JA - JO Surnames

History of Luzerne County, Pa.,

by H.C. Bradsby, 1893

B. JACKSON, merchant, Nanticoke, was born June 4, 1846, in Chester county, Pa., and is a son of Caleb and Letitia (Brinton) Jackson, the former a native of Chester county and the latter of Delaware county, both being of English lineage. He was educated at the West Nottingham Academy, in Cecil county, Md., and began life for himself clerking for H. C. Nesbitt, at Port Deposit, that State. After remaining there about two years, he came to Wilkes-Barre, this county, where he engaged as a clerk in the Company store of the Franklin Coal Company, where he remained one year. He then accepted a clerkship with Jacob Geiselman, continuing in his employ until 1873, when he came to Nanticoke, and was employed as a clerk for Hildreth & Co., remaining at that place for seven years. He then embarked in the grocery business at Nanticoke, with S. P. George as his partner, and after continuing the partnership for four years, Mr. Jackson commenced in his present general mercantile business, carrying full lines of all kinds of goods and wares. His store is located at No. 108 Prospect street, a very convenient and desirable part of the hustling borough of Nanticoke. Mr. Jackson was married September 15, 1881, to Maggie E., daughter of William Kirk, of Cecil county, Md., and this happy union has been blessed with two children: Laura C. and Mary L. Our subject is a member of the Knights of Malta, I. O. O. F. K. of L. and Royal Society of Good Fellows. In politics he is a Republican, and has served two terms in the borough council.

Ernest V. JACKSON, attorney at law, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., August 6, 1848, a son of Angelo and Elizabeth (Whitney) Jackson. The father, who was a native of Erie, N. Y., was reared in North Moreland township, Luzerne (now Wyoming) Co., Pa., and graduated from Yale College in 1847. He studied law, was admitted to the Luzerne county bar April 1, 1850, and was for some years a law partner with the late Charles Denison. On October 10, 1861, he entered the army as a first lieutenant of Company I, Fifty-eighth P.V.I., and June 5, 1863, was promoted to the captaincy; on September 5, 1865, he was mustered out with his regiment. He then became chief of a division in the Treasury Department at Washington, in which city he died in 1874. His first wife was Elizabeth Whitney (mother of our subject), daughter of Asa C. Whitney, M.D., and a granddaughter of Elisha Whitney, who settled in the Wyoming Valley in 1810, and removed to Wysox, Bradford Co., Pa., in 1816. He was a native of Spencer, Mass., born in 1747, and married Esther Clark, who was born in the same place in 1782; both are buried at Wysox, the former having died in 1832, and the latter in 1851. The subject of this sketch received an academical education in Wilkes-Barre, and was graduated from Union College, Schenectady, N.Y., in 1869. He read law with William S. McLean, Esq.; September 9, 18__, was admitted to the Luzerne county bar, and at once entered into partnership with his preceptor under the firm name of McLean & Jackson, which existed until January 1, 1883. He then removed to West Virginia, and there spent several years in other pursuits, after which he returned to Wilkes-Barre, where he has since been in the active practice of his profession. On October 2, 1878, Mr. Jackson, married Mary E., daughter of G. Byron and Mary A. (Stone) Nicholson, of Wilkes-Barre, and has one son living, Byron N. Mr. Jackson in politics is a Democrat, and in 188_, he was chairman of the Democratic County Committee.

E. B. JACKSON, farmer, P.O. Carverton, was born at Bowmanís Creek, Wyoming county, July 23, 1837, and is a son of Samuel and Ruth A. (Carver) Jackson, the former born March 30, 1805, probably in one of the New England States, the latter February 18, 1810, in Wyoming. Samuel was a son of Jabez, who was a valiant soldier in the Revolutionary army. He reared a family of four children, all of whom are now deceased. His son Samuel began life as a farmer at Bowmanís Creek, where he remained till 1840, when he moved to Carverton. He purchased a farm of sixty-five acres, part of which was improved, the rest he brought under cultivation during his lifetime; the place now comprises ninety acres. Samuel Jackson was a hard-working man, he was a strict Methodist, and a man of deep and sound convictions. He was twice married: first in 1834 to Ruth A. Carver, by whom he had five children: Sarah J., born February 5, 1836; E. B., born July 23, 1837; Jabez, born March 23, 1839; William H. H., born March 13, 1841, and Almon (deceased) born December 10, 1841. Mr. Ruth A. Jackson died May 1, 1843, and for his second wife, he married Miss Sarah, sister of Judge Phoenix, of Wyoming county, who still survives. Samuel died, April 7, 1888, at the age of eighty-four years. The subject of this sketch is the second in the family, and received his education at the common schools of Carverton. He always confined himself to farming, and has always resided on his present farm, since he removed hither with his father. On February 12, 1867, He married Miss Mary Ann, daughter of George and Sarah Keller, to which union have been born three children: Rose H., Bessie (deceased) and Lizzie H. Mrs. Mary Ann Jackson was born in Harris Hill, May 19, 1843. Mr. Jackson is a practical farmer, a good neighbor and a sincere Christian man. He and his family are members of the M. E. Church, in which he is a trustee at the present time. He has also held the office of steward.

Ernest V. JACKSON, attorney at law, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., August 6, 1848, a son of Angelo and Elizabeth (Whitney) Jackson. The father, who was a native of Erie, N. Y., was reared in North Moreland township, Luzerne (now Wyoming) Co., Pa., and graduated from Yale College in 1847. He studied law, was admitted to the Luzerne county bar April 1, 1850, and was for some years a law partner with the late Charles Denison. On October 10, 1861, he entered the army as first lieutenant of Company I, Fifty-eighth P.V.I., and June 5, 1863, was promoted to captaincy; on September 5, 1865, he was mustered out with his regiment. He then became chief of a division in the Treasury Department at Washington, in which city he died in 1874. His first wife was Elizabeth Whitney (mother of our subject), daughter of Asa C. Whitney, M.D., and granddaughter of Elisha Whitney, who settled in Wyoming Valley in 1810, and removed to Wysox, Bradford Co., Pa., in 1816. He was a native of Spenser, Mass., born in 1747, and married Esther Clark, who was born in the same place in 1782; both are buried at Wysox, the former having died in 1832, and the latter in 1851. The subject of this sketch received an academical education in Wilkes-Barre, and was graduated from Union College, Schenectady, N.Y., in 1869. He read law with William S. McLean, Esq.; September 9, 18--, was admitted to the Luzerne county bar, and at once entered into partnership with his preceptor under the firm of McLean & Johnson, which existed until January 1, 1883. He then removed to West Virginia, and there spent several years in other pursuits, after which he returned to Wilkes-Barre, where he has since been in the active practice of his profession. On October 2, 1878, Mr. Jackson married Mary E., daughter of G. Byron and Mary A. (Stone) Nicholson, of Wilkes-Barre, and has one son living, Byron N. Mr. Jackson in politics is a Democrat, and in 188- he was chairman of the Democratic County Committee.

William Henry Harrison JACKSON was born in Carverton, Kingston township, March 13, 1841, the youngest in a family of four children born to Samuel and Ruth Jackson. He received a fair education at the country schools, and worked upon his fatherís farm until the war broke out. His father, fearful that his youngest son would enlist, exacted from him a solemn promise that he would not, but the spirit of patriotism was too strong to be resisted, and seeing his companions older than himself enlisting, he forgot his promise, and affixed his name to the muster roll of Company F, Fifty-third P.V., attached to the First Division, Second Corps, army of the Potomac. He participated in all the battles in which that army engaged, from its formation to the battle of Gettysburg, at which battle, during the second dayís fight, he received a wound in the hip which incapacitated him for further service. After being mustered out at the close of the war he returned to Carverton, where he married Miss Emeline Frantz, daughter of a neighbor. Two children were the results of this union: Elloma R., now Mrs. B. S. Emory, and Minnie F. In 1871, he removed to West Pittston, where, during the greater portion of his residence, he has followed the vocation of painting. In May, 1892, in company with B. S. Emory, he purchased the Acme Steam Laundry, in the conducting of which he has taken active part. Mr. Jackson is an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is esteemed by all who know him for his unquestioned rectitude and integrity.

Frederick JACOBS, No. 39 Hazel street, Wilkes-Barre, was born at Mahlstadt, in Germany, March 13, 1859. He is the eldest son of Conrad Jacobs, also a native of that place, who is still living, in the enjoyment of robust health. Our subject came to Wilkes-Barre March 15, 1873, and obtained employment at the Empire Colliery; he followed the occupation of miner until 1888, when he established a saloon at No. 39 Hazel street. The memorable and disastrous cyclone of August 19, 1890, entirely demolished Mr. Jacobís place of business, and a man named Peter Rittmeyer was killed by the structure falling upon him, but, fortunately, no member of the family was injured. Mr. Jacobs was married, March 18, 1880, to Miss Kittie Niedermeyer, and they have six children, namely: Barbara, Maggie, Kate, Frederick, Henry and Marie.

Henry JACOBS, hotel-keeper, Pittston, was born in Germany, August 24, 1862, son of Conrad and Helen Jacobs, both of whom were born in Germany. They emigrated to this country in 1873, locating in Wilkes-Barre, where the father kept hotel. He is now a popular and prosperous hotel man at Schulylkill, Pa. His family consisted of eleven children living out of eighteen born to him. Henry is the fourth in order of birth of this numerous family, and was eleven years of age when he came to this country. He has always followed, and is now following, the same business as his father. He removed from Schuylkill to this county in January, 1892, and now occupies the "Tunkannock Hotel" In November, 1885, he married Miss Eliza, daughter of John S. and Elizabeth Jones. To this marriage there was born John (now six years of age), Conrad (aged five), and William (three years of age). Mr. Jacobs has served some time on the police force of Schuylkill. He is now a member of the Golden Eagle. Politically he is a Republican.

Daniel P. JAMES, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Monmouthshire, Wales, November 16, 1834, a son of John and Mary (Pritchard) James. He was reared and educated in Wales, and in 1858 located in Australia, where he remained seven years, engaged in gold mining. In 1865 he sailed for America, landing at San Francisco, and worked in the gold mines of California until 1868. He then settled in Wilkes-Barre, where he has since resided, and has been in the employ of the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre and the Red Ash Coal Companies as miner, fire-boss and inside foreman. March 19, 1870, Mr. James married Miss. Jeannette, daughter of William and Genevive (Morgan) Thomas, of Glamorganshire, Wales, and by her has had seven children: William A., Margaret (deceased), John (deceased), Annie, Minnie, Spencer and Arthur. Mr. James and his family are members of the Welsh Presbyterian Church, and he is a member of the I. O.O.F. and a charter member of the Ivorites. He is a respected citizen of Wilkes-Barre, and in politics is a Republican.

Edward JAMES, pump engineer at No. 1 Shaft, Susquehanna Coal Company, Nanticoke, was born in Morris, N. J., September 6, 1863, and is a son of John and Elizabeth (Young) James, natives of England. They came to this section in 1870, and located at Wilkes-Barre, Pa., where our subject was reared and educated. In the family there were seven children, of whom Edward is the fifth. His father was master mechanic for the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company until 1884, since when he has devoted his attention to mine contracting. Our subject has made engineering the occupation of his life, beginning at South Wilkes-Barre Shaft, working for his father, where the latter held a large contract. He was at this place five years, and then went to the Indian Territory, where he was employed at mine engineering six months, at the end of which time he returned to Pennsylvania and engaged at engineering at Pleasant Valley for the Land Cleff Coal Company. There ha remained six months, and then removed to Sugar Notch, where he was employed by the Hanover Coal Company about six months, when he came to Nanticoke and accepted his present position, which he has since filled. Mr. James attends the Methodist Church, and in politics he is a Republican.

Edward F. JAMES, proprietor of steam laundry, Hazleton. This enterprising gentleman was born at Stockton, Luzerne Co., Pa., July 18, 1864, and is a son of William and Mary (Holman) James, natives of Cornwall, England. The family emigrated to this country in 1850, settling at Stockton, where the father of the subject of this sketch was engaged as mine foreman, by Linderman, Skeer & Co., during a period of thirty years. Mr. James, who is the fifth in a family of seven children, was reared and educated in this country, and began life as a coal shipper for Linderman, Skeer & Co., which position he held eight and one-half years. He then came to Hazelton and purchased from Mr. Drake an interest in the Hazleton Steam Laundry. The business carried on in partnership for a short time, when Mr. James succeeded to the entire concern, which he successfully conducted until September, 1891. Mr. James at that time acquired an excellent position in the Hazleton National Bank, and he disposed of the laundry business to George W. Thompson. In April, 1892, the laundry was re-purchased by Mr. James, who soon after took into partnership Charles Wilde, one of Hazletonís energetic young men. Mr. James gives his personal attention to the management of the business, which, under his skilful control, has been enlarged and remodeled, and supplied with new machinery throughout, until now it is one of the best regulated and most thoroughly equipped steam laundries in eastern Pennsylvania. Mr. James is also identified with the Hazleton Steam Heating Company as secretary. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., the P.O.S. of A., and Hazle Commandery No. 17, and in politics votes the Republican ticket. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

James D. JAMES, inside foreman of Nottingham Mine, No. 15, was born in Cardiganshire, Wales, April 11, 1852, and is the third in a family of five children born to David and Susanna (Davis) James, also natives of Wales. Our subject was educated in Wales, and in 1875 came to America, locating in Shenandoah, Pa., where he engaged in mining at the Giant and Thomas Mines, staying about one year in all. Coming from there to Plymouth in 1876, he began mining at the Gaylord where he remained about a year, when he came to the Nottingham and worked as a miner for five years, at the end of which time he was given the position of inside foreman, which he has ever since held. He has charge of about 850 men, who work in and about the mineó330 miners, 230 laborers, and about 300 Company hands. They take out on an average 2,800 tons daily. In 1877, Mr. James was married to Rachel, daughter of Isaac and Sarah (Jenkins) Edwards, natives of Wales. Six children have blessed this union, viz: Sarah, Martha, Arthur, Agnes, Herbert and Gertrude. Mr. James is a Republican in politics, a member of the I.O.O.F., the Mystic Chain, and the Knights of the Golden Eagle. The family are members of the Congregational Church.

WILLIAM P. JAMES, P.O. Hazleton, was born in Hazleton March 19, 1846, a son of James and Jane (Jenkins) James, natives of Wales, who came to America in 1838, locating at Pottsville, Pa. Here the father was employed as engineer at the mines until 1842, when he removed to Hazleton, where he followed the same vocation until 1852. After spending one year at Catasauqua, he returned to Hazleton in 1854, and was engineer and superintendent for A. Pardee & Co. until 1861, when he engaged in mercantile trade for two years with William Kisner. In 1864 he embarked in business alone, and so continued until 1869, when he was appointed postmaster ot Hazleton by President Grant; re-appointed in 1873, by President Hayes in 1877, by President Garfield in 1881, and held the office sixteen years and four months. He died in 188_ at the age of seventy-four years. His children were George, Richard, William P., Mary (Mrs. Thomas J. Williams), Sophia and Sally. Our subject was reared in Hazleton, educated in the public schools, and at the age of fifteen began his business life as clerk for A. Pardee & Co., with whom he remained five years; from 1866 to 1868 he was clerk in a general store at Tamaqua, and afterward was sixteen months baggage master on the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad. In 1869 he returned to Hazleton, and served an apprenticeship of three years at the machinist trade; worked as a journeyman one year, and from 1877 to 1885 was assistant postmaster at Hazleton. In the fall of 1885 he was elected clerk of courts of Luzerne county; re-elected in the fall of 1888, and retired from office in January, 1892. In 1870 Mr. James married Frances, daughter of Alfred W. and Catherine (Schreiuer) Leyburn, of Tamaqua, Pa., and has one daughter, Libbie (Mrs. H.L. Collenson). Our subject is one of the best known and most popular citizens of Luzerne county; is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and in politics is a stanch Republican.

HON. WILLIAM R. JEFFREY, Freeland, was born at Slatington, Lehigh county, October 12, 1857, and is a son of Samuel and Catherine (Roberts) Jeffrey, natives of North Wales. His parents came to America in 1852, and located in Lehigh county. The father died at Upper Lehigh, this county, June 27, 1877, and Mrs. Jeffrey now resides at Freeland. Mr. Jeffrey was educated in the public schools of Slatington. He attended school in winters, and worked around the slate quarries in summer. On August 15, 1874, he came to Upper Lehigh, where he was employed in the mines until 1888, when he removed to Freeland, where he has since resided. He was married October 5, 1878, to Miss Elizabeth J. Jones, of Upper Lehigh. They have five children, viz.: Samuel, Uriah, Gertrude, John and Mary. Mr. Jeffrey is, and has always been, a worker in behalf of organized labor, having been one time master workman in the Knights of Labor. In 1888 he was elected Representative of the Fourth District, which office he now holds, much to the satisfaction of his constituents. He is a member of the P.O.S. of A., the I.O.O.F., the I.O.R.M., and the Jr. O.U.A.M. In political views he is a Republican.

DAVID D. JENKINS, miner, Parsons, was born in Providence, Lackawanna Co., Pa., March 31, 1862, and is a son of William and Jane (Davis) Jenkins, natives of Wales. He was educated in Providence, and began laboring in the mines at nine years of age; he worked in Carbon Run for a time, and in 1874 came to Parsons, where he has since been engaged in mining, in the employ of the Delaware & Hudson and Lehigh Valley Coal Companies, being at the present time with the latter. Mr. Jenkins was married December 23, 1885, to Miss Ruth, daughter of Mesach and Sarah (Davis) Watkins, and they have had five children, viz.: Mesach (deceased), Willie (deceased), Jennie, Sarah and Ralph. Mr. Jenkins is a member of the I.O.R.M., is first sergeant of Company E. Ninth Regiment N.G.P., and in politics he is a Republican

EDWARD W. JENKINS, miner laborer, Plains, was born in South Wales, January 3, 1867, and is a son of William C. and Margaret (Morgans) Jenkins. In his father=s family there were eight children, five of whom are living, viz.: Mary (Mrs. Thomas W. Roberts); Edward W.; John W., in Maltby, Pa.; Evan W., and Thomas W., in Plains. The American home of the parents was in Miners Mills, where the mother died, September 19, 1883, and the father, December 24, 1891. Our subject, with but a meagre common-school education, began working in the mines at an early age; he tended door three years, drove mule two years, and has since followed his present occupation. Mr Jenkins was married, September 8, 1889, to Miss Ann, daughter of David J. and Mary Thomas, natives of Wales, and they have had three children: William E., who died at the age of two years; David E. and Margaret. Mr. And Mrs. Jenkins attend the Welsh Independent Congregational Church, of which she is a member; he is a member of the I.O.R.M. and the Ivorites, and in his political views is a Republican.

WILLIAM JENKINS, Plymouth. Among the most highly respected citizens of Luzerne county may well be noted the gentleman whose name opens this memoir. He comes from a family of pioneers who can, at least, claim a share of the honor of the early settlement and development of the Wyoming Valley. He is a son of William and Rebecca (Rickard) Jenkins, the former a native of New Milford on the Delaware (but reared in this county, his parents locating here when he was but five years of age), the latter a native of Spring Mills, Pa. Our subject is the fourth in a family of seven children, and was born at Plymouth April 6, 1818. After receiving all the education that the common schools of his day afforded, he engaged in boat-building. At this time he was about twenty-five years old. He has made the carpenter=s trade the chief occupation of his life, although he has also been interested in boating on the Susquehanna, never since he was a young man being without a boat on the river between Nanticoke and Wilkes-Barre. He married, for his first wife, Miss Mary, daughter of Dr. Ebenezer and Helen (Van Loon) Chamberlin, natives of Rhode Island and early settlers in this locality. She died in 1848, leaving three children: Benjamin, Lucilla and Robert. Mr. Jenkins was next married in 1853, to Miss Ellen, daughter of Peter and Keturah (Ware) Shaffer, of Dallas, Pa., and to them have been born six children: William, Thomas, Francis M., John, Charles F. and Jessie B. The family attend the Christian Church. Politically, Mr. Jenkins is a Republican. It may here be mentioned that a landmark in the shape of a huge elm tree, still standing on the lawn of the old Jenkins homestead, is reputed by tradition to have been used as a whipping-post by the Indians, in their inhuman freaks of savage cruelty.

MRS. ANN JENNINGS, hotel-keeper, Newport township, P.O. Glen Lyon, is a native of Arless, County Queen=s, Ireland, born in March 1839. Her parents were Matthew and Catherine (Moore) Lenard, also natives of Arless, County Queen=s, Ireland, and County Kilkenny, Ireland, respectively. Matthew Lenard was born in 1782, and died in Pittston at the age of seventy-eight years; Catherine, his wife, was born in 1790, and died in Ireland in 1844. Mrs. Ann Jennings is one in a family of ten children, of whom four are deceased. Those living are: John, Mary, Catherine, Margaret, Michael and Ann. Patrick Lenard met his death October 16, 1879, at the age of forty-nine years; he was a miner and lumberman. The subject of this sketch was married on October 30, 1864; her husband was a miner, and he died in Leadville, July 25, 1891. They had a family of seven children: Peter, Matthew, John, Michael, Mary, James and Alice. Peter, the eldest in the family, is a bottler, doing business in Newport township. Mrs. Jennings came to this country in 1848, landing in New York, where she remained two years, and then spent ten years in Connecticut; she has also resided in Wilkes-Barre; for the past few years she has lived at Newport. Mrs. Jennings is a member of the Roman Catholic Church, and was one of the aides in establishing the Catholic Church at Glen Lyon.

RICHARD W. JEREMY, merchant, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Glamorganshire, Wales, October 4, 1857, and is a son of David C. and Elizabeth (Lewis) Jeremy, who came to America in 1861, locating in Schuylkill county, Pa., where the father was clerk in and manager of a general store, ten years. In 1871, they located in Wilkes-Barre, where David C. Jeremy embarked in general merchandising, in which he has since successfully continued, being one of the prominent merchants of the city, though he has been a resident of Virginia since 1890. His children are six in number, viz.: Richard W., John H., Arthur L., Ceridwen, Mabel and Deborah. Our subject was reared in Schuylkill and Luzerne counties, and was educated in the public schools and at the Wyoming Seminary, Kingston. In 1877 he located at Emporia, Kans., where he was superintendent of water-works, thirteen years; then returned to Wilkes-Barre in 1890, where he has since managed his father=s general store. On September 13, 1888, he married Sarah, daughter of David and Anna Evans, of Newark, Ohio, and by her he had two children: Arthur E. (deceased), and Ruth. Mr. Jeremy is a member of the Puritan Congregational Church, of the A.F. & A.M., Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, and Emporia (Kansas) Commandery, K.T.; in politics he is a Republican.

JOHN JESSOP (deceased) was born in Yorkshire, near Huddersfield, England, December 6, 1815, the only child of Charles and Esther (Jessop) Jessop, also natives of England. He was educated in his native land, and at the age of twelve years came to America, landing in New York City, whence he soon afterward proceeded to Philadelphia where he resided four years. He then came west to Minney, Pa., where he remained two years, removing at the end of that period to White Deer Mills, Union Co., same State, where he was interested in a woolen factory. At that place he lived for about nine years, going from there to Columbia county, where he became sole proprietor of the Buer Creek Woolen Mills, which he operated two years. At the end of that period he removed to Beach Haven, this county, and kept hotel for four years. He was also in the grocery business for about one and on-half years at Northumberland and Espytown, returning from the latter place to Beach Haven, where he remained but a short time, however, going from there to Fraueler=s Rest where he kept hotel for eight years. He then purchased a farm at Espytown where he followed agricultural pursuits two years. In 1859 he came to Plymouth and was engaged in the hotel-keeping at the West End for about eight years, at the end of which time he retired from active business. Mr. Jessop was married January 28, 1838, to Miss Martha J., daughter of James and Margaret Campbell, natives of Northumberland county, and six children were born to this union: Mary Elizabeth, who died February 19, 1839; Hester Margaret, Caroline Alice, Grace Arilla, John Campbell (deceased) and William Riter. The father of this family was called from earth July 14, 1892. In political preferences he was a Republican.

JOHN A. JOHN, fire-boss, Henry Shaft, Plains, was born in South Wales, and is a son of Timothy and Ann (Griffiths) John, the former of whom was a farmer. They reared a family of eight children, seven of whom are living, and John A. is the third. Our subject came to America in 1863 and located at Locust Dale, Pa., where he was engaged in mining two and a half years; then at Shenandoah a few months, afterward came to Wilkes-Barre, where he worked in Baltimore Shaft, No. 3, eight years; and in 1870 he came to Plains, where he has since been engaged in fire-bossing. Mr. John was married, July 29, 1850, to Miss Barbara, daughter of Evan and Mary (Jones) Pugh, and they have had born to them twenty children, five of whom are living, viz: Margaretta, married to Isaac Evans, a miner in Plains; Mary J., living with her parents; Emma, married to John Watkins, a mine laborer in Planinsville; Thomas, a laborer in the Henry Shaft, and Ann, living at home. Besides his own large family, our subject took upon himself the additional burden of supporting the five orphan children of his brother-in-law, Jenkins Pugh, who was killed in the mines in Wales, thus shielding them from the training of the poorhouse; and when, after he had been in America a short time, he sent for his own family, four of these little orphans accompanied them to the New World; they were as follows: Jane, married to William Thomas, in Parsons; John, residing in Wilkes-Barre; David who died in 1885 at the age of thirty-six years; Evan, a miner in Nanticoke, and Daniel, who died in Wales at the age of twenty-two. Mr. And Mrs. John are members of the Baptist Church at Parsons; he is a member of the A.O.K. of M.C., and in political matters is a Republican.

JOSHUA T. JOHN, miner, Plains, was born in South Wales, March 7, 1848, and is the son of Joshua and Maria (Twiney) John; in his father=s family there were eleven children, seven of whom are living, of whom he is the third. He came to America in 1868, and located at Dutchtown, Pa., where he worked in the mines four months, and in 1869 removed to Plains; here he worked, laboring in the mines a few months, and has since been engaged in mining; he removed to his present residence in 1883. Mr. John was married, August 14, 1869, to Miss Sarah, daughter of Evan and Sarah (Williams) Thomas, natives of Wales, and they have had eleven children, seven of whom are living, viz.: Sarah (Mrs. Daniel D. Powell), Maria (Mrs. John C. Jones), Margaret, Edith, Bessie, Blodwen, and Joseph. This gentleman is a member of the I.O.O.F. and the A.O.K. of M.C., and he is a Republican.

C. BEN (CHARLES BENJAMIN) JOHNSON, was born in Philadelphia, January 15, 1847, and is a son of John Marion and Mary (Gwilliam) Johnson, the former of whom was born in Baltimore, Md., and the latter in Shrewsbury, England. C. Ben Johnson attended the public schools in Philadelphia, and entered the high school below the legal age, but did not graduate. After leaving school, his father having met financial reverses, he was employed making boys= shoe uppers, serving newspaper routes and in stores. In August, 1861, when not yet fifteen years old, he enlisted as a drummer in the One Hundred and Fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served three years in that organization; afterward enlisted in the Seventh United States Veteran Volunteers, serving one year, or a little over. After the war he entered journalism, and was for six years editor of the AAnthracite Monitor@, at Tamaqua, Schuylkill Co., Pa., and AThe Workingman@, at Pottsville, in the same county, both of which ere the official organs of the Miners= Associations of the Anthracite Counties. He removed to Wilkes-Barre in 1876, and in 1878 became connected with the Wilkes-Barre ALeader@, then a weekly paper, owned by the late J. K. Bogert and George B. Kulp. He continued with the Leader and other Wilkes-Barre newspapers until 1883, when he was elected reading clerk of the State House of Representatives. In 1887 he assisted in the re-organization of the Wilkes-Barre Board of Trade, and served as its secretary until 1891. In the fall of 1890 he was the Democratic candidate for member of the State House of Representatives for the District comprising the City of Wilkes-Barre, and though there were Republican, Prohibition and Labor candidates against him, he was elected by a plurality of 239 votes. In the Legislature he gave much of his time to the advocacy of free-school books, and of a bill making it a misdemeanor for candidates or political committees to pay the taxes of voters, or the cost of naturalizing aliens. Mr. Johnson was at one time secretary of the National Labor Union, the first national labor organization of any consequence ever organized in the country. He was secretary of the Revenue Reform Press Association of Pennsylvania, which was organized in the early Aeighties@ to further the cause of revenue reform in the Democratic party, the press of the party, in Pennsylvania, inclining at that time largely in the other direction. Mr. Johnson=s editorial bent has always been toward serious topics, particularly those of a polico-economic character. He was secretary of the Democratic County Committee during several years, and is the author of the rules now governing that party, and under which the unseemly quarrels and disorder that used to characterise Democratic Conventions have wholly disappeared. He was commander of Conyngham Post No. 97, G.A.R., in 1890, while the fine large Memorial Hall belonging to that organization was being constructed. He has written many paper on historical, industrial and other topics, and from time to time delivered a number of public addresses, principally of a political character, and with reference to labor matters, or matters incident to the work of the Wilkes-Barre Board of Trade. He is religious belief a Universalist. On May 17, 1872, Mr. Johnson married Sallie J., daughter of the late Edward Enterline, then a prosperous farmer and leading citizen of Tamaqua, Pa. Mr. And Mrs. Johnson have had two children: Mary E. and Gertrude C. Johnson, the former of whom, born March 4, 1873, still survives.

DAVID JOHNSON, one of the oldest settlers in Ashley, was born in County Derry, Ireland, in 1831, a son of William and Martha (Jameson) Johnson. His brothers, Robert, Jonathan, Hugh and James, came to Ashley. Soon after finishing his education he began working about the mines, an occupation that he followed until 1886, including twenty-eight years mining. He built his residence in 1864. April 27, 1852, Mr. Johnson married Miss Ellen, daughter of John and Martha (Mullen) Williamson, natives of County Antrim, Ireland, and of this union have been born nine children, viz.: Nancy (Mrs. Daniel Erob); John, who died at twelve; Martha, who died at three; Margaret (Mrs. Edward Space); James, boiler-maker; Elizabeth, who died at three; Mary (Mrs. Edward Wier); Clara, who died at thirteen; and Ellen. Our subject and his family are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is a Republican in his political views, and has held the offices of school director and councilman in Ashley borough.

FRANK P. JOHNSON, grocer, Wilkes-Barre, was born in that city August 27, 1852, a son of Priestley and Sarah (Monega) Johnson. His paternal grandfather was Jehoida Johnson, a son of Rev. Jacob Johnson, formerly of Connecticut, and a pioneer of Wilkes-Barre. He was the first settled pastor of the Congregational Church, afterward organized into the Presbyterian, and erected the first house on the corner of Union and River streets, which was built prior to the Revolution, where he resided until his death in 1797; it was afterward occupied by his son Jehoida until 1826; it was torn down about 1887, and the site is now known as the Ingham property. Rev. Jacob Johnson came to Wilkes-Barre with the Connecticut party, and was a man of rank in his day and generation. Priestley Johnson was born at what is now Parsons, and for seveal years was engaged in the manufacture of powder kegs there. He later engaged in the hardware business at Wilkes-Barre, where he also, for eleven years, was street commissioner of that city. He died in 1878, at the age of fifty-eight years and six months. His wife was a daughter of Simon Monega, a native of France, who followed the fortunes of the great Napoleon in nearly all the bloody fields of Europe, and who settled in Wilkes-Barre prior to 1820. The homestead is now occupied by the widow and daughter of Priestley Johnson. The latter had four children who grew to maturity, viz.: Henry, Frank P., Lizzie and May. Our subject was reared and educated in Wilkes-Barre. When twenty-one years of age he located in Ohio, and later in Abilene, Kansas. After an absence of eleven years he, in 1884, returned to Wilkes-Barre, and since 1886 has been engaged in the grocery business. Mr. Johnson married September 16, 1875, Martha B., daughter of William and Ann (Sherman) Reinhart, of Mt. Vernon, Ohio, and has one child, Robert M. He is a member of the I.O.O.F. and P.O.S. of A., and in politics is a Republican

FREDERICK C. JOHNSON, editor and publisher of the Wilkes-Barre Record, was born at Marquette, Wis., in 1853. He is a son of Wesley and Cynthia (Green) Johnson, and great-grandson of Rev. Jacob Johnson, who settled in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., in 1772. The father of our subject was born in Wilkes-Barre, December 20, 1819, and died there October 27, 1892. The subject of this sketch was educated at the public schools of Wilkes-Barre, and at Ripon College, Wisconsin. Subsequently, he entered the banking house of Bennett, Phelps & Co., afterward the coal office of F. J. Leavenworth, and then was with the Wilkes-Barre Gas Company ten years, meanwhile engaging, at odd moments, in penning voluntary contri-butions to the local papers, and supplying special correspondence from the coal region for the Chicago Tribune; he also spent a year at reportorial work in Chicago for that paper. He studied medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and was graduated from there in 1883. Instead of commencing the practice of medicine, however, he embraced an opportunity that presented itself for entering journalism, and purchased an interest in the Wilkes-Barre Record, the oldest daily paper in that city. He has conducted every department of the paper in turn--local, editorial and business management. Mr. Johnson married, in 1885, Miss Georgia Post, a daughter of Joseph H. Post, of Knoxville, Tenn., and two children have been born to them: Ruth and Frederick G. Mr. Johnson has actively identified himself with the local life of the community, in various ways con-genial to his taste. He is a member of the Board of Trade; an officer of the Historical Society; a director of the Young Men's Christian Association; a member of the Republican County Committee, also of the Luzerne County Medical Society, and the State Medical Soc-iety; a member of the F. & A. M., the A. L. of H., the I. O. H., and is one of the stand-ing committee appointed by the State Board of Charities to inspect the public institutions of Luzerne County. He is a member of the State Editorial Association, and was one of its vice-presidents. The Record was purchased in 1883 by C. B. Snyder, F. C. Johnson and J. C. Powell. In 1888, Mr. Snyder retired, and the management of the paper has since contin-ued under the firm name of Johnson & Powell.

HARRIETT S. JOHNSON, Plains township, P. O. Parsons, was born in the house where she now lives, November 27, 1845, and is a daughter of Jehoiada and Priscilla (Scovell) Johnson, natives of Pennsylvania, of New England origin. There were three children in her father's family, viz.: Harriett S., Thomas M. (deceased) and Emily. Her great-grandfather, Jacob Johnson, is known in history as the celebrated "Pioneer Preacher of Wyoming;" he came to the Wyoming Valley from New England at the dawn of civilization in the Valley to preach the Gospel to the Redmen and became one of the largest land owners in the Valley. He dug his own grave, and was buried on his land, on the present site of the Memorial Church, at Wilkes-Barre, whence in 1870 his remains were removed to the city cemetary. Miss Johnson was educated in the common school at Parsons, and is a devoted member of the Presbyterian Church at Wilkes-Barre.

HENRY JOHNSON, farmer, P. O. Huntsville, was born in Plymouth, October 26, 1818. He is a son of Nathaniel and Jane (Devens) Johnson, the former a native of Connecticut, the latter born in Plymouth. Nathaniel came to this county about 1812, locating in Plymouth. He was a musician by profession, and was the father of three children: Clark, Hiram, and Henry. Henry was reared and educated in Plymouth and Kingston at the common schools, and has always confined himself to farming. On January 999, 1842, at the age of twenty-four, he married Miss Amelia, daughter of Mathias and Temperance Van Loon, by which marriage there were fourteen children, eight sons and six daughters, ten of whom grew to maturity, and eight of whom are now living. For his second wife Mr. Johnson married, January 26, 1887, Mrs. Delia Wolfe, widow of William Wolfe. There were no children born to this union. Mr. Johnson's children are all married and comfortably situated in life. He is a general farmer, a self-made man, who by perseverance and economy, has become the own-er of two fertile and productive farms. He is a man of worth and influence in his com-munity, and has held various offices of trust and responsibility, serving as constable for the term of eight years. In religious belief he is a Methodist.

HENRY C. JOHNSON, justice of peace, Luzerne, was born in Kingston township, December 10, 1849, a son of Hiram and Mary A.(Hughes) Johnson. The family consists of two sons and three daughters besides Henry C., all of whom are living. Mr. Johnson was edu-cated at Lancaster, Pa., and, returning to Kingston after completing his education, ent-ered the employment of the Wyoming Coal Company in the capacity of foreman, where he re-mained until a serious accident five years later disabled him for life. He soon after removed to Luzerne where he has held successively the offices of tax collector, burgess, clerk of council and justice of the peace. His term as justice of the peace and burgess has not yet expired. Mr. Johnson married Miss Emma Lamareaux, daughter of Fletcher and Mary (Ransom) Lamareaux, and their union has been blessed by one child, S. M. Stanley, who is four years of age. As a politician Mr. Johnson is a decided Republican. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. and also of the P. O. S. of A.

MRS. MARY A. JOHNSON, widow of Hiram Johnson, who was in his lifetime a farmer in Luzerne County, was born in Luzerne borough in 1814, a daughter of James and Hannah (Hughes) Swetland, the former of whom was born in Shamokin, the latter in Kingston. James was a son of Joseph, who located on a small farm in Wyoming in the early history of the county, where he remained for some time. He then removed to what is now known as Luzerne borough, where he bought a mill property, now owned by Raub & Fuller, which he operated with success for several years. He finally sold out and removed to Susquehanna county, where he died. Joseph Swetland reared a family of ten children by two marriages. His son James began life in Luzerne borough, and was a millwright by occupation, at which trade he worked all his life. He was an educated man of refinement and culture, whose influence was often solicited and always given when justice and righteousness demanded it. He died in 1870 at the age of ninety years. His family consisted of ten children, five of whom are now living: James, Charles, Edward, Margaret and Mary A. Mrs. Mary A. Johnson was reared and educated in Luzerne borough. On May 24, 1840, she was married to Hiram Johnson, to whom she bore eight children, six of whom are living: George, Henry, James, Louisa, Elizabeth and Maggie; all are married and well provided for. Hiram John-son was born April 3, 1815, son of Nathan and Jane Johnson. After their marriage the parents moved in 1844 to their farm of one hundred and twenty-five acres. At that time, it was all unimproved, but by hard and honest toil they succeeded in clearing, beautify-ing and embellishing, until today their farm is a model of perfection. In 1858, they built a magnificent stone house. Mr. Johnson was a man respected by all who knew him; during his lifetime he held several township offices. He died November 3, 1890, at the age of seventy-four. Mrs. Johnson is a woman of marked intelligence and refinement; she is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

M. G. JOHNSON, farmer, P. O. Huntsville, was born in Jackson township, August 13, 1854. He is a son of Henry and Emily (Van Loon) Johnson, both of whom were born in this county; the father is a hard-working man, who, by close attention to business principles, has made for himself a pleasant home. He has now reached the advanced age of seventy-three. He had fourteen children born to him, of whom he reared eleven. M. G. is the sixth in the family, and was reared and educated at the schools in his native town, and has followed the vocation of his father. When he reached the age of twenty-four, he was married, on January 9, 1878, to Miss Emma, daughter of William and Margaret Hoover. Four children were born to them, three of whom are living: Alvernia M., born November 23, 1878; Anna G., born April 5, 1880; and Maggie M., born September 8, 1884. William H., born June 4, 1882, died January 8, 1883. Mr. Johnson is a practical farmer, he is living on a farm of seventy-two acres, once the property of William Hoover. Mr. William Hoover, Jr., the father of Mrs. Emma Johnson, was born about 1834, in Dallas township, where he engaged as a farmer, and then moved to Lehman where he followed the same vocation; he next moved to Jackson township where he engaged in butchering, at which he continued successfully for about eight years. He married Miss Margaret Laudenbury, born about 1837, by whom he had five children, four of whom are now living. Mr. and Mrs. Hoover are now residents of Wilkes-Barre, where they own considerable real estate, all of which he has acquired by his own labor; they receive rent from fifty tenants. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are congenial and hospitable to a high degree, following in this the example of their progenitors.

NICHOLAS B. JOHNSON, miller, P. O. Sybertsville, was born in Beaver Valley, Colum-bia Co., Pa., May 1, 1843, and is a son of Jesse and Sarah (Rittenhouse) Johnson. His paternal grandfather, John Johnson, a native of Philadelphia County, Pa., was a pioneer of Beaver Valley, where he cleared and improved a farm, and lived and died. His maternal grandfather was Martin Rittenhouse, a native of Pennsylvania, whose wife was Amelia Rit-tenhouse, of Briar Creek, Columbia Co., Pa.; was a pioneer of Black Creek township, this county, where he erected the first gristmill in the township, and lived and died there. The father of subject was a farmer of Beaver Valley, and died there at the age of sixty-five years. The subject of this sketch was reared in Beaver Valley, educated in the common schools, and served an apprenticeship of two years at the milling business. From 1863 to 1865, he had charge of his grandfather's mill in Black Creek township, and after-ward was employed in mills at Sugar Loaf, Catawissa, Mahanoy City, and Port Carbon. He was then engaged in farming, three years, in Black Creek township; for twelve years was proprietor of the old Turnbach mill, in Sugar Loaf, and since 1884 has been proprietor of the Seybertsville mills. Mr. Johnson was three times married. His first wife was Amanda, daughter of Roswell and Maria (Rittenhouse) Trumbull, of Black Creek township, and by her he has five children living: Sarah (Mrs. Winfield Hausze), Margaret (Mrs. George Hetler), Roswell, Emma and Frank. His second wife was Caroline Hausze; and his third wife was a widow, of Hazleton. Mr. Johnson is a member of the M. E. Church; in politics he is a Republican, and has been school director of Sugar Loaf township one term.

OTTO M. JOHNSON, carpenter, P. O. Wapwallopen, was born in Hollenback township, this county, November 16, 1860, a son of Samuel and Caroline (Sones) Johnson. His paternal grandparents were Samuel and Elizabeth (Harlacher), of Columbia County, Pa., and Samuel, the father of our subject, was their only son. He was a blacksmith by trade, which he followed in Hollenback township for some years. He served through the Civil War as a member of Company F, One Hundred and Forty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and died in 1867, of disease contracted while in the service. Our subject, the only survivor of a family of three, was reared in Hollenback township, where he received a limited education in the common schools. He served an apprenticeship of three years at the carpenter's trade, and since 1881 has worked as a journeyman being now in the employ of the Dupont Powder Company. On September 8, 1881, he married Cora, daughter of Lewis and Rosanna (Sizer) Weiss, of Nescopeck township, and has one son, L. Scott. Mr. Johnson is a member of the German Reformed Church, of the P. O. S. of A. and O. U. A. M.; politically he is a Republican.

SAMUEL R. JOHNSON, jeweler, Nescopeck, was born in Beaver township, Columbia Co., Pa., September 8, 1843, a son of David and Sarah (Snyder) Johnson. His paternal grand-father, John Johnson, was of Scotch descent and a native of Montgomery Co., Pa.; he was a pioneer of Beaver township, Columbia County, where he carried on farming, and ended his days. His wife was Hannah Strong. David Johnson was a native of Montgomery Co., Pa., a blacksmith and farmer by occupation, and spent most of his life in Beaver township, Col-umbia Co., Pa., where he died. His wife was a daughter of Michael Snyder, of Catawissa Valley, Schuylkill Co., Pa., and by her he had thirteen children: Amos, Hannah (Mrs. Charles Kyer), Sarah E. (Mrs. William H. Koch), Martin L., Emma J. (Mrs. John Steiner), Samuel R., Louise, Jesse, Mary A. (Mrs. William Shaffer), Moses, Michael, Ida V. (Mrs. Grifeth), and Casper W. Our subject was reared and educated in his native county and learned the miller's trade, which he followed twenty years. Since 1866, he has followed the jeweler's trade, a part of the time while he was engaged in milling. He served in the Civil War, enlisting August 6, 1862, in Company E, One Hundred and Thirty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, in which he served nine months. On March 11, 1864, he re-enlisted, in Company L, Third Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery; he was promoted to corporal and sergeant, and was honorably discharged by general order of the War Department after twenty-one months' service. He married, October 4, 1866, Mary C., daughter of Joseph C. Hughes, of Columbia County, Pa., and has two children: Ella B. (Mrs. A. L. Vandeling) and Robert B. Mr. John-son has been a resident of Luzerne County since 1872; he is a member of the M. E. Church, K. of M. and G. A. R., and in politics is a Republican.

MRS. WESLEY N. JOHNSON, nee Miss Sarah E. Pettebone, is a daughter of Noah and Margaret N. (Speece) Pettebone, who were natives of Pennsylvania, and of French and English origin, respectively. Noah Pettebone was a farmer by occupation. He reared a family of ten children, seven of whom are now living, and of whom our subject is the eighth in order of birth. She was born November 13, 1847, and was educated in the com-mon schools and Wyoming Seminary. November 19, 1874, she was married to Wesley N. John-son, son of Erastus and Nancy (Newton) Johnson, both of whom were natives of New York State, of English origin. The father was a farmer by occupation. This union was blessed with three children: Jessie Louise, born August 30, 1875, now at school at the Keystone Academy, Factoryville, Pa.; Frank E., born September 5, 1877, attending school at Lake Geneva, Wis.; and Edna May, born May 26, 1879, died November 26, 1883. Mrs. Johnson is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

WILLIAM JOHNSON, one of the first settlers in Ashley, was born in County Derry, Ireland, in August, 1827, and is a son of William and Eliza (Jameson) Johnson. The fam-ily came to America in 1846 and settled in Ashley. In his father's family there were twelve children, as follows: Robert, who died in Ashley, aged seventy years; Margaret (Mrs. William Brown), deceased; Jonathan, who died in Nanticoke, aged eighty years; Hugh, who died in Ashley, aged thirty years; James, somewhere in British America; William; Rebecca (Mrs. Samuel Black, in Ashley); Eliza (Mrs. Robert H. Johnson), who died in Ash-ley when yet young; David, residing in Ashley; John W., who died at the age of twenty-three years; Kennedy, working at his trade in the machine shops at Susquehanna, Pa.; and Nancy (Mrs. James Williamson, in Ashley). Our subject was educated in his native country, where he followed farming till he came to America with the family in 1846, when he began working about the mines, which occupation he followed in all thirty years, in-cluding ten years mining. He then engaged in railroading, which he has since followed. Mr. Johnson was married February 20, 1854, to Miss Nancy, daughter of John and Martha Williamson, natives of County Antrim, Ireland, where her father was a miller. The issue of this union was ten children, viz.: Martha, married to Charles Ehert, carpenter, Ash-ley; Ellen, married to Charles Kennedy, now of the firm of Kennedy & Grossworth, Phila-delphia (she died at the age of twenty-one, leaving one child, Mira); Eliza J., deceased in infancy; Rebecca, married to William Lee, fireman on the Central Railroad of New Jer-sey; Isabella (Mrs. Henry Clemens), who died at the age of twenty-two years; Agnes, who is keeping house for her father; William, a boiler-maker in Mauch Chunk; David, a brake-man on the Central Railroad of New Jersey, and living at home; Bertha, also at home; Charles, in the Central shops, and living at home. Mr. Johnson and family are members of the Presbyterian Church, of which he is a trustee. In his political views he is in sympathy with the Republican party. In 1848 he built his present residence, where he has since lived.

WILLIAM JOHNSON, miner, Parsons, was born in Plains township, May 5, 1842, and is the youngest in the family of six children of Samuel and Mary (Carman) Johnson, natives of Pennsylvania, and of New England parentage. He was educated in the common schools of Plains township, and April 17, 1861, enlisted at Wilkes-Barre, in Company F, Eighth Pen-nsylvania Volunteers, for ninety days, at the expiration of which time he re-enlisted, on this occasion in Company D, Forty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and after serving two years re-enlisted in the same company. He participated in the following engagements: Winchester, Cedar Mountain, Second Bull Run, Antietam and Gettysburg. His corps was then sent to join Sherman at Chattanooga, under whom he took part in the following battles: Resaca, Dallas, Peach Tree Creek, Altoona and several minor engagements, and was in Sherman's march to the sea; was taken prisoner at Chesterfield Court House, N. C., Feb-ruary 27, 1865, and taken to Libby Prison, from which he was shortly after paroled. At the battle of Dallas, Ga., he received a gun-shot would in the left leg, and was mus-tered out at Annapolis, Md., June 29, 1865, when he returned to Plains (now Parsons), and engaged in mining in the employ of the Delaware & Hudson Coal Company, where he has since remained. Mr. Johnson was married September 30, 1866, to Miss Melvina, daughter of Burton and Amanda (Root) Hadsell, of Forkston, Wyoming Co., Pa. Our subject and wife attend the Methodist Episcopal Church; he is a member of the G. A. R., and is a staunch Democrat.

William P. Johnson, farmer, P. O. Ketcham, was born March 14, 1814, reared and educated in Wilkes-Barre in the Old Academy. He is the son of Jehoiada P. and Hannah (Frazier) Johnson, both of whom were born in Connecticut. Jehoiada P. was the son of Rev. Jacob Johnson, who was the first Presbyterian minister in the Valley, and a practical expounded of the Gospel from his point of view. He came from Connecticut about 1760, and was father-in-law to Gen. Butler, who commanded the fort at that time. Rev. Jacob had four children; he lived to be ninety years of age, and dug his own grave. His son, Jehoiada P., began life in Wilkes-Barre township as a wealthy farmer, owning about 500 acres in and about Parsons, where he owned and operated a gristmill. He was a very influential man in his day and town, and gave his children a fine, liberal education. One of his sons, Ovid F. Johnson, was at one time attorney-general of the State, and a man of great influence in his party. Wesley, another son, studied and practiced law. Jehoiada P. died in 1830, at the age of sixty-three years. William P. is the fourth in the family in order of birth. He first began working in Wilkes-Barre, at the printing business, at which he continued two years. He next entered the distilling business, then worked at powder-making, after which he was engaged in boating, which he continued for ten years, and finally, in 1859, came to Dallas, where he settled down as a practical farmer, and has since remained as such. In June, 1837, at the age of twenty-three, he married Miss Eliza, daughter of John and Mary Rothrock, by which marriage there were born six children, five of whom are now (1891) living, viz.: Jane, Wesley, George, Sarah and Robert, all of whom are married. Jane married E. St. Clair; Wesley married Miss Anna Miller; George married Miss Jane M. Brace; Sarah married J. C. Ryman; Robert married Miss Ida Farrell. Miss Clara Louise Johnson, daughter of Robert and Ida (Farrell) Johnson, lives with her grandfather. Mr. Johnson is a practical and intelligent farmer, an upright man of business and a loyal citizen. He has made many improvements on his farm, changing the wild, bleak hills into beautiful harvest fields. While in Wilkes-Barre, he was honored with the office of justice of the peace for five years, also serving as assessor, collector and school director. In this town, he held the office of school director for twelve years, and that of supervisor for two. Mr. Johnson was one of the first men to prospect for coal in the Valley; but the lack of knowledge of mining, and mining facilities, was against him. Politically, he is a Democrat.

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