JO - JU Surnames

History of Luzerne County, Pa.,

by H.C. Bradsby, 1893

CHRISTOPHER C. JONES, contractor and builder, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Plains, this county, December 11, 1847, a son of Levi and Eleanor (Bryan) Jones. His father was a native of Luzerne county, a cabinet-maker and boat-builder by occupation, and died December 11, 1879, in his sixty-sixth year. His wife was a daughter of Charles and Rebecca (Wilson) Bryant, natives of New Jersey, who settled at Forty Fort in 1825, residing there until they died, the former at eight-four years of age. Levi Jones was the father of six children who grew to maturity; John, James, Christopher C., Levi, Lewis C. and Ellen (Mrs. J. H. Nagle0. Our subject was reared and educated in Wilkes-Barre, served an apprenticeship of four years at the carpenter=s trade with H. C. Perry, and worked as a journeyman twenty years. Since 1871, with the exception of four years, during which time he was a foreman for J. H. Fisher, contractor, he has been in business for himself as a contractor and builder. He was a delegate to the Democratic State Convention in Harrisburg in 1889, and is now serving his first term as a member of the city council from the First Ward, to which office he was elected in 1892.

D. T. Jones, physician and surgeon, Plymouth, was born in Carmarthenshire, South Wales, October 31, 1857, and is a son of William and Margaret (Thomas) Jones, also natives of Wales. Our subject was educated at Bedford College, and at St. Thomas Hospital, London, England. He came to American, and began the practice of medicine at Plymouth, this country, where he is at present located. He married September 8, 1885, to Miss Anna, second daughter of Daniel and Margaret (Edwards) Edwards, natives of Wales, but now residents of Kingston, Pa. The Doctor is a member of the Luzerne County Medical Society. In politics he votes the Republican ticket.

Donald X. Jones, farmer, Fairview township, P. O. Mountain Top, was born in Breconshire, Wales, February 10, 1844, a son of David and Elenore (James) Jones, the former of whom was a farmer. They had two children, of whom David X. is the younger. He was reared on his father=s farm, living with him till he was twenty-four old, when he quit the farm and went to work in the mines where he worked until 1880, in which year he came to this country. He secured work in the coal mines in Wilkes-Barre, this county, in the Empire Colliery, and remained there until 1888, when he gave up the coal work and went to teaming in and around the city. At the end of a year he leased a farm in Fairview township, where he has since resided, paying particular attention to stock breeding, and he has at this date a well stocked farm. On November 28, 1863, Mr. Jones was married to Jane, daughter of David and Catherine (Williams) Jenkins, and their union was blessed with three children, viz: Jennie E. (at home), Elizabeth (married to William Miller, of Fairview township) living with her mother-in-law in that township) and David at home. Mr. and Mrs. Jones and family are all members of the Puritan Church of Wilkes-Barre. In politics he is a Republican and has, during his residence in this county, held offices under that party.

Edward J. Jones, bottler, Plymouth, was born in Glamorganshire, South Wales, July 1, 1861, and is the third in a family of five children of David R. and Ann (Williams) Jones, also natives of South Wales. The family came to America in 1865, and located at Johnstown, Pa., where the children were reared and educated. They removed to Plymouth, this county, in 1877, where the father of our subject took charge of the Welsh Baptist Church, continuing there until his death, which occurred in September, 1886; he had been educated for the ministry in London, England, and was ordained at the early age of seventeen years. After coming to Plymouth he engaged in the jewelry business on the corner of Center avenue and Main street, and his son, Edward J., was employed about the store as a clerk. This business they followed for four years, selling out at the end of that time to Walton. In 1883 the subject of this sketch established his present industry, the manufacturing of all kinds of carbonated drinks, which are bottled at the Plymouth Bottling Works, also operated my Mr. Jones. He employs three men, and keeps two teams with which to deliver his beverages; he also handles bock-beer. Mr. Jones resides with his mother at No. 73 Willow street, Plymouth. In politics, he is a Republican. The family adhere to the Welsh Baptist Church.

Emmanuel Jones, retired, Inkerman, was born in Glamorganshire, Wales, Ma 1, 1817, and is a son of John and Mary (Thomas) Jones, natives of the same place, who reared a family of twelve children, of whom Emmanuel is sixth in order of birth. Our subject received his education in his native place, and worked in the mines there up to a time of his emigration to America. He landed in Philadelphia May 3, 1849, and located in Schuylkill county, PA., where he worked at his old trade, the of mining, until the year 1854. He then went to Montour county, remaining there one year, coming to Inkerman, this county, in1855. He was employed as a miner by the Pennsylvania Coal Company from that time until 1833, and as a watchman until his retirement in 1890. Mr. Jones was married February 10, 1842, to Ann, daughter of Moses and Ann Edwards, natives of Wales. She dying in 1843. Our subject married in May, 1844, Elizabeth, daughter of David and Catharine (Jenkins) Morris, also natives of Wales. This wife died February 18, 181, and he married March 4, 1872, Phoebe Morris (sister of his second wife), who still lives. Mr. Jones is a member of the Congregational Church, and of the I.O.O.F.; in politics he is a Republican.

Enoch I. Jones, miner, Wilkes-Barre, was born at Dudley, Staffordshire, England, August 17, 1842, and is a son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Incher) Jones, both also natives of England, the mother of Cornwall. When our subject was seven years old, his parents left Dudley, England, with five sons and one daughter, and emigrated to Nova Scotia. Here Enoch I. Was educated in the common schools, and at the age of eleven years began life in the mines, working until fifteen years of age when he accepted the position of sexton of Christ Church, Albion Mines, which he held six years. He then resumed mining there until 1869, in which year he came to Pennsylvania, locating in Plymouth, this country, where he followed mining until 1888 when he removed to Wilkes-Barre, where he still resides engaged in mining. For one year he was inside contractor for the Conyngham Mine, and holds a certificate from the Mining Board of Pennsylvania, (of Date August 24, 1891), as fully qualified to fill the position of mine foreman. Mr. Jones was married February 9, 1853 to Barbara, daughter of Obadiah and Ann (Gordon) Turnbull, now of Plymouth, and they have five children living; Obadiah, George, Jesse, Harry and Robert. Mr. Jones is a member of St. Stephen=s Episcopal Church. Socially his is a member of the Sons of St. George and the Good Templars. In politics he is a Prohibitionist.

F. M. Jones, farmer, P. O. Slocum, was born in Owego township, Tioga Co., N.Y., January 11, 1826. He is the son of Elisha and Esther (Bells) Jones. The former was born in Massachusetts, the latter in Vermont. Elisha is a descendant of Welsh parentage. His ancestors emigrated to this country, locating in the eastern States. In 1818, Elisha removed to Owego, N.Y. By occupation he was a farmer and drover; also engaged in the lumber business. Indeed he was a thorough going business man, and one whose influence was mighty in many circles of society. He died in 1829, aged thirty-six years. His wife died in 1885, aged ninety-six years. Their family numbered seven children. F. M. Jones is the only surviving member of that family, and the fifth in order of birth. He was reared and educated at Little Meadows, Susquehanna county, and at several institutions of learning at various points of important. He contemplated the study of medicine, but impaired health at the time forbade its completion. He was seven years of his life in the mercantile business in Bradford county, where he succeeded in making for himself a host of friends. In 1852, he removed to this county, locating in Slocum (now Newport) township. In 1855, he married Miss Mary A., daughter of C. F. and Hannah Leuder, and to them were born ten children, eight of whom are living in 1892; Frances M., Clara A., Cora E., Hannah I., Mary E., Martha S., William E., Christian F., Charles F., and Isaac H. Mrs. Mary A. Jones was born in Hanover township, July 1, 1835. Mr. Jones was a very active man in his younger days. He has held several offices of importance in the township and county; he has served as constable and assessor, and in several minor offices; at various times and under various exigencies he has been called upon to discharge the office of deputy sheriff. He was the leading spirit in cutting off Slocum from Newport, and the first postmaster in the new township, after it was formed. It was called ALutsey.@ He owns 182 acres of choice land, which he works in a profitable and practical manner. He keeps himself abreast of or up with the times. He is a member of the I.O.O.F. Politically he is a Republican.

George Jones, outside foreman of Humbold mines, was born in Glamorganshire, South Wales, April 1, 1853, and is the eldest in a family of thirteen children of John and Mary (Jones) Jones, also natives of Wales, who came to America in 1859, settling in Nesquahoning, Pa., where they remained but a short time, afterward removing to Audenreid, same State, where the children were educated and reared. The subject of this sketch commenced his mining experience by picking slate at Silver Brook, where he worked several years, and then began firing at the Yorktown Mines, working there one year, after which he ran pump-engines for a year at No. 5, soon thereafter taking charge of the hoisting engines at No. 4, which he ran two years. In 1875 he visited the land of his birth, and after almost a year spent there returned to Yorktown, and went about his old occupation of firing. At that he continued but a short time, however, as he again took charge of a hoisting engine at No. 6, which he ran two years. He was then given charge of machinery at these mines two years, at the end of which time he went to Black Ridge, where he worked nearly two years; thence went to the Tomhicken Mines, and had charge of timbering for seven years. In 1899 he came to Humboldt Mines, and took charge as outside foreman, where he has since been employed. Mr. Jones was united in marriage September 7, 1876. With Miss Eliza, daughter of William Kenvin, of Hazelton, and five children have blessed this union, namely: John, William, Howard, Margaret, and Josephine. In political matters Mr. Jones is a Republican: the family attend the Methodist Episcopal church.

Gomer E. Jones, general mine foreman, Stockton, was born in Monmouthshire, South Wales, April 21, 1855. He is the son of Evan T. and Mary (Lewis) Jones, natives of Wales, who came to America in 1868, locating in Wanamie, where their children, live in number, of which Gomer is the second, were reared and educated. Mr. Jones began work about the mines at the tender age of seven years, and has since continuously followed mining in its different branches. In 1878, he was appointed mine foreman for the Upper Lehigh Coal Company. In 1889, he came to Stockton and accepted the position of general mine foreman for Linderman, Skeer & Co., which position he now holds. He now has charge of six mines in the vicinity of Stockton. Mr. Jones has been twice married: first on July 4, 1876, to Miss Ida J., daughter of John W. Crouse of Wanamie, Pa.: nine children were born to this union, namely Jerobabel (deceased), John W. Gomer E., Jr., Frank W., Charles, Ida j., Evan T., Mary E. and Jane. Mrs Ida Jones died in August,1, 1891, and Mr. Jones was married August, 1892, to Miss Isabella, daughter of James Brookmire of Upper Lehigh, Pa. Mr. Jones is a member of the I.O.O.F. and the F.&A.M.

Harry C. Jones, round-house man for E.B. Coxe & Co., Drifton, P.O. Freeland, was born at Lykens, Daupin Co., Pa., July 3, 1864, and is the son of Charles and Ruth (Thomas) Jones, natives of Wales, the former of whom died October 19, 1883, and the latter now resides at Jeddo. In the family there are five children, one of whom is elder than our subject. When he was about two years of age his parents came to Luzerne county, locating at Yorktown, Carbon county, and eleven years later came to Drifton. Mr. Jones began life at the eleven, picking slate, which occupation he followed during the summers, attending school in winters. He worked around the mines in various capacities until he was fifteen years old, when he engaged in firing a locomotive, in the employ of Cox Bros. & Co. This position he filled about three years, at the end of which time he was promoted to locomotive engineer, in which capacity he continued nearly four years at Drifton, when he resigned and went to Parsons, where he was in the employ of the Delaware & Hudson Coal Company eighteen months. He was then engaged in running a locomotive for the Lehigh Valley coal company. After remaining in Parsons about three years, he returned to Jedda, where he was locomotive engineer for B. Markle & Son nearly two years, and in January, 1891, he accepted his present position, which involves considerable responsibility. Mr. Jones was united in marriage, December 26, 1886, with Miss Mary Ann Cowans, an estimable young lady of Oakdale, Luzerne Co., Pa. He is a member of the P. O. S. of A., Jr. O. U. A. M., and I. O. B. M. In politics he is a Republican.

Henry H. Jones, hardware merchant, tanner and plumber, P. O. Wilkes-Barre, was born at Cardiff, Glamorganshire, Wales, June 1, 1839, a son of Henry and Betsy (Smith) Jones. He lived in Wales until he reached his majority and in 1860 came to American locating at Five Points, near Pottsville, Pa., where for five years he worked in the mines. He removed in 1865 to Wilkes-Barre, where he has since resided, and was employed in the mines until 1890. In 1888 he established the business in which he is now engaged. Mr. Jones married, in 1865, to Miss Gwennie, daughter of Nathaniel and Catharine (Evans) Griffith, of Schuylkill county, Pa., and has five children: Nathaniel, Henry, Littie, Kate and Benjamin. Mr. Jones and wife are members of the Welsh Baptist Church. Mr. Jones has been a member of the I. O. O. F. since 1863, and is also an Ivorite, and in politics is a Republican.

Isaiah Jones, Wilkes-Barre, is the fifth son of Abram Jones, a native of Slocum, this county. Mr. Jones was born November 5, 1833, in Chester county, and received his early education in the schools of that place. He was united in marriage, February 21, 1857, with Rebecca Arnold, a daughter of Abram Arnold. Nine children have been born to this marriage: Abraham, Joseph, Ella, Anning, Emma, Winfield, Eva, Irvin and Annie. Mr. Jones was employed Christian Lueder at Slocum, for twelve years. In 1887 he came to Wilkes-Barre and entered the employ of the sons of Mr. Lueder, who operate a bus line in the city.

James Jones, agent, Yatesville, was born in Herefordshire, England, February 21, 1842, and is a son of William and Sarah (Jones) Jones, also natives of England. They had a family of seven children (our subject being second in the order of birth), all of whom died in early childhood except Henry (who lives in Parsons, Luzerne Co., Pa.) And James. The subject of this sketch emigrated to Canada in 1863, making his first stay in Toronto, Ontario, where he resided some seven months, during which time he was in the employ of Robert Walker & Sons, merchants. In April, 1864, he moved to Scranton, thence to Yatesville, Pa., and was employed as a miner by the Pennsylvania Coal Company until 1873, when he moved to Mill Creek, this county, and went into business as a general merchant. In 1882 he returned to Yatesville, where he has since been engaged as a general agent. In England, and also in Canada, Mr. Jones was a member of the Primitive Methodist Church, but subsequently united with the M. E. Church; he was licensed to preach, and in 1881 was ordained a local deacon by Bishop E. G. Andrews, at the annual Conference held at Waverly, N. Y. Mr. Jones in one of the most active members of the communion in this part of the country, as he holds the positions of superintendent of the Sunday school and trustee and steward of the Church. On April 16, 1872, he was untied in marriage with Jane E., daughter of Francis and Mary (Pratt) Yates, residents of Yatesville, and of English extraction. Politically, our subject is a Republican Prohibitionist: socially, he is a member of the I. O. O. F. He is one of the directors of the Y. M. C. A. at Pittston, and is a member of the Miners= Exchange Committee. In May, 1892, he was appointed director of the poor for three years, for the district embracing Jenkins township, Pittston borough and Pittston township, and in February, 1892, was elected to the school board, also for a period of three years.

James D. Jones, dealer in general merchandise, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Cardiganshire, South Wales, April 10, 1840, a son of David and Mary (Alban) Jones. He was reared on a farm in Wales, educated in the public schools, and in 1865 came to America, where he spent two years on a farm at Jackson, Ohio. In 1867, he located at Wilkes-Barre, where he was employed in the mines up to 1889, when he embarked in the merchandise business, in which he has since continued. Mr. Jones was married to Rachel, daughter of David Morgan, of Wales, and by her he had seven children: Mary, Elizabeth, Maggie A., David C., Thomas, Morgan and Blanche. He is a member of the Welsh M. E. Church and of the I. O. R. M, and of the Foresters: in politics he is a Republican.

JENKIN J. JONES, fire boss in the Delaware Colliery, Miners Mills, was born in South Wales, December 29, 1847, and is a son of Jenkin B. and Elizabeth (Parry) Jones, who came to America in 1857, followed in 1858 by the family. The father was engaged in mining, successively, in St. Louis, Mo., six months; Minersville, Ohio, one year; Pittston, Pa., two years; as mine foreman at Hyde Park, two years; at Providence, four years, and in 1868 he removed to Miners Mills, where he died February 8, 1886, at the age of sixty years, being survived by his widow till October 5, 1890. Their family consisted of three children, two of whom are living, viz.: Jenkin J. and Elizabeth (Mrs. Daniel D. Davis). Our subject received a common-school education, and began working in the mines at the age of seven years, which vocation he has since followed, chiefly in Luzerne, Lackawanna and Wyoming Counties, including ten years mining and five years as foreman. He built his present residence and removed therein in 1871. In March, 1864, Mr. Jones enlisted, at Scranton, in Company C., Sixteenth P. V. C.; was with the army at Petersburg, participated in many skirmishes and was also on detached service; he was mustered out in August, 1865. Mr. Jones was married, November 11, 1867, to Miss Margaret J., daughter of John M. and Mary (Daniels) Jones, and they have had born to them seven children, four of whom are living, viz.: Mordecai J., John C., Mair and Morgan M. Mrs. Jones and the children are members of the Welsh Congregational Church. Mr. Jones is a member of the I. O. O. F., A. O. K. of M. C., K. of H., Ivorites, Improved Order of Red Men, and of the G. A. R.; he is a Republican in his political views, and has been a member of the borough council.

JENKIN T. JONES, grocer, Plymouth, was born May 29, 1859, in Cardiganshire, South Wales, and is fourth in the family of five children of Thomas and Hannah (Reese) Jones, also natives of Wales. The family came to America in 1869, and located at Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Our subject worked in and around the mines till he was twenty-two years of age, when he went to the Wyoming and Commercial Colleges, at which latter he graduated in 1884. He then took a position with the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, at Plymouth, and worked there one year, after which he took a similar position with the Delaware & Hudson Canal & Coal Company in the same place. With them he worked two years and then opened for his own account the business he is at present conducting. Mr. Jones was married in February, 1885, to Sarah, daughter of Peter and Mary (Lippete) Richardson, natives of England. Politically, our subject adheres to the Republican party; and he is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and Knights of the Golden Eagle. The family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church.

JOHN JONES, engineer at Slope No. 11, Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company. This intelligent and skillful engineer was born in South Wales, October 9, 1847, and is the sixth in the family of ten children of Evan and Ellen (Watkins) Jones, also natives of Wales. Our subject was but a few months old when the family came to America, locating at Summit Hill, Carbon Co., Pa., where the children were educated and reared. Our subject did general outside and inside work about the mines until twenty-three years of age, when he learned engineering at Plymouth, Pa., and he has since followed that vocation. He has been in his present position as hoisting engineer at No. 11 since 1881, and fully merits the confidence imposed in him by his employers. Mr. Jones was united in marriage, December 25, 1875, to Catherine, daughter of Louis and Catherine (Jones) Harris, natives of Wales, and six children have blessed this union, namely: Margaret, Mary, Lewis J., Evan, Henry and Catherine, the latter being now deceased. The mother of these children died August 15, 1888. The family attend the Welsh Baptist Church, and in politics Mr. Jones votes the Republican ticket.

JOHN D. JONES, engineer at the Gaylord Colliery. This pleasant and gentlemanly young man was born at Dowlais, Glamorganshire, South Wales, and is a son of John D. and Margaret (Thomas) Jones, also natives of South Wales. The family came to America in 1866, locating at Coalburgh, Ohio, where the subject of this sketch received his educational training. In 1870, they removed to Plymouth, this county, where John D. received the earliest rudiments in coal mining--picking slate--which he worked at for about two months; then took different positions incidental to coal mining, such as inside door-keeper, loading coal, firing, etc., until 1878, when he was promoted to engineer. He ran pumps at the Gaylord until 1879, when he was given charge of the large hoisting engines at the Gaylord Colliery, which he has worked ever since, and which hoist 1,300 tons of coal daily from a depth of 573 feet. He also had charge of the fan-propelling engine. Mr. Jones has not only to keep this great amount of machinery in working order, but also has charge of twenty-eight large boilers and furnaces, which he has to inspect and keep in condition, and it may be added that the position of hoisting engineer is not an enviable one, as the responsibility is very great. Mr. Jones was united in marriage September 6, 1879, with Miss Kate, daughter of Joseph and Diana (Lewis) Morris, natives of Pennsylvania, and one child, Ralph, was born to this union June 9, 1883. The little voyager, however, was not destined to sail on life's rough seas for long, as he was called to cross the Dark River, December 25, 1889. Mr. Jones is a member of the English Congregational Church; a member of the I. O. O. F. and Knights of the Mystic Chain. Politically he is a Republican.

JOHN F. JONES, inside foreman of the South Wilkes-Barre Colliery No. 5, Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Flintshire, Wales, March 27, 1854, and is a son of Robert and Ann (Evans) Jones. He was reared and educated in his native country, and when twelve years of age began life in the lead mines, where he remained four years; later he engaged in coal and slate mining. He came to America in 1879, locating in Plymouth, where he engaged in mining fifteen months; in June, 1880, he moved to Wilkes-Barre, Pa., where he was in the employ of the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company until 1884, when he was employed by the Hillman Vein Company six years--first three years as fire boss, and the last three years as mine foreman. On December 1, 1890, he left them to fill a position in the South Wilkes-Barre Colliery. In February, 1889, he married Mary, daughter of John and Elizabeth James, of Carmarthenshire, South Wales, where she was born and reared; she came to America in 1884. Mr. and Mrs. Jones have one son, Robert John. Our subject is a member of the Welsh Presbyterian Church, and of the Ivorites; in politics he is a Republican.

JOHN G. JONES, contractor, and alderman of the Fourteenth Ward, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Denbighshire, North Wales, August 3, 1830, a son of John and Eleanor (Williams) Jones. He was reared and educated in his native country, where he learned the builder's trade, and for thirteen years he worked in the city of Liverpool, England. In 1866 he was sent by his firm to Merionethshire, North Wales, to Carnarvenshire, to superintend a slate quarry, remaining there seven years. In 1880 he came to America, settling in Wilkes-Barre, where he has since resided, and in the fall of the same year he began work in the Franklin Mine, as a timber man. In the latter part of 1881 he was appointed fire boss, and on the death of the assistant superintendent in 1884, was appointed to fill the vacancy, which position he held until 1888, when he retired from the mine. He has since been engaged as a contractor and builder, spending two seasons at Richland, N.J., erecting dwellings, as well as doing business in Wilkes-Barre. On March 11, 1851, Mr. Jones married Mary, daughter of Thomas and Fanny (Jones) Strone, of North Wales, and has three children: John H., Frances (Mrs. Hugh H. Pugh), and Mary E. (Mrs. John T. Morgan). Mr. Jones is a member of the Second Welsh Congregational Church, and of the K. of P. and I. O. R. M.; in politics he is a Republican, and was elected alderman of the Fourteenth Ward of Wilkes-Barre in February, 1891, for a term of five years.

JOHN R. JONES, one of the oldest residents of Ashley, was born in Monmouthshire, South Wales, April 28, 1832, a son of John and Ann (Lewis) Jones. The father, who was a wheelwright, reared a family of sixteen children, of whom our subject is the fourth in number, and the only one living. Mr. Jones was educated in South Wales, and at the age of seven years began working about the mines. In 1851 he came to America, where he has been engaged in mining at Dover, N.J.; Johnstown, Ohio; Coalfield, Va.; Johnstown, Ohio; Holidaysburg, Pa.; Minersville, Pa.; Scranton, Pa. (eight and a half years); Summit Hill, Pa.; Dutch Town, Pa. After keeping a saloon in Hazleton, Pa., for nine months, he moved to Ashley, where he followed mining until 1891, when he retired from active life. He has made three visits to Europe since coming to America. He enlisted in both emergency calls during the Civil War. December 8, 1851, Mr. Jones married Miss Ann, daughter of Reese and Mary Edwards, of Wales, and by her had one child, George, who is in Wales. In 1857, he was married to Mrs. Ann Harper, daughter of John and Betsy (Fowler) Russell, natives of Wales, and widow of John Harper, by whom she had two children: Sarah (Mrs. William White), and Elizabeth (Mrs. William Richards, Grass Valley, Cal.). Of this union were born four children, viz: William, who died in Cuba at the age of thirty-one years; John R.; Ellen (Mrs. Isaac Collborn), and Isaac, brakeman, of West Pittston. Our subject was married, the third time, December 17, 1874, to Mrs. Susanna Harding, daughter of John and Hannah (Blunt) Platt, natives of North Wales, and widow of Robert Harding [by whom she had two children: Hannah (Mrs. Samuel Kindred), and John, machinist, of Altoona, Pa.], and by her had one child, Annie, who died at the age of eight years. Mr. Jones is a steadfast Republican in his political views.

JOHN R. JONES, merchant, Ashley, was born in Hyde Park, Pa., October 17, 1862, and is a son of John R. and Ann (Russell) Jones. He was educated in the public school at Ashley. He worked eight years about the breaker, sixteen months as brakeman on the P. & L. E. R. R., at Pittsburgh; four years and nine months as brakeman on the C. R. R. of New Jersey. He lost his left leg November 6, 1888, and in the following year engaged in his present business. March 18, 1886, Mr. Jones married Miss Matilda, daughter of Edward and Catherine Goff, natives of Ireland, and by her has three children: Annie, Edward, and Matilda. He is a Republican in his political views.

JOHN R. JONES, druggist, Miners Mills, was born in Monmouthshire, England, December 11, 1868, and is a son of William R. (Edwards) Jones. He was educated in the common schools, and embarked in life working about the mines, which he followed five years; he then engaged in the drug business, which he has since followed. In 1890, he engaged in business for himself. Mr. Jones was married February 19, 1890, to Miss Jennie, daughter of Thomas M. Reese, formerly of Miners Mills; they have one child, Willard. He and wife attend the Baptist Church, at Parsons, of which Mrs. Jones is a member; he is a member of the K. of P., I. O. O. F., I. O. R. M., and the Sons of Temperance, and politically he is a Republican.

JOSIAH M. JONES, engineer at Washington Colliery, Plymouth, was born in Northumberland County, Pa., April 20, 1864, and is the eldest in the family of eight children of Abram E. and Mary (Morgans) Jones, also natives of Pennsylvania. Our subject was reared and educated in Luzerne County, and until 1887 did general work about the mines. He then began firing at the Washington Colliery, continuing at same until 1891, when he was given charge of a pair of slope engines, which he has since operated. Our subject was united in marriage, June 20, 1887, with Lizzie, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Williams, natives of Pennsylvania. Two children have come to this union: Deborah, born January 13, 1889, and Jacob, born September 12, 1891. The family attend the English Baptist Church. Politically, Mr. Jones is a Republican, and he is a member of the Knights of Pythias.

LEWIS S. JONES, retired, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Cardiganshire, South Wales, February 23, 1827, a son of Stephen and Mary (Jenkins) Jones. He was reared in Monmouthshire, England, was educated in the schools of that place, and there began life in the mines, where he was employed twenty-six years. In 1860 he came to America and settled at Bellevue, near Scranton, Pa., and worked in the mines of that vicinity nearly four years. He then, in January, 1864, removed to Wilkes-Barre, where he has since resided. He served as inside foreman of the Hollenback and Kidder Slopes for a time, and was then, in 1870, removed to the Empire Shaft, where he served in the same capacity until 1890, in which year he retired. On December 28, 1877, he was badly burned by an explosion of gas, which laid him up for eight weeks. Mr. Jones has been twice married, his first wife being Margaret Jones, of South Wales, and his second wife was Ann, daughter of Edward and Maria (Morgans) Meredith, of North Wales, by which latter union he has eight children living: Iorweth (engineer of Crystal Spring Water Company), Mary A. (Mrs. David E. Thomas), Hannah M. (Mrs. Samuel Griffiths), Samuel (a druggist), Lizzie J. (a teacher), Margaret, Martha, and Meredith. Mr. Jones is a member and deacon of the First Welsh Presbyterian Church of Wilkes-Barre; in politics he is a Republican, and has served as member of city council three terms, a part of which time he was its president.

MORGAN JONES, roller, or heater, at a rolling mill, at present helper to moulders, in the Vulcan Iron Works, Wilkes-Barre, is a native of Pontypool, South Wales, born May 3, 1841. His father, Lewis Jones, who was a native of Breconshire, died at Pontypool in 1868. Mr. Jones was married at Pontypool September 20, 1863, to Martha Anthony, of that place, and eleven children have been born to this union, of whom are surviving Lewis, Richard, William, Clarence, George W., Mattie and Edward. Mr. Jones and his wife came to this country August 15, 1869, and after remaining in New York City for a few days,

they went to Scranton, where they remained three years, after which period they came to Wilkes-Barre, where they have since lived.

OWEN R. JONES, who is engaged in Company work in the Wyoming Colliery, with residence in Miners Mills, was born in Carnarvonshire, North Wales, April 27, 1838, and is a son of Richard and Grace (Jones) Jones. His father, who was a slate maker, reared a family of three children, viz.: John R., who was librarian in the British army in East India and Africa for thirteen years (he came to America in 1870, and died in New York City four years later); Owen R., the subject of this sketch; and Jane, who married William Hughes, a sailor of Bangor, North Wales. Our subject came to America in 1869, and located in Poultney, Vt., at which place he followed slate making five years, and afterward at Slatington, Pa., for ten months. He then moved to Miners Mills and began working about the mines, which he has since followed, including nine years mining; he built his present residence in 1882. Mr. Jones was married, January 5, 1864, to Miss Catharine, daughter of Richard and Alice (Jones) JONES, of Wales, the fruit of which union has been nine children, six of whom are living, viz.: Hannah, married to Owen Williams, a miner, or Miners Mills (they have five children, viz: Owen J., Esther, Catharine, Nellie and Grace); Alice, married to William Morris, who is a miner in the Keystone Mine, and lives with Mr. Jones (he is a member of the I. O. R. M. and the A. O. K. of M. C.); Richard, who is a miner in the Pine Ridge Mine, living with his father (he is a member of the I. O. R. M. K. of P., and the A. O. K. of M. C.); John I., a runner in the Pine Ridge Mine, living with his father (he is a member of the K. of P. and the P. O. S. of A.); Catharine J., living at home; and William, who works in the Pine Ridge Breaker, and lives with his father (he is a member of the Sons of Temperance). Mr. Jones and family are members of the Welsh Congregational Church; he is a member of the I. O. O. F., K. of P., and the Sons of Temperance; he is a Republican in his political views, and also advocates the principals of the Prohibition party.

ROWLAND WATKINS JONES, Freeland. This gentleman, who is in the front rank of Freeland's merchant tailors, was born in Anglesea, Wales, in 1854. His father was a shoe dealer at Gwalchmae, North Wales; his family consisted of two children, viz.: Roland W. and Mary, who married David Evans, editor of the Welsh Herald, Caernarvon, Caernarvonshire, North Wales. Our subject received his education in his native town, and at the age of twenty-two was employed as cutter in a mammoth merchant-tailoring establishment in London. He remained there about six months, after which he was employed by one of the leading merchant-tailor houses of Liverpool, remaining there two years. He then went to Lamberis, near Snowdon, where he engaged in business for himself, and where he still owns property. He remained there twelve years, and in 1887 came to this country, locating at Slatington, where he was also engaged in the merchant-tailoring business for two years, thence coming to Freeland, where he has since enjoyed a large patronage. Mr. Jones was married at the age of twenty-five to Miss Margaret Jones, of Lamberis, North Wales. To this union was born one child, Jane, who died at the age of one year. Mrs. Jones is also deceased. Mr. Jones is a member of the Mystic Chain, Knights of Pythias, and in his political views he is a Republican.

STEPHEN S. JONES, assistant mine foreman at No. 11, Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, Plymouth. This intelligent and experienced gentlemen was born at Minersville, Pa., December 24, 1854, and is a son of Stephen and Ann (Hughes) Jones, natives of Wales. The subject of this sketch was educated in Schuylkill County, and commenced life as a clerk for John Wadlinger, of Minersville, Pa., with whom he remained three years. He then took up mining and civil engineering, serving with a corps of engineers at Minersville for three years, afterward taking a position as foreman at the Forrestville Mines, where he was employed two years. Moving to Jeansville at the end of that period, he was engaged as a contractor at sinking slopes and driving tunnels. This he followed for eight years, and then opened up the Silver Brook Coal Mines, being afterward retained as inside foreman by that company for a period of five years. At the end of that time he came to Plymouth, and was given the position of assistant inside foreman at No. 11, where he has since been engaged. Mr. Jones was married, December 11, 1884, to Miss Annie, daughter of Rev. John D. and Ann (Hughes) Jones, natives of Wales. Four children were born to this union: Howard J., John D. (deceased), Stephen and Beulah. Mr. Jones is a Republican, and has held several minor offices of trust. He is a member of the I. O. O. F The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

THOMAS D. JONES, superintendent and manager of the Mill Creek Coal Company, with residence at Hazleton. This gentleman has worked his way rapidly and surely from the very first round in life's ladder, and although yet a comparatively young man, has attained a distinction among those interested in coal mining that few of even maturer years have had the privilege of enjoying. He was born in South Wales, January 28, 1842, and is the only child of Daniel and Ann (Vaughn) Jones, also natives of Wales, who came to America in 1850, locating at Nesquehoning, Carbon Co., Pa., where Thomas D. was reared and educated. At the close of his school life, he engaged in mercantile business at Lansford, Pa., during two years. He then became interested in the coal industry, and from 1869 to 1872 held the position of assistant engineer with the Lehigh Coal & Navigation Company, and from 1872 until 1875 was superintendent of collieries for the same company. In 1875 he had so far and so thoroughly mastered the difficult problems of coal mining that he was appointed to the responsible position of mine inspector for the Fourth District of Pennsylvania. At the expiration of his term, in 1881, he was immediately re-appointed, but a short time afterward he resigned to accept a more lucrative position as superintendent of the extensive system of collieries of the Ebervale Coal Company. This position he held until 1886, when he secured the desirable and responsible position which he now holds. The important incumbancies this gentleman has filled indicates the exceptional ability he possesses as an expert and skillful coal operator. In addition to the possession of great talent in his chosen line of work, Mr. Jones has been a most diligent student of English literature, and he possesses a great fund of information, which in social life makes him one of the most pleasant and entertaining of men. In his home life he is unusually blessed; his genial nature, seconded by the friendly manners of his wife and the sprightly atmosphere which surrounds a household of interesting children, render this homestead one of the most sunny and inviting spots in the social community. His marriage with Miss Ruth, daughter of John and Mary (Hughes) Byron, occurred January 4, 1870, and the union has been blessed with four children, as follows: J. Elmer, a student at Columbia College, New York City; Anna (deceased), Mary (deceased) and Gladys. Mr. Jones is in strong sympathy with the Republican party, but always votes for the best man, irrespective of politics. He is president of the school board and a member of the select council. Socially, he is a prominent member of the Masonic Lodge. The family support the Presbyterian Church.

THOMAS H. JONES, inside mine foreman, for the Susquehanna Coal Company, at No. 1 Shaft, Nanticoke, was born at Mountain Ash, Glamorganshire, South Wales, a son of Thomas and Sheba (Bath) Jones, both natives of Wales. Our subject is a self-educated man, never having attended school more than two weeks in his life, and this was when he was disabled from working in the mines on account of an injured hand. At the age of eight years, he entered the mines, and worked in various capacities, from slate picker to miner. At the age of twenty-one he emigrated to America, and engaged in mining at Excelsio Station, Northumberland Co., Pa., where he remained about two years, when he removed to Shamokin, same state, and was employed in the mines there until 1874. He then came to Luzerne County, locating at Nanticoke, entered the employ of the Susquehanna Coal Company, and worked as a miner until 1880. In that year an explosion occurred in No. 4 Slope, and during the progress of this fire, he was appointed fire boss in this mine, where he remained until a large explosion and fire took place in No. 1 shaft, when he was transferred to the latter. Immediately after this, Mr. T. M. Williams, then mine inspector of Luzerne County, appointed him inside mine foreman of No. 1 Shaft, where he has since been employed. Mr. Jones was married December 25, 1869, to Miss Mary Summers, of Excelsior, Pa., and they have children as follows: Eliza, Sheba Bath, Mabel, Mary Jane, Sterling Omana, and Florence Apella Verdella. Mr. Jones is a member of the Legion of Honor, the Sons of St. George and the Fraternal Guardians.

THOMAS M. JONES, miner at Laflin, with residence at Hudson, Plains township, was born in Pittsburgh, Pa., June 8, 1846, and is a son of Morgan and Ann (Williams) Jones, natives of Wales, whence they emigrated to this country, in 1836. The father lived in Pottsville eight years; Pittsburgh, two years; Pittston, forty-four years, and came to live with his son at Mill Creek, this county, in 1891, where he now resides; he was born May 1, 1800, and is unusually well preserved for his time of life; his wife has been dead forty-one years. His family comprised twelve children, eight by his first wife, of whom Thomas M. is the sixth. Our subject embarked in life driving on the canal, which occupation he followed three summers, and then enlisted at Rayville, N.Y., but, being a miner, his father compelled him to return home, where he remained three months, and then entered on an apprenticeship with John M. Groover, of Plains, to learn the carpentry trade. On February 6, 1865, he again enlisted, this time in Scranton, in Company F, Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, and served till July 12, 1865, when he was discharged at Fairfax Seminary, whence he went to Philadelphia, where he was paid off. He then returned to Pittston, remained a few months, and then went to Plains, where he finished his trade and worked five years. In 1870, he engaged in mining at Mill Creek, which he has since continuously followed, with the exception of five years, during which he was engaged as watchman at the Mill Creek Slope. Mr. Jones was married October 14, 1867, to Miss Sarah J., daughter of John and Ann (Harper) Hine; they have six children, five of whom are living, viz.: Annie M. (Mrs. James Isaac), Carrie E. (Mrs James E. Turner), William H., Charles M. and Nellie C. Mr. and Mrs. Jones are members of the Primitive Methodist Church, and of the Pocahontas; he is a member of the I. O. R. M. In his political views he is a Republican, and has held the office of constable in Plains township. He built his present residence in 1882.

WILLIAM JONES, miner, Parsons, was born in Chicago, Ill., September 27, 1847, and is the only son of William and Esther (Parry) Jones. When he was very young his father removed to Wales, where he prepared for college, and then went to Oxford University, England, remaining for a time, after which he returned to Wales to assist his father in the mercantile business. In 1874 he enlisted in the British army, in which he remained for seven years, serving her Majesty faithfully throughout the Zulu and the Boer wars. In 1875, he went to Natal, Africa, remaining there a short time; thence proceeded to Cape Colony, also in Africa, and embarked for Philadelphia, where he remained a few months. He then went to Wyoming Territory, where he was engaged in mining four years, after which he came to Parsons, where he has since been engaged in mining. Mr. Jones is an esteemed and worthy citizen, and his political preferences are Republican.

WILLIAM J. JONES, carpenter, Kingston, is a native of Wales, son of Owen and Catherine Jones, also natives of Wales. His parents came to America in 1853, when he was very young, and located at Carbondale, where they remained for a time, removing thence to Olyphant, residing there until their deaths. Mr. Jones began life working in the mines when yet a mere boy, and, at the age of twenty, commenced to work at the carpenter's trade at Olyphant, where he remained a short time. He then removed to Kingston, where he has resided about eighteen years, during which time he has been constantly engaged in the carpenter trade, at general house building, at which he has attained the highest degree of proficiency. He was married January 8, 1877, to Miss Carrie, daughter of James and Elizabeth (Loudenberg) Cobert, of Kingston. They have two children: Katie, born October 16, 1886; and Ernest, born October 2, 1891. Our subject is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and the Knights of the Golden Eagle, and politically is a Republican.

WILLIAM M. JONES, justice of the peace, West Hazleton. This genial and learned gentleman was born February 22, 1832, in Monroe County, Pa., and is the second in the family of fourteen children of Peter and Hester (Muffly) Jones, the former of Welsh extraction, the latter of German. Our subject was reared and educated at his birthplace, and when quite young learned the forgeman's trade, working at it about ten years. On October 15, 1862, he answered the call of his country by enlisting in Company B, One Hundred and Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until July 27, 1863. As a soldier he never feared danger, and was found to be where the strife was fiercest. At the close of his service he came to Carbon County, and was elected justice of the peace for two consecutive terms, aggregating a service of ten years. At the expiration of his term of office he came to Hazleton, and was elected to the office of justice of the peace, two terms, a period of ten years. He has held two commissions by appointment for West Hazleton borough, and has recently been elected to serve another five-year term. In his official capacity, Mr. Jones is always guided by the merits of the case on trial, and his long experience has so well fitted him for the position that he makes few, if any, mistakes in his decisions. Mr. Jones was married, February 17, 1852, to Miss Susan Van Buskirk, of Wind Gap, Pa., to which union were born seven children, namely; Angeline, Cecelia, Louis M. (deceased), Joseph H., Alinia (deceased), Silas E. and Marietta. Politically Mr. Jones votes with the Democratic party; he is a member of the G. A. R. The family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church.

WILLIAM R. JONES, miner in the Oakwood Colliery, Miners Mills, was born in Cardiganshire, South Wales, July 24, 1839, and is a son of John and Elizabeth (Richards) Jones. The father, who was a miner for fifty-five years, reared a family of eight children, five of whom are living, and of whom W. R. is the eldest. The subject of this sketch came to America in 1869, and has been engaged in mining successively at the following places: Irvine Station, four months; Taylorsville, eight years, and in 1879 removed to Miners Mills; he has worked in and about the mines forty-five years. He purchased his present residence and removed therein in 1887. Mr. Jones was married February 20, 1859, to Miss Esther, daughter of Daniel Edwards, of Caermarthenshire, South Wales; she died April 6, 1891, having become the mother of six children, viz.: Mary, who married Daniel Bevan, a miller of Miners Mills; William, who is a miller at Sparta, Wis.; Anna E., who married Thomas H. Price, a miner in Miners Mills; John R.; Gomer, engaged with John R., and Elvira, at home. Mr. Jones has been a member of the Welsh Congregational Church forty-one years; he is a member of the I. O. O. F., and is a Republican in politics.

 George Jopling, miner, Inkerman, Jenkins township, was born in Mill Creek, Schuylkill Co., Pa., October 12, 1852, and is a son of James and Jane (Routledge) Jopling of Inkerman. At the age of thirteen years, he began working about the mines as errand-boy, has since been engaged in the various occupations pertaining to mining, and has been mining since 1868. Mr. Jopling was married June 29, 1879, to Miss Sarah, daughter of Richard and Elizabeth (Foster) Bostock, natives of Durham County, England. They have three children, viz.: Olive, Bartholomew B. and Howard S. Mr. and Mrs. Jopling attend the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which she is a member. He is a member of the P. O. S. of A. and the K. of H. His political sympathy is with the Republican party, but he votes irrespective of party lines. He built his present residence in 1887.

Henry Jopling, inside foreman at the Pennsylvania Colliery, No. 14, Inkerman, Jenkins township, was born in the County of Northumberland, England, July 30, 1833, and is a son of James and Mary (Bainbridge) Jopling. His father, who was a miner in England, and also in America, whither he brought his family in 1851, reared ten children, of whom Henry is the seventh. Our subject has always been engaged about the mines, including fifteen years mining and twenty-one years bossing. In 1855, he was married to Miss Ruth Routledge, of Inkerman, who died eleven months later, leaving one child, also deceased. On January 7, 1857, Mr. Jopling was married to Miss Ann, daughter of John and Ann (Merry) Adamson, natives of Scotland, the fruit of which union was ten children, five of whom are living, viz.: Ann (Mrs. George L. Walker, of Plains); Mary (Mrs. William Mitchell, of Inkerman); John (assistant mine foreman with his father); Henry (married to Miss Annie, daughter of Mary E. (Sprinker) Pullman, of Alexandria, Va., and natives of England and Maryland, respectively); and Sarah, a sweet-faced school girl, still at home. Mrs. Jopling died July 3, 1885, and our subject was afterward married, January 19, 1888, to Miss Jane, daughter of James and Agnes (Black) Robertson, natives of Scotland. Mr. and Mrs. Jopling attend the Presbyterian Church, of which she is a member. He is a F. & A. M.; a Republican in politics, and has held the office of justice of peace in Jenkins township.

James Jopling, a prominent citizen of Inkerman, Jenkins township, was born in the County of Northumberland, England, August 29, 1828, and is a son of James and Mary (Bainbridge) Jopling, the former of whom was a miner in both England and America. They reared a family of nine children, five of whom are living, viz.: Ann (Mrs. Robert Baxter, of Duquoin, Ill.); Robert, a shoemaker in the State of Missouri; James and Henry, of Inkerman; and Bartholomew, a miner in Duquoin, Ill. Our subject, accompanied by his brother, John (since deceased), came with his family to America in 1849, and located in Mill Creek, Schuylkill Co., Pa., where he resumed his former occupation of mining, and remained seven years, when he removed to Inkerman, where he followed same business till 1875 mining in all about forty years. He then embarked in mercantile business, continuing at same some fourteen years, after which he retired from active life. Mr. Jopling was married, June 27, 1849, to Miss Jane, daughter of George and Ruth (Gardner) Routledge, natives of England, and they had eight children, six of whom are living, viz.: George; Ruth (Mrs. William A. Reed, of Scranton); Mary (Mrs. Thomas Walker, of Inkerman); James (a carpenter in Scranton); Sarah J. (Mrs. William Rooke, of Peckville, Pa.); and Anna, who is still at home. One son, Thomas, died at the age of thirty-nine, leaving a widow and six children in Yatesville. Mrs. Jopling died September 23, 1869, at the age of forty-three years. Our subject is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in his political views is a Republican.

THOMAS H. JORDAN, merchant, Parsons, was born at Archbald, Lackawanna Co., Pa., June 9, 1851, and is a son of Richard and Bridget (Hosie) Jordan, both natives of Ireland, the former born in Crossmolina Parish, County Mayo, and the latter in Innisgrove, County Sligo. They came to America in 1848, and located at Archbald, Pa., where they remained until 1891, in which year they removed to Green Ridge, Lackawanna County, where they now reside. Thomas H. Jordan was educated in the common schools, and began life for himself, at the age of twenty-one, as brakeman on the Delaware & Hudson Gravity Road, where he remained about four years, when he came to Parsons, and engaged as clerk for Golden & Walsh, remaining with them thirteen years. On June 20, 1887, he embarked in his present business, consisting of a store of general merchandise. Mr. Jordan was married, August 9, 1874, to Miss Hanorah, daughter of Martin and Margaret (Kearney) Golden, of Archbald, formerly of Carbondale, they have had children as follows: Richard, born June 21, 1875, who is a student at St. Michael's College, Toronto, Canada; Joseph, born March 29, 1877; Mary, born February 8, 1879; Gertrude, born June 15, 1881, died October 21, 1882; Martin, born September 18, 1883; Margaret, born March 20, 1885; James, born March 11, 1887, and Rose, born September 5, 1890. Mr. Jordan is a member of the C. M. B. A. of which he is secretary, and of the E. B. A., of which he was president for two terms. He is president of Parson's borough council, and was assessor of Parsons one term. He and his family are members of the Catholic Church, and in politics he is a Democrat.

JOHN W. JOSEPH, assistant inside foreman, South Wilkes-Barre Shaft, Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Craigtrebanos, Glamorganshire, South Wales, April 7, 1843, a son of William and Rachel (Williams) Joseph. He was reared and educated in Glamorganshire, where he began life in the coal mines at the early age of six years, and worked there in the various grades up to 1866. He then came to America and located in Wilkes-Barre, where he has since been in the employ of the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, as miner fifteen years, fire boss nine years, and assistant inside foreman since 1890. On October 18, 1867, Mr. Joseph married Margaret, daughter of William and Gwennie (Morgans) Thomas, of Ystrad Gynlais, Wales, and has eight children living, viz.: Rachel, Isaac W., Albert, Gomer, Annie, Alice, John A. and Cedwyn. Mr. Joseph is one of the prominent Welsh citizens of Wilkes-Barre, has been a member of the I. O. O. F. for twenty-four years, is a member of the Legion of Honor, and in politics is a Republican.

PATRICK JUDGE, merchant, Plains township, P. O. Hudson, was born in County Mayo, Ireland, in March, 1830, and is a son of Edward and Catherine (Hagerty) Judge. The father, was a farmer, reared a family of eleven children, five of whom are still living, and Patrick is the sixth. Our subject came to American 1862, and located in Wayne County, Pa., where he remained three years; he then traveled through Ohio, West Virginia, Indiana and New York, also spending considerable time in Pennsylvania. He then worked one year in Hawley, Pa., after which he removed to Wilkes-Barre, where he labored seven and mined fourteen years, engaging in his present business in 1888. Mr. Judge was married, July 3, 1868, to Miss Mary, daughter of Patrick and Ellen (Irwine) Ruddy, natives of County Mayo, Ireland; they had born unto them five children, three of whom are living, viz.: James J., Mary A. and Margaret C. He and his family are members of the Catholic Church; in politics he is a Democrat.

THOMAS JUDGE, conductor, Lehigh Valley Railroad, Pittston. This popular young con-ductor was born at Pittston, October 13, 1863, and is a son of Michael and Ann (Cardan) Judge, natives of County Mayo, Ireland. He is the second in a family of nine children--five boys and four girls--and was educated and reared in Pittston. At the age of nine years, he began railroading, first as water boy; and then through the different grades of work until 1888 he was promoted to the position of conductor, which he has since filled. His services have always been with the Lehigh Valley Railroad Company, with the exception of fourteen months he was in the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad freight office. As a railroad man, Mr. Judge is thoroughly posted in all departments. He was united in marriage April 8, 1885, with Miss Mary J., daughter of Patrick and Mary (Hart) Monahan, natives of Glasglow, Scotland, and to this union were born four children, namely: Willie (deceased), Joseph (deceased), Annie and May. In political matters, Mr. Judge is independent; the family are members of the Catholic Church.

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