Ha - He Surnames

History of Luzerne County, Pa.,

by H.C. Bradsby, 1893

JOB HABBLETT, inside foreman of No. 3 Shaft, Delaware & Hudson Canal Company, Plymouth Division. Perhaps there are not many men who have had a more varied experience in coal mining than the one whose name opens this sketch, as he has been engaged in it the greater part of his life, and has not confined his labors to one locality. Mr. Habblett was born September 29, 1834, and is the oldest in the family of nine children of John and Mary (Llewellyn) Habblett, natives of Gloucestershire, England. The parents emigrated from England to the United States and were married in Schuylkill County, Pa., where their family were born and reared, all being educated in the public schools of Schuylkill County. The subject of this sketch began mining when quite young, working with his father (who was a contractor for many years) until he was eighteen, when he served an apprenticeship of three years with John Parker, a blacksmith of Bucksville, Pa. After completing his trade, he assisted his father, who had a contract for tunnelling from one vein to another at the Bucksville Colliery; after completing this work he engaged in the business of contractor with Thomas Moss, and continued it for seven years, near Tamaqua, Pa., afterward taking a contract to sink a slope for Stine & Co., which was to be six hundred feet in depth. Matthew Camp was taken into partnership, and the work was satisfactorily completed; but owing to a fire, it was necessary to re-open it, and Mr. Habblett had full charge of the work. After completing this work a second time, he removed to Coaldale, Pa., where he was engaged in removing standing gas from the mines, a gas which is very deleterious to health if permitted to remain in the coal chambers and gangways. In 1877, he came to Plymouth, and was employed as assistant inside foreman of the Fairmount Colliery, operated by Morris, Roberts & Co., where he remained six years. Mr. Habblett then returned to Plymouth and took the position of inside foreman of No. 3 Shaft, Delaware & Hudson Canal Company, in which capacity he has since been employed. In this mine there are employed 100 miners, 100 laborers, 117 company hands, and a number of extra hands, making a total of about 330 men. They take out on an average one thousand tons of coal daily. Mr. Habblett was united in marriage September 28, 1850, with Eliza, daughter of William and Eliza (Parfet) Lane, natives of England, to which union have been born nine children, viz.: John, born March 10, 1859; Lizzie, born June 8, 1860, now wife of James Sassaman, of East Mauch Chunk, Pa.; William, born March 29, 1862; Willington, born February 28, 1864; Harriet, born August 29, 1866, now wife of Frank Leeds, of Plymouth; George Lincoln, born April 4, 1873; Melinda, born December 14, 1875; Mary, born March 10, 1878; Sadie, born October 14, 1880. In politics Mr. Habblett is a Republican. The family attended the Primitive Methodist Church.

REV. JOHN HAGUE, pastor of the Ebenezer English Baptist Church, Plymouth, was born June 4, 1843, in Glamorganshire, South Wales. He is the eldest of five children born to Elijah and Catharine (Davis) Hague, the former of English and the latter of Welsh descent. His early education was received in Wales, and he was there married December 7, 1862, at Stowe Church, Monmouthshire, to Mary, daughter of John and Margaret (Davis) Davis, also natives of Wales. Seven children were born to this union, viz.: Mary Ann (deceased), John Arthur, Louisa, Clemantine, Catharine Florence, Rebecca Ann and Elijah Frost. The subject of this sketch came to America in 1879, and was, for some years prior to studying for the ministry, superintendent of Black Creek Mines, and later master mechanic for G. B. Markel & Co., at Jeddo, Pa. He was afterward master mechanic for the zinc mines, located at Friedensville, Pa., where the largest engine in the work, "The President," is operated. In 1886, he entered the Crozer Theological Seminary, at Chester, Delaware Co., Pa., and took a course of study in that institution, graduating in 1889. Immediately there after, he assumed the pastorate of the Ebenezer English Baptist Church, at Plymouth, which position he has satisfactorily filled ever since. When he first took charge, the meetings were held in McAlarney Hall, but by his efforts a comfortable church has been erected on Centre Avenue, where the congregation, which has greatly increased in numbers since his pastorate, can worship at their own altar, all being largely due to the efforts of the pastor.

JOHN A. HAGUE, music teacher, the second child of Mr. and Mrs. Hague, has been a student of music since he was eleven years old, at which age he was placed under the tutorship of Dr. Frost, of South Wales, one of the greatest musicians in the world. As soon as the family came to America, he was placed under the tutorship of competent teachers at Reading, Pa., and for the last three years, has been a student of Dr. D. J. J. Mason, of Wilkes-Barre. Mr. Hague is skilled both in vocal and instrumental music. He was united in marriage February 25, 1890, with Amelia Evans, a graduate of the West Chester State Normal School, and one child was born to this union; but ere the young couple bad fairly launched out on the sea of married life, the young wife was taken seriously ill and died a few hours later, leaving the baby, Marguerite, as the only comfort for the bereaved husband. He has since resided with his father at Plymouth.

EDWARD HAHN, inside foreman of the Delaware & Hudson Colliery, No. 4, was born in the Province of Hessen, Germany, April 30, 1832, and is a son of Edward and Catharine (Haeinbaecher) Hahn, natives of Germany. He was educated in the land of his birth and, in July, 18500, came to America. He first engaged in the cabinet-making trade at New York for a short time, afterward followed farming, canaling, etc., until 1852, when he went to Hazleton, Pa., and there engaged in mining about one year. Removing at the end of that time to Wilkes-Barre, he here worked as a miner at the Baltimore Shaft, No. 2, until 1855, when he returned to Hazleton, and mined there one year. From there he again came to Wilkes-Barre and worked once more in the old Baltimore Shaft. In the spring of 1857, he moved to Hyde Park, Pa., and worked there as miner for the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company until the spring of 1861, when he removed to Nanticoke, working in the Lees Mines until 1865, in which year he was given a position as foreman at No. 1 Shaft at Wanamie, Pa. This incumbency he held till 1869, when he was tendered a like position at Baltimore Shaft, No. 2, which he accepted and occupied until 1877, when he was installed as foreman at No. 4, and has sine filled that position. Mr. Hahn was married, May 23, 1854, to Elizabeth, daughter of William and Jeanette (Pekin) Burns, natives of Scotland, and fourteen children have been born to this union, of whom William E. is the fourth in order of birth.

WILLIAM E. HAHN is occupying the position of assistant inside foreman at No. 4, Delaware & Hudson. He was born February 8, 1861, and was educated in Luzerne County. At an early age, he began mining in all varieties of labor about the mines until 1885, when he worked as a miner. In 1887, he was appointed to his present position of assistant inside foreman. He was married October 29, 1884, to Bridget, daughter of Eugene and Margaret (Carey) Doyle, natives of Pennsylvania, and four children have been born to them, viz.: Elizabeth, William E., Edwin and Eugene. In politics, William is a Democrat; socially, he is a member of the I. O. O. F. and of the P. O. S. of A. The family attend the German Reformed Church.

HARRY HAKES, Wilkes-Barre. The Hakes family is of English extraction and of the earliest Puritan stock. The Hon. Harry Hakes, Sr., was born June 10, 1825, at Harpersfield, Delaware Co., N.Y. His father, Lyman Hakes, Sr., first saw the light as far back as 1788, at Watertown, Litchfield Co., Conn., which county furnished a large part of the early settlers of this Valley. The grandfather of Harry Hakes was Lewis Hakes, who married Hannah Church, of the family of Capt. Church, about 1778, in Massachusetts. Lyman Hakes, Sr., moved to Harpersfield, N.Y., where he died in 1873. He married Nancy Dayton, of Watertown, Litchfield Co., Conn., September 23, 1813. Her father, Lyman Dayton, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. The mother of Mr. Dayton was Abiah, daughter of Stephen and Rebecca Matthews, of Watertown, Conn. Stephen Matthews, was the son of Thomas Matthews, also of Watertown. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and was at the surrender of Fort Ticonderoga. Thomas Matthews was the son of William Matthews, who emigrated from Wales, England, to Connecticut, in 1671. He was born in Watertown in 1699, and died in 1798 aged ninety-nine years. At the age of forty, Thomas Matthews was appointed a magistrate of Watertown, and held the office for forty years, being appointed yearly, and at the age of eighty declined further appointment. Mr. Hakes served in the War of 1812, and was a judge of the county in which he lived. Mrs. Hannah Carr, nee Hakes, sister of Lyman Hakes, Sr., was the grandmother of Hon. C. E. Rice, president judge of Luzerne County. His family consisted of eight children, four sons and four daughters. Of the sons, Harry is the youngest, and Lyman, Jr., for many years a resident and leading member of the bar of this county, the oldest. He was for more than thirty years prior to his death, in 1873, an active practitioner at the Luzerne bar, and very much at the bars of surrounding counties and in the supreme court; and for his genius and liberal tastes and benevolence as a man, Lyman Hakes will be long remembered by the bar and by the people. Homer, another of his sons, died in 1854. Another of this breeder of big men, Hon. Harlo Hakes, resides at Hornellsville, N. Y. Two of the sisters are still living, one the mother of Lyman H. Bennett, a member of the Luzerne bar, and residing in Wilkes-Barre. The boyhood of Harry Hakes combined the usual experience of farmers' sons--work upon the farm during the summer, and attendance upon the district school during the brief school term in winter. He had even at that age, a habit of study and taste for general reading which made him, as nearly as possible for a boy, a proficient in all the branches taught, and gave him a fairly good English education. Leaving the following of the plow, he entered the Castleton Medical College, in Vermont, from which institution he graduated, in 1846, and M.D., with all the honor that title conveys, and opened an office at Davenport Centre, N.Y., which soon became the center of attraction for a large population needing medical help, and in which he remained for three years with gratifying financial success to himself, and more than equally gratifying good to his patients. In June, 1849, when he was but twenty-four years of age, he married Maria E. Dana, eldest daughter of Anderson Dana, Jr., of Wilkes-Barre, who was the uncle of ex-Judge Edmund L. Dana of that city. She died in the December following, unfortunately, and the bereaved husband devoted the year 1850 to the attendance and faithful and effective work in the schools and hospitals of New York City. Then he removed to the, at that time, rapidly growing village of Nanticoke, in this county, where he continued the practice of his profession for three years. In 1854, he visited the old country, and spent another year of study in the medical institutions of London and Paris. Returning, he married, August 29, 1855, Harriet L. Lape, the daughter of Adam and Elizabeth Lape, both natives of this county. He then resumed his practice as a man of medicine, and, interspersing it with the care and culture of his fine farm in the vicinity of Nanticoke, did good work for himself and his country until the spring of 1857. He has no children living, having lost two in their infancy. Dr. Hakes had succeeded in the cure of the physical ailments of man, but, probably by heredity transmission, he had an aptitude for the law. His father, as has before been stated, was a law-giver of no little distinction. His brother was a lawyer of acknowledged repute practicing at our own bar. Another brother is one of the leading lawyers in the Empire State; has been district attorney of his county, member of the Legislature, and register in bankruptcy. Harry began, urged by these influences, the study of the law, in the office of his elder brother, Lyman, in 1857, passed the usual examination, and was admitted to practice, January 25, 1860. In 1864, he was elected a member of the Legislature on the Democratic ticket, representing Luzerne County. During that term, and the succeeding one to which he was re-elected, he secured an appropriation of $2,500 each year for the Home for Friendless Children. He served on the judiciary local, judiciary general, ways and means, banks, corporation, federal relations and estates and escheats committees. H drafted the bill to prevent persons carrying concealed deadly weapons, the bill for the extension of the Lehigh Valley Railroad from Wilkes-Barre to Waverly, N.Y., and the bill for the collection of debts against townships, all of which passed. Although he still keeps up his relations with his brethren of the "healing art," and takes an active part in business and discussions as a member of the Luzerne County Medical Society, his attention and time are chiefly given to the law. Of late years, the Doctor has turned his attention almost wholly to literature, wherein is a field congenial to his tastes, and where he has so far met the most flattering success. His latest product from the press in "The Discovery of America by Columbus," which has met a most cordial reception from the press of the country from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The work is timely and meets the great demand of this Columbian era, probably better than any of the many volumes now coming from the press on the subject. The Doctor is a life-long, earnest Democrat, and is always ready, both in public and private, to give a reason for the faith that is in him. He is a member of the American Medical Association, and is often a delegate from the Luzerne County Medical Society. He is frequently called upon to make speeches on medical, agricultural and scientific subjects. He is not a member of any Christian Church, but is a Methodist in religious belief. Dr. Hakes is a genial friend, and a public-spirited citizen.

D. N. HALE, farmer, Reyburn, was born near Pittston in February, 1838, son of John and Martha (Day) Hale, the former born near Pittston, the latter in Yorkshire, England. John is the son of Joel, a native of Connecticut, who removed from there to this county when a young man, and when the country was in its infancy. He was a man of marked ability, of keen perception and wide and deep conception. He taught school for a number of years with great success; he owned considerable property in Yatesville, and was not only a man of learning, but a practical farmer. His pure life and temperate habits were the means of considerably lengthening his days. Joel Hale reared a family of seven children, to of whom are living. His son, John, began his business career in Pittston, where he always resided, living a quiet and uneventful life. John Hale died in 1882, aged seventy-four years. He reared a family of seven children, five of whom are living. D. N. is the fourth of the family in order of birth, and was reared and educated in Jenkins township, learning the carpenter's trade, at which he worked for seven years. In 1861, he was mustered into the U.S. service as a private in Company H, Eighth P. V. I., for the term of three months. He served his time faithfully and well, was honorably discharged, and reenlisted, for three years in the One Hundred and Forty-second P. V. I. army of the Potomac, participating in the battles of Fredericksburg, Thoroughfare Gap, Rappahannock, Mead's retrograde movement, Weldon R. R., Hatchers Run (first) Dabney's Mill, Hatchers Run (second), Fort Steadman, Boydton Plank Road, Five Forks and Appomattox. He received a wound at Fredericksburg, but served to the close of the war, and was honorably discharged; he now draws a pension. Mr. Hale married in 1880, Miss Anne, daughter of Peter and Louisa Naugle. He removed to his present place of residence the same year, where he has made for himself a beautiful home. Mr. Hale is a stirring man, of fine appearance, and makes a good and lasting impression on his auditor. He is a member of the G. A. R., and has held several important offices in the township. He is a practical farmer, devoting his time to general farming. Mrs. Anna (Naugle) Hale was born in Parsons, in 1843. They have no children. Politically, he is a Republican.

ISAIAH H. HALE, merchant and farmer, P. O. Cease's Mills, was born March 20, 1836, and reared and educated at the common school at Pittston (now Yatesville). He is a son of John N. and Martha (Day) Hale, the former of whom was born in Pittston township in 1808, the latter born in Manchester, England, in 1811. John N. Hale was a son of Joel Hale, who came from Connecticut about 1790, and located at Lackawanna, where he took up a farm of fifty acres of land (whereon now stands the borough of Yatesville), which he improved, at the same time teaching school. He lived to be sixty-four years of age, and his family numbered nine children. John N. Hale, his son, settled in what is now known at Jenkins township, where he lived an uneventful, but honest life, dying in 1883 at the age of seventy-two years. His family consisted of seven sons, six of whom grew to maturity, Isaiah H. being third in the family. In his early life, our subject taught school with marked success, and also studied photography in its various branches, proving himself an adept in that branch of science. Mr. Hale is a self-made man, having commenced with nothing, and is now surrounded with all the necessaries, and even the luxuries, of life. He owns forty acres of land, on which is erected a neat and tastefully constructed house, with out buildings to correspond, showing both culture and refinement. In 1887, he built a store house which is stocked with a full line of country goods, which enterprise has proved a success. Mr. Hale has lived on his present place for twenty-five years. In 1859, he married Miss Annie, daughter of William and Sarah Lerch, of Pittston, and by her he had eleven children, nine of whom are living, viz.: George A., D. N., Eugene B., J. W., Rosa M., I. H., Elmer, Charles S., and Adrian A. Of these, George A. married Miss Clara Case (he has followed the example of his father, and has taken up the photographer's profession); Adrian A. married Miss Minnie Cragle (he is a carpenter of some repute). Mr. I. H. Hale has been honored with nearly all the offices of the town; he is a man of true principles, one who follows closely the "golden rule," and is a strictly temperate man, who has yet for the first time to drink a glass of spirituous liquor. He is a consistent member of the M. E. Church, of which he has been steward and trustee. Politically, he is a Prohibitionist. On October 21, 1890, his wife departed this life at the age of forty-nine years.

WILLIAM HALE, mine foreman, No. 1 Colliery, Jeansville. This experienced miner and mine foreman was born in Gloucestershire, England, September 24, 1852, and is a son of John and Eliza (Smith) Hale, also natives of England. He was reared and educated in the land of his birth, and at the tender age of twelve years, began working in the mines, which occupation he followed in England until 1879, when he came to America, locating at Lattimer, Pa. Here he worked as a miner until 1885, when he was given the position of mine foreman at No. 3 Colliery, operated by Pardee Bros. & Co. He was there for one year, when he began blasting coal. In 1887, he came to Jeansville and took charge of No. 1 Colliery operated by J. C. Hayden & Co., which position he now holds. He has charge of about one hundred and fifty men. Mr. Hale was united in marriage, March 28, 1874, with Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel Churchill, a native of Gloucestershire, England. Mr. Hale casts his vote and sympathies with the Republican party; he is a member of the Sons of Temperance and of the Episcopal Church.

W. D. HALE, retired carpenter, Yatesville, was born in Jenkins township, April 15, 1831, and is a son of John and Martha (Day) Hale, natives of Luzerne County, Pa., and of New England origin. They reared a family of seven children, of whom William D. is the eldest. Our subject received his education in the common schools, and at an early age, became engaged on public works. In 1850, he was employed on a canal boat, and in 1857 as a carpenter in the mines; from 1864 to 1872, he was proprietor of the first and only hotel in the borough. He then returned to his trade, at which he continued until his retirement in February, 1892. Mr. Hale was united in marriage January 3, 1856, with Elizabeth, daughter of William and Sarah (Sleigel) Lerch, natives of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, respectively, and this union has been blessed with the following children: Laura J., born April 24, 1860, married December 24, 1879, to Leferd D. Schuler, carpenter, Yatesville; Francis H., born November 17, 1862; George W., born September 27, 1865; Cyrus B., born April 3, 1867; William L., born January 20, 1870; John H., born February 13, 1875; Sarah M., born March 14, 1877; and Clara R., born January 22, 1881. Our subject is a member of the M. E. Church, and of the I. O. O. F. He is a Republican, and has held the offices of tax collector and treasurer of the borough council, at present serving his second term on the school board.

WILLIAM WALTER HAMILTON, (deceased) was born November 3, 1830, and was a son of Walter Hamilton, of Glasgow, Scotland. Our subject came to America in 1858, locating at Tamaqua, Pa., and worked in the mines there until 1862, when he removed to Plymouth and engaged in mining, a business he followed until his death which occurred November 23, 1870. Mr. Hamilton was married to Mrs. Young, widow of Thomas Young, by whom she had six children. By her marriage with Mr. Hamilton she had one child. Politically, Mr. Hamilton adhered to the principles advocated by the Republican party. He attended the Presbyterian Church. Mrs. Hamilton occupies the homestead on East Main street, her daughter living in a part of the house with her.

C. G. HAMMOND, carpenter, West Pittston, was born in orange county, N. Y., June 10, 1847, and is a son of Theodore and Maria (Hill) Hammond, natives of Orange and Sullivan counties, N. Y. and of English and Irish origin, respectively, the former of whom was a harness maker and carriage trimmer. They reared two children, Charles G. and Elizabeth (Mrs. Joseph Ellison, deceased). The father went to Ohio in 1854, joining an Ohio regiment, and was killed in the battle of Port Hudson, La. Our subject remained in Orange county with his grandfather, Richard Hammond, receiving an academic education, taught school one winter, and then enlisted at Middletown, N. Y., October 31, 1862, in Company G, One Hundred and Seventy-sixth New York Volunteers, was discharged February 23, 1865. He was taken prisoner at Brashear, and paroled ten days later. He then returned to Orange county, and engaged in farming one year, after which he was a bookkeeper in New York City two years. He then returned to Orange county, where he worked at the carpenters trade and taught school till 1872, when he went to Paterson, N. J., and again worked at his trade two years. He worked on the lower bridge at Pittston in 1874, taught school in Orange county in the winter of 1874-75, and in the latter year came to Pittston, where he has since lived. On September 16, 1867, Mr. Hammond enlisted in Company G. Thirteenth New York Regular Infantry, and was discharged in April, 1869, by a general order to reduce the Army. Mr. Hammond worked in Browns store, Pittston, six months during the winter of 1887-88, but with these exceptions he has followed his present calling. He married January 25, 1877, to Miss Addie, daughter of Charles F. and Ruth (Fuller) Herrmann, natives of Germany and Orange county, respectively, and of German origin. Mr. And Mrs. Hammond have four children, viz.: Archibald, Nellie, Frank and Rosa. Our subject is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in his political views is a Republican.

MICHAEL J. HAMMOND, (deceased) was born in Luzerne county, Pa., February 19, 1857, and was a son of Patrick and Elizabeth (Barrett) Hammond, the former of whom was a miner. They reared a family of seven children, six of whom are living. Our subject worked about the mines till he was eighteen years old, and then began working on the Delaware & Hudson Railroad, holding the position of conductor for four years. He lived in Parsons one year, Miners Mills two years, and Indiana two ears. He then returned to Miners Mills, where he was killed, after having saved a woman and child from being run over by a carload of pig iron which had been put on a flying switch in the yard in Wilkes-Barre; he had pushed them out of danger, and was about returning to the engine when by an improper manipulation of the switch the loose car jumped from the track and crushed him to death almost instantly. His widow purchased her present home in 1887, and the following year built the store which she has carried on successfully since. Mr. Hammond was married, January 27, 1881, to Miss Margaret, daughter of Patrick and Bridget (Sweeney) Moran, natives of County Mayo, Ireland. His three daughters, Elizabeth, Mary and Theresa, live to never appreciate a father. Mr. Hammond was a member of the Catholic Knights of America, and while in Indiana was a member of the Emeralds and corporal of the Ninth Regiment of National Guards. The family, as was Mr. Hammond, are members of the Catholic Church.

CHARLES HAMPEL, retired, P. O. Sybertsville, was born in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, April 18, 1820, and is a son of Weigand and Elizabeth (Wagner) Hampel. He was reared and educated in his native country, served two years apprenticeship at the tailors trade, and for ten years was a private in the German army. In 1852 he came to America, and in 1853, located in Hazleton, Pa., where he worked at his trade as journeyman, two years. In 1855 he embarked in the merchant tailoring business for his own accounts, in which he continued up to 1891, when he retired. In April of that year he located in Sugar Loaf township where he still resides. In 1844 Mr. Hampel married Margaret, daughter of John and Anna (Wagner) Hampel, of Germany, and by her had three children who grew to maturity; Elizabeth, Charles and Pauline; of whom, Elizabeth is now Mrs. Thomas R. Martin, and by her first husband, John Zuschnett, had four children living: John, Alice (Mrs. William M. Froehlich), Ida P. and Katie. Mr. Hampel is a member of the Lutheran Church, and of the I. O. O. F.; in politics he is a Democrat.

GEORGE HAMPTON, engineer at No. 4 Slope, for the Susquehanna Coal Company, Nanticoke, was born in Monmouthshire, England, October 18, 1843. He received his education in his native country and began life working on a farm in England, which he followed for two years, and, at the age of eighteen, he went to work in a machine shop, where he remained until he had completed his trade, at which time he commenced running a stationary engine. Following this business a short time he went to Mountain Ash, Glamorganshire, South Wales, where he followed the same business about three years. In 1859 he came to America and located at Mill Creek, this county, where he remained q short time, and then went to Pleasant Valley, same State. He remained there about three years in the employ of Patton, and then entered the employ of the Lehigh Coal Company. Remaining there a short time, he was transferred to Exeter, where he sojourned a short time, and then was sent to the Prospect Shaft, from there to the Henry Shaft, during all of which time he was employed as stationary engineer. He then went to Moosic, and entered the employ of the Hillside Coal & Iron Company, remaining there a short time; then proceeded to Colorado and entered the employ of Murphy & Co., mine operators in Jefferson county, that State. After working there a short time, he went to Gold City, for William Lovelind, remaining in his employ until 1882, since when he has chiefly been engaged in the employ of the Susquehanna Coal Company, having made stationary engineering the principal occupation of his life. Mr. Hampton was married to Miss Sina Watkins, of Glamorganshire, South Wales, and they have five living children, namely: David, Martha, Oliver, Sina and Eva. Mr. Hampton is a member of the F. & A. M., and his political principles are of a decided Republican cast.

WILLIAM HANCOCK, retired merchant, Wyoming borough, was on August 2, 1831, in Plains township, a son of James and Mary (Perkins) Hancock. James was a son of Jonathan Hancock, a native of Snowhill, Md., who came to Wilkes-Barre when the city was in its infancy, dying there in 1829, when sixty years of age. James Hancock was twice married. He removed to Plains township to Wilkes-Barre, and finally to Wyoming, where he died in 1880. He left a family of six children, of whom the following is a brief record: Jonathan married Elizabeth Reynolds, of Peoria, Ill., where he resided (he was a member and president of the Peoria Board of Trade; he died in 1891; Elizabeth R., his only daughter, married William W. Arnett, of Philadelphia);l William is the subject of this memoir; David P., a graduate of West Point, served through the late war, rising to the rank of lieutenant-colonel (he died in 1880); Sarah P. married Dr. B. F. Miles, of Peoria, Ill. (She died in 1881); James D. is a resident of Franklin, Pa; Elisha A. is a resident of Philadelphia (he was a soldier in the late war, where he lost a leg; he retired with the rank of major; he was colonel on Ex-Governor Hoyts staff. He has been twice married, and has one son). Our subject, William Hancock, was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and at the age of sixteen engaged as clerk with John S. Yost, of South Wilkes-Barre, in a general store, where he worked two years. He also worked two years for Oliver, Jones & Granger, of New York City. Being in poor health he went to California, where he remained fifteen years. He came back to Wyoming, but again went to California for another two years. He then returned to Wyoming and opened a general store, continuing the business for twenty-two years, when he retired. Mr. Hancock was married September 25, 1873, to Isabell, daughter of Rev. Abel and Phebe A. (Brown) Barker, natives of Pennsylvania and of English origin. This union was blessed with three children, viz.: Anna M., at school at Wyoming Seminary; William J. and Louise B. Mrs. Hancock is a member of St. James Episcopal Church, of Pittston. Mr. Hancock was the first burgess of Wyoming borough; he was the auditor of Kingston township for a number of years, having been elected to that office several times, and has also been a member of the council; he has also been president of the board of trustees of the Presbyterian Church of Wyoming.

ISAAC PLATT HAND, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Berwick, Columbia Co., Pa., April 5, 1843, and is a son of Rev. Aaron Hicks and Elizabeth (Boswell) Hand. His first ancestor in America was John Hand, of Maidstone, Kent, England, who came to this country in 1648, and settled on Long Island, where he died in 1660. The paternal grandfather of subject was Aaron Hand, whose wife was Tamer Platt. Aaron was the son of John, the son of John, the son of John Hand, above mentioned as the first ancestor in America. The Rev. A. H. Hand, father of subject, was born in Albany, N. Y., December 3, 1811. He was graduated from Williams College, Mass., in 1831: form Princeton Theological Seminary, New Jersey, in 1837, and preached the Gospel in various sections of the country until his death. His wife was a daughter of Capt. John L. Boswell, of Norwich, Conn. Our subject was graduated from La Fayette College in 1865. During the Civil war, he was a member of Company D, Thirty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, serving from June 30, 1863, until his discharge, August 7, 1866. From 1865 to 1867 he was principal of Hyde Park public schools, and from 1868 to 1870 was clerk of the city council of Scranton. He read law with hand & Post, of Scranton, was admitted to the bar of Luzerne county November 15, 1869, and in December, 1870, returned to Wilkes-Barre, where he has since resided, in the active practice of his profession. He served on the school board several terms, and subsequently was secretary of the board, and presiding officer. He has been secretary and treasurer of the Wilkes-Barre Academy, trustee of the Wilkes-Barre Female Institute, and is a present trustee of La Fayette College. He has been grand commander of the American Legion of honor for the State of Pennsylvania. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church; in politics, an active Republican, having served as chairman of the Republican City Committee, four years; and was chairman of the Republican County Committee in 1880 and 1892. Mr. Hand married, May 30, 1871, Mary L., daughter of J. L. Richardson, a native of Vermont, who located in Luzerne county in 1843. Mr and Mrs. Hand have eight children living: Kathleen, Isaac P., Bayard, Laura, Richardson, Joseph H., Emily and Phillip Lyman.

JOHN A. HANEY, stock raiser, Bear Creek township, P. O. Bear Creek, was born in Chestnut Hill township, Monroe Co., Pa., July 24, 1838, and is a son of Charles H. and Sarah (Storm) Haney, both natives of Pennsylvania, the former of Irish descent, the latter of German. They had a family of fourteen children, John A. being the eighth. Our subject was reared on a farm by his grandfather, having lived with him from the time he was a small boy, and was educated in the common schools. He left his grandfather when he was eighteen years old, and then went to work in the woods at lumbering, at which he continued but a short time, when he secured employment from jay Gould, at the Gouldsboro Tannery. For Mr. Gould he worked about six moths, and then commenced driving stage between White Haven and Eckley (then known as Filmore), continuing same till the war broke out. On June 10, 1861, he enlisted in Company F, Forth Pennsylvania Reserves, remaining in that company till November 13, 1862; he was then transferred to the Fifth U. S., Company C, and was with that company till the end of the war, having participated in twenty-four important engagements and many small skirmishes. He is a member of the G. A. R., Conyngham Post No. 97, Wilkes-Barre, and a member of K. of P., Nov. 365. In politics he is a Republican. In 1866 Mr. Haney married Emeline, daughter of Jonas and Mary A. (Albert) Christman, and their union was blessed with a family of eleven children, viz: Sarah, Mary, Arvilla, George, Merritt, Anna M., John T., Laura M., Beatrice, Elsie and Edith, all yet living at home except Mary, who is married. Mr. And Mrs. Haney and family are members of the M. E. Church.

HON. GARRICK MALLERY HARDING, a leading lawyer of Wilkes-Barre, and, from 1870 to 1880, president judge of the Eleventh Judicial District of Pennsylvania, was born at Exeter, Luzerne Co., Pa., July 12, 1830. He is a lineal descendant of Stephen Harding, who is referred to as a freeman of Providence, R. I., in the records of that city, bearing date as far back as 1669. The fourth son of this ancestor, also named Stephen, born about 1680, and probably a native of Providence, was a sea captain by profession, a man of ample means "and from his acquaintance and transactions, evidently one of the first persons in the colonies." His third son, born in 1723 and named after him, removed to Colchester, Cona, about the year 1750, and made his home there for nearly a quarter of a century, during which period his large family of children, consisting of nine sons and three daughters, was born. In 1774, following the example of many other adventurous sons of Connecticut, he removed to the Wyoming Valley-which under the charter granted to Connecticut by King Charles, was included within the boundaries of that colony-and settled on the western bank of the Susquehanna, his farm lying within the limits of what is now Exeter, Luzerne County, and he died there October 11, 1789. He took an active part in the memorable events which occurred in that historical locality soon after his arrival, and "commanded Fort Wintermost in the Wyoming Massacre." His eighth son, John, born about 1765, was the only member of the family who escaped death at the hands of the fiendish Indians, allies of the British, in this bloody affair. The Hon. Isaac Harding, a son of this survivor, and the father of the subject of this sketch, was born at Exeter, and lived there until 1846, when he removed to Illinois. He was a lawyer by profession and practiced with distinguished success in that State, and was elected a judge of the county court of Lee County. He died at Paw Paw Grove, Ill., in 1854. Garrick Mallery Harding was the fourth son of his parents. He seems to have inherited a love for books and study, and from his earliest years to have paid strict attention to his teachers. His education began in Franklin Academy in Susquehanna County, was continuedin Madison Academy at Waverly, and was completedin Dickinson College, at Carlisle, pa. In each of these institutions he made an excellent record, and took his collegiate degree with distinguished honors. The profession of law held out the greatest inducements to his tastes, and upon leaving college, he engaged in the work of mastering the intricacies under the preceptorship of the Hon. Henry M. Fuller, who was a leading member of the Luzerne County bar. In 1850, just two years later, he was regularly admitted to practice. The bar of Luzerne County at that time was conspicuous for the strength and ability of its members, and to meet them on an equal footing in the courts of law was in itself an experience of high educational value, as was also the business connection he formed with his preceptor, which lasted six years. The young lawyer had many admirable personal qualities to commend him to public attention. His eloquence was striking and convincing, and made him a power before juries. Naturally his practice enlarged, and before ten years had passed he was a formidable rival of his older colleagues. In 1858 the Republicans placed him in nomination for the office of district attorney of Luzerne County. His opponent was Gen. Winchester, a popular and able Democrat, whom he defeated by a majority of 1,700 votes: although the county was largely Democratic. In 1865 he took, as partner in his law business, Henry W. Palmer, a promising student of his, who subsequently rose to eminence at the bar and became attorney general of Pennsylvania. This connection was maintained until 1870, when, on his fortieth birthday, Mr. Harding received from Governor Gear y the appointment as president judge of the Eleventh Judicial District, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of the Hon. John N. Conyngham. In the fall of the Same year this office was one of those the people were called upon to fill by election, and Mr. Harding was nominated for it by the Republican County Convention. His opponent in this canvass was the late George W. Woodward, ex-chief justice of the supreme court of Pennsylvania, and it was a magnificent attestation of the popular appreciation of Mr. Harding’s ability and general fitness for the position that he was elected to fill it by a majority of 2,365 votes. "On the bench Judge Harding displayed those active qualities which had been a distinguishing feature of his life, and the promptness with which he dispatched business, the constant attention he gave to the duties demanded, the fearless methods that he employed, all linked with an integrity of purpose that was undeviating, gained for him the highest respect of the bar, and the wide plaudits of the people." Satisfied that he had faithfully and fully discharged his duty to the public, and had earned the right to retire from official life and devote himself to his personal interests, Judge Harding, in the fall of 1879, tendered his resignation as president judge, to take effect on the first of January following. Being assured that it was the Judge’s sincere desire to retire from the bench, Governor Hoyt reluctantly accepted and appointed Stanley Woodward, Esq., to fill the vacancy. Upon laying aside the ermine he at once assumed the practice of his profession, and is still absorbed in its duties. In connection with Judge Harding’s judicial career, there occurred an incident of such an extraordinary nature as to make reference to it pertinent in this place. This was a attempt at his impeachment, which had its origin, evidently, in personal malice, and which as the fullest investigation proved to the entire satisfaction of his friends and the general public, was without a shadow of foundation in fact. It was made in the early part of 1879 and was a complete surprise to the community, and not less so to his political opponents than to the members of his own party. In justice to the former it should be recorded that they viewed the attempt with disgust and contempt. Nearly every paper of importance in the State criticized the movement severely-the editors of the great metropolitan journals joining with those of the provincial sheets in a universal condemnation of it. The petition for impeachment, to judge from the signatures appended to it, emanated from a totally irresponsible quarter, for a prominent member of the Luzerne county bar, well known for his just and impartial historical writing (George B. Kulp Esq.) alludes to it as follows: "The petition did not contain the name of a single member of the bar of either Luzerne or Lackawanna county, nor is there to be found on it the name of a single man of prominence, and, with the exception of a very few which were familiar by reason of having been before him (Judge Harding) in the court of quarter sessions, the names were not recognized as those of residents in this section." It is scarcely necessary to comment further. As may be imagined, the lawyer employed to act as prosecutor had great difficulty in getting the petition before the Legislature, as no member of either party from Luzerne county would even touch it. In the opinion of these before whom it was finally brought, "I bore upon its face the open evidence of a malignity," and not a few believed it constituted ample ground for a charge of criminal libel against those who presented it. Judge Harding courted the fullest investigation, and personally addressed the general judiciary committee of Legislature, requesting that his accuser be given "the widest possible latitude for investigation." This was done, but no one could be brought forward to swear that the charges of Harding were established. Such an utter, complete, absolute failure was never before witnessed anywhere in a proceeding aspiring to a dignity beyond that of broad farce." The Legislative committee’s report was a full and complete vindication of Judge Harding. In his personal appearance, Judge Harding is a man of striking proportions, carrying in his physique the evidences of good health and sound mentality. In private life he is generous and charitable, devoted to his family and to his books; a faithful friend and an outspoken opponent. He is one of the incorporators of the Wyoming Commemorative Association, and took an active and prominent part in the proceedings marking the one hundredth anniversary of the Battle and Massacre of Wyoming, held in Luzerne County in 1878. On October 12, 1852, he married Maria M. Slosson, daughter of Mr. John W. Slossen, of Kent, LitchtfieldCo., Conn. And has three children, one daughter and two sons: Harriet (wife of William W. Curtin, only son of EX-Gov.Curtin), John S. and Henry M.

JOHN SLOSSON HARDING is a son of Ex-Judge Garrick m. Harding and Maria Mills (Slosson) Harding. Both the Hardings and the Sossons are of English origin; bothwere among the earliest settlers of New England, and both were represented in the appalling incidents of the early history of the Wyoming Valley, and the accompanying atrocities of the Indians. Stephen Harding was a blacksmith at Providence, R.I., in 1669, and it is believed that one of the family was the wife of Sir Robert Groges, who in 1623 received from the Council of New England a grant of a tract of land in Massachusetts Bay, four miles wide, and extending thirty miles into the interior, together with an appointment as "General Governor of the whole Country." Stephen Harding’s grandson (another Stephen) removed to Wyoming in 1774, and settled inwhat is now Exeter township. He was a captain in the militia, and was taken prisoner in Jenkins Fort at the time of the massacre. His sons, Benjamin and Stukely, were the first to be killed by the Indians in their merciless invasion in 1778, and John, a mere boy, saved his life by hiding himself in the water beneath some willows. A brother of these, Benjamin F., removed to Oregon, and after holding many important positions became a United States Senator. Isaac Harding was a son of the boy John, above mentioned, and Garrick Mallery Harding was his son, and the father of John Slosson Harding, and was for ten years president judge of the Luzerne county courts. The Slossons trace back to George Slosson, who was one of the proprietors of the town of Sandwich, Mass., in 1637. Representatives of the family served in the Revolution, and were otherwise distinguished in New England history; Capt. Asath Whitlesy, a descendant, was killed at the massacre.

JOHN SLOSSON HARDING was born in Wilkes-Barre August 29, 1859. He attended the public schools in Wilkes-Barre and the academy of W. R. Kingman in the same city, and St. Paul’s school at Concord, N.H. for two years. He subsequently entered Yale College, graduating in the class of 1880. His legal studies were prosecuted under the guidance of his father, Judge Harding, and he became a member of the Luzerne bar November 21, 1882. For six years he was deputy district attorney of Luzerne County, and in 1891 came within one vote of receiving the nomination of the Democrats for district attorney. He has been very active as a party worker in county and city committees. He practices law in connection with his father, is unmarried, and is a member of the Episcopal Church.

MERRIT S. HARDING, contractor and builder, was born in Eaton, Pa., October 21,1839, and is a son of Steadman and Martha A. (Mitchell) Harding, also natives of Pennsylvania, and of English origin. He is a grandson of Thomas and Martha (McNamara) Harding, and a great grandson of Thomas Harding, who with eight brothers, cam from Connecticut to the Wyoming Valley some time prior to the massacre of 1778, and two of whom were killed at Exeter the day before that terrible event. In his father’s family there were eight children, seven of whom are living, and Merrit S. is the third. Our subject was reared on the farm, educated in the common school, and on April 20, 1861, enlisted at Tunkhannock in Company B,Twelfth Pennsylvania Reserves. He participated in the battle of Drainesville; the seven days’ fight on the Peninsula, the second battle of Bull Run, and was wounded in the right wrist while carrying the flag, August 31, 1862. He then passed some time in the hospital and furlough, during which he was enrolling officer, and served notices of draft. On September 14, 1864, at Philadelphia, he joined, as second lieutenant, Company C. One Hundred and Twenty-seventh U.S.C.T., and was mustered out as first lieutenant at Brazos, Tex., October 7, 1865. His two brothers, Anson A. and Horace, fought in defense of the old flag, the former offering up his life for it at the battle of the Wilderness; the latter is living at Kansas City, Mo. When the war closed, Lieutenant Harding returned home and worked on the farm summers, teaching school winters. In 1870 he came to Plainsville, where he has since been engaged in his present business. Mr. Harding was married, September 11,1864, to Martha S., daughter of Joseph and Viletta (Miller) Kishbough, natives of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, respectively, and of German lineage; she is a granddaughter of Sebastian Miller, who was a Revolutionary soldier, and a niece of Margaret Bedillon, who stole away in the night from the house of the British family where she was employed, secured a horse, and carried to Gen. Washington to divulge, and thus saved the American army. This happy union has been blessed with eight children, viz.: Letta, Alberts, Fred, Merrit, Joseph, Hattie, Claud and Mercy. Mr. And Mrs. Harding are members of the Baptist and Methodist Episcopal Churches, respectively; he is a member of the G.A.R., the P.O.S.of A., and the Carpenters; and Joiners; Union: politically he is a Republican, has held office of supervisor two terms, and in 1890 took the census of Plains township.

W.F. HARLOS, farmer, P.O. Dupont, was born in Ransom township, Lackawanna Co., Pa., January 22, 1856, a son of Philip and Christina (Miller) Harlos, both natives of Germany. Philip, who was a shoemaker by trade, emigrated to this country in 1834, being then twenty years old. After his arrival here he abandoned his trade and took to farming, owning eighty acres of valuable land. He was married in this country, and his wife bore him ten children, seven of whom grew to maturity, William F. being the seventh in the family. Our subject was reared and educated in his Native Township, and always-followed agricultural pursuits. He resided at home with his father till April 3, 1883, when he married Miss Liz Rodcrux, who was born April 23, 1857, daughter of Simon and Anna Rodcrux, to whom were born four children: Minnie J. (deceased), born April 20, 1884; Gertrude Y., born August 14, 1886; Edna M., born December 13, 1887, and William F., born October 17, 1889. Mr. Harlos removed to Pittston Township in 1885. He purchased a farm of 100 acres, twelve of which were cleared, and twelve more were cleared during his residence there. He is engaged in mixed or general farming, and is a hard-working, industrious man, sure to make his mark in life. On his farm is a very fine quality of stone suitable for building, pavement and sidewalks, which is a source of revenue from which he draws considerable income. Mr. and Mrs. Harlos are both consistent members of the German Lutheran Church. He is a member of the I.O.O.F.

C.P.HARNED, merchant, Koonsville, was born in Union township, April 11, 1863, a son of John and Phoebe (Moore) Harned, and is the youngest member of the family. He received his education at the common schools of his native town, and during the first few years of his boyhood life worked on his father’s farm. He was afterward engaged as a clerk in a general store in Wilkes-Barre, for a few years. After the expiration of three years he began business for himself at Koonsville, where he keeps a general, well-stocked store, and by his gentlemanly bearing and straight-forward dealing, has established himself in the confidence of the people. This means success. In 1891 there was a post office established at Koonsville, and he was appointed postmaster; he has also held the office of township clerk. In August, 1886, Mr. Harned married Miss Lizzie, daughter of J. S. and Jerasha Koons, and to them was born one child, Warren K. Mrs. Lizzie Harned was born in Union Township in 1864. Mr. Harned is a promising young man of marked ability and pleasing manners, sure to make the mercantile business a success.

JOHN HARNED, FARMER, P.O. Town Line, was born in Union township. July 13, 1825, and is a son of Samuel and Malina (Huff) Harned, both of whom were born in Union Township. Samuel is the son of Jonathan, who was a native of New Jersey; he was a grandson of Nathaniel Harned, an Irish nobleman, who emigrated to this country in 1630. Jonathan removed to this county about 1798 stopped at Plymouth for a while, thence to Union Township, where he owned 100 acres of land. His life was passed as that of other pioneers. He was a hard-working man, whose example for good might well be emulated. He died at an advanced age, having reared a family of fourteen children, all of who grew to maturity, and one of who is now living. His son, Samuel, succeeded his father on the homestead, but after his marriage with Malina Huff, he removed to Ross Township, on a farm of 100 acres of virgin soil, which, by hard toil and incessant perseverance, he succeeded in bringing under cultivation. He was a loyal citizen and a staunch Democrat. His family consisted of twelve children by two marriages, all of which grew to maturity, and eleven of who are now living. John is the third of the family. He was reared and educated in Union Township, and in early life learned the carpenter’s trade, at which he worked for seventeen years. He then took up farming, and since 1852 has been living on his present farm, comprising 117 acres. In 1847 he married Miss Phoebe, daughter of Joseph and Ann Moore, to which union have been born four children, as follows: Josephine A., Charles B., Nellie G. and Chester P. Mr. Harned has held several township offices. He is a practical farmer, and a worthy man and much respected in his neighborhood. Mrs. Phoebe (Moore) Harned was born in Union Township in 1824. Her father, Joseph Moore, was born in Cecil County, Md., January 21, 1792, and removed to this county in 1799, when seven years of age. Joseph was a son of William, who was born in East Nottingham, February 13, 1758. He was the first of the pioneers of the Moores to locate in this county. William was a son of Sampson, who was of English birth.

ELIAS H. HARRIS, farmer, PO Carverton, was born January 1, 1831the son of Hiram and Mary (Heft) Harris, the former born on Harris Hill, the latter in Carverton, this county. Hiram was a son of Charles Harris, who was born at Forty Fort, and was about nine years of age at the time of the Wyoming Massacre. Charles was the first settler who removed to this side of the mountain on a tract of 800 acres, building himself a log-house and barn; he was obliged to carry his provisions from Wilkes-Barre on his back, after disputing the right of the wolves to his pack. His nearest neighbor'’ house was in Dallas(there was only one then), and he cleared up a large farm during his lifetime. He reared six children, two of whom are now living: Chester and Hiram. Charles was a son of Elijah Harris, who was a native of Connecticut, and who was one of the first settlers in the Valley. Hiram located on the farm owned by his father, and is now living at an advanced age-a man of pure life and habits, and one of the old pioneer members of the M.E. Church. His family consisted of three sons: Elias, Lyman and Lewis. Our subject began life near the old homestead on Harris Hill, and in 1866 removed to Franklin Township, where he purchased a farm of 101 acres, which he improved until now it "blossoms as the rose." Mr. Harris is a man of worth in his township, a good citizen, and honored with several offices of trust. In 1865 he married Miss Cordelia, daughter of Jacob and Mary Frantz, and by her he had six children, five of whom are now living: Elizabeth, Charles, Emery, Mary and Amy. Of these, Elizabeth married John Rice; Charles married Mamie Phillips; Emery married Miss Etta, daughter of Levi W. and Sarah M. Rice; Mary married Lawrence Roberts; Amy is yet single. Mrs. Harris was born in Kingston borough. October 22, 1834. The Harrisses were all Republicans up to Elias’time whom, with his sons, are Democrats.

Hiram Harris, retired, P. O. Trucksville was born September 8, 1807, reared and educated in Kingston township, on Harris Hill. He is the son of Charles and Martha (Pearce) Harris, the former of whom was born in Orange County, N.Y., in 1768, the latter in Kingston township. Charles was a son of Elijah Harris, who removed from Orange county, N.Y. about 1769, locating in Forty Fort, where he owned a vast tract of what was then considered worthless land. He was a native of Connecticut, and was one of the first pioneers in the Valley and took an active part in the Indian trouble here. Charles was one year old when his father came to this county, and the first white man who settled north of the Kingston mountain. He was a stonemason by occupation, and was compelled to work in the Valley after he removed over the mountain, while his crops grew. He carried his provisions from Wilkes-Barre to Harris Hill on his back, often disputing the right of the wolves and bears to share them. He located on Harris Hill about 1800, purchasing two hundred acres of land in its natural state, seventy acres of which he cleared during his lifetime. He was a sturdy old pioneer, and should receive much credit for what he has accomplished in cultivating the forest, causing it to yield abundantly. His barn is standing today, the oldest in the county. Charles Harris died in 1864, at the age of ninety-six years, having reared a family of nine children, two of whom are now living: Hiram and Chester. Hiram is the fifth in his father’s family, and has always confined himself to farming, having always lived on the old homestead on which he now resided, which comprises one hundred and twenty-five acres of fertile land. In 1832, at the age of twenty-five, he married Miss Mary, daughter of Daniel and Lizzie Heft. To their union have been born three children, two of whom are now living: Elias and Lyman. After the death of Mrs. Mary Harris, he married in 1852, for his second wife, Miss Mary, daughter of Christian and Kate Atherholt, and they have two children, Lyman and Milton. Mr. Harris is a man of marked piety; he was a leading spirit in the M. E. Church, in which body he has held the offices of trustee and class-leader. Politically he is a Republican.

Isaac K. Harris, of the firm of Harris & Co., manufacturing jewelers, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Elmira, N. Y., February 17, 1848, a son of S. B. and Getell (Anholt) Harris, natives of Prussia. His parents came to America about 1842, locating in Elmira, N. Y. Where the father engaged in the grocery business for may years and is now a resident of Scranton. Our subject was reared and educated in Elmira, N. Y. At the age of twenty he embarked in the dry-goods trade at Pittston, this county, continuing there several years. At a later date he removed to New York, where he was a salesman for a cloak manufacturer and diamond broker, respectively, and in the fall of 1891 located in Wilkes-Barre, where, as a member of the firm of Harris & Co. He is conducting one of the largest jewelry houses in the city. In March, 1886, Mr. Harris married Miss Lillie, daughter of M. Schrier, of New York City.

John A. Harris, miller and postmaster at Outlet, was born August 17, 1851, in Knowlton township, Warren Co., N.J., where he was reared and educated. He is a son of A. S. and Rebecca (Kinney) Harris, both natives of the same county. A. S. Harris is a farmer of considerable means, and still resides in Warren county, N. J. His family numbered eight children, five of whom are living, J. A. Being the third in order of birth. In early life our subject learned the miller’s trade, which he thoroughly understands, and at which he has worked all his life. He removed to this county in 1887, locating on the outlet of Harvey’s lake, where he has rented the mill property of E. Troxell, of Wilkes-Barre. This mill was built by Hollenback and Orkutt about 1857 and has been in continuous operation since that time; it has a capacity of 200 bushels per day, and is propelled by a forty-horse power water pressure. Mr. Harris in 1874 married, at Portland, Pa., Miss Laura, daughter of Henry and Susanna Gangwere, and there were three children born to them, one of whom is living; Adam S. Mr. Harris is a man of intelligence and thought. He is a member of the I.O.O.F. In 1889 he was appointed postmaster at Outlet, and enjoys the full confidence of his fellow citizens.

John B. Harris, retired merchant, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Carmarthenshire, South Wales, march 10, 1840, and is a son of Thomas and Mary (Bowen) Harris. He was reared in his native country, educated in the common schools, and when fifteen years of age began work about the mines as driver; at the age of eighteen he began mining, which he followed in Wales seven years. In 1865 he came to American, and located at Kingston, Pa., where he worked in the mines two years. In 1867 he removed to Wilkes-Barre township, and was in the mines until 1882, when he embarked in general merchandising, continuing in the same until 1888, when he retired. Mr. Harris is the inventor of an improvement on the safety lamp, consisting of march tube and smothering apparatus, to prevent the explosion of gas in the mines, which is destined to become one of the most useful inventions of the age for the safety of lives in mining. Mr. Harris was married February 10, 1861 to Ann, daughter of John and Rachel Evans, of Carmanthenshire, Wales, and has three children living: Thomas B., Mary A. (Mrs. John Wooden), and Rachel. He is a member of the Welsh Presbyterian Church, and in politics he is a Republican.

Joseph Harris, proprietor of restraint, Plymouth, was born in Glamorganshire, South Wales, and is a son of Robert and Margaret (Sims) Harris, also natives of Wales. He was educated in the land of his birth, and is 1868 came to America where he worked at painting four years. He then opened a tobacco and cigar store following that business about three years. Afterward he embarked in his present prosperous business in Plymouth. In ___ Mr. Harris was married to Catherine, daughter of John and Ann (Beywon) Phillips, natives of Wales, and two children have been born to them: John P. and Margaret, the latter being deceased.

John P. Harris was born at Lougher, Glamorganshire, South Wales, January 10, __, and was brought by his parents to this country as a child. The family first located at Hyde Park, Scranton, Pa. Moving to Plymouth, this county, not long afterward, and John received his education int he public schools of the county. Early in life he learned the jeweler’s trade serving his apprenticeship at Scranton and Philadelphia, which occupied three years. Afterward he opened his store at Plymouth, Pa., where he has a choice and complete assortment of goods in his line. Hr. Harris was married April 17, 1888 to Miss Harriet, daughter of William ans Hannah (Jones) Jones, natives of Breconshire, South Wales, which union had been blessed with two children: Annie, born August 30, 1889 ,and Catherine , born April 30, 1891. Joseph and John P. Harris are both stanch Republicans.

Lorenzo D. Harris, farmer, P.O. Trucksville, was born in Carverton in 1817, son of Samuel and Ann (Ayers) Harris. Samuel was a son of Elijah who removed from Connecticut to this county, locating in Kingston township where he remained for several years; he then removed beyond the Kingston mountain on the property now owned by D. Heft. He was an experienced hunter and trapper, and during the Indian war, took and active part in struggle. He owned about four hundred acres of land, and being a hard-working man improved about one hundred acres during his lifetime. Like most pioneers of his day, his life was uneventful. Elijah Harris died at the good old age of eighty-five years, having reared a family of six children. His son, Samuel, began life as a farmer in the same township, owning about ninety acres of land. He was a practical man in his way honest and industrious. Samuel and Ann (Ayers) Harris reared a family of six children, four of whom are now living. L. D. Is the second in the family, was reared and educated at the common schools of Kingston township, and chose agricultural pursuits as his life vocation. He resided on the old homestead in Carverton till 1880 when he removed to Trucksville, on a small farm of twenty-five acres where he enjoys life, carrying on general farming on a small scale. In September, 1854, he married Miss Phoebe, daughter of Thomas and Amelia Crispell, and they had seven children who grew to maturity, six of whom are now living: John, Charles (married to Miss Jane Nulton), Harry, William, Edgar, and Estella. Mrs. Phoebe (Crispell) Harris died November 16, 1891. Mr. Harris is a worthy and respected man of sound Christian principles, observing in all his experience the Golden Rule: he is a member of the M. E. Church in good standing.

LYMAN HARRIS, saddler, Luzerne, was born in Kingston township, September 22, 1837, and is a son of Hiral and Mary (Heft) Harris, the former of Connecticut origin, the latter of German lineage. Our subject was educated in Luzerne county, and followed farming until September 9, 1862, when he enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Forty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, First Corps, Third Division, which was under command of Reynolds. The first battle in which our subject engaged was the bloody fight of the Wilderness, where he was severely wounded and later, taken prisoner. Upon examination of his wound, it was found necessary to amputate his limb, which was done on the battle-field. After being kept a prisoner for about four months, he was paroled, and he remained at Annapolis, Md., until January 24, 1865, when he received his discharge. After returning home he engaged in the harness business at Dallas for eight years, and then removed to Luzerne, where he has a general harness store. Mr. Harris was married July 4, 1868, to Miss Catherine, daughter of Jacob and Jane (DeLong) Hoover, the former a native of New Jersey, the latter of Pennsylvania. Two children were born of this union: Lester, who is a bookkeeper at Wilkes-Barre, and Walter, at home, working with his father. It can indeed be said of the Harris family that they have contributed their share toward defending our country’s rights; the great-grandfather of our subject having been in the Wyoming Massacre, the grandfather, who was only ten years of age, being in the fort, and then our subject losing a limb in defense of the Union - all speaking more than pages of history can for the bravery of the family. In politics Mr. Harris is a stanch Republican, and he is a member of the G.A.R. and I.O.O.F.

PHILLIP HARRIS, miner, Parsons, was born in Wales, October 20, 1844, and is a son of William and Jane (Thomas) Harris. He was educated in Scotland, and at the age of eighteen came to America, settling in Pennsylvania, where he engaged in mining at Minersville, Schuylkill county. He remained there about a year, and then went to Mahanoy City, where he worked in the mines two years; then removed to Wilkes-Barre, remaining there a short time, and in 1868 came to Parsons, where he has since been engaged in mining. Mr. Harris was married April 1, 1861, to Mrs. Naomi Jenkins, formerly Miss Naomi Thomas, daughter of Evan and Jenett (Jones) Thomas, and they have nine children living, viz.: Thomas, born December 8, 1863; Margaret, born November 8, 1866; Jennie, born September 13, 1868; John, born January 10, 1870; William, born December 20, 1872; Phillip, born October 28, 1874; Hayes, born November 10, 1876; Naomi, born March 10, 1879, and Garfield, born June 29, 1881. Mr. Harris and his family are members of the Baptist Church; politically he is a Republican, and has held the office of borough councilman two years.

H.H. HARRIS, tracklayer, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Wales, October 12, 1840, a son of Henry and Rachel (Davis) Harris. His parents came to America in 1840, locating at Carbondale, Pa., where the father worked in the mines until his death, in 1853. Their children were four: William H., John, Mary A. (Mrs. Morgan Griswold), and George. Our subject was reared in Carbondale, educated in the common schools, and began life in the mines when but eight years of age. He worked in various capacities there until the breaking out of the Civil war, and in April, 1861, enlisted in Company H, Eighth Pennsylvania Regiment, and served three months, when he was honorably discharged; he then re-enlisted in Company C, Ninety-sixth Pennsylvania Regiment, and after serving two months was transferred to Company I, Fifty-second Pennsylvania Regiment, and after three years and three months’ service was honorably discharged. He returned home November 5, 1865, since which time he has held his present position of tracklayer for the Wilkes-Barre Coal Company. June 19, 1867, Mr. Harris married Miss Mary, daughter of John and Sarah (Borris) Jones, of Wales, and has three children living: Willie, John, and Rachel (Mrs. Charles Sprague). Mr. Harris is a member of the G.A.R., and of the K. of P. In politics he is a Republican.

BRADLEY HARRISON, farmer, P.O. Irish Lane, was born in Huntington township, February 4, 1831, a son of Stephen and Elizabeth (Bonham) Harrison, the former born in Huntington in 1804, the latter in 1805, in one of the adjoining townships. Stephen was a son of William Harrison and a native of Connecticut, who removed to this county when a young man. He located in Huntington township, where he owned a farm of 200 acres, and was a man of influence, who did much for the advancement of agriculture. He was an Old-school Baptist, conscientious in all his dealings with his fellow men. Politically, he was a Whig through and through. He lived to be about seventy years of age. His family consisted of six children, all of whom are now dead. His son, Stephen, began life on the homestead, but on an improved part of it - a lot of seventy-five acres - to which he added 280 more. He was a thorough-going man, full of business and push, and was a strict member of the M.E. Church. After a life of usefulness, he died in 1854, at the age of thirty-five years. His children numbered six, five of whom are now living, Bradley being the third in the family. Our subject was reared and educated in Huntington township, and when twenty-one years of age removed to Ross township, where he has since been a resident, a leading man and a practical farmer. He owns 105 acres of valuable land under fair cultivation. In 1852 he married Miss Mary, daughter of Isaac Benscoter, and by her he had six children, all of whom are living: S.D., C.C., E.E., C.H., West Erie, and May. Mrs. Mary Harrison died in 1872, and for his second wife, Mr. Harrison in 1873 married Miss Mary, daughter of Philip and Julia A. Wilson, and to this union were born four children, three of whom are living: Alice, Lilly, and Lena. Mr. Harrison is a man of intelligence and deep thought, and is very popular in his township. Politically he is a Republican, and has held the office of justice of the peace one term, besides other minor positions of trust. Mrs. Harrison is a member of the M.E. Church.

DR. C. OLIN HARRISON, dentist, Plymouth, was born June 13, 1863, and is a son of Joseph H. and Mary M. (Glace) Harrison, natives of Luzerne county. There were eleven children in the family, ten of whom are living. The subject of this sketch was educated in the common schools of Luzerne county, and subsequently taught five years in the same schools. He then prepared for a medical course of dentistry, and entered the Philadelphia Dental College, from which he was graduated in the class of 1888. He came directly to Plymouth, where he opened an office, and has since continued to practice his profession at that enterprising place. The Doctor was married February 22, 1888, to Marjorie E., daughter of Samuel and Jeanette (Baldwin) Wilkins, natives of Pennsylvania. One child has blessed this union, Edna M., born March 20, 1889. Politically, Dr. Harrison affiliates with the Democratic party, and socially, he is a member of the P.O.S. of A.

E.E. HARRISON, farmer, P.O. Prichard, was born December 9, 1862, in Ross township, where he was reared and educated. He is a son of Bradley and Mary (Benscoter) Harrison, both of whom were born in Huntington township. Bradley is a son of Stephen Harrison, an early settler in this county, who located at Town Line, where he lived the remainder of his days as a tiller of the soil, much respected by his fellow citizens. His son, Bradley, began his public and active life in Ross township, on a farm where he has lived ever since, and where he now resides. His farm contains 100 acres of valuable land, and he himself is a practical agriculturist. He is now (1892) sixty years of age. He reared a family of nine children, all of whom are living, E.E. being the fourth by birth. Our subject has chosen for himself a farmer’s life, which he diligently follows. On December 25, 1888, he married Miss Clara Benscoter, who was born in Hunlock township, in 1865, a daughter of Jacob and Susanna Benscoter, and to this union was born one child, Raymond. In the same year in which he married, our subject removed to Hunlock township, where he now resides on a farm of fifty-six acres well under improvement. Mr. Harrison is a worthy and promising young man of good habits and pure morals. He and his good wife are members of the Baptist Church, and politically he is a Republican.

ISAIAH N. HARRISON, lumberman, Fairmount township, P.O. Fairmount Springs, was born in said township March 18, 1844, a son of Merritt and Harriet (Stevens) Harrison, natives of Pennsylvania, of English origin. The father was a farmer by occupation; he died November 7, 1867, aged sixty-eight years. He was a son of Stephen and Mary (Dodson) Harrison. Our subject is the seventh in order of birth in a family of eleven children, seven of whom are living. He was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and began life for himself when twenty-one years of age, farming on shares on the homestead farm. This he followed for twelve years, when he spent a year in the West, and on his return worked the Davis farm for two years, when he bought the steam sawmill, and has since devoted his time to lumbering. He lives on his portion of the homestead, twenty-eight acres, one-half mile south of Fairmount Springs postoffice. He married, March 17, 1867, Miss Lottie, daughter of William and Savilla (Yaple) Lutz, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German origin. This happy union is blessed with three children, viz.: Mary E., born October 3, 1868, married Charles Schultz; Willetta, born March 26, 1871, married George Davis; and Clinton H., born May 21, 1874. Mr. Harrison has held the offices of school director and constable, and politically is a Republican.

JACOB HARRISON, farmer, P.O. Plymouth, was born in Warren county, N.J., May 16, 1824. He is the son of William H. and Rebecca (Lippencott) Harrison, both of whom were born in Warren county, N.J., the former August 11, 1792, and the latter August 17, 1791. William H. was a farmer of some means, and a worthy citizen; he served in the war of 1812. He removed to this county about 1831, locating in Wilkes-Barre, where he resided for a few years, when he removed to Plymouth, remaining there till his death, which occured at the age of eighty-two years. He was a man of stern moral principles, who took an active part in political matters, and whose influence swayed as he leaned. His family consisted of eleven boys, two of whom are now (1892) living: John and Jacob. The latter is the sixth in order of birth, and was reared and educated in Plymouth. He was about seven years of age when he removed to this county with his father. He chose for himself a farmer’s life, and, by hard and incessant toil, has made for himself and family a neat and comfortable home. In his early life, Mr. Harrison worked for a while in the mines, during which time he lived in Plymouth borough. He removed for a few years to Columbia county, where he followed farming. In 1866 he returned to Luzerne county, where he has since resided. He purchased a farm of thirty-eight acres of land in a good state of cultivation, under which is supposed to be a vein a coal. In June, 1852, he married Miss Mary, daughter of Henry and Susan Barney. Nine children were born to them, six of whom grew to maturity and are now (1892) living: William H., Sarah E., Marilda E., Samuel W., Almira and Bertha M. William H. married Miss Amanda S. Ransom; Sarah E., married John T. Jones; Marilda, married William Coates. Mrs. Harrison was born in Plymouth in 1831; she and the family are members of the Presbyterian Church.

J.H. HARRISON, farmer, P.O. Town Line, was born in Huntington township September 6, 1825, where he was also reared and educated. He is the eldest of a family of nine children born to Stephen and Elizabeth (Bonham) Harrison. J.H. has chosen for himself a farmer’s life, and has followed it closely all his life with marked success. He resided at home until he had reached his majority, and, like other dutiful sons, was subject to his parents. On October 15, 1846, he married Miss Maria, daughter of George and Mary Glase. To this union were born eleven children, ten of whom grew to maturity: Mallissa E., Hannah E., George M., Florence A., Stephen W., T.B., W.D., C.O., E.J. and E.Y. In this family there is a county superintendent of schools, one M.D., one D.D.S., and a teacher. Mrs. Maria (Glase) Harrison died October 25, 1870. For his second wife he married, April 18, 1872, Miss Rhoda A., daughter of John Laubach. There was no issue by this marriage. He was again married, June 4, 1886, to Mrs. Levina J., widow of John Shortz, and daughter of William and Jettie Santee. After his first marriage he removed to his present residence, a farm containing 111 acres, which he beautified and embellished to a surprising extent. Under his magic touch the forest gave way to the beautiful, golden and waving grain. The rude and rough log cabin gave place to a more modern structure. Thus he helped the onward march to a higher civilization. Mr. Harrison is a practical farmer, as his surroundings show. He has been honored by his fellow citizens with several township offices; he is a member of good standing in the M.E. Church. Politically he is a Democrat. His father, Stephen Harrison, was born in Huntington; his mother, Elizabeth, in Union township. The former began his active life as a farmer in Huntington, on a part of the old homestead, on which his father had settled. He was a hard-working man, whose quiet life flowed on peacefully to the end, but whose current helped to swell the tide of usefulness. Stephen Harrison was a man of deep religious convictions, being first a Baptist in his belief, but as he grew in years and experience, he became a Methodist. He died at the age of fifty-four years. His family consisted of nine children, six of whom grew to maturity and five of whom are now living. Stephen was a son of "Billy" Harrison, who was born in Connecticut, and was nine years of age when he removed with his father to Huntington. "Billy" owned considerable land on Huntington creek. He was a sturdy pioneer, and did much to promote the growth and settlement of Huntington township. He reared a family of seven useful and well-trained children, who in their turn became a credit to their county. He lived to be an old man, and passed away in peace, after a life of toil and usefulness.

JOHN S. HARRISON, farmer, Fairmount township, P.O. Fairmount Springs, was born in that township May 14, 1839, a son of Merritt and Harriet (Stevens) Harrison, natives of Pennsylvania and of English origin. Merritt Harrison was a farmer by occupation, and died November 7, 1867, aged sixty-seven years; his wife Harriet died January 23, 1892, aged eighty-seven years. He was a son of Stephen and Mary (Dodson) Harrison. Our subject is the fourth in a family of eleven children, seven of whom are living, viz.: Mary A., lives with our subject; Susan (Mrs. Caspar Bailey); Matilda (Mrs. John Lutz); Isaiah N.; John S., the subject proper of this memoir; Lucy P. (Mrs. Fred Laubach); and Elizabeth R. (Mrs. Charles Park). The eldest son, Clinton D., enlisted during the Rebellion in Company A, Thirteenth Illinois Infantry, and gave up his life on the altar of his country November 11, 1862, at Bendon Barracks, St. Louis, Mo., at the age of twenty-six years. Our subject enlisted in the United States army, in Company F, Seventh Pennsylvania Reserves, on June 13, 1861, and participated in the following battles: Drainesville, Mechanicsville and Gaines’ Mills, where he was wounded and taken prisoner, and held for four weeks on account of disability and sickness; after this he was home for about five months, when he returned to his regiment and served until June 16, 1864, receiving an honorable discharge. After a short stay at home he went to Washington, and worked as clerk in a sutler’s tent until the close of the war; he then returned and worked the homestead farm for one year; then worked out for one year, and again on the home farm a year. He next went to Williamsport, and worked at lumber jobs for several years; thence to Collomsville for ten years; and in 1886 moved to his portion of the homestead farm, where he now resides. Mr. Harrison married August 20, 1874, Miss Ellen, daughter of Fredrick and Elizabeth Bricker, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German origin. She is the ninth in a family of eleven children, and was born December 21, 1851. This union is blessed with three children, viz.: Leroy, born January 15, 1878; Jennie, born September 1, 1886; and Ida, born December 11, 1890. He is a member of the G.A.R. and is a Republican.

M.D. HARRISON, farmer and proprietor of the "Huntington Mills Hotel," Huntington township, P.O. Huntington Mills, was born in that township, March 24, 1839. He is a son of Meritt and Sarah A. (Edwards) Harrison (both now deceased), natives of Pennsylvania and of English origin, the former of whom was a farmer by occupation, and died April 25, 1874. He was a son of Stephen and Hulda (Daboll) Harrison, natives of Connecticut, who came to the Huntington Valley about 1795. Our subject, who is the fourth in a family of eight children, seven of whom are now living, was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and when nine years of age began life for himself at farm work; then after three years was taken by a cousin, Daniel F. Harrison, to be reared. This gentleman, who was also a farmer, died July 12, 1888, and our subject then inherited his property, comprising 110 acres of land, situated one mile south of Huntington Mills postoffice. In 1887 Mr. Harrison moved into the hotel, where he has since catered to the wants of the traveling public, and by careful attention, and an earnest desire to please, has won for himself a host of friends. He married, January 12, 186-, Miss Jane C., daughter of Martin and Ellen (Courtright) Line, natives of Pennsylvania and of German origin; she is the youngest in a family of five children, four of whom are living, and was born April 24, 1837. This union was blessed with eight children, viz.: Annie F. (Mrs. Bernard Gearhart, of Huntington township), born July 25, 186-; Ellen M. (Mrs. Dr. E.L. Williams, of Lehman, Pa.), born September 26, 1863; Martin F., born November 20, 1865, married Elsie Sutliff, and works the homestead farm; Sallie M. (Mrs. Grant Teller, of Wilkinsburg, Pa.), born October 17, 1867; Lillie G., born April 9, 1870; William F., born February 17,1872; Minnie, born March 24, 1877, died April 8, 1877, and Raymond D., born March 12, 1878. The family attend the M.E. Church. Mr. Harrison is a member of the P.O.S. of A., the P. of H. and the I.O.O.F., and politically he is a Republican.

TORRENCE B. HARRISON, county superintendent of schools, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Union township, this county, November 1, 1858, and is a son of Joseph H. and Mary M. (Glace) Harrison. His paternal grandfather, Stephen Harrison, of Connecticut stock, was among the pioneers of Huntington township, this county, where he cleared and improved a farm and there died. His wife was Elizabeth Bonham, and his children who grew to maturity were Joseph H., Bradley, Clarissa (Mrs. Daniel Sutliff), Benjamin, Diantha (Mrs. Judson Benscoter), and William H. Joseph H., father of subject, was born in Huntington township, but has been engaged in farming in Union township since 1845. His wife was a daughter of George Glace, of Huntington township, and by her he has ten children living: Melissa E. (Mrs. J.N. Culver), Hannah E. (Mrs. Fred Naugle), George M., Florence A. (Mrs. E.L. Santee), Stephen W., Torrence B., Winfield D., C.Olin, Eva I. (Mrs. F.E. Hartman), and Ezra Y. Our subject was reared in Union township, educated in the public schools and State Normal School at Bloomsburg, where he was graduated in 1881. He began teaching in 1876, was principal of the Hazleton High School from 1882 to 1885, when he resigned to accept the superintendency of schools in the Second District of Wilkes-Barre, which position he held until 1890, when he was elected county superintendent of schools. On July 19, 1882, Mr. Harrison married Charlotte E., daughter of Patrick and Eliza (Knaggs) Hickey, of Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and has five children: Minnie M., Ada D., Mary M., Joseph H. And Jennie E. Mr. Harrison is a member of the M.E. Church and of the F. & A.M.; in politics he is a Democrat.

COL. HENRY G. HARROWER, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Lindley, Steuben Co., N.Y., June 17, 1832, a son of Benjamin and Diana (Merserean) Harrower, and of Scotch-French and Dutch descent, respectively. He was reared in his native town, where he attended the public schools. On attaining his majority he engaged in business as a lumberman. In July, 1861, he enlisted in Company F, Eighty-sixth New York Volunteers, and was mustered into the service as captain of the company in September, 1861; was breveted major in 1862, and was commissioned colonel in March, 1863. During the entire war he was with the First Division, Third Army Corps, army of the Potomac. He is a member of the G.A.R., Post No. 110, department of Wisconsin, at Marshfield, and politically is a Republican.

Claude G. Harsch, a merchant and prominent citizen of Wyoming borough, was born at Seurre, France, March 29, 1849, and is a son of George (a shoemaker) and Claudine (Thevenin) Harsch, natives of Germany and France, respectively, who reared a family of three children, of whom Claude G. is the eldest. Our subject was educated in the public schools of sunny France, and at the age of fourteen engaged as clerk in a music store, where he remained six years. In 1869 he came to America, landing at New York, and worked four months on a railroad; then moved to Scranton, where for some time he was employed in a sawmill and in the iron mills. He enlisted in the State militia, and served throughout the big strike of 1870 in that section; in 1872 he moved to New Jersey, and worked three years for Pardee & Company as weighmaster, after which he was for four months captain of a boat on the Morris Canal. He then returned to Scranton, and worked for a short time for the Scranton Water company; then moved to Wyoming, and worked till 1883 in the mines, when he accepted a position with William Hancock in a general store, remaining two years, when he decided to take his daughter to France to be educated. He remained abroad one year, and returning to Wyoming worked again for William Hancock for four years and six months, at the end of which time he again visited France in order to see the great Exposition in Paris, and bring his daughter home. After a short visit, he returned to Wyoming and purchased from Mr. Hancock the store where he had been employed, and where he has since conducted a general mercantile business with great success. On July 2, 1874, Mr. Harsch was married to Henrietta, daughter of Timothy M. and Jane (Booth) Sutton, natives of New Jersey, and of English origin. This happy union has been blessed with one lovely daughter, Emelie J., born July 31, 1875, who graduated at Limeil, France, with the highest honors, and is now at the Wyoming High School. Mrs. Harsch is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Harsch is a member of the I. O. O. F., I. O. R. M., K. of L., and the French Association of Scranton. He is a sound Democrat, and is auditor of the borough. For two years he was member of the State militia.

John Hart, farmer, P. O. Tank, was born in Black Creek township, June 4, 1840, a son of Jesse and Rebecca (Mowery) Hart. His paternal grandfather, William Hart, formerly of Philadelphia, and his wife, Phoebe Mendenhall, of Chester county, Pa., were for many years residents of Schuylkill county, where they died. Jesse Hart was reared in Schuylkill county, settled in Black Creek Township in early manhood, and worked at the carpenter’s trade, later engaging in farming. He died at Rock Glen at the age of eighty-three years. He was twice married, his first wife being Sarah Frey, by whom he had five children; Lydia (Mrs. Isaac Driesbach), Sally (Mrs. Ephriam Kisbauch), Rebecca (Mrs. Jacob Fertie), Mary (Mrs. Michael Remly) and Anna. His second wife was Rebecca, daughter of John Mowery, of Schuylkill county, Pa., and by her he had four children: John, Jacob, Caroline (Mrs. George Stegner) and Edward. Our subject was reared in Luzerne and Schuylkill counties, and received his education in the common schools. He enlisted, August 11, 1862, in Company F, One Hundred and Forty-seventh P. V., participating in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. He was then transferred to the Western army, and took part in all the engagements of his regiment, being honorably discharged from the service June 13, 1865. After the war Mr. Hart located in Black Creek township, where he followed the carpenter’s trade until 1888. In 1887 he was elected commissioner of Luzerne county, serving his term of three years; since 1891 he has been engaged in farming. In 1866 he married Catherine, daughter of Abram and Kate (Dresher) Mowrey, of Butler township; they have four children: Milton T., Ella, Emma (Mrs. Jacob Whatnecht) and James. Mr. Hart is a member of the Lutheran church; he is also a member of the G. A. R., and in politics is a Democrat.

Theodorus Hart, editor and proprietor of the Evening Gazette, was born in Athens, Bradford Co., Pa., September 10,1 847. His parents were Theodorus and Eliza (Ruland) Hart, both natives of New York State, and now deceased. Our subject was educated in the common schools, and learned the printer’s trade, at which he worked in Pittston and elsewhere until 1874, when he purchased a half interest in the Weekly Gazette, which was established in 1850. In 1878 he became sole proprietor, in 1882 establishing the Daily Gazette, and has since conducted the daily and weekly issues. The Gazette is Republican in politics, and the only newspaper in the place. Mr. Hart has been twice married, his first wife being Rebecca Dymond, and his second wife Mrs. E. E. (Hopkins) Davis. A daughter by his first wife, Mary L. D., his only child, is at present attending Syracuse University. Mr. Hart is a thirty-second degree Free-mason and an Odd Fellow. He is a member of the Baptist Church, ex-president of the Y. M. C. A. and treasurer of the Pennsylvania Christian Endeavor Union. He represented the Luzerne-Lackawanna Seventh District in the State Legislature in 1885-86.

Thomas W. Hart, deputy treasurer of Luzerne county, was born in Hazle township, February 22, 1859, a son of Thomas and Julia (Newcomb) Hart, natives of County Sligo, Ireland. They came to America in 1844, and settled in Hazle township, where the father followed mining for some years, and has been a resident of Hazleton since 1874. He has four children: Patrick, Mary (Mrs. James Durkin), Kate (Mrs. Meil McGinty) and Thomas W. Our subject was reared in Hazle township; educated at the public schools of same, and learned the trade of carpenter and car builder, serving a four years’ apprenticeship. In 1884 he was appointed deputy register of wills of Luzerne county, under S. W. Boyd, in 1886 became clerk of the Orphan’s Court, under Judge Rhone, and in 1887 served as deputy sheriff under H. W. Search. In 1889 he was in the hardware business at Ashley. In January, 1891, he was appointed deputy treasurer under J. S. McGroarty, which position he still holds. He married, May 21, 1889, Elizabeth A., daughter of Michael and Ann (Coneon) McCarty, of Ashley, and has one son, Michael W., and one daughter, Alice Josephine. Mr. Hart is a member of the Elks, Columbia Club, A. O. of H., and in religion is a member of the Catholic Church. Politically, he is a Democrat.

George W. Harter, farmer, P. O. Belbend, was born in Salem township, December 18, 1850, and is a son of William and Lydia (Rabert) Harter. His paternal grandparents were Jacob and Rachel (Hess) Harter. Jacob was a son of Martin, who was a son of Martin, both natives of Germany, pioneers of Lehigh county, Pa., and also of what is now Conyngham township, where they took up a large tract of land prior to 1800, the homestead now being occupied by A. K. Harter. Martin (I) died in 1800, and his body was the first to be buried in the Harter cemetery. Jacob Harter, the paternal grandfather of subject, was born in Lehigh county, Pa., in 1791, and died on the old homestead, in Conyngham township, April 22, 1868. His wife, Rachel, was a daughter of Jeremiah and Elizabeth Hess, and by her he had nine children, of whom the father of our subject is the second child and eldest son. William Harter is a farmer by occupation, and has resided in Nescopeck township for the past thirty-five years; his wife was a daughter of George and Margaret (Snyder) Rabert, of Salem township, and by her he has five children living; Aaron M., Cevilli (Mrs. E. H. Frey), George W., Jacob W. and Michael M. Our subject was reared in Nescopeck township, and attended public school at Nescopeck from the time he was six years old until he was seventeen; then attended a _____ school at Berwick, six months, after which he entered the Bloomsburg (Pa.) State Normal School, remaining there nearly one year. For six years thereafter he followed teaching as a profession. He afterward was for four years a clerk in a store at Berwick, and for four years was in business for himself at Beach Haven; since 1884, he has been engaged in farming. On April 12, 1881, Mr. Harter married Rachel, daughter of James and Susan (Santee) Lockhart, of Salem township, and he has three children; Annie C., Ettie M. and Ruth E. Our subject is a member of the M. E. Church, and of the F. & A. M.; in politics , he is a Republican.

John H. Harter, contractor and dealer in hardware and novelties, P. O. Nescopeck, was born in Nescopeck township, May 3, 1828, a son of Jacob and Margaret (Deitrick) Harter. His paternal grandfather was Martin Harter, son of Martin, a son of Martin; the latter was killed by Indians; the latter two were pioneers of Nescopeck township, now Conyngham; the maternal grandfather was Jacob Dietrick, a pioneer of Briar Creek, Columbia Co., Pa. Jacob Harter, father of subject, was born in Nescopeck township, cleared two farms, and died in Mifflin township, Columbia county. His children were fifteen in number, of whom he reared twelve: Martin, Jacob, Aaron, Lucinda (Mrs. William Kester), John H., Sarah, Theodore, Hannah (Mrs. Samuel Smith), Esther E. (Mrs. Thomas bond), Maggie (Mrs. Stephen Miller), Mary (Mrs. W. E. Patterson), and Ammon L. Our subject was reared in Nescopeck township, where, with the exception of about two years, he has always resided; since attaining this majority, he has followed the business of general building contractor, and has also been engaged in the hardware and novelty trade since 1890. He married February 2, 1860, Elizabeth, daughter of John and Catherine (Lantz) Bond, of Mifflin, Columbia Co., Pa., and has eight children living: Melinda (Mrs. J. W. Pifer), Nellie (Mrs. J. A. Courtright), Emma (Mrs. S. W. Snyder), Addison, Grant, Anna, Martin and Stephen. Mr. Harter is a member of the Evangelical Church, K. of M., and P. O. S. of A.; politically he is a Republican.

Joseph Harter, retired, P. O. Trucksville, was born in France, September 15, 1818, and is a son of Francis and Catherine (Meyers) Harter, both of whom were also born in France, and emigrated to this country in 1826, coming by way of Boston. They located in Maine, where the father engaged in agricultural pursuits and resided two years. They then removed to New Jersey, where they remained for one year, and proceeded thence to Reading, Pa., where they resided five years. They then removed to Paterson, N. J., where they remained fourteen years, at the expiration of which time he sold out and removed to this county, locating at Wilkes-Barre. In the meantime he purchased a farm in Dallas township, comprising ninety-six acres of land, which he exchanged for three houses in Wilkes-Barre. Francis Harter was an honest and industrious man, quiet and reserved , and possessed of good judgment and sound principles. He died in 1884 at the age of ninety-seven years. His family consisted of seven children, all of whom are now living: Joseph, Anthony, Charles, John, Frank, Catherine and Mary. Joseph is the eldest in the family, and was reared and educated in New Jersey, or rather educated himself, for which he should receive much credit, being now a man of marked intelligence and refinement. He was only six years when he accompanied his father to this country. In his early life he learned the calico-printer’s trade, but soon gave it up, and afterward went to farming, an occupation he followed for fourteen years. He spent ten years in Wilkes-Barre in the butcher business, at which he proved successful. In 1865 he removed to Trucksville, on what is known as "Ice Cave," where he bought two acres of land to which he added fifty-four acres on one side of the creek, and then purchased fifty-four acres on the other side. He built a hotel on this property, which he conducted for fourteen years with marked success. He also owned a farm which he bought of Mr. Rice and afterward sold to Mr. Conyngham. On one of the fifty-four-acre lots Mr. Harter discovered a remarkable and attractive feature on his property, an ice cave, in which there is ice all the year round. Mr. Harter has been twice married, his first wife being Miss Margaret J., daughter of William and Sarah Riker, to whom he was married in 1835. This union was blessed with ten children, six of whom are living: Sarah, Charles, Albert, A. W., Mary and W. C., all married. Mrs. Margaret J. Harter died July 8, 1888 , and for his second wife he married, in 1889, Miss Addie, the accomplished daughter of L. and Elizabeth Pritchard. Joseph, a son of our subject, now deceased, was a member of Company A, Fifty-second P. V. I.., and died in 1886 from the effects of exposure. Mr. Harter is an energetic business man, and has held several local offices of trust and responsibility. He is a member of the M. E. Church, and of the I. O. O. F.

Samuel Harter, farmer, P. O. Nescopeck, was born in Nescopeck, October 21, 1824, a son of Martin and Catherine (Bittenbender) Harter. His paternal grandfather, Martin Harter, and his paternal great-grandfather, Martin Harter, both natives of Germany, were pioneers of what is now Conyngham township, and his maternal grandfather, Jacob Bittenbender, was a pioneer of Nescopeck. Martin Harter, father of our subject, was an early settler of Nescopeck, and cleared the farm now owned by John Harter, where he died. His children were Lydia (Mrs. George Karchner), Jacob, John, Hannah (Mrs. David Diehl), Martin, Elizabeth (Mrs. Samuel Miller), Conrad and Michael (twins), and Samuel. Our subject has always resided in Nescopeck, and has cleared most of the farm he now occupies, where he has resided for thirty-five years. His wife was Eliza, daughter of Conrad and Elizabeth (Bittenbender) Bloss, of Nescopeck; he has five children: Reuben, Nathan, Freeman, Mary (Mrs. John Naugle) and Catherine (Mrs. John Gearhart). Mr. Harter is a member of the Lutheran church; he has been supervisor of Nescopeck township for nineteen years. In politics he is a Republican.

Levi W. Hartranft, farmer and constable, P. O. Weston, was born in Pottstown, Pa., October 22, 1839, a son of Jacob and Mary A. (Weaver) Hartranft, and third cousin of the late Governor Hartranft. He was reared in Berks county, Pa., received a limited education in the common schools (ten months comprising his attendance), and at seventeen years of age he began an apprenticeship of four years at the trade of forgeman; he also served five years as puddler and heater at Pottsville, Pa. He was in the Civil war, enlisting February 2, 1864, in company C, Eighteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, and after twenty-two months’ service was honorably discharged. In 1866 he located in Dorrance township, this county, where he was engaged in farming one year, also two years in Butler township. He then entered the employ of E. B. Coxe & Co., with whom he remained fifteen years, the last eight years as breaker-boss of four breakers. He has resided in Black Creek township since 1881, and is the founder of the present village of Weston, which he platted in 1882, and which village now has a population of about 800. In 1860 Mr. Hartranft married Sarah, daughter of Abraham and Sarah (Hafer) Wiser, of Pottstown, Pa., and has three children living: Clara (Mrs. William J. Hill), Henry and Charlie. Mr. Hartranft opened the first general store at Hopeville (now Weston), which he conducted one year. He is a member of the Lutheran church, and in politics is a Democrat.

Hiram Hartzel, carpenter and farmer, P. O. Nescopeck, was born in Mifflin township, Columbia Co., Pa., December 31, 1835, a son of Samuel and Mary A. (Mosteller) Hartzel. The father was born in Roaring Creek township, Columbia Co., Pa., January 20, 1810, a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Nuss) Hartzel, and grandson of Peter Hartzel, a native of Germany and pioneer of Columbia county. Samuel Hartzel has been a resident of Nescopeck township since 1838, where for many years he was engaged in farming; his wife was a daughter of Abram and Elizabeth (Sherry) Mosteller, of Columbia county, Pa., and his children were John, Hiram, Maria (Mrs. Henry Karehner), Elizabeth (Mrs. Daniel C. Heller), Nathan, Frances A. (Mrs. Ellis Lutz), Aaron and Sarah. Our subject was reared in Nescopeck, and learned the carpenter’s trade, which he followed twenty years; he is also engaged in farming, and has owned his present farm since 1861. His wife was Christina, daughter of George and Lydia (Harter) Karchner, of Nescopeck, and they have seven children living: Samuel F., George W., William A., Henry E., Martha J. (Mrs. Tobias Kishbauch), Mary A. and E. Frances (Mrs. C. A. Kisbauch). Mr. Hartzel is a member of the Lutheran Church; in politics he is a Democrat, and has held several township offices.

HENRY HARRISON HARVEY, dealer in real estate, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Plymouth, September 30, 1840, and is the third in the family of four children of Jameson and Mary (Campbell) Harvey, of Scotch-Irish descent. In his father’s family there were four children, of whom he is the third. He is a grandson of Elisha and Rosanna (Jamerson) Harvey, and a great-grandson of Benjamin Harvey, who came from Lyme, Conn., about 1770, and settled in Plymouth, bringing with him his children, his wife being deceased; he afterward married Mrs. Katherine Draper, of Kingston, Pa. He had three sons: Benjamin, of Capt. Ranson’s Independent Company, Revolutionary service, who died at Valley Forge from the severity of the winter; Silas, who fell in Capt. Whittlesey’s Company, at the battle of Wyoming, and Elisha. On the evening of December 6, 1780, while the elder Mr. Harvey, his son Elisha, and daughter Lois, Miss Lucy Bullford and George Palmer Ransom were seated around a bright wood fire in his home in what is now the town of Plymouth, six Indians entered, bound them and started for Canada, where was then the best market for their captives. When they arrived on the top of the Shawnee mountain, they held a consultation, which resulted in the release of the two young ladies, whom the chief painted in true Indian style, and sent them to Col. Butler withe the remark to tell him that "I put on this paint." The young women made their way though the dark forest on that cold winter night and arrived at the Wilkes-Barre fort the following morning. At the close of the following day the party were at the head waters of the Mehoopany creek, where they remained till morning. Benjamin Harvey was nearly seventy years of age and it was plainly evident that he could not endure the heavy march before him, so a council of war was held, the old gentleman fastened securely to a tree with thongs, and three young warriors standing but three rods away hurled their tomahawks at him. Owing to the youth and inexperience of the would-be executioners, they all missed him, when, the chief thinking that the "Great Spirit" had saved him, he was set free. Bewildered with fatigue and the effect of this terrible experience he lost his way, and at the close of the following day came to the very spot which he had left on that fearful morning. He wandered about till the fourth day, when he reached the Fort at Wilkes-Barre, during which time he was compelled to eat of the flesh of a small dog that had met him on the mountain. Ransom and Elisha Harvey were taken to Canada, where the former was turned over to the British, whence he subsequently escaped and died in Plymouth at an advanced age. Harvey, who was about seventeen years of age, was active and sprightly, and won the good opinion of his master; he remained with the Indians till spring, when he was traded for a half-barrel of rum to a Scotch merchant in Montreal, who made him his clerk. From here he managed to communicate with his family, and in 1782 his father, through the influence of Gen. Schuyler, secured his exchange for a British lieutenant, a prisoner held at the Wilkes-Barre fort by Col. Butler, thus having been nearly two years a prisoner. He died March 13, 18800 at the age of forty-two years, and his father, Benjamin Harvey, died November 27, 1795, at the age of seventy-seven years. Jamenson Harvey, born January 1, 1796, died July 4, 1885, at the advanced age of nearly ninety years. Our subject was educated at Middletown, Conn., Edge Hill School, Princeton, N.J., and finished his education at Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pa. He was called home in the beginning of his senior year to assume the duties as manager of the Harvey Mines at Nanticoke, to take the place of his brother who had enlisted in the army. In the year 1863, the firm of Harvey Brothers (composed of William J. and H. H. Harvey) was formed, for the purpose of mining and shipping coal from the Harvey Mines, one of the oldest mines in the Valley. This business was continued until about 1872, in all over forty years, without a single loss of life, when the mines were sold to the Susquehanna Coal Company. The firm was also engaged in the lumber business, and continued in that until 1886, when they sold out their mills and timber land. Real estate was carried, along with their other interests, and eventually it developed to such an extent that they are now probably, outside of the coal corporations, the largest owners of tenement houses in the Valley. H. H. Harvey has the supervision of all the real estate connected with the firm, and he is also identified with man other enterprises and corporations. He is also interested in the Wilkes-Barre & Wyoming Valley Traction Company, Sanson Cutlery Company, Anthracite Savings Bank; a life member and trustee of the Wyoming Historical and Geogolical Society, and a dirctor in the following corporations; Wilkes-Barre Electric Light Company, Wyoming Valley Ice Company, First National Bank of Plymouth, Plymouth Water Company, Plymouth Light, Heat and Power Company, Hunlock’s Creek and Muhlenburgh Turnpike Company, etc. Mr Harvey takes great interest in blooded stock, and owns some of the finest trotting-bred stock of horses in the State. He is president of the Trotting and Pacing Horse Breeder’ Association of Eastern Pennsylvania, and has done much to promote its welfare. He was united in marriage April 15, 1885, with Jennie J., daughter of Gasherie and Jennie (Dowling) DeWitt, natives of New Jersey and England respectively. The issue of this union is three bright children: Marjorie, Hazel and Josephine. Mrs Harvey’s father, who was the founder of the DeWitt Wire-Cloth Company, at Belleville, N.J., was a nephew of Chief Justice Hornblower. She is a granddaughter of Gasherie and Christianna (Hornblower) DeWitt, the latter of whom was a granddaughter of Josiah Hornblower, who was sent over by King George III, to take charge of copper mines, and who afterward left the crown and had a reward of £5.000 placed on his head. She is a great-granddaughter of Gasherie DeWitt, whose mother, a Miss Gaherie, was a French lady. The DeWitts were among the early Holland settlers about Albany, N.Y., and later moved down the river. She is also a granddaughter of Rev. Dr. John Dowling, of New York City, author of the "History Of Romanism." Mr. Harvey and family worship at the First Presbyterian Church of Wilkes-Barre, of which his wife is a member, and in his political views he is a Republican.

WILLIAM JAMERSON HARVEY, real estate dealer, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Plymouth May 13, 1838, a son of Jamerson and Mary (Campbell) Harvey, also natives of Pennsylvania, the former of whom was an extensive coal operator and owner of the Harvey Mines at Nanticoke, Pa. They were the parents of four children, William J. being the second in order of birth. Our subject was educated at Wyoming Seminary and Edge Hill, Princeton, N.J. In 1861 he enlisted in Company F. Seventh Regiment Pennsylvania Reserves, afterward appointed first lieutenant in Company I, and subsequently adjutant of the regiment; he was for two years in active service. He was twice married, and is now a widower; his first wife was Jessie Wright, daughter of Harrison Wright, Esq., and by her he has one surviving son, Robert Rieman; his second wife was Mrs. Amanda (Laning) Merritt, by whom he has one son, Laning. In politics he is a Republican, and was one of the Harrison State electors from the Twelfth Congressional District of Pennsylvania. He has been honored with several positions of trust; He has been school director and a member of the city council; was president and manager of the Wilkes-Barre & Kingston Street Railway; president of the Wyoming Valley Lace Mills; president West Side Driving Park; director of the Miners’ Savings Bank, and a member of the firm of Harvey Bros., dealers in real estate, stocks and bonds.

JAMES G. HARVEY, proprietor of meat market, Hazleton. This popular and genial gentleman was born in Cornwall, England, December 23, 1862, and is the youngest in the family of eight children of Peter and Mary A. (Gartwell) Harvey, also natives of England who came to America in 1869, settling at Stockton, where the children were educated and reared. The gentleman, whose name opens this sketch, began working about the mines when but a lad, and followed this occupation for about thirteen years, doing every kind of work connected with coal mining. Early in life he was thrown upon his own resources, and, after thirteen years of hard toil about the mines, feeling the want of educational advantages, he took a two years’ course of study at Dickinson Seminary. He then returned to Stockton, and was employed by Linderman, Skeer & Co., for four years in their meat market at that place. In 1888, he, with a partner, William Curtis, opened a market at Hazleton under the firm name of Harvey & Curtis, which was conducted by them six years. In February, 1892, they dissolved partnership, and Mr. Harvey opened his present establishment at No. 48 Vine street, where he owns a very neat structure in which his marker is located. He keeps two wagons on the road, and is also owner and proprietor of an oil wagon that makes regular trips through Hazleton and vicinity. On June 4, 1891, Mr Harvey was united in marriage with Miss Georgia Thomas, of Johnstown, who was made an orphan by the terrible flood that destroyed the city. In political matters he is true to his nature and votes independently; he and his estimable wife attend the Methodist Episcopal Church.

ABRAHAM R. HAUZE, farmer and dairyman, P.O. Rock Glen, was born in Black Creek township, July 12, 1852, a son of John and Phoebe (Rittenhouse) Hauze. His paternal grandfather, Christian Hauze, was born October 1, 1780, in Berks county, Pa., and his grandmother, Susannah (Pettit), was born March 15, 1783, in the State of New Jersey. They were both taken to Berwick, Columbia Co., Pa., when quite young, where they were raised, and where they married. From Berwick they moved to Sugar Loaf township, this county, where they passed the remainder of their days. They had a family of nine children. Abraham R. Hauze’s maternal grandfather, Martin D. Rittenhouse, was born September 17, 1788, in Montgomery county, Pa., and died June 1 1865, in Black Creek township, Luzerne county. Grandmother Amelia Rittenhouse (whose maiden name was also Rittenhouse) was born in Columbia county Pa., July 22, 1790, and died December 30, 1864. They were married March 18, 1810, and had eight children: Amos, Ann, Sarah, Phoebe, Nicholas, Elizabeth, Mary and Susannah. Our subject’s great-grandfather was Martin Rittenhouse, and his great-great-grandfather was William Rittenhouse (founder of the Rittenhouse family), who was born in the year 1644 in Arnhem, Holland. In 1690 he erected the first paper mill in America, on the Wissahickon creek, near Germantown, Pa., and on paper manufactured at this mill the Declaration of Independence was written; also from paper purchased at this mill, the first Bibles in America were formed in the year 1743; Benjamin Franklin got his paper at the same place for his "Poor Richard’s Almannack."

John HAUZE, father of Abraham R., was born in Sugar Loaf township, but spent most of his life in Black Creek township, where he cleared and improved a farm and died. His children were eleven in number, nine of whom grew to maturity; Amelia (Mrs. George Payton), George, Lydia (Mrs. Daniel Bitter), Hannah (Mrs. Matthew O’Brien), Susan (Mrs. Andrew Fritz), Abraham R., Amos B., James H. and Ella (Mrs. Stephen Kirkendall). The subject proper of this memoir was reared in Black Creek township, where he has always resided, and was educated in the common schools and at the State Normal School, Bloomsburg. He has been engaged in farming thirteen years, and since 1887 has conducted a dairy in connection. He married, March 13, 1879, Alimira E., daughter of Reuben and Charlotte (Airgood) Welch, of Black Creek township, and has three children living: Phoebe, Charlotte, Agatha and Mildred M. Mr. Hauze is a member of the M.E. Church. In politics he is a Democrat, and has held the offices of supervisor and school director.

EVAN HAVARD, farmer, P.O. Inkerman, was born at the old homestead, where he now resides, October 8, 1861, and is a son of Thomas and Martha (Williams) Havard, of the same place, of Welsh extraction. They reared a family of eight children, of whom Evan is sixth in order of birth. Our subject was educated in the common schools, and about the year 1871 he went to work with his father as a teamster for a short time, since when he has cultivated the old farm of about seventy-five acres of land. Mr. Harvard was united in marriage, February 23, 1885, with Elizabeth, daughter of David Richards, a native of Wales, and their union has been blessed with the following issue: Thomas, born February 14, 1886; David born March 7, 1889, and Helen, born September 22, 1891. Our subject is a member of the Welsh Baptist Church, and of the A.P.A, and K. of P. In politics he is a Republican.

JOHN A. HAWK, outside foreman of No. 2 Shaft, Delaware & Hudaon Canal Company, Plymouth division, was born June 11, 1850, at Lykens, Dauphin Co., Pa., and is the eldest in the family of five children of William and Rebecca (Landenschlager) Hawk, natives of Pennsylvania. The subject of this sketch was educated in Dauphin and Snyder counties, and after receiving his education taught school in Wieonisco township, Dauphin county, and also at Tower City, Schuylkill county. This profession he followed for eight years, and during the succeeding four years did a variety of work until coming to Plymouth, when he was engaged at No. 3 Shaft to do inside work. There he remained on year, at the end of which time he was given the position of weighmaster at No. 4 Shaft, Delaware & Hudson, continuing there for about one and one half years. He was then promoted to the foremanship of No. 5 Shaft, Delaware & Hudson, remaining at that shaft three years, being transferred at the termination of that period to No. 2 Shaft, where he has since had charge. This shaft is 600 feet deep, and 307 men are employed, about 122 men and boys being engaged on the outside under the immediate charge of Mr. Hawk. There is mined daily an average of about 800 tons of coal. Mr. Hawk was united in marriage May 27, 1874, with Anna M., daughter of John and Elizabeth (Acker) Kershner, residents of Tamaqua, Pa., the father being one of the early pioneers of that county. Five children have been born to this union, namely: Cady I., Josie Elizabeth, Lucretia Ray, Harry L. and William B.W. In politics Mr. Hawk is a Republican; socially, he is a member of the I.O.O.F. The family attend the Presbyterian Church.

L. N. HAWLEY, FARMER, P.O. Fades Creek, was born in Burlington, Conn., May 6, 1821, a son of James and Amanda (Wooden) Hawley, the former of whom was a son of Ebenezer Hawley, who was also a native of Connecticut and a farmer by occupation; he died in that State. His family numbered seven children. His son, James, began life in Connecticut as a farmer, and removed to Orange county, N.Y., in 1831, where he remained nine years; then came to this county, locating in Lake township. Where he purchased about 250 acres of land, seventy-five of which he improved during his lifetime, thus showing him to be a hard worker. He was a man of strict moral principles, a consistent member of the M.E. Church and a local preacher in that body; in politics he was an ardent Whig. He died January 20, 1848, at the age of sixty-six years, having reared a family of five children, four of whom are yet living, L.N. being the fourth in the family. Our subject was reared and educated in New York, and always continued himself to agrienltural pursuits. He removed to this county about 1835, locating in Exeter township, where he spent two years; in 1837 he came to Lake township, locating on a farm of 250 acres, thirty of which he now owns. He was married, December 25, 1850, to Miss Rosilla, daughter of Garrett and Rosilla Durland, by which union there were born James W., Charles L., Julia A., Louisa L., Ira V., Brewster E. and William F., six of whom are married and comfortably situated. For his second wife Mr. Hawley married March 14, 1872, Miss Mary, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Congleton, and to this union two children were born: Joseph C. and Chesley C. Mr Hawley is a man of more than ordinary intelligence. He is a strong Republican, and has held all the offices in the town, among them being postmaster, fourteen years; justice of the peace, ten years; constable, seven years, besides other minor offices.

JOHN HAY, farmer, P.O. Ketcham, was born in Hope township, Warren Co., N.J., December 13 1831. He is the son of John and Rachel (VanSickle) Hay, both of whom were born in New Jersey. The father was a son of John Hay, who was a Revolutionary soldier, fighting bravely for liberty and independence. After the close of the struggle he settled on a large tract of land where now stands the village of Delaware on the Delaware river. The subject of this sketch moved from Warren county, N.J., in 1856, locating in Dallas, where he bought a farm of 133 acres on which he lived about six years, after which he bought a farm in Kingston township of 140 acres, on which he now resides; besides these he also owns another farm of 130 acres, which he rents. Mr. Hay is a practical and prosperous farmer, a man of influence in his township and county, and though not an office-seeker, has filled several local positions which he has filled with credit to himself and his fellow citizens. Mr. Hay has been twice married; for his first wife he married in 1853, Miss Mary C., daughter of John and Jane Miller, of Knowlton, Warren Co., N.J., by whom he had two children, one of whom is living, A.D. Hay, a prosperous farmer of Lehman township and a enterprising business man of Dallas borough, having a farm in the former and a store in the latter. For his second wife Mr. Hay married, in 1860. Miss Phoebe A., daughter of Solomon and Harriet Frantz, by whom he has had five children, viz.: Hattie E., Mary K., Cora A., John I. And Edwin F. Mrs. Phoebe (Frantz) Hay was born in Dallas in 1839. Mr. And Mrs. Hay are both consistent members of the M.E. Church, in good standing.

REV. HORACE EDWIN HAYDEN, M.A., was born at Catonsville, MD., February 18, 1837. His descent is thus given in his volume of Virginia Genealogies, page 26:

1. SERGEANT WILLIAM HAYDEN of Haydon, born Somersetshire, England, 1600-5; died September 27, 1669; came to New England May 30, 1630. Land owner Hardford, Conn., 1639, and Windsor, Conn., 1642, which land the family have owned 250 years. On it his monument is erected. Was a gallant soldier in the Indian wars of 1637. His sword is in the Connecticut HIstorical Society. Was a member of the General Court of Connecticut from Killingworth, 1667. Is eldest sonn--

2. LIEUT. DANIEL HAYDEN, born September 2, 1640; died March 22, 1712, age seventy-two; soldier; married March 17. 1664, Hannah WILCOCKSON, daughter of William WILCOCKSON. , of St. Albans, Engl., 1590, who came to New England 1635; deputy from Hartford 1637, and whose widow was the second wife of Sergeant William Hayden. His two commissions are extant. His eldest son--

3. DANIEL HAYDEN, born October 5, 1666; died December 22, 1759, age ninety-three; maried 1702, Elizabeth GIBBS, daughter of Samuel and Hepsibah (DIBBLE) GIBBS, son of Giles GIBBS, who came from Devonshire, Eng., who came from Devonshire, Eng. 1630. HIs eldest son--

4. LIEUT DANIEL HAYDEN, born August 22, 1703; died 1790, aged eighty-seven; married December 31, 1735, Esther MOORE, daughter of Samuel (and Damaris STRONG), son of John (and Hannah GOFFE) and granson of Deacon John MOORE, who came from ENgland to Dorchester, and was member General Court 1643. Lieut, He was and officer in the French and Indian wars. His second son, brother to Mrs. Gen. Roger ENOS--

5. LIEUT. THOMAS HAYDEN, born January 14, 1745; died November 28, 1817, aged seventy-two; married November 19, 1767, his cousin Abigin PARSONS, daughter of Moses (and Elizabeth VENTRES) Moses (and Abigail BALL), Hon. Joseph (and Elizabeth STRONG), Cornet Joseph PARSONS (and Mary BLISS) who came from Great Torrington, Eng., to Dorchester 1630, was a leading founder of Springfield and Northampton, Mass. Lieutenant Hayden was an officer of the Revolutionary war 1775-83. When the news of the battle of Lexington reached Windsor, April 20, 1775, he mounted his horse and called the people throughout that region to arms; was sergeant in the troops that marched that day to Lexington; sergeant-major Connecticut Line, August 11 1775; second lieutenant, January 1, 1776; first lieutenant January 1, 1777; adjutant to Col. Jed. HUNTINGTON, October 29, 1776, and to Col. Zebulon BUTLER, of Wyoming fame, at Danbury, Conn., April 8, 1777; lieutenant Connecticut Line, June 20, 1781 and 1782; discharged at the close of the war in 1783. HIs eldest son--

6. HORACE H. HAYDEN, M.d., of Baltimore, MD., born October 13, 1769; died January 25, 1844, aged seventy-five; married, Baltimore, MD., February 23, 1805, Maria Antoinette ROBINSON, daughter of Daniel, of Samuel, of George, of George, of Kent county, Delaware, 1650. He came from England. Daniel ROBINSON served in the Pennsylvania Navy, 1776, and was a member of the Finance Committee of Delaware, 1778. Dr. Hayden was a physician, geologist and dentist, author of "Geological Essays" and other works; eminent as a scientist in Europe and America. He served as assistant surgeon in the war of 1812. He was a founder and first president of Baltimore Dental College, and an honorary M.D of the University of Maryland, and Jefferson Medical College, PA. His eldest son--

7. EDWIN PARSONS HAYDEN, born in Baltimore, August 7, 1811; died in Howard Co., MD, May 10, 1850; married, September 15, 1832, Elizabeth HAUSE, daughter of William (and Catherine HULL), of Philadelphia, of Michael, who came from germany in 1750, and served in the Pennsylvania lines 1776-80. Mr Hayden was a lawyer, educated at the University of Maryland; studied law at Yale College 1829-30; was a member of the Maryland Legislature 1847-48; clerk of Howard county, MD, 1848-48; clerk of Howard county, MD, 1848-50. His third son was--

8. REV. HORACE EDWIN HAYDEN, M.A., born in Maryland, February 18, 1837. He was educated at St. Timothy’s Military Academy, MD., 1847-53, and Kenyon College, Ohio, 1858-59, whence he received the honorary degree of M.A., 1886, and at the Virginia Theological Seminary, where he graduated 1867. His father died 1850, aged thirty-eight years. In 1853, owing to the financial crisis of that time, he left school and entered business life in Baltimore and Philadelphia. He served as bookkeeper for two years under the late Gen.. David Bell BIRNEY, U.S.A., Philadelphia, and for an equal time with HAMMOND, SNYDER & Co.,, and Dale ROSS & WITHERS, wholesale dry-goods and importing houses. HE relinquished his business career in 1838, and entered Kenyon college to prepare for the ministry. In 1861 he engaged in teaching in order to complete his college course, which purpose was frustrated by the war between the States. June 1,1861, he entered the Confederate States Army under Gen., then Col, J.E.B. Stuart, First Virginia Cavalry, serving also under his class-mate Gen. Fitzhugh LEE, and later, in the First Maryland Cavalry, and Third Virginia Infantry, serving until 1865 as a volunteer. Baptized in th Prot. Epis. Church, September, 1840; confirmed, April 10, 1857; he was ordained to the Diaconate in that church, July 26, 1867, by his relative Rt. Rev. John JOHNS, D.D.,LL.D., Bishop of Virginia and to the Priesthood, August 7, 1868 by Rt. Rev. F.M. WHITLE, D.D., LL. D., Assistant Bishop of Virginia, was rector of Christ Church, Point Pleasant, West Virginia, 1867-73, and of St John’s Church, West Brownsville, PA, 1873-79. He became Assistant Minister to the Rev. Henry L. JONES, S.T.D., Rector of St. Stephen’s Church in Wilkes-Barre, PA, November 1, 1879, which relation he has held continuously since then, a period of nearly thirteen years; since 1885 he has been one of the examining chaplains of the Diocese of Central Pennsylvania. Mr. Hayden is an enthusiastic student of American history, in which line of study he has printed some thirty or more papers and titles, the most important of which is his last volume of :Virginia Genealogies,: royal Svo. 800 pages, 1891, an historical, biographical and genealogical work said by R.S. BROCK, F.R.H.S., secretary Virginia Historicl Society, to be "the most accurate in data, and the most comprehensive in scope and material, of any such work yet published on Virginia." He is a member of many historical and scientific societies, among which are the Historical Societies of Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, Georrgia, Kansas, Buffalo, American Historical Association; Maryland Academy of Science; Anthropological Society, D.C.; N.E. H istorical Gen. Society; Wyoming HIst. and Geol. Society; Pa. Sons of the Revolutioon; Army and Navy, C.S.A.; Southern Hist. Society, etc. He is also an honorary member Brownsville Lodge No. 60 F.&A.M., having been a member of the Fraternity for thirty years. Mr. Hayden had four ancestors who served in the Revolutionary war 1776-83, and is the sixth of his direct line who have been soldiers in the wars of America. He married, November 30, 1868, Kate Elizabeth BYERS of Hancock, MD. He has had two children: Mary Elizabeth, born in Virginia, October 15, 1875, died in Wilks-Barre, December 26, 1879; Horace Edwin, born in Wilkes-Barre, January 6, 1884. Mrs. Hayden descends from David DAVIS and Jenkins DAVIS of Chester county, PA, 1680-1740; John BYERS, M.D., Lewes, Del., 1785; Paul WEITZEL of Lancaster, PA, 1742, etc. Mr. Hayden is possessed of a keen sense of honor and an utter devotion to the truth both of which qualities render him of great value as an historian. As a correct genealogist he has no superior, and as a clergyman the church has no more loyal son. Firm in his own belief, yet generous toward others, and always ready to lend a helping hand he is an execellent type of the American Christian gentleman. (H.P.J.)

JOHN HAYES, miner, Port Bowkley Mine, Plains, was born in Briley Hill, England, April 26, 1839, a son of John and Mary (WALTON) HAYES. The father, who was a miner, reared a family of seven children, of whom John is the third. The father came to America in 1852, and in 1857 the mother came, bringing our subject and two brothers. They located at Pittston and remained there till 1868, when he removed to Plains. He was preceded here a short time by his father, where the latter was mining. John Hayes was married in the spring of 1861 to Mrs. Mary (MAGGS) NEWTH; she was of English lineage, and was widow of John NEWTH, by whom she had had three children. Mr. and Mrs. Hayes had five children, four of whom reached majority, viz.: Mary A. (Mrs. Henry BROWNBRIDGE, of Plains); Thomas, a teamster, of Miners Mills; John, who went to Montana in January, 1891; and Robert B., who died at the age of twenty-one. Mrs. Mary Hayes died May 16, 1873, and Mr. Hayes was married on March 1, 1883, to Elizabeth J., daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (MARTIN) LANGDON; she is of English origin, and widow of William JAGO, by whom she had three children, two of whom are living with her at present, viz.: Martha and Elizabeth J. To the second union have been born five children, three of whom are living, viz.: Phoebe, William J. and Rosina. Mr. Hayes is a member of the IO.O.F. and Encampment, and the Sons of St. George, and politically is a Republican.

EUGENE STANLEY HAYS, physician and surgeon, Wyoming, was born at Wilkes-Barre, December 6, 1859, and is a son of Lewis and Catharine (SCUREMEAN) HAYS, nativesof Pennsylvania and of German origin, the former of whom was a brickmason by occupation. They reared a family of three children: Eugene S.; Joseph B., shipping clerk for the Lehigh Valley Railroad Company at Coxton (he married Lucy (SUTHERLAND); and Lewis M., attending the Wyoming High School. Our subject is a great-grandson of Peter, who came to America from Germany about the year 1690, and settled at Easton, purchasing from William Penn 400 acres of land, the consideration for same being seven grains of barley ( the deed for which land is now in the possession of Dr. Eugene S. Hays). Peter was a son of Malcom (of Germany) and lived to be eighty-two years of age. Charles H., grandfather of our subject, was a blacksmith by trade, and at the time of his death in October, 1880, was tipstaff in the courthouse at Wilkes-Barre. Eugene Stanley Hays was educated in the common schools, at the University of the City of New York, and finally at the Detroit Medical College, where he graduated in medicine in 1881. Opening an office in Pittston, the Doctor here remained one year, and then moved to Wyoming, where he has since resided in the active practice of his profession. Dr. Hays was married, March 28, 1882, to Miss Henrietta, daughter of Charles and Elenor (BROWN), DETRO, natives of Pennsylvania, and of French and German origin, respectivrly, the former of whom is a carpenter and contractor, with residence at White Haven. This happy union has been blessed with one child, Malcom, born October 26, 1891. Dr. and Mrs. Hays attend the Presbyyterian Church at Wyoming; the Doctor is a member of the I.O.O.F.; is a Republican, and has been school director for the borough of Wyoming three years. He is a thorough physician, and a gentleman who has won the love and respect of all how know him.

JOHN H. HEBEL, general outside foreman, Stockton, was born at Lautenhausen, Province of Hessen, Germany, November 22, 1846. He is a son of Henry and Barbara C. (ZANG) HEBEL, also natives of Germany, and is the eldest in a family of five children. He was educated in Germany, and at the age of fourteen commenced to work as a carpenter. In 1866, with his parents, he came to this country and settled at Hazleton, PA. Here he worked at the carpentering trade during four years, or until 1870, in which year he removed to Stockton, where he was employed by LINDERMAN & SKEER. In 1880 he was appointed foreman carpenter, in which positioni he remained until 1891, where he was appointed, by James e. RODERICK, general superintendent for general outside foreman. In 1890 he fell from a breaker, and remained from duty nine weeks. Mr. Hebel was united in marriage, September 4, 1870, with Miss Elizabeth LINDEMAN, of Hazleton, and to this happy union six children have been born, viz.: William, Elizabeth, Henry, Harry, Dora and Anita, of whom Henry died in 1876. Mrs. Hebel died December 7, 1890. Mr. Hebel is a staunch Republican, and is a member of the I.O.O.F., Knights of Pythias, Seven Wise Men, Hazleton Unterstutzungs Verein, andof the Hazleton concordia Singing Society. The family attend the German Lutheran Church.

ANDREW HEIM, superintendent of Wilkes-Barre City Cemetery, was born in Bavaria, Germany, June 19,1826, a son of Peter and Maria (BECKER) HEIM. He was reared and educated in his native country, and in 1852 came to America, settling inWikes-Barre, where he worked at various occupations up to 1872, in which year he was appointed superintendent of Wilkes-Barre City Cemetery, a positioin he has acceptably filled to the present time. He was married, November 6, 1853, to Anna, daughter of Martin and Anna (BECK) HOFSOMER, of Germany, and they had eight children, as follows: Martin, Mary (deceased, Mrs. Fred RAVE), Peter, Anna (deceased), Lena (Mrs. George BITTENBENDER), Anna (second) (also deceased), Lewis and Belle (Mrs. Henry SCHMOLL). Mr. Heim is a member of the German Lutheran Church, of the I.O.O.F. and encampment, and of the Wyoming Verien; in politics he is a Democrat.

ADAM HEIZE, truck farmer, Forty Fort, was born November 19, 1856, at Bowman’s Creek, Wyomng Co., PA., a son of Philip and Elizabeth (SHIPS) HEINZ, natives of Germany, who came to America in 1837. Mr. Heisz was a stone-cutter, and while in Wilkes-Barre helped cut the stone for the Wyoming monument. Our subject is the seventh in a family of twelve children, six of whom are now living. He was educated in the common schools and has followed farming all his life. At the age of twenty he farmed for one year on a company farm, then came to Forty Fort and lived in the house of James SPACE for one year. He then purchased a piece of land from James VAN LOON, and built a house on it, living there for six years after which he purchased his present farm and built thereon in 1877, his present cozy home. January 9, 1866, Mr. Heisz was married to Elizabeth L., daughter of John S. and Anna (ALLABUCH) JACKSON, natives of Pennsylvania, and of English and German descent respectively. He has two children: Cora L and Charles P., who married Carrie PEMBERTON, now deceased (he is a farmer by occupation). Mr. and Mrs. Heisz are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Forty Fort. He is a Prohibitionist and served as a member of the Borough council for three years.

A. WESLEY HELLER, lumber and coal dealer, Wapwallopen, was born in what is now Conyngham township, this county, July 11, 1854, son of Absalom and Catherine (WEISS) HELLER. His paternal grandfather, Isaac HELLER, formerly of Northampton county, PA., and of German descent settled at Wapwallopen about 1839, owned and operated the old gristmill, and was also a dealer in general merchandise. His wife was Elizabeth YOUNG, and his children were Eliza (Mrs. Philip ODENWELDER), Absalom, Henry, Samuel and John M. Of these, Absalom, father of our subject, in early life was a miller; his wife was a daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (FENSTERMACHER) WEISS, of what is now Conyngham township, and by her he had five children who grew to maturity, viz. : Sallie E. (Mrs. J.M. SNYDER) , Mary A. (Mrs. John ANDRESS), A. Wesley, George W. and France E. (Mrs. W. C. BOND). Our subject was reared on the old homestead, where he has lived since three years of age, and which he has owned since 1880. Until 1883 he was engaged in farming, when he embarkedin the lumber and coal business, in which he has built up a large and successful trade. On May 22, 1888, he married Flora E.,, daughter of Reuben and Mary A. (WEISS) SWANK, of Hollenback township, and has two sons, Clark W. and Hoyt E. Mr. Heller is a member of the German Reformed Church, of the P.O.S. of A., and politically is a Democrat.

WILLIAM M. HELLER, clerk, P.O. Conyngham, was born in Conyngham village, June 14, 1859, and is a son of David and Marietta (KEIM) HELLER. His paternal grandfathaer, Michael HELLER, formerly of Lehigh county, PA., was a tanner, butcher and farmer, and one of the early settlers of Conyngham village, where he followed his various occupations until his death. His wife was Sophia RAEDLER, who bore him two children, David and Caroline (Mrs. Dr. A.L. CRESSLER). David Heller was a farmer, and lived and died in Sugar Loaf township. He married a daughter of John M. and Lydia (MUSSELMAN) KEIM, of Sugar Loaf township, and his children were John M. and William M. William M. Heller, our subject, was reared in his native town, and was educated in the public schoolss and the State Normal School, at Bloomsburg. He has followed various occupations and since 1888 has been clerk in a general store. June 8, 1878, he married Minerva daughter of Ernest and Elizabeth (BENNER) FREDERICK, of Sugar Loaf township. He has two children, Erma and Earl B. Mr. Heller is a member of the I.O.O.F., and P.O.S. of A; in politics is a Democrat, and in religious faith a member of the Reformed Church.

CHARLES D. HENDERSON, farmer, P.O. Dallas, was born in Bear Creek township, where he received his primary education, afterward finishing his education in Dallas. He is a son of James S., and Catharine (LONG) HENDERSON, the former of whom was born in New York, the latter in New Jersey. James removed from New York to New Jersey, where he married, and in 1833 removed to Bear Creek township, this county, where he remained until 1801, when he removed to Dallas township and purchased a farm of eighty acres of land. He was an honest, upright, and industrious man, content to look after his own farm, and was much respected. He died in January, 1883, at the age of seventy-three years. His family consisted of thirteen children, seven of whom grew to maturity, and three of whom are now living. Charles D., although the son of a farmer, for years gave farming a wide berth, busying himself at various vocations. He took a trip to Michigan in younger days, remaining in the pine forests for two years, an experience which had a salutary effect on the boy in after years. He was appointed deputy sheriff from 1872 to 1874, and held other offices of trust and importance. He afterward owned and controlled a livery stable in Wilkes-Barre with successful results. On May 17, 1993. Mr. Henderson married Miss Elizabeth C., daughter of Peter BERTRAM, by whom he has had five children, four of whom are living: Milton B., Fred, Crissy L., Charles P., and Clarence. In the same year he removed to his present home where he has since given his attention to farming and stock-raising. His farm consists of sisty-six acres; his stock is very fine and promising. On October 9, 1890, the West Side Water Company, in making the necessary preparatins for buildig a large reservoir covering about 500 acres, took in his farm, which he sold to the company at a reasonable figure. Mr. Henderson has held the office of councilman since the incorporatio of Dallas borough, up to the present time. He is a member of the Grange, and a consistent member of the Christian Church of Dallas. Politically he is a Democrat.

SAMUEL W. HENESS, of the firm of WATKINS & HENESS, contractors and builders, Plymouth, was born in Monmouthshire, Wales, November 18, 1861, the only child of Samuel and Elizabeth (LODGE) HENNESS, natives of England. He received his early education in Wales and learned the mason’s trade, serving at it in England and later in America. In 1883 he came to Plymouth, PA, and engaged in general mason work with Charles WATKINS, his brother-in-law, and they have been partners ever since. Mr. Heness was united in marriage, August 9, 1885, with Miss Mary, only daughter of Morgan and Ann (RODGERS) EVANS, natives of Wales. This union has been blessed with three children,: Ann, born August 25, 1886; Flora May, born February 22, 1888; Lizzie, born May 30 1890. The subject of this sketch is a member of the Knights of the Golden Eagle, and of the Loyal Knights of America. The family attend the English Baptist Church.

GEORGE HENNEY, proprietor of bakery, and collector for REICHARD & Co., Wiles-Barre, was born in Phildelphia, PA, July 6, 1854, a son of Frederick and Elizabeth (SIMONS) HENNEY, natives of Germany who came to America in 1848, remaining in Philadelphia ten years, when they removed to Charleston, S.C. They returned to Philadelphia in 1864, and died in Wikles-Barre city, this county. They had four children, viz.: Minnie (Mrs. Simon AICHER), Henry W., Augusta (Mrs. August SCHOLL) and George. Our subject, who was reared in his native State and educated in the public schools, learned the trade of tanner in philadelphia, serving an apprenticeship of three years, and worked as a kid-finisher in that city thirteen years. In 1876 he located in Wilkes-Barre, and embarked in the bakery business, in which he has since successfully continued, and since 1889 has held the responsible position of collector for REICHARD & Co. On January 30, 1882, he married, Lizzie, daughter of Philip and Mary (REINHARD) KNUBER, of Wilkes-Barre, and they have two children: Henry and Charles. Mr. Henney, in politics, is independent.

JOHN HENRICH, farmer, P.O. Huntsville, was born in Bavaria, on the Rhine, Germany, a son of Charles F. And Susanna (Hoffman) Henrich, the former of whom was a farmer in Germany, and lived and died in his native land. His family consisted of eleven children, nine of whom grew to maturity, John being the seventh in the family. Our subject was reared and educated in Germany, and he and his sister, Phillipine, were the only members of the family to immigrate to this country. John came to this county by way of New York, in 1851, locating in Wilkes-Barre, where he lived about three years, working at various jobs. In 1854, he moved to Lehman township where he purchased a farm of sixty-two acres, on which he erected a house and outbuildings. There was no clearing on this place, but Mr. Henrich went in to the wilderness, out of which he has produced a comfortable home. In 1879, he added forty-two acres to his original farm, making in all 105 acres of fertile land, but somewhat rough. He is a wide-a-wake farmer, keeping well abreast of the times, and looking well after his own interests. In 1851 Mr. Henrich married Miss Mary E., daughter of John and Frances Gable, and there were nine children born to them, five of whom are living: Margaret, Adam, Jacob, Elizabeth and Henry. Of these, Margaret married Ludwig Roos, by whom were born two children; Adam married Miss Elizabeth Layer, by whom were born two children; Jacob married Elizabeth Henry; and Elizabeth married Charles A. Conrad, by whom were born six children. Mr. Henrich is a Democrat, and was school director for the term of four years. He and family are members of the German Catholic Church.

P.J. ARNOLD HENRICH, proprietor of the "Windsor Hotel," Pittston. This enterprising and well-known hotel man was born in Germany June 16, 1848, and is a son of Th. Joseph and Caroline (Schmitz) Henrich, natives of Germany. The subject of this sketch is the eldest in a family of five children, and was reared and educated in his native land. In 1864 he came to America, settling in New York City, where he learned photography, working at the same in that city for five years. He was then bar-keeper in New York for fifteen years, after which he went to Scranton, Pa., running a hotel in that place for two years, and then embarking in the cheese business, which he also continued for about two years. In December, 1890, our subject came to Pittston, and tended bar at the "Windsor Hotel" until 1892, when he bought out his employer, and has since conducted the business alone. Mr. Henrich is a skillful caterer, and viands of all descriptions can be had at his cafe during all hours. He has been twice married: first to Miss Frederika Carl, who died in 1886, leaving two children: Walter and Carl (the latter being deceased). In 1887 Mr. Henrich was married to Lizzie Rosar, and to this union have been born three children, namely: Julia, Carl and Lizzie. In political matters Mr. Henrich is a Democrat, and the family are members of the Catholic Church.

WILLIAM HENRY HERRING, outside superintendent of Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, Wilkes-Barre, was born September 7, 1853, a son of Clinton D. And Mary (Knorr) Herring. His paternal grandparents were John and Rachel (Snyder) Herring, and his great-grandfather, John Herring, who was a native of Germany, was among the pioneers of Columbia county, Pa. His grandfather in early life was a farmer, later entering the employ of the Pennsylvania Canal Company, and serving as master carpenter for eighteen years. Clinton D. Herring is a native of Columbia county, Pa., and a carpenter by trade. Since 1860 he has resided in Wilkes-Barre, and for the past eighteen years has been connected with the Lehigh and Wilkes-Barre Coal Company as master carpenter. His wife was a daughter of Henry D. Knorr, of Columbia county, Pa., of German descent, and by her he has six children, as follows: William H., Samuel B., Abner M., Ernest M., Emma (Mrs. Joseph French) and Maggie I. Our subject was reared in Wilkes-Barre from the age of five years. His education was received at the public schools, the Academy at Orangeville, and the State Normal School at Bloomsburg, from which he graduated in 1871. He has since been in the employ of the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, twelve years as carpenter, seven years as outside foreman, and since 1890 as outside superintendent. Mr. Herring married, October 1, 1874, Mary I., daughter of Hugh P. and Mary I. (Morton) Smith, of Glasgow, Scotland. They have two children, George DeWitt and Marian E. Mr. Herring is a member of the Grant Street Presbyterian Church, in which he is treasurer of the board of trustees; in politics he is a Republican.

S.M. HERRMAN, senior member of the firm of Herrman & Green, merchants, Hazleton, is a progressive young business man. He was born in Gleusdorf, Bavaria, May 14, 1858, and is a son of Jacob and Rose (Kaufman) Herrman, natives of Germany. Our subject was reared and educated in the land of his birth, and, when a mere boy, came to America, locating at Pittston, where he was employed as clerk in the large dry-goods establishment of A.B. Brown. He remained with this gentleman for thirteen years, and, at the expiration of that time (in 1887), came to Hazleton, and, in company with Mr. Green, opened their present establishment, where a large line of ladies’ millinery and cloaks, and gents’ furnishings, are handled. The members of this firm are practical, "go-ahead" business men, and with such characteristics it is only natural that their business should be extensive and of a first-class order. It requires the services of twelve clerks and employes to supply the wants of their many customers. Mr. Herrman was married, February 4, 1885, to Miss Millie, daughter of the late Simon Green, of Scranton, Pa., and two children have blessed this union, May F. and Irene. In political matters, Mr. Herrman reserves the right to vote as he chooses, and is not controlled by party ties or prejudices. He is a member of the I.O.O.F. and of the K. of H.

JOHN H. HERSHBERGER, blacksmith, Plymouth, was born September 21, 1848, at Tremont, Schuylkill Co., Pa., and is second in the family of six children of David and Elizabeth (Singer) Hershberger, also natives of Pennsylvania. The subject of this sketch was educated in the public schools of Dauphin county, Pa., and at quite an early age became an apprentice to Lewis Boughton, for the purpose of learning the blacksmith trade, serving there twenty-one months. In 1866 he came to Plymouth, and here worked with Boughton for a short time, afterward at No. 5 Shaft for nearly six months. Later he worked at the following places consecutively: Harrisburg, one month; Avondale Mine, four months, and Cramer Hook, six months. He then returned to Plymouth, and worked at No. 12 Shaft for eighteen months, going from there to Chicago, where he remained six months, when he once more came to Plymouth, and worked for Matthew Wier, one year, after which he opened business for himself on Church street, Plymouth, continuing four years and a half, at the end of which time he sold out and removed to Michigan, where he carried on a shop for about three and one-half years. He then returned to Plymouth, and worked at No. 12 Shaft for a short time, afterward proceeding to Beaver Run, where he was employed as clerk in Shonk’s store about one year, after which he again came to Plymouth, and was employed by Albert Gabriel for one year. Moving from there to Pittston, worked at the Pittston Shaft; and coming from there to Plymouth, he established his present business, which consists of, general blacksmithing, horse-shoeing, painting, and manufacturing carriages, buggies, and light and heavy wagons. Mr. Hershberger has a factory equipped with every facility for carrying on a great variety of work. On May 20, 1869, he was married to Barbara, daughter of William and Barbara (Clyde) Young, natives of British Columbia, and five children were born to this marriage, viz.: Charles, Wilbert, Harry, Frank and Marion. The mother of this family died May 21, 1884, and in 1886 Mr. Hershberger married Rubina Young, sister to his former wife. One child was born to this marriage, named Linnie B. In politics Mr. Hershberger is a Republican. The family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church.

PETER HESLIN, miner in No. 7 Shaft, Inkerman, Jenkins township, was born in County Leitrim, Ireland, in 1832, and is a son of James and Mary (Morahan) Heslin, in whose family there were seven children, of whom Peter is the third. Our subject came to America in 1848, and located in New York, where he drove a horse and cart for three years, after which he came to Inkerman, this county, where he has since been engaged in mining. With the exception of a slight injury across the left hand, he has never had a hurt while employed in his vocation. Mr. Heslin was married June 28, 1855, to Miss Ellen, daughter of Patrick and Bridget (Early) Moran, natives of County Leitrim, Ireland, and they have eleven children, viz.: Bernard, an inmate of the Ransom Insane Asylum; Bridget (deceased wife of John McCue); Elizabeth (Mrs. John King); Ellen (Mrs. John Gannon); Mary, a Sister in the Sacred Heart Convent, Boston, Mass.; Celia, still living with her parents; Margaret, Sister Egidius in the Immaculate Heart Convent, Carbondale, Pa.; James, Patrick, Susan and Catherine. Mr. Heslin and family are members of the Catholic Church. He is a member of the Father Mathew Society, and in his political views is a Democrat. He built his present beautiful residence in 1882.

E. FREAS HESS, station agent for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company at Wapwallopen, was born in Huntington township, this county, February 18, 1859, a son of Milton E. and Harriet C. (Golder) Hess. His paternal grandfather, Elijah Hess, was a native of Columbia county, Pa., where he died at thirty years of age; his wife was Margaret Coleman, by whom he had five children who grew to maturity, viz.: Milton E., Mary A. (Mrs. Edward McHenry), Clara (Mrs. Thomas Hartman), Adeline and Helen. The father of our subject was a native of Columbia county, Pa., where he was reared and educated, and was a miller by trade. He located in Huntington township, this county, in 1859, and operated a mill there twenty-two years, then removed to Watrousville, Tuscola Co., Mich., where he still resides, engaged in farming. His wife was a daughter of David Golder, of Sugar Loaf township, Columbia Co., Pa., formerly of New Jersey, and by her he had nine children, as follows: Asenath, E. Freas, Mary R. (Mrs. Willard Greenfield), Frank D., Edward B., Cora A., Lee G., Doyle C. and Harry S. Our subject was reared in Huntington township, educated in the public schools, and since 1882 has been in the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, having held his present position at Wapwallopen since 1883. He married, December 23, 1886, Jennie M., daughter of Hon. Huston and Susan (McMicken) Hepburn, of Williamsport, Pa. Socially, Mr. Hess is a member of the P.O.S. of A. and K. Of M.; in politics he is a Democrat.

URIAS HESS, farmer, P.O. Beach Haven, was born in Salem township, October 21, 1847, and is a son of John and Elizabeth (Harter) Hess. His paternal grandfather, Jeremiah Hess, a native of Lehigh county, Pa., was a pioneer of what is now Conyngham township, this county. He removed to Salem township in 1824, where he died at the age of eighty-two years. His wife was Catharine Fenstermacher, and by her he had eleven children, ten of whom grew to maturity: Philip, Susan (Mrs. John Fenstermacher), John, Jeremiah, Polly (Mrs. Thomas Brader), Elizabeth (Mrs. Charles Hill), Nathan, Aaron, Reuben, and Catharine (Mrs. Reuben Hill). The father of our subject was born in what is now Conyngham township, in 1820, but, with the exception of eight years, spent all his life in Salem, where he died in 1882, at the age of sixty-two. His wife was a daughter of Jacob and Rachel (Hess) Harter, of Conyngham township, and by her he had five children: Norman, Urias, Lydia C. (Mrs. Charles Harmon), Alice (Mrs. Jacob Smethers) and Lizzie (Mrs. Frank Hess). Our subject married in January, 1881, Frances, daughter of William and Martha (Stahl) Edwards, of Salem township. Mr. Hess is a member of the Reformed Church, and in politics is a Democrat. He has always resided in Salem township.

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