. In politics he is a Democrat, and served a term of three years as member of Wilkes-Barre council from the Sixth Ward.

THOMAS MEEHAN, miner, Inkerman, was born in County Galway, Ireland, April 14, 1844, and is the son of Thomas and Honora (Ferragh) Meehan, natives of the same place; they reared a family of eight children, of whom our subject is the seventh in order of birth. He received his education in Ireland, and worked on a farm until 1864, when he decided to seek his fortune in the New World. On landing here, Mr. Meehan immediately proceeded to Inkerman, and was employed as a laborer in the mines until 1870, since which time he has been a miner in the employ of the Pennsylvania Coal Company. Our subject was united in marriage November 4, 1860, with Mary, daughter of Thomas and Catharine (Diskin) Gorman, natives of County Galway, Ireland, and their union has been blessed with the following issue: Peter, born April 7, 1867; Honor, born May 15, 1869; Mary, born January 22, 1871; Bridget, born December 9, 1872; Margaret, born June 12, 1873; Sarah, born August 12, 1875; and John, born August 10, 1886. Our subject is a member of the Catholic Church, St. Johns Literary and Benevolent Association, and the C. T. A. B. U. In politics, he is a Democrat, and held the office of school director in 1884 and 1885.

J. C. MEIXELL, superintendent of the Wilkes-Barre & Wyoming Valley Traction Company of Wilkes-Barre, was born at Saylorsburg, Pa., October 10, 1860, and is a son of John J. and Amanda E. (Altemus) Meixell, also natives of Pennsylvania. Mr. Meixell was educated in Luzerne county, and, until the age of fifteen, was engaged in assisting his father, who was contractor and builder located at Wilkes-Barre. He then engaged in the mercantile business in Wilkes-Barre, and continued at that for ten years. In August, 1889, he began the study of electricity, and was employed by the Edison General Electric Company to assist in equipping cars for the road. He was employed here but a short time when he accepted a position as motor-man for the Wilkes-Barre & West Side Railway Company. This position he held nine months, at the end of which time he was called to the Electrical Station as overseer, which place he occupied a year and three months. From the electrical station the successful young man was appointed to the responsible and trustworthy position of superintendent of the Wilkes-Barre & Wyoming Valley Traction Company, which position he now occupies. Mr. Meixell was married in July, 1886, to Lena D., daughter of George Bruce, formerly of Owego, N. Y. It is needless to say that his success in life has been due to his own exertions, and, like the great electrical teacher, he has made perseverance and hard labor his motto. His political views are Republican. Mr. Meixell is yet young, and it is safe to predict that his career in the electrical world has just begun.

Peter Meixell, farmer, P. O.Belbend, was born in what is now Conyngham township, Luzerne Co., Pa., September 15, 1820, and is a son of Philip and Catherine (Lanehart) Meixell. His paternal grandfather, Philip Meixell, a native of Bushkill, Northampton Co., Pa., settled in Salem township, this county, in 1810, cleared and improved the farm now occupied by our subject, and died there. His wife was Elizabeth Varner, by whom he had two sons, John and Philip, the former of whom died in Fairmount township, and the latter, after attaining his majority, settled in what is now Conyngham township, cleared a farm and passed the rest of his days there. His wife was a daughter of Philip Lanehart, a native of Germany, who came to America in 1774, and was a pioneer of Conyngham township, where he died in 1802; his wife was Susannah Boyer, of Northampton county, by whom he had two children: Catharine (mother of our subject) and Margaret (Mrs. Nicholas Strole). Philip and Catharine Were the parents of eleven children, some of whom died young, and nine of whom grew to maturity, viz: Elizabeth (Mrs. Philip Weiss), Samuel, Peter, Polly (Mrs. Reuben Andrews), William, Maria (Mrs. Levi Hess), Philip, Michael and G. Washington. Our subject was reared in Conyngham township, was educated in the common schools, and in 1844 began farming in Salem township, on the old homestead (which was settled by his grandfather, Philip Meixell, in 1810), where he has since resided. He has been twice married: His first wife was Elizabeth, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Fenstermacher) Weiss, of Nescopeck township, and by her he had five children, as follows: Jacob W., Adeline (Mrs. Theodore Brymer), W. M. C., Lydia (who died young) and Sarah. His second wife was Elizabeth, daughter of John and Sarah (Hess) Fenstermacher, of Nescopeck township, and by her he had six children, all of whom are deceased except one son, Peter A., a well-known lawyer in Wilkes Barre. Two sons of Peter Meixell are prominent farmers of Salem township.

William M. C. Meixell was born in Salem township, January 26, 1847, where he was reared and educated, and has always resided on the old homestead. He was married July 25, 1868, to Maria E., daughter of Joseph and Mary (Bilhimer) Hess, of Conyngham township, and they have five children: Joseph F., Peter T., Clara M., Laura A. and Bessie E. The Meixells are members of the Reformed Church, and in politics are Democrats.

Jacob W. Meixell, farmer, P. O. Beach Haven, was born in what is now Conyngham township, this county, March 18, 1844, and is a son of Peter and Elizabeth (Weiss) Meixell. [For the genealogy of Meixell, see sketch of Peter Meixell.] Our subject was reared in Salem township, was collector and weighmaster for the Pennsylvania Canal Company, at Beach Haven, for fourteen years, and since 1885, has been engaged in farming. In 1870 he married Anna M., daughter of George and Eliza (Burlingame) Hicks, of Salem township, and has four children living: Owen R., Ralph L., Boyd B. and Royal A. Mr. Meixell in politics is a Democrat, and has held the office of justice of the peace of Salem township, two terms.

Peter Augustus Meixell, attorney at law, Wilkes Barre, was born in Salem township, Luzerne Co., Pa., August 16, 1857, and is a son of Peter and Elizabeth (Fenstermacher) Meixell. His paternal grandfather, Philip Meixell, Jr., was a native of Bushkill, Northampton Co., Pa., and was born in 1796, and in 1812 he removed to Salem, this county, with his parents, Philip and Elizabeth (Warner) Meixell. Philip, Jr., was a farmer, and in 1845 was elected one of the commissioners of Luzerne county; his wife was Catherine, a daughter of Peter and Susannah (Boyer) Lanehart. Peter Lanehart came from Germany to America in 1774. His wife was a daughter of John Boyer, who at one time was captured by the Indians near Drylands, Northampton Co., Pa., taken to Canada, and subsequently returned to his home after enduring many hardships. Peter Meixel, father of subject, was born in Salem township in 1820, and is one of its prominent citizens. His wife was a daughter of John Fenstermacher, of Hollenback (now Conyngham) township, a native of Northampton county, Pa., and a son of Philip Fenstermacher, who was a son of George Fenstermacher, a native of Germany. Philip Fenstermacher was a pioneer of what is now Conyngham township, this county, and his wife was Gertrude Harter. John Fenstermacher held the office of justice of the peace for Nescopeck township nearly forty years, and died July 29, 1885, in his eighty-third year. [For genealogy of Meixell family, see sketch of Peter Meixell] Our subject was reared in Salem township, educated in the public schools, Wyoming Seminary, and at the State Normal School, at Bloomsburg, where he was graduated in 1878. At eighteen years of age he taught his first school, and followed the vocation of teacher for eight years. He was principal of the Nanticoke public schools one year, and of those at Blakely, Pa., two years; also taught a select school at Beach Haven. He read law with Hon. Garrick M. Harding and John McGahren, of Wilkes Barre, and was admitted to the Luzerne county bar in 1886, since when he has been in the active practice of his profession in Wilkes Barre. On April 18, 1888, Mr. Meixell married Ella G., daughter of Andrew C. and Elvira C. (Peck) Wise, of Peckville, Lackawanna Co., Pa., and has two children, Carrie E. and John Harold. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and of Landmark Lodge No. 442, F. & A.M., in the city of Wilkes Barre. Mr. Meixell evinces a happy understanding of the requirements of his profession, being a close and patient student, and conscientious and energetic in the elucidation of all the material facts in such causes as are given into his keeping. He is a first-rate office lawyer, and with reasonably good fortune is assured of a large and lucrative practice. In politics he is a staunch Democrat, and is reasonably well posted upon the principles advocated by his party, and has given much time and attention to the direction of campaign work since he has been a resident of Wilkes Barre. He began his political work by taking upon himself much of the detail office work that is so arduous, that few know so little about, and that is so essential to success even where a party is supposed to be strongly fortified in the confidence of the people, and with an unexceptional ticket. Mr. Meixell served his party so faithfully in the minor duties, that in the campaign of 1890 he was elected chairman of the Democratic Standing Committee of his county, and by his zeal and honest effort succeeded in his work to the satisfaction of his whole party. He is personally very popular with all who know him, being of a genial and obliging temperament, honest and earnest in his friendship, and faithful in his every undertaking.

Henry J. Melan, contractor and builder, Wilkes Barre, was born in that city April 4, 1850, and is a son of Michael and Margaret (Gay) Melan, natives of Ireland and Ohio, respectively, who located in Wilkes Barre about 1845. His father was a lime burner by occupation, and resided in Wilkes Barre until his death, which occurred in February, 1879. His children were: Frank (deceased), Anna (Mrs. Chas. Garrahan), Henry J., Elizabeth (deceased wife of Charles Klein), Catherine (deceased), Edward (deceased), Jenney (deceased), Charles and Maggie. Our subject was reared in Wilkes Barre, educated in the public schools, and served an apprenticeship of three years at the carpenter's trade, after which he worked as a journeyman nine years. In 1882 he embarked in business for himself as a contractor and builder, in which he has since successfully continued, and in connection has been engaged in the lumber business since 1885. His wife was Belinda Clark, daughter of James Clark, of Scranton, Pa., and by her he has had eight children: Mary (deceased), William H., John E. (deceased), Gerturde R., Joseph, Theresa, Ambrose Francis and Christopher. Mr. Melan and family are members of the Catholic Church; politically he is a Democrat.

Martin Melvin, quarryman, Port Blanchard, was born October 12, 1847, in County Mayo, Ireland, and is a son of John and Bridget (Dougher) Melvin, also natives of the same place. They reared a family of five children, of whom the subject of our sketch is third in order of birth. He received his education in the Irish national schools, and left Ireland in 1864, landing in New York on September 4, same year; he immediately went to work as a laborer in te mines at Pittston, Pa., where he stayed until March 26, 1866, when he enlisted in Company B, U. S. Infantry, and served three years. He then returned to Pittston and went back to labor in the mines, remaining there until 1872, when he went to work as a fireman for the Pennsylvania Coal Company, which position he still holds, working in addition the Port Griffith Stone Quarry, of which he is owner. Our subject was married, June 24, 1870, to Annie, daughter of Andrew and Margaret (Forrester) Cawley, natives of County Mayo, Ireland, and the issue of this union has been as follows: Mary A., born April 24, 1873; Margaret R., born August 18, 1875; Lucy H., born August 28, 1877; Joseph A., born October 17, 1879; Annie, born November 17, 1881; John, born May 18, 1886; Martin, born November 7, 1888, and Francis, born May 23, 1891. The family are all members of the Catholic Church; Mr. Melvin is a member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians; he is a Democrat in politics, and was elected auditor of Jenkins township in 1883, and school director in 1886.

Patrick J. Melvin, outside foreman at the No. 6 Colliery, Inkerman, Jenkins township, with residence on Market street, Pittston, was born in County Mayo, Ireland, March 13, 1863, a son of James and Bridget (Loftus) Melvin. His father, who was a mason by trade, came to America in 1864, and located in Pittston, where he still works, and resides on William street. Mrs. Melvin died February 13, 1890. Their family consisted of six children, four of whom are living, viz: Michael T., employed by the Lehigh Valley Railroad Company, Pittston; Catherine, who lives with her parents; John J., who is employed at the Ewen Breaker, and Patrick J. Our subject was educated in the common school, and at an early age began working in the breaker, where he remained two years, afterward working at the mason's trade for four years. He then secured a position as shipping clerk for the Pennsylvania Coal Company, which he held eleven years, being promoted to his present position April 1, 1892. Mr. Melvin was married August 27, 1885, to Miss Jennie, daughter of John and Ann (Reading) Sheridan, natives of Ireland and Pennsylvania, respectively, and of Irish origin. They have four children, viz: Irene, May, James and Raymond. He and his family are members of the Catholic Church, and in his political sympathies is Democratic, but he voted irrespective of party lines.

G. W. Meneeley, inside foreman for the M. S. Kimmerer Coal Company, Sandy Run, was born at Tamaqua, Pa., September 30, 1856, and is a son of Alexandra and Mary (Davis) Meneeley, natives of the North of Ireland, the former of whom came to this country in 1842, locating in Tamaqua, and now residing at Sandy Valley, where he is engaged in farming. In the family there were nine children, as follows: John, a miner at Sandy Run; Alexander (deceased); George W.; Susan, married to Milton Hoodmacher, of Wilberton; Isabella, residing with her parents; Samuel D.; and Mary E., who married Theadore Hindson, of Sandy Valley, which union was blessed with two children: Winfield Ellsworth and Gordan Alexander, who are now attending Girard College, in Philadelphia. Their father died at Sandy Run, May, 1888, and their mother is now living with her father in Sandy Valley. When George W. was about six years of age, he engaged at working in the mines at Eckley, and he has since followed mining in nearly every capacity. February 27, 1886, he entered the employ of the M. S. Kimmerer Coal Company in the capacity of inside foreman, and has since filled that position to the entire satisfaction of all parties concerned. He was married, April 30, 1889, with Miss Jenetta Lester, of Sandy Valley. This union has been blessed with two children, viz: Andrew Alexandra and Jeanetta Virginia. Mr. Meneeley is a member of the P.O.S. of A., Camp 91, Hazleton, the Junior Order of United Ameican Mechanics; his political views are Republican, and he is at present a member of the school board of Foster township.

Edward Meredith, stationary engineer, Larksville. This gentleman, who has charge of a gigantic pair of hoisting engines for the Kingston Coal Company at No. 3 Shaft, was born at Dowlais, Glamorganshire, South Wales, January 23, 1845, and is a son of Thomas and Jane (Cromwell) Meredith, also natives of Wales. The father being a machinist, as a natural consequence Edward, who is the eldest son, followed that occupation. At the age of fourteen he began his apprenticeship in the Cambrian Railroad Shops (one of the largest systems in England) in Shropshire, England, and five years later entered the employ of the same firm as a journeyman. He continued with them, working throughout various parts of England, until 1880, when he came to America and located at Scranton, Pa., where he entered the employ of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company, working at his trade about one year. He was then engaged in locomotive engineering for a short time, when he took up his present vocation, and has since given entire satisfaction, being noted for his caution and ability in handling the stupendous machinery that is guided by his manipulation of the levers. Mr. Meredith was married, February 1, 1861, to Miss Margaret Roberts, a native of Wales, and they have four children, vis: Thomas, a carpenter in Larksville; Margaret Jane, a dressmaker in Larksville; Edward, a student, and Mary. Mr. Meredith is a member of the Knights of Pythias, the I.O.R.M., Knights of the Golden Eagle, the Knights of Malta, the Chieftain's League of Pennsylvania, and the Sovereign Patriotic Knights of America; in politics he is a Republican.

Hayden Merithew, manager of Pittston Box Company, Pittston. This energetic young business man was born in Wayne county, Pa., March 18, 1867, and is the only child of Myron and Christine (Swingle) Merithew, natives of Pennsylvania. He was reared and educated in Wayne county, and followed the occupation of a miller, working with his father, who had been a miller the greater part of his life. He continued in the mill until he reached manhood, and then embarked in the mercantile business at Simon, Pa., where he was also postmaster. Two years later he removed to Wilkes Barre, engaging in the hardware business, and continuing there until 1892, when he came to Pittston as manager of the Pittston Box Company. August 10, 1887, Mr. Merithew married Miss Jennie, daughter of Irvin and Orilla (Swingle) Benjamin, natives of Wayne county, Pa., and this union has been blessed with the birth of one child, Lyle L. In political matters, Mr. Merithew is a Republican, and his family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church.

William Merrel, farmer, P. O. Carverton, was born in Greenwich township, Warren Co., N. J., October 20, 1825, a son of John and Ann (Lutz) Merrel, both of whom were born in Warren county, N. J. John was a true patriot (serving two terms in the war of 1812, and receiving two honorable discharges), a loyal citizen in time of peace, and an affectionate father in the home. His wife's name was VanHorn, and William Merrel is one of the claimants of the great Van Horn estate. John Merrel had eight children, who grew to maturity, five of whom are now living, William being the sixth. In early life he learned the boat-builder's trade, at which he worked about five years. In 1844 he removed to Wilkes Barre, where he resided about twenty-five years, working at various vocations, and accumulated considerable property, so that he and his wife are comfortably off, and his children are well educated and provided for. In 1847 he was married to Miss Augusta L., daughter of William W. and Mahaley Gitt. Stephen Evans, her grandfather served in the War of 1812, and was in the same regiment as James Bird. By the union of William Merrel and Augusta L. Gitt, nine children were born, five of whom are now living: Albert E., Emma F.C., Bertha L., Josephine C., and Benjamin F., all living in Wilkes Barre. Of these, Albert married Miss Jemima Frantz; Emma married G.L.C. Frantz, of Wilkes Barre; Josephine C. is fitting herself for a professional nurse. In 1872 Mr. Merrel removed from Wilkes Barre to Franklin township, where he bought a farm of 125 acres of good land of S. W. Frantz, on which he has lived ever since, and on which he has made many necessary improvements. He is a practical farmer, and he shows a master mind in agricultural pursuits. Mr. Merrel is not only a man, but a gentleman, and enjoys the confidence of his fellow citizens. In politics he is a Republican. Mrs. Augusta L. Merrel was born in Plymouth, March 3, 1831, and on her mother's side is a descendant of William Cooper, one of the old settlers in that town, who owned a large tract of coal land before coal was discovered in the Valley. His daughter, Mira, was the first teacher who taught school in Wilkes Barre.

Henry Merritt, postmaster and merchant, Plains, was born in England, December 15, 1845, and is a son of Henry W. and Mary A. (Truscott) Merritt, who were the parents of four sons, of whom Henry is the third. His father made three trips to America, and finally died in San Francisco. Henry, our subject, went to Australia from England in 1865, the voyage occupying 105 days; remained there three years, and then crossed the Pacific Ocean to California, calling on the way at Tahiti, where they remained three weeks; thence sailed for Honolulu, arriving there in twenty-two days, and remained three days; thence sailed for San Francisco, the entire voyage from Sydney, N.S.W., taking 101 days. In California he remained three years, and then came to Parsons, this county, where he worked in the mines for fifteen years, during a portion of which time he also carried on a mercantile business, but of late years he has devoted his entire attention to the latter. In 1889 he was appointed postmaster at Plains. Mr. Merritt was married May 8, 1871, to Mary A., daughter of Benjamin and Mary A. (Torr) Rodda, natives of England, and they have had seven children, viz: Mary A., born February 6, 1872, assistant postmaster, Plains; Henry W., born July 19, 1873, assistant bookkeeper for Stoddard & Co., of Wilkes Barre; Elizabeth, born February 17, 1877; Edith, born September 20, 1879; Frank G., born August 16, 1881; William, born August 15, 1883, and Florence, born January 3, 1892. Mr. and Mrs. Merritt and family are members of the Primitive Methodist Church; he is a member of the I.O.O.F. and Encampment, the sons of St. George, and in his political views is a Republican.

John W. Merritt, electrician, Pittston. This gentleman may well bear a scientific title, for he comes from a family of inventors. He was born in Pittston, December 21, 1859, and is a son of John and Margaret (Stephens) Merritt, natives of England. John Merritt had charge of the machinery of the Pennsylvania Coal Company until 1870, and from that time was superintendent of the Pittston Gas Company, in which capacity he served until his death, which occurred March 1, 1882. His wife, Margaret Stephens, was a daughter of William Stephens, a well known mechanical engineer, who was for many years identified with various machine shops in Pittston and vicinity. He died in 1890. Our subject is the second in a family of four children, the others being Adrian, an engineer in Pittston; Mary E., and Margaret J. John W. Merritt was educated in the common schools of Luzerne county and in Wyoming Seminary. In 1879, he went to learn pattern-making, and after completing his apprenticeship, accepted a postion as clerk in the Pittston postoffice, where he served two years, and then worked for the Pittston Gas Company for about the same length of time. After this he again attended school for a time, making a specialty of electricity, and in 1885, entered the employ of the Scranton Illuminating Company, as electrical engineer, and in 1890 resigned this postion, and accepted his present one. Mr. Merritt was married October 14, 1891, to Miss Myrtle S., daughter of George Warner, of West Pittston.

John W. Metcalf, a prominent farmer of Huntington township, P. O. Irish Lane, was born in Illinois August 14, 1841, a son of Rev. Richard R. and Mary (Moister) Metcalf, natives of England, the former of whom came to Luzerne county in 1824; he now resides in Askam, Hanover township, at the age of eighty-three years. Mr. Metcalf, who is the third in a family of four children, was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and when twenty-one years of age began life for himself. It was in 1874 that he purchased his present property. He enlisted in September, 1864, in Company F, Two Hundred and Third P.V., was wounded at Fort Fisher, and discharged from the service in June, 1865. Mr. Metcalf was married April 22, 1866, to Miss Christina, daughter of Reuben Keysar, and by her he has six children, viz: William R., Harry R., Elmer Dana, Milbery B., Clark L., and Charles M. The mother of these departed this life February 21, 1879, and August 14, 1879, Mr. Metcalf married Miss Mary Selena Snowden, daughter of Rev. E. H. Snowden. Mr. and Mrs. Metcalf are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and Presbyterian Church, respectively. The Metcalf farm, consisting of one hundred and fifteen acres, is situated two miles east of Harveyville postoffice, and is worked by a tenant. Mr. and Mrs. Metcalf reside in Forty Fort.

James L. Metz, proprietor of the "Columbia House", Ashley, was born in Nescopeck township, this county, May 2, 1849, a son of William and Charlotte (Swank) Metz, natives of Pennsylvania and of German origin. The father, who was a boatman and later a United States detective, reared a family of five children (three of whom were by his second wife) viz: Miner, killed in the Red Ash Mine in November, 1889, at the age of fifty-two years; James L.; Capitola, a milliner in Pittston; Luella (Mrs. Stewart Hartman, Pittston); and Franklin B., stationary engineer, Scranton. Our subject was educated in the public schools of Nescopeck, and boated on the canal for ten years, after which he played the part of comedian in Concross and Dixie's minstrel show, at Philadelphia for two years; for one year he was in the Commonwealth Circus. Later he acted as brakeman on the Central Railroad of New Jersey, three years, and was engaged at the Hartfor Breaker, eight years. In 1885 he commenced the hotel business in the "Hartford House", Ashley, and removed to his present place in 1890. July 4, 1869, Mr. Metz married Miss Hannah Rebecca, daughter of Daniel and Catherine (Close) Kugle, of American birth and German extraction, and of this union were born nine children, six of whom are living, viz: Charlotte (Mrs. Jeremiah W. Huff); William F.; George W.; Mary J.; John L.; and Robert C. Our subject is a member of the I.O.O.F.; and is a Republican.

Raymond E. Meyer, Freeland, is one of the hustling, energetic young men ofLuzerne county. He was born in Hazleton, July 9, 1871, and is a son of W.C and Mary (Boyd) Meyer, also of Hazleton. In his father's family there are four children, viz: Raymond E., Carrie, Olive and Mame. The subject of this sketch was educated in the Hazleton high school, where he graduated in the class of 1890. Before completing his education he had served an apprenticeship at watch-making with J.E. Giles, of Hazleton, and also with William Glover, Jr., of the same place. Since his childhood Mr. Meyer has been a close student of the most complicate sciences. When he was but eight years of age the phenomena of electricity attracted his attention, and since that time he has been an ardent worker in this broad field of scientific development. Through his experiments and investigations he has brought to light many marvelous features of the utility of this power. His investigations have not been confined to electricity alone, but he has developed new ideas in the use of steam, and has also constructed telescopes and models to prove the success of many inventions in various scientific branches. In 1891 he purchased the jewelry business of W.J. Gentz, of Freeland, where he has since enjoyed an appreciative patronage of the people in that vicinity. His stock of jewelry is among the best in this part of the country, and his policy of dealing is fairness to all. Besides a full line of jewelry he carries a supply of musical instruments and photographic outfits.

R.H. Meyer, druggist, Nanticoke. One of the leading gentlemen in business, and in society of Nanticoke, is the subject of this memoir. He was born in Hazleton, Luzerne Co., Pa., October 31, 1855, and is a son of Charles and Sarah (Boston) Meyer, the former a native of Osnabruck, Germany, the latter of London, England. Mr. Meyer's father came to America in 1848; he was an exceedinglywell educated gentleman, speaking and writing seven different languages; after settling in this country he followed bookkeeping for an occupation. Robert H., was educated in the Hazleton high school and the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, where he was graduated in 1874. He then engaged as clerk in a drug-store at Hazleton, where he remained until 1878, when he came to Nanticoke and began business for his own account; he has succeeded in building up a large and respectable trade. Mr. Meyer was united in marriage November 19, 1880, with Miss Iola Bird, of Hazleton, and they have one child Hubert. Mr. Meyer is a Republican, and has served on the Nanticoke school board two years.

Mrs. Harriet B. (Goodwin) Meyer, Pittston, was born in Exeter, May 6,1837, and she is a daughter of David and Rachel (Jenkins) Goodwin. She is consequently descended from one of the first pioneers of the "Valley." Rachel Jenkins was a daughter of Col. John Jenkins, a very prominent man in the Wyoming Valley. He was a son of John Jenkins, Esq., Who was a loyal patriot to the stuggling colonies during their efforts to free themselves from English oppression. For this cause he was expelled from Westmoreland, and he settled in Orange county, N.Y. His son John was as patriotic as his father, and was willing to lay his life on the altar of his country as a sacrifice in behalf of independence. In November, 1777, while on a scouting expedition he, with his companions, was captured by a band of Indians and taken within the British lines, this taking place near Wyalusing. During his captivity among the Redmen he became the object of a young Indian's friendship through whose intercession and watchfulness he was released, and he was finally allowed to return to his home and loved ones. After the Massacre he joined Capt. Spaulding's company as lieutenant, with whom he did valiant service, proving himself a courageous soldier. When Gen. Sullivan invaded the Indian country Lieut. Jenkins was appointed guide because of his zeal and courage. After peace and tranquility were restored, he went back to a life of citizenship of which his country might be proud. He followed the occupation of surveyor several years; he took an active part, and was a leading spirit in civil and military matters, and held several offices in each department. In the county he was commissioner, member of Assembly and colonel of a regiment of militia. Politically he was a Democrat. He purchased the ground on which Fort Wintermoot stood, and on which he built his house, which house and land have fallen to his granddaughter, Mrs. Harriet B. Meyers. Col. Jenkins married Miss Bertha Harris, by whom he had six children. He died April, 1827, at the age of seventy-three years. His daughter Rachel married David Goodwin, by whom she had four children, two of whom came to maturity. Harriet B. is the only surviving heir. She was reared and educated in the Valley where she has always resided. On September 25,1857, she was married to Jonathan E. Meyers, by whom she had seven children: Clarence E., Ida A., Mary G., Nellie A., Harry C., Jonathan E., and Willie. Of these Nellie A., married Fred Weinerth, a carpenter of Carbondale, and died May 3, 1892, leaving a baby boy nine days old that survived her six months, dying October 30, following. Jonathan E. Meyers was born in Sussex count, N.J., July 7,1835, and is the son of Jacob and Susan Meyers, being the sixth in a family of twelve. He was reared and educated in Luzerne county, and in early life learned the carpenter's trade which he always followed. He is a hard-working and honest man. His wife is a consistent member of the Baptist church.

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