KA - KI Surnames

History of Luzerne County, Pa.,

by H.C. Bradsby, 1893

George KAEUFER, outside foreman of the Florence Coal Company (limited) Dupont, was born in Germany, February 11, 1851. He is a son of George and Dorothy (Easterly) Kaeufer, both of whom were born in Germany and emigrated to this country in 1854, locating in Scranton, where they remained two years, thence removing to Wilkes-Barre, where they permanently resided. He was employed in Reichard’s beer brewery, where he remained till his death, which occurred in 1862 when he was aged thirty-six years. Mr. Kaeufer was a man of respectability and of sound principles, an indulgent parent, and a loyal citizen of his adopted country. His family consisted of five children, all of whom are living: George, John, Barbara, Jacob and Martin. George is the eldest, and was seven years of age when he came to this country, receiving his education at the common schools in Wilkes-Barre. In early life he learned the painter’s trade, which he followed for twelve years in various parts of the county. In 1872 he married Miss Margaret, J., daughter of Alexander and Mary McCaa, by whom he had eight children, four of whom are now (1892) living: Ursula, Pauline, Barbara and Charles H. In 1883, he removed to Dupont (then Smithville), where he took charge of the outside works of the Florence Coal Company, under the supervision of W.E. Colburn, in which position he has since remained. His office is to look after everything above the ground and see that all is in perfect working order. Under his supervision there are 130 men and boys. The Florence Mines has a capacity of 800 tons per day, giving employment to 300 hands. He is an active and energetic man of business and under his watchful eye everything outside is kept in perfect harmony. He has held the office of school director and while in office, he was the means of improving the building and system of the schools in his district. He is a member of the Lutheran Church.

James KANE, laborer, Inkerman, was born in County Mayo, Ireland, in 1847, and is a son of Patrick and Mary (Walsh) Kane, natives of the same place. They reared a family of nine children of whom James is the seventh in order of birth. Our subject came to this country in 1863, and in October of that year located in Pittston, where he worked in Hughes’ brewery for about six months. He was then employed as a laborer in the mines until the year 1869, since which time he has been a miner in the employ of the Pennsylvania Coal Company. On January 12, 1867 Mr. Kane was united in marriage with Mary, daughter of John and Sarah (Fieran) Cohan, natives of County Galway, Ireland, and their union has been blessed with the following issue: Mary born January 6, 1869; John, born May 7, 1874; Thomas, born June 14, 1878 and Belinda, born January 12, 1880. In religion, Mr. Kane is a Roman Catholic. He is a member of the C.T.A.U., and in politics is an Independent.

Patrick KANE, laborer, Inkerman, was born in County Mayo, Ireland, in 1847, and is a son of Patrick and Mary (Walsh) Kane, natives of the same place. They reared a family of seven children, of whom Patrick is second in the order of birth. Our subject received his education in Ireland, and came to America in May 1865, at once settling in Sebastopla, this county, and has been employed from that time to the present by the Pennsylvania Coal Company. He was united in the hold bonds of matrimony December 3, 1862, with Julia, daughter of Dominick and Ann (Conway) McDonald, natives of County Mayo, Ireland, and they have one daughter: Mary born, April 4, 1876. Our subject is a member of the Roman Catholic Church, and the C.T.A.U. In politics he is Republican.

Jacob F. KAPPLER, letter carrier, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Baden, Germany, January 17, 1845, a son of Jacob and Catherine (Brecht) Kappler. His father came to America in 1846, served through the Mexican war, and is now a resident of Lancaster, Pa. Our subject was reared in Germany, educated in the common schools, and came to America in 1858, locating in Wilkes-Barre, where he served an apprenticeship of three years at the shoemaker’s trade. He enlisted September 1, 1861, in Company D., Ninth, P.V.C., and re-enlisted January 1, 1864, in the same company and regiment. He participated in the battles of Perryville, Ky., Carter’s Raid, Shelbyville, Franklin and Chickamauga, Tenn. And was with Sherman on his march to the sea, taking part in the battles of Savannah, Ga., Averysboro, and Bentonville, N.C. and was one of General Sherman’s escorts at the surrender of General Johnston. April 5, 1862, he received seventeen bullet wounds in a guerrilla fight, and still carries three bullets in his body. He was honorably discharged with his regiment at Lexington, N.C., July 29, 1865, returning to Wilkes-Barre, where he resumed his trade, following it until 1875, when he was elected high constable of the city, serving one year. He then spent one year in Kansas, then returned to Wilkes-Barre, and worked at his trade until 1883, when he was appointed letter-carrier, which position he still holds. He was married April 12, 1868, to Catherine, daughter of George and Elizabeth (Schaib) Burkel, of Wilkes-Barre. The have four children: Lizzie S. (Mrs. George Steinhoner), Charles F., Henry W. and Edward S. Mr. Kappler is one of the most popular letter carriers in the city. He is a member of the German Lutheran Church, German Lodge No. 421, I.O.O.F., and G.A.R.; in politics he is a Republican.

G. Washington KARCHNER, farmer and grocer, P.O. Briggsville, was born in Nescopeck Township, July 27, 1849, a son of George and Lydia (Harter) Karchner, and was reared and educated in the township of his birth. He began life as a farmer, and with exception of five years he resided in Salem has always lived in Nescopeck, he now owns and occupies the old homestead of his father, where he was born. In May 1872, Mr. Karchner married Amanda, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Keen) Breyfogle, of Nescopeck, and has six children: Elmer F., Laura M., Mary G., Cora E., Elsie M. and Harvey C. Mr. Karchner is a member of the Lutheran Church, and in politics is a Democrat. He is an enterprising citizen.

Henry KARCHNER, farmer, P.O. Nescopeck, was born in Nescopeck Township July 6, 1830, a son of George and Lydia (Harter) Karchner. He was reared in his native township and educated in the common schools. He learned the carpenter’s trade, and erected many buildings in his vicinity. Since 1860, he has resided on the farm he now occupies, which he has partially cleared, and on which he has made all the improvements in buildings. His wife was Maria, daughter of Samuel and Mary (Mosteller) Hartzel, of Nescopeck, and his living children are James, George, Samuel, Lloyd and Hiram. Mr. Karchner is a member of the Reformed Lutheran Church; in politics he is a democrat, and has served as a constable of Nesocpeck nine years.

Martin KARCHNER, farmer, P.O. Nescopeck, was born in what is now Conyngham Township, Luzerne Co., Pa., February 1, 1836, a son of George and Lydia (Harter) Karchner. His paternal grandfather, Henry Karchner, formerly of Northumberland County, Pa., was a miller by trade, which he followed all his life. His wife was Christina Limbauch, by whom he had four children: Catherine (Mrs. Martin Ritter) Elizabeth (Mrs. Daniel Hill), Lydia (Mrs. David Hartzell) and George. The latter, his only son, was also a miller, and operated what is known as the Empire Mills, in Nescopeck. He died in 1880. His wife was a daughter of Martin Harter of Nescopeck Township, a granddaughter of Martin Harter, and a great granddaughter of Martin Harter, the two latter being natives of Germany, and pioneers of what is now Conyngham Township. George and Lydia Karchner were the parents of twelve children; Catherine (Mrs. Hiram Hartzall), Martin, Sarah (Mrs. Frederick Fry), John, Absalom, William, Eliza (Mrs. Jonathan Miller0, Washington, (all living) and Jacob (deceased.) Our subject was reared in Nescopeck Township. He is a carpenter by trade but is primarily engaged in farming. He was in the Civil War, enlisting in 1861, in Company K., Eighty-first P.V., and was wounded at the battle of Seven Pines, being honorbly discharged after two years of service. In 1864, he married Mary, daughter of Christian and Hannah (Heller) Kengle, of Weissport, Carbon Co., Pa., and has six children living: Elizabeth, Henry, Elmer, Robert, Nora and Blanche. Mr. Karchner has served as school director of Nescopeck Township for eighteen years. In politics he is independent.

Peter KASCHENBACH, furniture dealer, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Prussia, in 1824, and is a son of W. and Eva (Zenson) Kaschenbach. Being left an orphan at an early age, he was thrown on his own resources; he learned the cabinet-maker’s trade, which he followed for nineteen years in his native land. In 1852, he came to America, locating at Honesdale, Pa., where he worked as a journeyman two years, and afterward five years at Binghamton, N.Y. In 1859, he located in Wilkes-Barre and in 1861, embarked in the furniture business, in which he still continues. In 1849, Mr. Kaschecnbach married Gertrude, daughter of Hubert and Anna M. (Losen) Ackerman, of Germany, and has five children: Gertrude, Henry, John, Mary and Lizzie (Mrs. George Keller.) Mr. Kaschenbach is one of the leading businessmen of Wilkes-Barre; he is a member of the Catholic Church, and in politics is a Democrat.

Joseph W. KASPER was born in Pittston, December 23, 1865, a son of John Kasper and was educated in the public schools of his native city. At the age of fourteen he entered the office of the Evening Press, of Pittston, where he set type about two years, then he engaged in a meat market with his father on Exeter Street, where has since continued. He has been a member of the eagle Hose Company three years, and secretary of same, one term; is a member of the M.E. Church of West Pittston; of the P.O.S. of A., of which he has served one term as vice president, and the K.G.E.; politically he is a Republican. Mr. Kasper married October 19, 1876, Minnie Dodd, of Pittston, and has the following children: Helen, May and Harold.

G.A. Charles KASTRUP, senior member of the firm of Kastrup & Keck, bakers and confectioners, Ashley, was born in Westphalia, Germany, March 24, 1855, and is the only child of Charles W. and Henrietta (Strunk) Kastrup. The father, who had served seven years in the German army, was a contractor, and before the birth of our subject was killed by a falling timber while building a glass factory. After his death the mother married Peter Creamer. Mr. Kastrup was educated in Germany, and worked at manufacturing lime and brick and at stone-cutting until October 1871, when he came to America, locating in Fort Lee, N.J., where he remained eighteen months and learned the baker’s trade. After this he worked at his trade five years in New York and then returned to Fort Lee where he engaged in the butcher business for one year. At the end of that time he devoted his time to his regular trade in and about New York for a period of eleven years. In 1882, he removed to Wilkes-Barre where he had charge of Craft’s bakery for eighteen months and in 1883 he came to Ashley and commenced business. February 18, 1882, Mr. Kastrup married Miss Veronika, daughter of Henry and Theresa (Ricketer) Keck. They have one child, Annie Theresa. Mr. and Mrs. Kastrup are members of the German Lutheran and Catholic Churches, respectively; in political views he is a Democrat.

John C. KAUFER, alderman, Tenth Ward, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Wilkes-Barre, June 2, 1857, and is a son of George and Dorothea (Easterlee) Kaufer, natives of Germany, who emigrated to America about 1851, and the following year located in Wilkes-Barre, where his father, who was a brewer by trade, worked at that occupation until his death in 1862. His children were nine in number, five of whom are now living: George (superintendent Florence Coal Co.), John C., Barbara P. (Mrs. Alexander Schmallbach) Jacob R. and Martin. Our subject was reared in Wilkes-Barre, educated in the public schools, and served an apprenticeship of three and one half years in a printing office, after which he worked as a journeyman printer twelve years. In February 185, he was elected alderman of the Tenth Ward of the City of Wilkes-Barre, and re-elected in February 1890, for a second term. In March 1882, he married Catherine C., daughter of Henry and Catherine Rocker, of Wilkes-Barre, who died January 7, 1887. Our subject and wife had three children: Dorothea H., Caroline C. and George R. Mr. Kaufer is a popular official, and a well-known citizen of Wilkes-Barre. He is a member of Zion’s German Reformed Church, of the I.O.O.F., and in politics he is a Democrat.

John KAUFMAN, M.D., Hazleton, is a promising and prosperous young physician. He was born at Hazleton, Marc 28, 1864, and is the third in a family of ten children of John and Mary A. (Sonn) Kaufman, also natives of Hazleton. He was reared and educated in his native city, and after graduating at the Hazleton high school, he entered in the fall of 1885, the Hahnemann Medical College, Philadelphia, graduating therefrom in the spring of 1888. He then came directly to Hazleton where he began practice of his profession, and is now building up a good practice. Dr. Kaufman is unmarried and lives with his parents at No. 122 N. Wyoming Street. He is a member of the State Homeopathic Society, of the English Lutheran Church, belongs to the Knights of Malta, and in politics votes the Democratic ticket.

William KAUFFMAN, farmer and dairyman, P.O. Conynghan, was born in Prussia, June 9, 1832, a son of Henry and Mary (Daute) Kauffman, who came to America in 1854, settling in Hazleton, this county, where the father was employed in the breaker and where he resided until his death. His children were: William, Tobias, John, Catherine, Dorothea and Lizzie. Our subject was reared in Germany, and came to America in 1851; he worked in the mines at Hazleton two years, and then learned the blacksmith’s trade which he followed up to 1865, since which time he has been engaged in farming in Surloaf Township, since 1884 he has also been in the dairy business. He married Hannah, only daughter of Justus and Hannah (Stunntz) Rimbach, and had nine children: Catherine, Mary E., Amanda, Anna D., William H., Harry G., Otilla H., Lizzie C., and George E. Mr. Kauffman and family are members of the reformed Church; in politics he is a Democrat.

Samuel KAY, farmer, P.O. Dupont, was born in England, October 29, 1833, a son of Edmund and Ann (Miles) Kay, both of whom were natives of England, where they died. The father had been a soldier in the British army. Our subject was twenty years of age when he emigrated to this country in 1853. He located in Otisville, Orange Co., N.Y., where he was employed in copper mining, and remained there till 1865 when he removed to Pittston, this county, and engaged in coal mining. In 1867 he came to his present home on a lot of one hundred acres of unimproved land, which by patient and incessant toil he has cultivated and beautified beyond competition. His house is built out of stone quarried on his own farm. He is a practical man, and understands agricultural pursuits to perfection. In 1853 Mr. Kay married Mrs. Rebecca Eaton, daughter of George Kuler and by her he had one daughter, Elizabeth, who married Thomas Huett, and engineer. Mr. Kay is a consistent member of the M.E. Church, and a man of deep piety.

Patrick J. KEARNS, insurance agent, Pittston. This gentleman is filling his position of trust and responsibility by virtue of his worth as a businessman and high character for integrity and energy. He was born at Pittston, Pa., August 30, 1866, and is a son of Dominick and Mary (Moran) Kearns, natives of County Mayo, Ireland, who came to America in 1865, settling in Pittston, Pa., where they reared seven children, namely: Patrick J. (our subject), Mary E., Bezzie, John (deceased), Katie, Joseph and Dominick. Our subject was educated in the public schools of Pittston, and at the age of fourteen commenced life as a messenger boy at the mines, in which capacity he was employed five years. Then more than ever feeling the need of an education, he returned to school, where he remained three years. He then accepted a position as hoisting engineer at the Butler Shaft, where he worked for two years, at the end of which time he took a position as freight conductor on the Lehigh Valley Railroad, remaining there until 1890, when he accepted the agency of the Etna Insurance Company. He has since followed that line of business and has built up an extensive connection in his locality, which speaks well of his ability as an insurance man. Mr. Kerans has made vocal music an extensive study and for many year he was chorister in St. John’s Church in Pittston. He was united in marriage October, 23, 1889, with Miss Katie, daughter of Patrick and Catherine (Quinn) Corcoran, natives of Ireland, to which union have been born two children: John (deceased) and Frank. The family are members of the Catholic Church.

James KEATING, saloonkeeper, Pittston, was born in County Queen’s, Ireland, in 1841, a son of John and Betsy (Murphy) Keating, both also natives of Ireland. The former died in his native land, the latter emigrated to the United States in May 1856, locating in Pittston Township, this county. Her family consisted of ten children, nine of whom grew to maturity and are now living. Our subject was fifteen years of age when he came to this country and received his education in Pittston. He was a miner by occupation, at which he worked for twenty-eight years, and has resided in Pittston since he first located there. He has been a successful salon keeper for eleven years, owning his residence and the saloon adjoining. He is a man of influence in his party, a democrat, and has served his township for seven years as supervisor, giving entire satisfaction to all. At the age of twenty-one, in June 1861, he married Miss Margaret, daughter of Edward and Mary Tool, and by her he had six children, four of whom are living: Edward, John, William, and Jennie. For his second wife he married Miss Mary Keefe, by whom he had four children: Michael, Charles, Lucy, and Tillie, all living. The two elder members of the first family are married. Mr. Keating is a member of the Roman Catholic Church.

Mrs. Mary KEATING, (widow of Thomas Keating) hotel Keeper, Larksville, was born in County Clare, Ireland, in 1840. She is a daughter of Timothy and Mary (Maloney) Russell, both of whom were born in Ireland and emigrated to America in 1849, stopping for a short time in St. Johns, N.B., previous to their arrival in the United States. They first located in Wellsburg, N.Y., where they remained a few years and in 1855 removed to this county, settling in Plymouth Township, where the husband was employed by the railroad company, in its construction through that country. He is now living at an advanced age of eighty-seven years, having been born in 1805, and makes his home with his daughter, Mrs. Keating. Mrs. Mary Russell died in 1886. Their family consisted of eleven children, eight of whom grew to maturity, three now living: Michael C., Mary, and Sarah. Mrs. Keating the second in the family was reared and educated in Akron, N.Y. In 1860 she married Thomas Keating, and of this union were born seven children, five of whom are living: Mary E., Thomas R., Ellen, Anna and Patrick L. Of these, Mary E. married John F. Connole, hotelkeeper; Ellen married Andrew J. Lynch, hotelkeeper. Mrs. Keating has lived in Larksville since 1859, keeping hotel since 1867, and owning both her hotel and an adjoining block. She is a shrewd businesswoman, of excellent character, and has been a widow for twenty-two years, her husband having died February 14, 1870.

Henry F. KECK, of the firm of Kastrup & Keck, Ashley, was born in Westphalia, Germany, August 5, 1855, a son of henry and Thressa (Rickert) Keck. The father managed a hotel, a farm and a brickyard. He reared a family of eleven children, six of whom are living: Augustus who succeeded his father in business, and added the manufacture of clay pipes; Anthony, professor in a college at Brian, Germany; Rebecca, Wife of G.A.C. Kastrup; Henry F., John, a professor in a college in Germany; and Helena, wife of Henry Dempawolf, locksmith and general merchant, Germany. Our subject came to America in 1875, locating in New York City, where he tended bar for Smith & McNeil ten years. He was next employed in the "Wyoming Valley Hotel" in Wilkes-Barre for six months; and in 1884 engaged in his present business. December 1, 1884, Mr. Keck married Miss Annie, daughter of Anthony and Thressa (Sakie) Hager, natives of Westphalia, Germany, and by her had one child, Harry. Our subject and his family are members of the Catholic Church. In his political views, he is independent.

Morrison J. KECK, slate operator, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Hazleton, Luzerne Co., Pa., August 12, 1848, a son of David B. and Catherine (Dietrick) Keck. His paternal grandfather, Solomon Keck, was a native of Allentown, Pa., whose father, a native of Germany, was a pioneer merchant of Lehigh County, this State. Solomon Keck was an early settler of Luzerne County (lower end), a merchant and a farmer, and died in Conyngham Valley. David B. Keck was a native of Luzerne County, was a farmer and a mechanic, most of his life being passed in Hazleton where he was employed by A. Pardee & Co. His children were Elizabeth M (Mrs. William R. Megarry), Gilbert H., Solomon, Jacob S., Morrison J., Francis M., David A., Philip, Delphena (Mrs. Baxter Hutchinson.) Our subject was reared in Hazleton where he received a public school education, and at the age of fifteen years he commenced the molder’s trade. Serving afterward an apprenticeship at the drug business, he located March 1, 1869, at Ashley where he took charge of a drug store, and in 1873 he became a partner in the store under the firm name of Diefenderfer & Keck, in which he continued three years. He then (1876) returned to Hazleton and purchased the store where he had served his apprenticeship; in 1882 he sold out, removed to Bagor, Northampton Co., Pa. And embarked in the slate business in which he has since continued, with residence at Wilkes-Barre since 1879. He is a stockholder and superintendent of the Yule Creek Marble and & Mining Company, Crystal River, Colo., and is president of the Elk Mountain Railroad Company of Colorado. On May 8, 1873, Mr. Keck married Medora, daughter of Ephraim P. and Emeline (Smith) Lutz, of Columbia County, Pa., and has five children: Bessie T., Morris M., Marion R., Medora J. and Donald W. In 1863, Mr. Keck was a drummer boy during the "emergency" in 1871 he enlisted in the National Guard of Pennsylvania, and was elected captain from the ranks same year, but was compelled to resign same year on account of being assistant postmaster at Ashley. On July 6, 1877, he again enlisted, in a company formed at Hazleton; was elected first lieutenant, and before being commissioned was elected captain, July 21, 1877, the day the riots broke out in Wilkes-Barre; in that capacity he served during the riots in the old Ninth Regiment, then called the Third Division. In 1878 when the reorganization of the National Guards of Pennsylvania took place, the old Ninth Regiment was disbanded with the exception of Company H, which Capt. Keck commanded, and this company was transferred to the Twelfth Regiment with headquarters at Williamsport. On May 26, 1879, was elected lieutenant-colonel of the new Ninth Regiment; re-elected October 30, 1884, June 10, 1885, was elected colonel and re-elected June 10, 1890, took part in the Homestead riots of 1892, and during that time was commander of the Third Brigade in the absence of Gen. Gobin. He was the prime mover, and to his efforts are due the building of the Ninth Regiment armory, the finest edifice of its kind in the State. In connection with a number of citizens and ladies they had a fair from May 19 to May 29, 1886, resulting in a profit of thirty-one thousand odd dollars, and with the assistance of ex-Col. Reynolds, Major Price and Charles Parish, raised by subscription $12,000 additional. Socially Col. Keck is a Knight Templar; in politics he is a Republican.

Frederick P. KEELY, farmer, P.O. Sybertsville, was born in Berks County, Pa., July 21, 1841, and is a son of Isaac and Sarah (Prutman) Keely. His paternal grandfather was Amos Keely, a farmer of Berks County, Pa. Our subject was reared in Pennsylvania and educated in the common schools. He served an apprenticeship of three years at the blacksmith’s trade, commenced business for his own account when but nineteen years of age, and has followed it sixteen years, fourteen years of the time in Luzerne County, three years when he was located in Hobbie, and eleven years in Sybertsville, where he located in 1869. Since 1880 he has been engaged in farming. His wife was Eliza A., a daughter of Daniel and Lydia (Flickinger) Spade, of Sugar Loaf Township, and by her he had five children: Elvira (Mrs. Joseph Kline), Esther (Mrs. Elwood Walk), Frank (deceased), C. Norris, and Frank D. Mr. Keely is a prominent and well-known citizen of Sugar Loaf Township, is a member of the Lutheran Church, in politics is a Democrat, and served as school director of Sugar Loaf Township three years.

Evan H. KEEN, agent and dealer in agricultural implements, P.O. Nescopeck, was born in Nescopeck Township, April 30, 1832, a son of Peter and Hannah (Hughes) Keen. His paternal grandfather, George Keen, a native of New Jersey, was a pioneer of Nescopeck, where he owned a large tract of land and kept a hotel, passing the remainder of his life there. In 1811, he gave the land for the Lutheran Church, and built the principal part of the old log structure. He was twice married, and reared a large family. The father of our subject was born in Nescopeck Township in 1805; he was a carpenter and also followed farming. He married a daughter of Evan Hughes, of Hughesville, Lycoming County, Pa., and their children were six in number, viz.: Evan H., Edmund W., George, Alex, Rebecca, (Mrs. Joseph Faust), Martha V. (Mrs. Aaron Harter), and Ellen (Mrs. G.A.R. Smith.) Evan H. Keen was reared in Nescopeck and educated in the common schools. He learned the carpenter’s trade, which he followed eighteen years, later engaging in farming, and for the past twenty years he has been handling farm machinery. His wife was Elizabeth M., daughter of George and Louisa (Bertram) Everhard, of Hollenback Township. They have four children: Clara (Mrs. John A. Mowrey), Writer M., Hannah L. (Mrs. J.W. Naugle) and Charles E. Mr. keen is a member of the F. & A.M., I.O.O.F., and K. of M.; in politics, he is a Republican.

Christian KEIL, blacksmith for the Delaware & Hudson Coal Company, at the Mill Creek Mine, Hudson, was born in Germany, November 3, 1825. He is the son of John and Margaret (Guchim) Keil; the former of whom was a blacksmith by trade. They reared a family of ten children, of whom four sons are now living, viz.: Louis, a farmer in Ohio, Christian, and Charles (a teacher) and Henry (a blacksmith), both in their native country. Our subject came to America in 1868, and after laboring at the Baltimore No. 2 Shaft, for eighteen months, engaged with his present employers, for whom he has since worked at his trade. In 1888 he built his present comfortable residence. Mr. Keil was married in 1864 to Miss Margaret, daughter of Jacob and Eliza (Lent) Guchim, and they had four children, viz.: Charles, a farmer in Ill.; Louisa (Mrs. Peter Straub), Caroline (Mrs. August Becker), who died in Germany at the age of thirty-three, and Otto. Mrs. Keil died May22, 1862, and Mr. Keil was married November 1867 to Mrs. Elizabeth (Apple) Stark, daughter of Henry and Catherine (Kirchner) Apple, of Germany, and widow of Henry Stark, by whom she had three children, viz.: John, who died at the age of thirty-eight years; Catherine (Mrs. James Martin); and Henry J. Mr. Keil and his wife are members of the German Lutheran Church in Wilkes-Barre; in his political views, he is a stanch Democrat. Since his immigration, Mr. Keil has made five trips to his native country and various parts of Europe.

Otto KEIL, blacksmith, Miners Mills, was born in Darmstadt, Germany, October 29, 1856, and is a son of Christian Keil, of Plains Township, this county. Our subject came to America in 1872, and located in Mill Creek, where he worked at his trade with his father and later, at the same place, for the Delaware & Hudson Coal Company for thirteen years. He then opened a shop, which he had built, and has since been carrying on a prosperous trade; he also erected his residence adjoining the shop. Mr. Keil was married January 21, 1887, to Miss Mary S. Riechers, who was born January 11, 1854, a daughter of Frederick Riechers, of Miners Mills, and they have five children, viz.: Henry M., Catherine E., Louisa K.A., Charles F., and George j. Mr. and Mrs. Keil are members of the German Lutheran Church, he is a member of the I.O.R.M., and in politics is a republican.

G.W. KEISER, farmer, P.O. Wanamie, was born in Hamilton Township, Nothampton County, January 12, 1830, son of Charles and Sarah Keiser, both of whom were born in the same place. They removed to this county about 1838, locating in Hanover Township, where they lived for a number of years, as good, loyal citizens, who enjoyed the full confidence of their fellow men. They reared a family of nine children, six of whom are living. G.W. is the eldest in the family. He was reared and educated in Hanover Township, and learned the occupation of sawyer, which business he followed for ten years. In 1854 he married Miss Anna, daughter of Jesse and Elizabeth (Fink) Rosencrans, a native of New Jersey, who in a very early day removed to this county. He was a pioneer schoolteacher. He owned 200 acres of land, reared a family of seven children, and died in 1850, aged seventy years. His son Jesse Rosencrans, father of Mrs. Keiser, owned 300 acres, 100 of which he cleared during his lifetime. He reared a family of nine children and died in 1872, aged sixty-five years. Mr. Keiser owns thirty acres of good land in Slocum Township. Politically he is a stanch Democrat.

Thomas J. KEISER, Ashley, locomotive engineer on the Central Railroad of New Jersey, was born in Ashley, October 23, 1857, and is the youngest child of Thomas and Emily (Downing) Keiser. The father was born July 28, 1813, died February 21, 1872. The mother, born January 25, 1817, died September 15, 1889. Our subject’s grandfather, Christian Keiser was among the early settlers in Ashley, and afterward removed to Lisbon, Wis. The family consisted of nine children, Mary E. (Mrs. John W. Colborn) born December 10, 1836, died December 27, 1889; Charles F., a carpenter foe Maffet & Co., born March 31, 1839, and died July 14, 1872; Isaiah, born October 16, 1840, and who was wounded near Spottsville, May 6, 1864, dying the next day, being at the time a member of the Sixth Pennsylvania Cavalry; Emma M. (Mrs. Joseph Pool) born June 18, 1843, died October 3, 1875 (after her death her husband, a locomotive engineer, moved to Tyler, Texas, where he was killed); Jessie, born June 26, 1846, a carpenter contractor, Ashley; William T., born December 22, 1848, died October 13, 1850; Ella E. born January 25, 1854, wife of Ervine Bellows, boiler-maker foreman, Wilkes-Barre, Crissie, born August 23, 1855, wife of David Philips, stationary engineer, Ashley; and Thomas, the youngest. The subject of our sketch was educated in the public schools of his native town. He and his brother Jessie were in the lumber business at Plymouth for a time. After that he was for two years brakeman on the road he is now with, and after six years was promoted to his present position in 1888. He is a Knight Templar, a member of the I.O.O.F., and is a Republican in his political views.

Samuel C. KELCHNER, farmer, P.O. Conyngham, was born in Columbia County, Pa., December 31, 1837, and is a son of Jacob and Matilda (Colman) Kelchner, early settlers of Columbia County. He was reared in his native county, educated in the common schools, and learned the blacksmith’s trade, which he followed thirteen years. He then engaged in farming, in which he still continues and has been a resident of Sugar Loaf Township since 1876. Mr. Kelchner was united in marriage with Phoebe, daughter of Anthony and Lydia (Hess) Walp, of Berwick, Pa., and by her he has five children: Lloyd, Sarah A. (Mrs. Harvey Fenstermacher), Fannie (Mrs. Christopher Bummer), Lizzie (Mrs. Samuel Drasher) and Melville. Mr. Kelchner is a representative farmer and citizen, he is a member of the Lutheran Church, and in politics is a Democrat.

C. KELLER, jeweler, Luzerne, was born in Columbia County, Pa., September 23, 1866, a son of Adam and Mary (Herring) Keller, natives of Pennsylvania. There were four children in the family, our subject being the eldest. Mr. Keller received his education in Columbia County, and soon after engages in milling, an occupation which he followed until October, 1889, when he opened a jewelry store in Luzerne, and is building up a good trade. Mr. Keller is a follower of the Democratic Party, is a member of the M.E. Church, and belongs to the I.O.O.F.

Frank KELLER, (deceased) and his wife (who is still living) emigrated to this country from Mont Simsim, Biran, Germany, in 1854, locating at Pittston, Pa., after which they moved to Wyoming. Mr. Keller worked as overseer of machinery at the Exeter Shaft, where, on March 9, 1875, he was caught in a side cogwheel and killed, he left a widow and seven children. Mrs. Keller and her son John, are proprietors of a restaurant on Wyoming Avenue. The other children are Eva (Mrs. Jacob Rhinehart0, Martin, a bottler [see sketch]; Mary, who is a Sister in a convent in Baltimore; George, a clerk in Wilkes-Barre; Frank, in the Wyoming Shovel Works, and Jacob, in the Terra Cotta Works. Mrs. Keller opened her restaurant in 1877, and has since catered to the public, and her son John, who presides at the bar, spares no pains to please all, having won a host of friends. He is one of the most prominent Democrats in Wyoming borough, and has been a member of the Democratic County Committee several times. The family are all Democrats and are members of the German Catholic Church.

Harry M. KELLER, M.D., physician in charge and superintendent of the Hazleton Hospital. This successful young physician was born in Stroudsburg, Pa., November 24, 1866, and is a son of Charles B. and Mary (Walton) Keller, natives of Monroe County. He was reared in his native town, where he attended the high school, and in 1884 he entered the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania, from which he graduated in the class of 1887. Immediately after graduating he entered the Philadelphia Hospital as resident physician, where he remained sixteen months. This was not his first experience at hospital work, however, as his vacations had been spent in St. Mary’s Hospital, where he had a large practical experience. After graduating, he accepted the position as assistant to Dr. George S. Wentz, of Jeddo, Pa., where he remained two years. He was then elected superintendent and surgeon of the Hazleton Hospital, which incumbency he has since successfully and most ably filled. An appropriation of $60,000 was in 1887 made by the State for this magnificent building, and it is a notable fact that the commission in charge of the work kept the whole expense of erecting this remarkably large and convenient hospital within the amount appropriated by the State. It was handsomely furnished by funds raised by public subscription. The building is a handsome two-story brick structure, located in the eastern part of the city. The departments are conveniently arranged; there are two large wards containing twenty-four beds each, and a convenient modern operating room office, parlor and council rooms, besides the cozy apartments for those who are employed about the place. The hospital staff consists of the following members: Superintendent and surgeon, assistant surgeon, three trained male nurses, one clerk, a chief engineer, two firemen, five domestics and a matron. The record for the first year, 1891, sows that 222 cases were admitted for treatment, and there were 136 dispensary cases. Dr. Keller is known as a skillful and courteous practitioner, and his conduct of the institution under his charge has on many occasions been warmly commented on.

Joseph H. KELLER, farmer, P.O. Larksville, was born in Plymouth Township, July 13, 1864, a son of Philip and Ellen (Hunter) Keller, the former born in Plymouth, the latter’s birthplace not known. Philip was a son of Joseph Keller who removed from Northampton County here about 1807, locating in Plymouth Township on a farm containing about 150 acres, and under which were valuable coalfields. Before his death, he disposed of the coal, and retained the surface. After the death of Joseph Sr., his son Philip bought out the heirs and retained the homestead. Philip was a practical farmer and a good businessman. His family consisted of six children, all of whom are living. Our subject, the fifth by birth, was educated in his native town at the common schools and always confined himself to agricultural pursuits. September 3, 1888, he married Miss Sarah, daughter of Thomas and Sarah Waters, and by her had two children, both of whom are living; Harry H. and Laura. Mr. Keller owns a farm of forty acres of valuable land in good condition, on which he raises a general crop. He is independent in politics. Mrs. Sarah Keller was born in Wales, and came to this country when two years of age.

Martin KELLER, bottler of lager beer, porter and soft drinks, Wyoming borough, was born January 7, 1854, second in the family of seven children of Frank and Barbara (Endres) Keller, natives of Baiern, Germany. He was educated in the common schools, and at the age of twenty-five years began life for himself at blacksmithing, at which trade he worked for seven years, when he embarked in his present business, and has since carried on a general bottling trade, delivering his goods by wagon to all the smaller towns in his section. Mr. Keller is an honorable, upright man, doing a large business, and has made many friends. He is a member of the German Catholic Church, and in politics he is a strong Democrat. In 1887 he built his present home.

George M. KELLY, farmer, P.O. Larksville, was born in Plymouth Township, May 26, 1850, and is a son of Thomas and Harriet (Howard) Kelly, the former of whom was born in 1810, in Ireland, the latter in Plymouth Township. Thomas Kelly came to this country when twelve years of age, first locating in Plymouth, where he made his permanent home. He was a miner by occupation and also a boatman on the canal for some years; he was a man of nerve and physical strength, who worked hard and accumulated some means previous to his death, which occurred July 24, 1887; his wife died in 1885. Their family consisted of two children, one now living, George M. The latter was reared in Plymouth and educated in Wyoming Seminary, and in early life studied telegraphy, but does not follow it at present. He has lived in Plymouth all his lifetime, and is now retired. April 8, 1876, he married Miss Rachel, daughter of James and Almeda Washburn, and they have had five children, one of whom is living, Joseph B. Mrs. Kelly was born in Carbondale, in 1856. Mr. Kelly owns a farm of twenty-seven acres, besides twelve houses. He is a well-read and intelligent man, with a keen eye to business. Politically he is a Democrat.

John KELLY, of Georgetown, Wilkes-Barre Township, a native of County Longford, Ireland, was born in 1816, and is a son of John and Ann (Dempsey) Kelly. He was reared in his native county, where after attaining his majority, he was engaged in farming until 1864, when he came to America, locating in what is now South Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and in 1866 moving to his present residence in Georgetown, where he has since resided and where he has been principally employed about the coal mines. In 1852, he married Margaret, daughter of Farrell and Catherine (Doran) Reilly, of County Westmeath, Ireland and by her had seven children: Mary A. (Mrs. Patrick Donahue), Patrick F., Kate (Mrs. George Black), Margaret (married to James McGinty, and has one son, Frank P.), John, Ellen (deceased), and Sarah. Mrs. McGinty has been a popular teacher in the public schools of Wilkes-Barre Township twelve years, and Miss Sarah Kelly, since 1890. Mr. Kelly and family are members of the Catholic Church; in politics, he is a Democrat.

John E. KELLY, fire-boss, Empire Shaft, Wilkes-Barre, was born in County Longford, Ireland, January 14, 1863, a son of John and Margaret (Riley) Kelly, who came to America in 1865, and settled in Wilkes-Barre Township from two years of age, educated in the public schools and began life as a slate picker in the breaker at nine years. He worked as a miner five years, and has held position of fire-boss at the Empire Shaft since March 1890. October 28, 1891, Mr. Kelly married Miss Margaret, daughter of Michael Millnamow, of Wilkes-Barre. He is a member of the Catholic Church. He is a Democrat in politics and served one term as assessor of Wilkes-Barre.

Patrick F. KELLY, merchant, P.O. Wilkes-Barre, was born in County Longford, Ireland, January 14, 1855, and is a son of John and Margaret (Reilly) Kelly, who came to America in 1864, locating in Wilkes-Barre Township, where they still reside. Their children were Mary A. (Mrs. Patrick Donohue), Patrick F., Catherine (Mrs. George Black), Margaret (Mrs. James McGinty), John, Ellen (deceased) and Sarah. Margaret and Sarah are teachers in the Wilkes-Barre Township schools. Our subject was reared in Wilkes-Barre Township from nine years of age, was educated in the public schools of same, and began life as a slate picker in the breaker. He later worked as a carpenter in the mines until 1886 when he embarked in merchandising, in which he has since continued. In March 1882, he married Margaret, daughter of Bernard and Margaret (Sheridan) Reynolds, by whom he has five children: henry, John, Daniel, Bernard (deceased) and James. Mr. Kelly is a member of the Catholic Church; in politics, he is a Democrat and is one of the school directors of Wilkes-Barre Township.

George W. KELLMER, of the Kellmer Piano & Organ Works, Hazleton. Among the many large manufacturing concerns of Hazleton, perhaps none are more prominent or ably represented than the Kellmer Piano & Organ Works, with which the subject of this sketch is prominently identified. Mr. Kellmer was born June 21, 1868 at Hazleton, Pa., and is a son of Peter Kellmer, one of the pioneers of this section and the first man to establish a photograph gallery in Hazleton, which gallery is still operated by the sons, who do a thriving business. The gentleman whose name opens this sketch was educated in the public schools of Hazleton and after completing the high school course, learned the piano and organ manufacturing business, in a short time becoming skillful in not only constructing the instruments, but in tuning as well. The business was established in June 1883, by Peter Kellmer. The new factory was built during the years 1883 and 1884, and opened for business in April, the latter year. The establishment is located in a convenient part of the city, and consists of an immense brick building, which is divided up into commodious storerooms and workshops. The Kellmer piano needs no commendation in this work, as its reputation is already established, both in this country and in Europe. Our subject was married August 6, 1891, to Miss Alma M. Kupp, daughter of S.H. Kupp, a resident of Scranton.

George W. KELLNER, foreman at Deringer Colliery No. 2, Gowan, was born in Germany, December 4, 1853, a son of George and Christine (Knease) Kellner. They came to America in 1856, first locating at Hazleton, and later removing to Eckley, this county, where the father engaged in mining and resided until his death. His children were George R., Christine, Lizzie (Mrs. William Diehl), and Catherine. Our subject was reared in Eckley and served an apprenticeship of three years at the carpenter’s trade, which he has followed since 1874, holding his present position, the carpenter’s trade, which he has followed since 1874, holding his present position at Deringer since 1887. Mr. Kellner was married November 29, 1888, to Maria, a daughter of John and Lovina (Heimbach) Knelly, and they have three children: Lovina C., Rudolph W. and Ralph G. (twins.) Mr. Kellner is a member of the Lutheran Church, and of the F. & A.M., and in politics is a Democrat.

Joseph KELSHAW, mine foreman, Jeansville, was born in Shropshire, England, July 31, 1839, a son of William and Harriet (Vaughn) Kelshaw, natives of England. He is the fourth in order of birth in a family of nine children, and was reared and educated in England. At the age of sixteen he became a coal miner, and one year later he began sinking shafts, continuing in that occupation for ten years. When twenty-six years old he was appointed underground viewer in England, and followed that business three years in Staffordshire, three years in North Wales, seven years in South Yorkshire, and four years in South Wales. In 18880 Mr. Kelshaw came to America, locating in Pottsville, Schuylkill Co., Pa., where he worked at mining for one year. He then removed to Beaver Meadows, Carbon County, and secured a position as mine foreman with Coxe Bros. & Co., in which capacity he remained for five years. In 1887 he came to Jeansville, and took his present position as mine foreman at No. 4, Jeansville Colliery, operated by J.C. Hayden & Co. Mr. Kelshaw was married October 14, 1861, to Miss Emma, daughter of Jonathan and Mary (Jones) Brown, natives of Wales. To this union have been born thirteen children, namely: William, Jonathan, Emily, Joseph H., Thomas, James, Richard, Harriet, Margaret, Florence A., Matilda, Albert E. (deceased) and Albert E. (also deceased). Mr. Kelshaw is a supporter of the Republican Party; he attends the Methodist Episcopal Church and is a member of the Knights of Pythias, Sons of Temperance, and Knights of the Golden Eagle.

Daniel W. KEMBEL, outside foreman, Parsons, was born in Lower Mahanoy, Northumberland County, Pa., May 25, 1836, and is a son of David and Lydia (Wert) Kembel, the former a native of Pennsylvania and of Holland (Later of New Jersey) origin, the latter a native of Pennsylvania and of Holland lineage. Our subject was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools and began life for himself at the age of twenty-one, learning the miller’s trade, at which he worked in the following places: Millersburg, Mount Joy, Mahanoy City and Sunbury. On August 19, 1861, he enlisted at Allentown in Company C, Forty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, which company was sent to Washington, D.C., and from there to Arlington Heights, thence to Key West, Fla., where they were stationed in the Gulf Squadron. He was in the following engagements: Hilton Head, Port Royal, Beaufort and Poctaligo; did provost duty at Key West for one year, and was then sent on the Red River expedition, where he was at the battles of Pleasant Hill, Sabine Cross Roads and Alexandria, was on the march to Appalachee Bay, and was at the capture of Fort Finegan. He was then sent to Washington, and served under Sheridan throughout his Shenandoah raid, and was discharged at Berryville, VA, September 19, 1864, his term of enlistment having expired, and returned home. He was then engaged in railroading and milling until 1870, when he came to Parson and accepted his present position at Laurel Run Mine. Mr. Kembel was married January 1, 1865, to Miss Julia, daughter of Thomas Foults, of Derbyshire, England, and they have five children, viz.: Thomas A., married to Addie, daughter of Rev. W.D. Thomas; Adelia, married to Herbert T. Dolan, weighmaster at Parson; Jennie, Lulu may and John E. Mr. Kembel and his family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church; in politics he is a republican, and has held the following offices: assessor, school director, tax collector, burgess and councilman, which latter office he now holds.

William KEMP, P.O. Drum’s, who is among the leading well to do farmers of Luzerne County, is a native of Prussia, born February 4, 1836. He was reared and educated in his native land, and at the age of fifteen came to America, locating in Sugar Loaf Township, where he worked three years. He then removed to Butler Township, where he engaged in farming and lumbering, carrying on the most extensive lumber trade of anyone in Butler Valley. He has been the owner of several sawmills, and always kept two or more running full capacity, constantly employing not less than twenty-five men. He now devotes his entire attention to farming, having one of the finest farms in the well-known Butler Valley. Mr. Kemp was married September 1, 1857, to Miss Maria Ero, of Hollenback Township. This union has been blessed with nine children, viz.: Louisa, married to Ellick Thresher, Freeland; Christiana, married to Daniel Krummis, Butler Township; Emma, married to Henry Yager, Butler Township; Edna, married to Daniel Foust, Drum’s; Samuel; Ella; Allen; Stella and Ellick. Mr. Kemp, by industry and honesty, has helped himself and the land of his adoption. In politics, he is a firm Democrat.

Clarence KESTER, of the firm of John Kester & Son, furniture dealers and undertakers, Shickshinny, was born at Arch Bridge, Union Township, this county, September 22, 1869, and is a son of John and Lavina (Sorber) Kester, the father being a son of John and Martha Kester, the mother a daughter of Adam and Sarah Sorber. The father was also a native of Union Township, and is now a resident of Arch Bridge, where he is engaged in the lumber business. He served one year in the Civil war. He has a family of four children: Hattie (Mrs. Merritt Scott), Clarence, Martha and Lena. Our subject was reared in Union Township, educated in public schools, and began life as a clerk in the furniture store of George W. Sorber, of Shickshinny, in which capacity he served four years. In October 1891, he embarked in the business for himself, and since April 1892, the firm has been known as John Kester & Son. Mr. Kester has already succeeded in building up a first-class trade, and is one of Shickshinny’s enterprising businessmen. He was married September 22, 1892, to Miss Fannie Morley, of Harrisburg. Mr. Kester is a member of the M.E. Church, P.O.S. of A., and American Protestants; politically he is a Democrat.

C.M. and John KESTER, manufacturers, Shickshinny, were born in that place, the former April 11, 1851, the latter July 17, 1848. They are the sons of John and Martha A. (Wright) Kester, the former born in Nescopeck, in 1807, the latter in Hanover Township. John was a son of Jacob Kester, who was also a native of Nescopeck. The latter’s father, whose name has not been learned, was a native of Germany, and emigrated to this country, settling in Nescopeck. He was a farmer of some means and influence in his own vicinity. John Kester Sr., followed the example of his father for some years, but finally became a manufacturer- as his son are now. He removed to Union Township in 1851, where he owned a few acres, on which he erected a house, and entered the general lumber business, supplying ties, wood, etc. He was a man of enterprise and energy, succeeding in his undertaking and died in December 1869. His family consisted of ten children, eight of whom are living. John being the seventh and C.M. the eighth by birth. They were reared and educated in the common schools of Shickshinny and Union Townships, and always have followed the same line of business as their father, but on a much larger scale. They are extensive manufacturers of mine supplies, and handle lumber to a large extent; also have a shop wherein they do turning for the supply of cable rollers for the mines. John has established a furniture store in Shickhinny, under the firm name of J. Kester & Son. The Kester brothers are successful businessmen, full of energy and enterprise. They both reside a mile north of Shickshinny, at a place called Koonsville, and have built themselves beautiful modern structures in which they reside. John has a farm of sixty-two acres, C.M. has less. On January 1, 1873, C.M. Kester married Miss Rose Myers, born in Fairmount Township, June 20, 1854, a daughter of Wilson and Roxanna Myers, by which union were born three children, two of whom are living: Maude and Myrtle. Mr. and Mrs. Kester and daughters are consistent members of the M.E. Church. John Kester married in May 1867, Miss Lavina Sorber, who was born in Newport Township, in 1844, a daughter of Adam and Sarah Sorber, and by her were born five children, four of whom are living; Hattie, Clarence, Martha and Lennie. Mr. Kester was in 1864 mustered into the United States service as a member of Company B. Ninety-seventh P.V.I., for one year. He is a member of the G.A.R. Post no. 257.

James KESTER, foreman of the Pennsylvania Canal Company was born in Schuylkill County, Pa., June 23, 1837, a son of John and Martha (Wright) Kester. His paternal grandfather, Jacob Kester, a native of Northampton County, was a pioneer of what is now Conyngham Township, this county, locating on what is now known as "the Nicely Farm," which he partially cleared, and died there. He there reared his family consisting of the following named children: John, Jacob, Daniel, Peter, Catherine (Mrs. Joseph Campbell) and Susan (Mrs. John Lebick.) Of these, John (father of our subject) was born in the old homestead and became a farmer, most of his life being spent in Union Township, where he cleared a small farm near Arch Bridge, and there died. His wife was a daughter of John C. Wright, and by her he had nine children who grew to maturity, viz.: Daniel, William, Jacob, James, John, Charles, Harrison, Susan A. (Mrs. John Baer) and Mary (Mrs. George La Bar.) Our subject was reared in Union Township, educated in the common schools and followed farming until he was twenty-five years old. On August 18, 1862, he enlisted in Company F., One Hundred and Forty-third, P.V., was wounded at the battle of the Wilderness and June 12, 1865, was honorably discharged. Since the war he has been a resident of Shickshinny and for twenty years has been in the employ of the Pennsylvania Canal Company. In July 1865, Mr. Kester married Sabina, daughter of Lewis Post, of Union Township, and has one son living, Elias post, who is married and is a successful druggist in Lopez, Sullivan Co., Pa. Mr. Kester is a member of the M.E. Church and of the G.A.R.; politically, he is a democrat, and is one of the school directors and councilmen of Shickshinny.

J.T. KERN, farmer, P.O., Pittston, was born in Exeter Township, May 4, 1819, and is a son of Henry and Anna (Linaberry) Kern, both of whom were born in New Jersey, in 1790. Henry was a son of Henry Kern, also a native of New Jersey, who was born in 1763, and removed to this county about 1815, locating in Exeter Township, where his granddaughter Ellen now resides. His farm consisted of 175 acres, under which there was an abundance of then undiscovered coal. He was a tanner by occupation, a vocation he gave up when he removed to Luzerne County. He died April 11, 1834, at the age of sixty-one years, having reared a family of eight children, all of whom are dead. His son Henry was about twenty-five years old when he came to this county. He was a farmer of considerable ability. In 1883 he removed from Exeter Township, this county to Lackawanna County, where he remained about sixteen years as a farmer. He however desired to return to his first point of location, where he spent the remainder of his days, dying January 19, 1849, at the age of fifty-eight year, he was much respected by his neighbors for his own worth as a man. His family consisted of seven children, two of whom are now living. J.T. is the third of the family in birth order. He was reared and educated in his native town and always-followed agricultural pursuits. He owns a farm of ten acres of surface, which he devotes to vegetables, of which he raises abundance, supplying the Pittston Market. In 1864, he married Miss Mary, daughter of Nathaniel and Hannah Honeywell, by whom he has had four children: William, Anna, Elizabeth, and Gertrude. Mr. Kern is a man of sound principles, and has been honored by his fellow citizens with several township offices, which he has filled with credit.

O.P. KESTER, was born in Greenwood Township, Columbia Co., Pa., June 20, 1831, and is a son of Jesse and Elizabeth (Parker) Kester. His paternal grandfather, Samuel Kester, a native of Chester County, Pa., with three brothers- Joseph, Aaron and Jacob- were among the pioneers of Mount Pleasant Township, Columbia Co., Pa., where they all cleared farms and died. The wife of Jesse Kester was a daughter of Ephraim Parker, formerly of Warren County, N.J., and one of the pioneers of Columbia County, Pa. By her he had seven children: Sarah A. (Mrs. Jacob Rishel), Rebecca (Mrs. Jonathan Ebner), Margaret, David, Ephraim, Oliver P., and Isaac. Our subject was reared in Columbia County, Pa., learned the trade of wheelwright, and followed the business for twenty-eight years, twenty-three years of the time in Sybertsville, of which place he has been a resident since 1835. Since 1878 he has been engaged in trucking and marketing. In 1853 Mr. Kester married Christiana, daughter of Matthew and Elizabeth (Vance) Ferguson, of Greenwood Township, Columbia Co., Pa., and by her he had five children: Elizabeth (Mrs. Charles Haines), Mary A. (Mrs. Franklin Drumheller), James H., Ira P. and Jennie M. Mr. Kester is a member of the M.E. Church. In politics, he is a Democrat and held the office of justice of the peace in Sugar Loaf Township fifteen years.

Thomas KERR, music dealer and real estate agent, was born in Scotland, December 16, 184, and is a son of Andrew and Mary (Wright) Kerr, also natives of Scotland. Their family consisted of five children, Thomas being the eldest, and three of them survive. They came to America in 1849, settling in Luzerne County, near Wilkes-Barre. After our subject received a liberal education in the public schools of this county, he embarked in mercantile business at No. 18 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre, dealing in all kinds of gentlemen’s furnishing goods, during which time he was also agent for the Howe Sewing Machine. After nearly five years’ residence at Wilkes-Barre, he removed to Altoona, where he was engaged in establishing general agencies for the Howe Sewing Machine Company. From Altoona he went to Hazleton, Pa., where he had a music store with a sewing machine department attached, and here he remained three years. He then proceeded to Alabama, where he was engaged in the butcher business at Shelby and Helena, and after two years he came from there to Plymouth, this county, January 3, 1879, and opened a music store. This he continued for five years, and then bought out D.K. Spry’s hardware business, which he carried on in connection with the music store for the following five years. In 1888 he established his present business, which he has since continued. Mr. Kerr has on several occasions crossed the continent, and made extensive tours of the West. He was married, December 15, 1860, to Miss Alice, daughter of Nathaniel and Kate (Evans) Harris, natives of Wales, and he has seven children, viz.: Kate, Mamie, Lillian, Ettie, Allie, Nellie and Elmer. Politically, our subject is a Republican, and in 1886 he was elected chief burgess of Plymouth borough. As an officer, he was firm in his convictions and believed in living up to the "letter of the law"; he was re-elected in 1887. The family belong to the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Kerr is a member of the Knights of Pythias and the F. & A.M.

Clarence Porter KIDDER is of the seventh generation of the line of James Kidder, Jr., who emigrated from Sussex, England, to New England, and located at Cambridge, Mass., in 1649. Lyman Church Kidder, the father of Clarence Porter Kidder, who was born at Woodstock, VT in 1802, came with his father to the Valley of Wyoming about 1823. Clarence Porter Kidder’s mother was Mary, daughter of Anderson Dana, Jr. The name Dana is one of the most conspicuous in the annals of the Wyoming Valley, many owning it having contributed to its welfare and good name in field and forum, in the pulpit and otherwise. Both families in fact, have been notably associated with the Valley’s history, and the interesting fact is here recalled that both the great-grandfathers of Clarence Porter Kidder were slain in the Massacre of Wyoming. Clarence Porter Kidder was a student at Wyoming Seminary, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn. And Union College, Schenectady, N.Y., where he took a degree. He was a volunteer and served in both the Antietam and Gettysburg campaigns with Wilkes-Barre companies. He read law with Caleb E. Wright and D.C. Harrington, and was admitted to practice April 4, 1864. For six years, beginning with 1865, he was councilman for the borough and for three years, beginning in 1871, was councilman for the city of Wilkes-Barre. In 1869 he was the Republican candidate for register of wills of the county, but was defeated by less than 300 votes, though the county was at that time strongly Democratic. Mr. Kidder has done good service for his party on the stump. On May 24, 1864, he married Louisa Amelia, daughter of Capt. Calvin Parsons, of Parsons, and they have three children, two sons and one daughter. One son is married, and the other son and the daughter are verging on manhood and womanhood.

Patrick KILLGALLON, who was, in his lifetime, a prominent citizen of Plains Township, was born in County Mayo, Ireland, March 14, 1838, a son of James and Mary (Gibbons) Killgallon. His father, who was a farmer, reared a family of seven children, of whom Patrick was the second. When he was twelve years old the family migrated to England, where he remained till 1864, a portion of the time working in the mines. He then came to America and located in Ashland, Pa., where he engaged in mining two years; in August 1867, he came to Mill Creek, where he passed the remainder of his days, dying March 28, 1892. He followed mining till 1881, when he retired from active life. At the time of his decease he owned personal property and real estate in Plains Township amounting to several thousand dollars; his success in life was wholly due to his own personal efforts. Mr. Killgallon was married in May 1855, to Miss Bridget Corrigan, of England, who died May 4, 1889, they had nine children, of whom are living: Mary, Annie, Patrick, James, John, and Daniel. Mr. Killgallon was member of the Catholic Church, of which his family are also members; he was a Democrat in politics, but voted for the best candidate; he was once appointed supervisor in Plains Township, by the court.

James KILLION, miner, Port Blanchard, was born in Warren County, Ohio, September 9, 1860, and is a son of Michael and Catharine (Connors) Killion, natives of County Roscommon, Ireland. The family settled in Pittston, this county, in 1864, where our subject recieved his education in the common schools. In 1869 he went to work as a slate picker and in 1874 entered the mines as a driver; at the age of seventeen years, he was employed as a driver, and since 1883 has been a miner in the employ of the Pennsylvania Coal Company. On June 20, 1884, Mr. Killion took unto himself as his partner in life, Sarah, daughter of John and Winifred (Brogan) Noon, of Port Griffith, this county, natives of County Mayo, Ireland, and the issue of this happy union is as follows: Kate, born May 4, 1885, John, born September 30, 1887, Michael, born May 4, 1889 and George born February 2, 1891. Mr. Killion is a member of the Roman Catholic Church and of the Ancient Order of Hibernians. In politics, he is a Democrat.

F.W. KINDRED, farmer, P.O. Sweet Valley, was born near Stanhope, Morris Co., N.J., August 29, 1833, son of Moses and Elicta (Henderson) Kindred, both of whom were born in New Jersey. Moses was a son of George Kindred, who was a native of France, and emigrated to this country when a young man. He located in Morris County, N.J., where he reared a family of thirteen, and died at a ripe old age. His son, Moses, began his business career in Morris County, N.J., near Dover, where he was a collier by occupation. He removed to this county about 1850, locating at Bear Creek, where he was engaged in the lumber trade. He remained there about ten years, and finally removed to White Haven, where he died in November 1871, aged sixty-two years. He was a hard working, honest and industrious man. Moses Kindred reared a family of seventeen children by two marriages. F.W. is the first child by the first marriage. He was reared and educated in Morris County, and always confined himself to agricultural pursuits. In 1859, he removed to Dallas where he resided two years, when he removed to Ross Township. He is now a well-to-do practical farmer, owning ninety-two acres of valuable farming land, upon which he has erected a beautiful house. His surroundings show him to be a man of taste and agricultural skill. In 1854 he married Miss Mary, daughter of George and Susannah Bush. There has been no issue by this union.

Henry KINES, merchant, Hazleton. In selecting subjects for a biographical and historical work of Luzerne County, it gives the writer pleasure to present the names of such men as Henry Kines. He is a native of Hessen, Germany, and was reared and educated in his native land. He worked in the mines of Germany until he reached the age of seventeen years (1855), when he determined to cast his lot in a foreign climate. He accordingly emigrated to America and settled in the desirable, then little, hamlet of Hazleton. In his new home he took up the trade of shoemaker and followed that industry as a journeyman until 1871, when he engaged in the boot and shoe mercantile business which he has since very extensively carried on. Mr. Kines is a man in whom the public can depend, his word is regarded to be as good as a note, and he has gained the well-earned confidence of the public. In fact he is one of the leading boot and shoe dealers in Luzerne County. When he first went into business his brother William was a partner, but later he sold out to Henry, and during the last eleven years the latter has been the sole owner and proprietor. In 1860 Mr. Kines was married to Miss Anna D. Rudolph, an admirable young lady of Hazleton, and they have seven children, viz.: Katherine, married to Henry Happich of Hazleton; Hiram, a clerk; John H., a jeweler; Gustavius, Lizzie, Annie and Harry, Jr. Mr. Kines is a member of the Hazleton Working Men’s beneficial Association of twenty-five years standing, and of the Seven Wise Men, twenty-two years. He has been a member of the borough council two terms, and his political views are of the true Democratic type.

John KING, miner, Inkerman, was born in Jenkins Township, November 14, 1859, and is the eldest of four children of Michael and Mary (Breen) King, of the same place, and natives of County Mayo, Ireland. Our subject received his education in the common schools and in 1869 was employed as a slate picker in the mines; in 1874 as a laborer; and since 1884 he has been employed by the Pennsylvania Coal Company as a miner. Mr. King was united in the holy bonds of matrimony July 17, 1886, with Mary, daughter of John and Catharine (Burke) Flanaghan, natives of County Kilkeny, Ireland, and their union has been blessed with three children, two of whom are living; Michael, born January 2, 1888 and Nellie, born March 19, 1891. Our subject is a Roman Catholic, a member of the A.O.H. and C.T.A.U. In politics, he is a Democrat.

Dana W. KINGSBURY, physician and surgeon, Nanticoke, ranks among the flourishing followers of his profession in this county. He was born in Huntington Township, a son of Daniel H. and Ester (Chapin) Kingsbury, both natives of Pennsylvania, the former of English descent, and the latter a descendant of John Chapin, an early pioneer of Luzerne County. He came to this county from Springfield, Mass., and settled in the then unbroken wilderness of what is now Huntington Township. The date of his arrival here is not positively known, but the records show that he was a taxable in that township in 1796. He was a descendant of Deacon Samuel Chapin, who was one of Boston’s freemen as early as 1638; he soon after removed to Springfield, Mass., where he died November 11, 1675. Dr. Kingsbury’s parents are still living. He has nine brothers and sisters, who are all living and prosperous. Our subject was educated at new Columbus and Orangeville Academies. He then taught school in this county from 1870 to 1879, and had marked success in that line, becoming one of the leading educators of Luzerne County. In 1879 he entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, Md., where he was graduated in 1882. He immediately engaged in the practice of his profession at Nanticoke, where he has since remained, now commanding a lucrative practice, and where he was repeatedly demonstrated his adaptation to the profession of his choice. The Doctor was married December 31, 1882, to Miss Emma Sharpless, of Harpsville, Columbia County, and they have four children: Oscar J., Ebean P., Erma V., and Russell Sage. Mr. Kingsbury is a Democrat in politics.

George D. KINGSLEY, superintendent of the Avondale Colliery, with residence at Kingston. This gentleman was born January 31, 1858, at Scranton, Pa., and is a son of S. Dwight and Anna (Kenyon) Kingsley, natives of Pennsylvania, and of New England parentage. Our subject was educated in the common schools of Lackawanna County, and in Whitestown Seminary, Whitestown, N.Y., where he completed his course in 1876. He then engaged in the drug business at Scranton, Pa., was appointed superintendent of the Avondale Colliery, of mine-disaster fame, where he is present employed. Mr. Kinsley was married in 1879, to Miss Lizzie Wolcott, of Kingston, Pa., a daughter of Peter Wolcott, and this union has been blessed with one child, Jeanette, who was born March 25, 1882.

John KINNEY, engineer, Delaware & Hudson Shaft No. 2, was born at Plymouth, Pa., October 28, 1864, and is the sixth in the family of eleven children of John and Johanna (Finley) Kiney, natives of County Tipperary, Ireland. The subject of this sketch was educated in the public schools of Plymouth and when but eight years of age began working about the mines during the summers, attending school in the winters. In 1882, he was employed as fireman by the company for whom he is now working, and continued as such until December 1891, when he was promoted to engineer, taking charge of the large pump engine at No. 2, which he has operated ever since. Mr. Kinney’s father was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, in 1828, and was educated in his native country. He came to America in 1860, and has until recently followed the vocation of a miner. He was married to Johanna Finley, and they reared a family of thirteen children, of whom William is now a resident of Leadville, Colo.; Mary is now Mrs. Tom Brown, of Plymouth; Edward resides at Leadville, Colo.; Helen is now Mrs. Phelix Doughtery; Maggie is the wife of James Fox; John is the subject of this sketch, in addition to which we have the names of Bridget, Johanna, Thomas, Kate and Dennis. The family attend the Catholic Church and in politics they are democrats.

Ira M. KIRKENDALL, wholesale grocer and dealer in flour and feed, North Wilkes-Barre, was born in Dallas, this county, in 1835, a son of William W. and Maria (Dereemer) Kirkendall, natives of New Jersey, who settled in Dallas Township about 1830; father was a farmer and lived and died in Dallas. His children were: Conrad, John S., George W., Ira M., William P., Anna E. (Mrs. Dwight Wolcott) and Charles W. Subject was reared in Dallas Township, educated in the public schools and began life, after attaining his majority, as clerk in a general store at Pittston, Pa., serving in that capacity, where he had charge of a lumber business for Pursel & McKeen for six years. Since 1865 he has been resident of Wilkes-Barre; in lumbar business up to 1871. In 1870 he was burgess of Wilkes-Barre, and was elected its first mayor in June 1871, for a term of three years. From 1875 to 1878 he was deputy sheriff of Luzerne County, under his brother, W.P. Kirkendall; from 1880 to 1883, a member of the firm of Kirkendall & Whiteman grocers, and since 1883, a member of Kirkendall Bros., wholesale flour and feed dealers. Mr. Kirkendall was married November 3, 1868, and has two children: Grace W. (Mrs. Charles A. Bartlett) and Frederick C. Politically Mr. Kirkendall is a democrat, and has represented the Fourth Ward of Wilkes-Barre in the city council since 1883.

W.H. KIRKENDALL, farmer, P.O. Nescopeck, was born June 4, 1851, on the farm in Nescopeck Township, where he now resides, a son of Hiram and Sarah (Buss) Kirkendall. His parental grandparents were Joseph and Margaret (Gruver) Kirkendall, and his great grandparents were Emanuel and Mary (Garrison) Kirkendall, all pioneers of Mifflin Township, Columbia Co., Pa. The children of Emanuel Kirkendall were Joseph, Levi, Betsey (Mrs. Michael Gruver), Rachel (Mrs. Henry Bellows), Sarah (Mrs. Fred Peek), Catherine (Mrs. John Mosteller), Cornelius and Leonard, of whom Joseph, the grandfather of our subject was a farmer, and passed most of his life in Mifflin Township, dying there in his seventy-seventh year. His wife was a daughter of Paul Gruver, of Mifflin Township, and by her he had seven children who grew to maturity: Stephen, Mahala (Mrs. Matthias Hartman), Hiram, Caroline (Mrs. John Swank), Emanuel, Margaret (Mrs. Lewis Creasey) and Catherine (Mrs. La Fayette Creasey.) Of them, Hiram, father of subject was born in Mifflin Township, October 17, 1819, and died May 10, 1882. In 1842, he settled in Nescopeck Township, on the farm occupied by our subject, cleared and improved it and died there. His wife was a daughter of Jonas and Elizabeth (Shellhart) Buss, who cleared and improved the farm, in Nescopeck Township, now owned by William Houck, and there died, their children were Judith, Mary, Elizabeth, Margaret, John, Sarah B., Hannah and Lucinda. The children of Hiram, and Sarah (Buss) Kirkendall were William H., James W. and Martha L. (Mrs. David Thomas). Our subject was reared on the old homestead where he has always resided. On February 8, 1883, he married Martha L., daughter of George and Mary (White) Connor, of Centre Township, Columbia Co., Pa., and they have five children: Mary E. Ralph C., Laura M., Helen G. and Florence M. Mr. Kirkendall is a member of the P.O.S. of A.; in politics he is a Republican.

William Penn KIRKENDALL, lumbar dealer, a member of the Kingston Lumber Company. Our subject is a native of Dallas, Luzerne County, where he still resides, although engaged in business in Kingston. He was born April 13, 1843, and is the youngest of seven children- four of whom are living – born to William W. and Maria (Dereamer) Kirkendall, both of whom were natives of New Jersey. William P. Kirkendall was educated in the common schools of Luzerne County and in 1860, engaged in the lumber business, which he followed for fourteen years, when in 1874, he became the Democratic nominee for sheriff of Luzerne County, was elected by over two thousand majority, and served three years. He then returned to farming at Dallas, where he remained about four years, when he embarked in his present business at Kingston. He was married January 1, 1866, to Miss Olive A., daughter of James and Lucinda (Honeywell) Patterson, natives of Pennsylvania. To this union were born one child- a daughter, Carrie- who died at the age of three years. Mrs. Kirkendall is a member of the M.E. Church. Socially Mr. Kirkendall is a member of the Masonic Lodge and the I.O.O.F. He is at present a member of the Dallas borough council; is also a prison commissioner which office he has held since 1880; has served three years as school director of Dallas Township; has been a member of council of the city of Wilkes-Barre; has also been a member of the Democratic county committee, of which he was chairman two years; a member of the State Democratic Committee; is director of the Dallas Union Agricultural Society, and served as president of the Luzerne Agricultural Society four years.

John G. KIRSCHNER, general merchant, Hazleton, was born November 10, 1840, in the providence of Hessen, Germany, and is a son of John and Katherine Kirschner, also natives of Germany. He was reared and educated in the land of his birth, and in 1860 came to America, locating at Hazleton, where he at once found employment in the mines. He was a miner until 1872 when he established his present business, which consists of a general grocery and dry-goods store, in connection with which he handles flour, feed, grain, and hay. Mr. Kirschner was united in marriage in 1861 with Miss Anna, daughter of Valentine Deis, a native of Germany, and to this union have been born nine children, namely, George, John, Conrad J, William A., Emil, Adam, Lizzie, Kate and Anna. In February 1892, Mr. Kirschner was elected assessor of the Republican ticket, his term expiring in 1895, he has also been president of the borough council for three years. The family are supporters of the German Lutheran Church.

George H. KIRWAN, physician and surgeon, Wilkes-Barre, was born at Hawley, Wayner Co., Pa., July 21, 1856, a son of Martin F. and Winifred (Morris) Kirwan and is of Irish descent. He was reared in Wilkes-Barre, educated in the public schools of that city, and Wyoming Seminary, Kingston, and in 1879, began the study of medicine with Dr. John T. Doyle, of Wilkes-Barre. On May 16, 1882, he was graduated from the Medical Department of Columbia College, New York, and has since been in the active practice of his profession in Wilkes-Barre, where he is recognized as a popular citizen as well as an expert physician. He is attending physician for the Luzerne County Prison; is a member of the Luzerne County Medical Society, of the State Medical Society, and of the American Medical Association. In politics he is a Democrat, and served as coroner of Luzerne County one term.

Levi KISHBOUCH, mason and farmer, P.O. Nescopeck, was born in Nescopeck Township, May 31, 1840, a son of Jacob and Lavina (Myers) Kishbouch. His paternal grandfather (formerly of New Jersey) was at one time a resident of Nescopeck, cleared a farm and resided in the township until his death. His children were Phebe (Mrs. John Bowkman), Margaret (Mrs. John Whatnecht), Levi, Tobias, Susanna (Mrs. William Shadd), Mary (Mrs. Solomon Stewart), Elizabeth (Mrs. Benjamin Sloyer), Rebecca (Mrs. William Miller) and Silas J. Our subject was reared and educated in Nescopeck. He learned the mason’s trade, which he followed twenty years; cleared a farm in Nescopeck Township, and has been engaged in farming since 1871. On April 1, 1861, he married Maria E., daughter of George and Catherine (Nuss) Miller, of Nescopeck, and they have eight children: Austin, Calvin, Leslie, Ida, Minnie, Elmira, Edward, and Levi. Mr. Kishbouch is a member of the Presbyterian Church; in politics is a Democrat, and has been assessor of Nescopeck fifteen years.

Reuben KISNER (deceased), was born in Salem Township, October 20, 1816, and is a son of Jacob and Margaret (Seybert) Kisner, the former of whom was a wheelwright by trade and also a farmer. The paternal grandfather, Michael Kisner and maternal grandfather, Sebastian Seybert, both of German descent, were among the pioneers of Salem Township. The Children born to Jacob Kisner were: Kate, John, Susan, Polly, William, Sally, Betsy and Reuben. The subject of this sketch was reared in Salem Township, where he resided all his life, a prominent farmer and respected citizen. He married, September 20, 1851, Cordelia, daughter of Nicholas and Catherine (Beam) Seybert, of Brier Creek, Columbia Co., Pa., and she survives him as well as five children, viz.: Margaret C. (Mrs. Joseph Eek), Mary C., Nelson, Annie and Lida. Mr. Kisner was a member of the Lutheran Church and in politics he was a Democrat. He died August 23, 1882.

William KISNER, a prominent businessman of Hazleton, was born in Salem Township, January 11, 1809. His father, Jacob Kisner, was a native of Northampton County, Pa., where he was born in 1772. William Kisner’s grandfather, John Kisner, who died at Berwick, Pa, October 4, 1804, was probably born in Germany. Our subject was one of the pioneers of the town of Hazleton, having settled there over fifty years ago. He has been one of the active businessmen of the place, as merchant, real estate dealer, and banker. He served for many years as justice of the peace, and in numerous township and borough offices. He organized the Hazleton savings Bank, and was its first president. He is the founder of the prosperous town of West Hazleton. Mr. Kisner is and long has been a member of the Presbyterian Church, and in politics has always voted the democratic ticket. At the advanced age of eighty-four he is hale and hearty, and has no recollection of having been sick for even a day in half a century. He was married to Boann Seybert, a daughter of Sebastian Seybert, of Salem Township. Mrs. Kisner died the present year (1892) having almost reached the end of fifty years of married life. The children of William and Boann Kisner are Elliott P. and Gillingham F., both of whom live at Hazleton, where they are actively engaged in business.

Elliott P KISNER was born at Hazleton, August 1, 1845, son of William and Boann Kisner. He attended the public schools at Hazleton and a preparatory school at Franklin, N.Y., and entered the sophomore class in Hamilton College in 1864, graduating with the class of 1867. He became a law student in the office of Hon. Edmund L. Dana, Of Wilkes-Barre, attended lectures at the law school of Columbia College in the winter of 1867 and 1868, attended lectures the following winter in the law department of the University of Pennsylvania, from which he graduated in the spring of 1869. He was admitted to the bar of Luzerne County in August 1869, and has since practiced law at Wilkes-Barre and Hazleton. Mr. Kisner has been interested for a number of years with his father and brother in promoting the growth of West Hazleton, a prosperous and growing borough. He has served as director, president and vice president of the Hazleton National Bank. Mr. Kisner is an ardent Democrat and has served for three years as chairman of the Democratic State committee of his State. He took an active part in organizing the present city government of Hazleton, and is president of the common council.

George W. KITCHEN, proprietor of hotel at Hunlock Creek, was born in Ross Township, this county, August 29, 1852, as on of John and Mary (Keller) Kitchen, both of whom were born in Columbia County, Pa. They removed to this county in 1847, locating in Ross Township, where in the course of four years, they bought a farm containing seventy-seven acres of valuable land. John Kitchen was a practical farmer and a man of influence in his town. He lived to be seventy-eight years of age, dying in 1876. His family consisted of nine children, seven of whom grew to maturity and are now living, George W. being the fifth in order of birth. He was reared and educated in Ross Township at the common school and resided at home until he reached the age of eighteen years, when he set out to make his own way in life. He followed various vocations; finally settling down to hotel keeping, at which business he has succeeded. In 1878 he married Miss Martha A., daughter of Hiram and Susannah Croop, and to them were born five children, four of whom are now living: Susannah, fanny, Frease and Fred W. In 1885 he removed to Hunlock Creek, where he is now a popular hotelkeeper. He keeps a good orderly house, well patronized by the traveling public, and his bar is stocked with the purest of liquors, his cigars being of the finest flavor, while his table is always provided with the most inviting delicacies of any hotel in the surrounding country. Mr. Kitchen owns real estate in Nanticoke, besides other property, elsewhere. Socially, he is a member of the I.O.O.F., and Jr. O.U.A.M.; politically he is a Republican.

Henry KITCHEN, farmer, P.O. Sweet Valley, was born in Union Township, March 15, 1849, a son of John and Mary (Keller) Kitchen, both of whom were born at Rohrsburgh, Columbia County and removed to this county about 1839, locating to Union Township. John Kitchen owned 127 acres of land, some of which he sold to his son. In 1864 he removed to Ross Township, where he took land from the woods out of which to make his farm, and during his lifetime cleared about twenty acres and erected some buildings. He was a hard-working man, honest and industrious, and he died in 1875, when fifty-four years of age. His family consisted of nine members, five of whom are living. Henry is the sixth by birth, and was reared and educated in Ross Township. He has always confined himself to farming and lumbering. In 1864, at the age of sixteen, he was mustered into the U.S. service as a private in Company C, One Hundred and Ninety-ninth, P.V.I., and after the surrender of Lee, was transferred to the One Hundred and Eighty-eighth Regiment. He was honorably discharged in October 1865, and now enjoys a pension. On his return from the army our subject again took up agricultural pursuits. On January 21, 1875, he married Miss Mary A., daughter of Sylvester and Elizabeth White, and of this union were four children born, all of whom are living: James N., Frank A., Ida M. and Cora B. Mrs. Kitchen was born in Ross Township July 19, 1854; she is a member of the Christian Church. Mr. Kitchen owns seventy-seven acres of land and is a good and practical farmer.

Joseph KITCHEN, farmer, P.O. Irish Lane, was born in Columbia County, Pa., near Rohrsburgh, June 19, 1821. He is a son of Joseph and Susannah (Cavanee) Kitchen, both of whom were born in Columbia County, the former in 1783. Joseph was the son of Wheeler Kitchen, a native of New Jersey, who removed to Columbia County, at an early age, where he died in 1835, at a ripe age. The Kitchens are well-to-do farmers and prominent men. Joseph Kitchen died in Columbia County in February 1822, his wife died in 1835. Their family consisted of ten children, who grew to maturity, two of whom are now (1892) living. Joseph Jr., is the youngest. He was reared and educated in Mount Pleasant Township, Columbia County. He has always devoted himself to agricultrial pursuits. He removed to this county in 1839, locating in Ross Township, where he rented farms for a few years. In 1851, he bought his present farm of 115 acres, which he made out of the wilderness. He now has a model farm, fine outbuildings and a house with modern improvements. In 1842, he married Miss Nancy, daughter of Elias and Elizabeth Long, to whom were born three children, who are living: Wheeler, Elias and Susannah. The latter married John Kalor. Mr. Kitchen is a practical farmer, and a worth man who attends strictly to his own business.

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 Mary Ann Lubinsky
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