GI - GU Surnames

History of Luzerne County, Pa.,

by H.C. Bradsby, 1893

EDWARD J. GIBBONS, miner in the Delaware Colliery, Hudson, Plains township, was born in Ireland, August 15, 1844, and is a son of Peter and Mary (Payne) Gibbons. His father, who was a farmer, reared a family of six children, four of whom are living, of whom Edward J. is the third. He came to America in 1859, and located in Washington, D. C., where he remained till the fall of 1861, when he joined the United States Construction Corps; he remained with this branch of the army till March, 1865, when he enlisted, in Washington, in the Gulf Squadron of the United States Navy, and served till he was honorably discharged in the fall of 1867 at Port Royal, S. C. He then went to Ireland, and spent three years in the land of his birth. In 1870 he returned to America, and located in Hudson, entering the employ of the Delaware & Hudson Coal Company, where he has since remained; he has been engaged in mining for over twenty years. He built his present residence in 1885, or rather rebuilt the old residence of his wifeís people; besides his comfortable home he owns several other properties in Plains township. Mr. Gibbons was married, November 10, 1868, to Miss Maria, daughter of Austin and Sarah (Hughes) Gibbons, natives of Ireland, whence they emigrated in 1869 and located in Hudson; the fruits of this union have been eight children, on of whom is living, John P., a teacher in Laflin borough; he was educated in the Plains high school, and passed a teacherís examination before he was fourteen years of age. Mr. Gibbons and family are members of the Catholic Church; he is a member of the A. O. H. (American Board), C. M. B. A. and the G. A. R.; he is a Democrat in his political views, and has held the offices of school director and tax collector in Plains township.

JOHN GIBBS, engineer, No. 1, North Shaft, Susquehanna Coal Company, Nanticoke, was born December 2, 1832, in Monmouthshire, South Wales, the only child of Samuel Gibbs. He was reared and educated in his native land, where he learned the machinistís trade and became master of engineering, remaining there until 1854. In that year he emigrated to America and located at Pottsville, working at St. Clair, where he was engaged as hoisting engineer about one year. He then went to Wadesville, following engineering for Spenser & Co. about two years; then to Minersville, Pa., in the same capacity, for the same company, where he remained a few years when he was made master mechanic at Pine Knot Colliery, where he has remained about ten years. He then removed to Mt. Leffy, where he was engaged as contractor about one and one-half years, thence going to Jeansville where he was employed twenty years by the Spring Mountain Coal Company, during which time he never lost a day. In 1887 he came to Nanticoke, and engaged in his present position. He is a tried and trusted manipulator of the levers. In July, 1864, he enlisted in the United States service, serving three months. He was married in 1851 to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of William and Catherine (Martin) Edwards, natives of Wales. There were born to them thirteen children, only three of whom survive. Mr. Gibbs attends the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is a member of the Sons of Temperance, the I. O. O. F., and the F. & A. M. In politics he is neither troubled by party prejudices, nor guided by party zeal, but takes a purely independent position in all public problems.

WILLIAM GIBSON, outside foreman at the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Colliery, N.. 18, Wanamie, was born in Schuylkill county, Pa., January 17, 1840, and is the sixth in the family of fourteen children of Thomas and Maria (Crum) Gibson, natives of Pennsylvania. Our subject was reared and educated in Schuylkill county, and very early in life began work about the mines, doing almost everything in connection with mining, including engineering and the machinistís trade. He was soon promoted to the position of outside foreman at the Kalmia Colliery in Schuylkill county, which position he held for four years, when he moved to Shenandoah, same county, and accepted a foremanship in the Lost Creek Colliery, where he had charge for about one year. Mr. Gibson then went to Colorado, and engaged in mining there two years, at the end of which time he proceeded to Central America, where he was engaged in gold and silver mining. In that country he remained about one and one-half years, and from there traveled through various parts of South America. Returning to his native country, he was given the position of assistant mine foreman at the Keley Run Colliery, in which capacity he was employed until 1888, when he came to Wanamie, and has since had charge as outside foreman at the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Colliery, No. 18, where there are about seven hundred men employed, the daily output of coal being about fourteen hundred tons. During the Civil war, Mr. Gibson enlisted in the nine monthsí service, in Company D, One Hundred and Seventy-third P. V., under Capt. Samuel B. Greaff, and served his time, having been mostly assigned to special duty during his term of enlistment. Mr. Gibson was united in marriage, January 20, 1861, with Miss Hannah L., daughter of Philip and Eliza (Shaffer) Huber, the former a native of Germany, the latter of Pennsylvania. Mr. Gibson attends the German Reformed Church, is a member of the Royal Arcanum, and in politics is a Republican.

JAMES GILBERT, engineer, Fairview township, P. O. Mountain Top, was born October 27, 1839, in Buckinghamshire, England, and is a son of James and Sarah (Tavana) Gilbert; the father was a merchant, and a veteran of Waterloo. James, the subject of this sketch, was the eighth in a family of seventeen children. He was educated in the national schools of England, and at sixteen years of age he accepted a position with the London & Western Railroad Company, where he remained for about one and a half years, when he joined the British army, doing service in Lucklow, India, Gibraltar, Ionian Islands, in the West Indies, on the West coast of Africa, and at the insurrection in Jamaica. He was wounded, twice in Lucknow and twice in Jamaica. He left the English service on November 18, 1867, and on the 27th of the same month accepted a position from the London & Western Railroad Company, and held it until 1870, when he came to America and secured employment as stationary engineer in a rolling mill in Bolton, N. J., where he worked until February 14, 1871. He then came to Fairview township and secured work as fireman on the Ashley Planes. He was promoted to engineer on the same Planes on March 15, 1878, and has worked there steadily since, except for a few months that he spent in traveling for his health, being much benefited thereby. On September 20, 1852, Mr. Gilbert was united in marriage with Jane, daughter of William and Sarah (Collins) Franklin, both of England. Their marriage was blessed with one child, Sarah J., who is married to Richard Keemer, of Black Creek township. Mr. Gilbert was at one time ruling elder of the Fairview Presbyterian Church, but is now a member of the Episcopal Church, of Ashley. Mrs. Gilbert and daughter, Sarah J., are members of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Gilbert is a prominent member of the F. & A. M., being a master mason, and has "passed the chairs" in the I. O. O. F. In politics he is a Republican.

JOHN W. GILCHRIST, tax receiver, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Wilkes-Barre June 15, 1840, and is a son of Peter McC. and Elizabeth (Horton) Gilchrist. His paternal grandfather, John Gilchrist, a native of Scotland, spent most of his life in Charlton, Saratoga Co., N. Y., and died there. Peter McC. Gilchrist, father of subject, was a native of Charlton, N. Y., and came to this county, settling in Wilkes-Barre about 1827. He served as clerk in a store a short time, later engaged in stage business, and for thirty years was proprietor of the old "Phoenix Hotel" where the "Wyoming Valley Hotel" now stands. He died March 1, 1870. His wife was a daughter of Miller Horton, a pioneer of Wilkes-Barre, and their children were eight in number, viz.: Grizzie E. (Mrs. George N. Richard), Millen H., John W., Tom McC., Harry S., Agnes, Anna C., and Isabel M. Our subject was reared in Wilkes-Barre, where he has always resided, and was educated at Wilkes-Barre Academy, and Wyoming Seminary. On August 10, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Fifty-second P. V. I.; re-enlisted in same company and regiment in 1863, and was honorably discharged in July, 1865. After the war he engaged in the livery business in Wilkes-Barre, and later, in the hotel business, at Port Blanchard. He was chief of police of Wilkes-Barre, 1878-9; warden of county prison, from 1879 to 1882; was appointed tax collector of Wilkes-Barre in 1883, and is now serving his fourth term to end in 1895. On December 23, 1861, Mr. Gilchrist married Ruth A., daughter of Thomas C. and Abigail (Church) Reese, of Wilkes-Barre, and is the father of four children: Elizabeth (Mrs. Thomas W. Haines), Emily (deceased), William B., and John W. Mr. Gilchrist is a member of the G. A. R. and is a Knight Templar. Politically, he is a Republican.

PETER J. GILLESPIE, physician and surgeon, Avoca, was born in Pittston, Luzerne county, May 25, 1861, a son of John and Ellen (Keating) Gillespie, natives of Ireland, the former of whom came to this country in 1840, and followed the carpenterís trade. They were the parents of four children. Peter J. Gillespie was educated at Pittston High School and Jefferson Medical college, where he was graduated in the class of 1890. Immediately after he began the practice of his profession at Avoca, where he still remains. On February 4, 1891, he was united in marriage with Margaret, daughter of Thomas and Bridget (McKale) Blewitt, natives of Ireland, whence they immigrated to this country about the year 1840. Of this union there is one child, Helen, now (1892) aged ten months. Mr. and Mrs. Gillespie are members of the Catholic Church, and in politics he affiliates with the Democratic party. He was at one time school director for three years in the borough of Hughestown.

PATRICK M. GILLIGAN, general merchant, Wilkes-Barre, was born in County Sligo, Ireland, April 29, 1846, and is the son of James and Mary (Carty) Gilligan, also natives of County Sligo. The father came to America in 1822, and located in Luzerne county; was a laborer by occupation, and worked on the Catawissa and other roads. In 1841 he returned to Ireland, married there, and in 1850 came back to Wilkes-Barre, where he resided until his death, which occurred in 1886, when he was aged eighty-two years; his wife died April 15, 1887, at the age of sixty-four years. Their children were: Margaret (Mrs. Thomas Devany), Patrick M., Owen, Michael, John, James, Mary (Mrs. James McGreevy), and Winifred (Mrs. James McGuigan). Our subject was reared in Wilkes-Barre from four years of age, was educated in the public schools of Hanover township, began life in the mines, and was for eleven and one-half years engineer for the Wilkes-Barre Coal & Iron Company. In 1877 he embarked in general merchandising, in which he has since continued; he has been highly successful in speculation and dealing in real estate. In 1867 Mr. Gilligan married Mary, daughter of Thomas and Mary (Tigue) Reape, of Scranton, Pa., and has three children living: James (who is engaged with his father), John (a medical student in the University of Pennsylvania), and Frank. Mr. Gilligan is a member of the Catholic Church. In politics he is a Democrat, and served one term of three years as one of the jury commissioners of Luzerne county.

JAMES GILMORE, conductor on the Delaware & Hudson Railroad, with residence at Plains, was born in Providence, Pa., November 13, 1862, and is a son of Robert and Agnes (Noble) Gilmore, natives of Scotland, the former of whom was a stationary engineer. Robert Gilmore brought his family to America in 1851, and located first at St. Clair, Pa., and afterward lived seven years at Providence, same State, five years in New York State, and then came to Luzerne county. The family consisted of nine children, seven of whom are living, viz.: Robert, Jennet, Isabella, James, Ellen, Anna and Benjamin A. Our subject received a common-school education, and at the age of ten years began working about the mines, which he followed eight years, at the end of which time he began working as brakeman on the Delaware & Hudson Railroad, and has held his present position since 1887,. Mr. Gilmore was married, June 16, 1888, to Miss Rhoda, daughter of Daniel and Mary (Davis), Howell, natives of South Wales, and the fruit of this union has been one child, Alice. The Howells emigrated to Schuylkill county, Pa., and later in 1887 moved to Luzerne county: the family consisted of ten children, four of whom are living, viz.: Elizabeth, Dinah, Rhoda and Rachel. Mr. Gilmore is a member of the P. O. S. of A., and in his political views is a Republican.

John GILMORE, farmer. Bear Creek township, P.O., Miners Mills, is a son of James and Ann (RILEY) Gilmore, both natives of Ireland, where John was born June 15, 1843. He worked on his father's farm until he was twenty-two years old, and then came to this country. He secured employment in the mines in Ashland, Schuylkill Co., PA, where he worked as a miner two years; leaving Ashland, he came to Plains township, this county, entering the mines again for the Delaware & Hudson Coal Company, where by close application to his work, he was soon considered one of the company's most trusted employees. He worked for the above company for about twelve years, during most of which time was engaged as a contractor, driving tunnels, etc. Mr. Gilmore then engaged with Waddell & Co. to sink a shaft, which he did a a highly satisfactory manner. After finishing his contract with Mr. Waddell, in 1882, he purchased a farm of 125 acres in Bear Creek township, most of which he has under cultivation; and he has replaced the old log hut and barn by buildings of more modern appearance. On January 12, 1869, Mr. Gilmore married Bridget COFFEE, a native o this State, of Irish descent, and their union was blessed with four children, three of whom are dead. John, the eldest child, is still with his parents on the farm. The family are all members of the Roman Catholic Church; in politics, Mr. Gilmore is a Democrat.

M. F. GILROY, merchant tailor, Pittston. This gentleman, one of Pittston's most prosperous young business men, was born in Pittston, PA., July 20, 1860, and is a son of Martin and Mary (LOFTUS) Gilroy, natives of Ireland, who were married at Syracuse, N.Y. During his residence in the old country, the father of our subject, follow agricultural pursuits, but after coming to the United States he was engaged in the salt works of Syracuse, N.Y., where he remained many years. About 1858 he came to Pittston, and was engaged in coal mining up to the time of his death. He had a family of nine children, viz.: Patrick, a carpenter residing in Pittston; John, a carpenter, of Pittston; M. F.; James, a plumber, of Cleveland, Ohio; Mary, residing in Pittston; and Kate and Annie, both deceased. Our subject passed his boyhood in Pittston, and had the advantage of a limited public school education. At the age of twelve he began working in the Old Tompkins Coal Breaker, being employed there for one year, and then became a driver boy in the mines, which occupation he followed until the age of seventeen, when he began working as a laborer in the mines, continuing at that occupation until1883. He then entered the merchant tailoring establishment of U. GREEN, at Pittston, and there began to learn the trade of cutter. For one year he was with Mr. Green, and then entered the employ of Mr. STEVENS, of Wilkes-Barre, with whom he remained until 1885, when he returned to Pittston and opened a merchant tailoring establishment for his own account, in a room of the James H. Craig building on South Main Street. He continued in this room for about eighteen months, and then removed to his present quarters at No. 35, South Main street. Although Mr. Gilroy has been in business here but a short time, he has built up a very large trade, and the superior work which he sends out is constantly increasing his business. He is located in comfortable quarters in the central portion of the city, and has shelves amply stocked with an elegant line of suitings of every variety. He employs the best workmen that money can secure, and uses every endeavor to please his customers. The fact that his trade is so large that it necessitates the employing of twenty workmen, shows that he is meeting with a large patronage is v very successful. Mr. Gilroy was untied in marriage February 2, 1887, with Kate E. CUMMINGS, a daughter of Patrick Cummings, a retired gentleman of Pittston. This union has been blessed with three children, viz.: Joseph, Mary and Robert. Mr. Gilroy and family are members of St. John's Catholic Church. He is a member of the Father Mathew Temperance and Benevolent Society of Pittston; politically he is identified with the Democratic party. Mr. Gilroy has been eminently successful in his business venture in Pittston, and owes his success to his straight-forward and honest business methods, and he has secured an enviable position among the substantial citizens of his native city.

Monroe GIRTON, blacksmith, West Nanticoke, was born in Columbia county, PA, July 14, 1862, and is a son of Cornelius and Rosanna (HESS) Girton, natives of Pennsylvania. He is the second in a family of four children - two boys and two girls. Our subject was reared and educated in Luzerne county, and learned the blacksmith trade at Benton, Columbia county, where he worked three years. He then went to Hunlock Creek, where he worked at this trade a short time, after which he proceeded to Dakota, where he engaged at his trade about six months, and then returned to Hunlock Creek, and opened a shop for his own account, working five years. He then went to Central, where he worked a short time, and in 1889 he came to West Nanticoke, and here he has since been engaged at his trade. On March 23, 1887, Mr. Girton married Anna, daughter of William and Mary (VARNER) SHULTZ, of Nanticoke, PA., and three children have been born to them: Flossie I., Lillie, and Daniel H. Our subject is a member of the Jr. O.U.A.M. and in politics is a Democrat.

Patrick F. GLENNON (deceased) was born in County Roscommon, Ireland, and received his education in the Irish national schools. He came to the United State in 1845, and settled in Lowell, MA., where in June, 1848, he married Catherine E., daughter of John and Mary (EARLY) LOFTUS, native of County Mayo, Ireland. Mr. Glennon and his wife came to this county in 1851, settling in Pittston, where he worked as a miner. He was killed in the mine November 3, 1871. Mr. And Mrs. Glennon reared a family of five children, namely: Mary E., born November 9, 1850, was married on November 12, 1872, to Edward J. GIBBONS, breaker foreman, Port Griffith; Joseph H., born January 26, 1855; Theodolph J., born September 9, 1859 (he received his education in the common schools, and went to work when eight years of age, picking slate at the mine; in 1870, he worked as a driver, in 1874 as a laborer, and in 1879, as a miner, at which he stayed until 1883, when he was appointed deputy recorder of deeds, which office he held until 1887, when he was appointed to the position he still holds, that of collector for the firm of Hughes & Glennon, of Pittston. In politics he is a Democrat, and holds the office of school director; he is a member of the A.O.H., and president of the division to which he belongs); David, born April 11, 1863, principal of the Port Griffith public schools; and, Agnes V., born November 3, 1867, a teacher. The family are members of the Roman Catholic Church.

Jacob GOELTZ, foreman in the Empire Coal Yards, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Annweiler, Bavaria, Germany, December 3, 1840, a son of Christian and Elizabeth (SCHNEHELE) Goeltz. His father came to America in 1841, locating in Wilkes-Barre, where he worked as a laborer, later becoming a merchant, and died there in 1870. His children were Sybille (Mrs. Christian BAKER), and Jacob (our subject), who was reared in Germany until fourteen years of age. He then came to America, and spent one year in Sparta, Wisconsin. Afterward he resided in Wilkes-Barre three years, at the end of which time he went to Kansas, remaining there two and a half years. In 1860 he returned to Wilkes-Barre, and in April, 1861, enlisted in Company G, Eighth P.V. serving three months and eight days, and was honorably discharged at Harrisburg, Pa. On August 14, 1861, he re-enlisted at Harrisburg, as a member of Company A, First Battalion Twelfth U.S. Infantry, and served three years, when he was honorably discharged. Returning to Wilkes-Barre, he has here since been in the employ of the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company. Mr. Goeltz married, October 15, 1864, Caroline, daughter of John RUHS, of Wilkes-Barre, and by her had three children: Kate, Isabel, and Jacob A. (deceased). His second wife was Elizabeth, daughter of Daniel LANDMESSER, of Wilkes-Barre, by which union there are three children: Daniel, Helena, and Louisa. Mr. Goeltz, is a member of the German Lutheran Church, and of the G.A.R.; in politics he is a Republican.

Warren F. GOFF, lumberman, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Monroe township, Braford Co., PA., April 7, 1835, and is a son of William and Anna (DECKER) Goff. His paternal grandfather, William Goff, a native of Connecticut, was one of the pioneers of Bradford county, where he cleared and improved a farm in Monroe township, and there died. His maternal grandfather, Decker, was one of the first surveyors in Bradford county, where he died in the early part of the present century. The father of subject was born and reared in Bradford county, and is now a resident of Canal Dover, Ohio. Warren F. Goff was reared in Bradford County, received a common-school education, and in early manhood engaged in farming. In 1863 he located in New York City, where for three years he was a contractor on sewer buildings. He then spent three years in Wyoming County, engaged in lumbering and general merchandise. In 1869 he located in Wilkes-Barre, and has since been the junior member of the lumber firm of Sturdevant & Goff. On February 7, 1866, Mr. Goff married Harriet M., daughter of Levesius D. and Ada (MORLEY) STURDEVANT, of Braintrim township, Wyoming Co., PA., and he has one son, William S. Mr. Goff is a member of the Central M.E. Church of Wilkes-Barre; politically he is a Democrat, and is now serving his second term as councilman of the Fifteenth Ward.

A.J. GOOD, farmer, P.O. Carverton, was born in Pittston township, October 9, 1834. He is a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (IRWIN) Good, the former of whom was born in Northhampton county, PA., the latter in New York. Samuel's father was a native of Germany, but served in the army of his adopted country during the Revolutionary struggle, proving himself a good soldier and a loyal citizen. After he returned to a life of peace he located across the river from Wyoming, where he resided for a number of years. He was a worthy man of good moral principles which he practiced during his entire life. His family consisted of seven children, all of whom are deceased. Samuel Good, son of this old pioneer, began his business career as an agriculturist in Pittston township, where he owned a large farm which he worked with perfect skill, for he was a practical farmer. He was also a man of influence, who took an active part in all political gatherings; during his lifetime he held several township offices. Of a family of ten children, nine of whom grew to maturity, four now (1892) living. A.J. is the sixth in the family in order of birth, and was reared and educated in Kingston township. In his early life he worked some at the carpenter's trade, but is, by choice and the force of circumstances, a farmer of no small experience. Like most boys, his life was uneventful until he reached the age of twenty-five, when he fell in love with and married in 1860, Miss Lucinda, daughter of Conrad and Sarah SAX. To this happy couple were born six children, two of whom are living; Carrie and Belle. Carrie married J.J. HOWELL, a farmer; Belle is unmarried. Mrs. Good was born in Pittstown township in 1841. Mr. Good has been living on his present farm of ninety-five acres for over fifty years, and has retained the good name he inherited from his ancestors. He is a genial man, full of dry and harmless jokes, the "cracking" of which he hugely enjoys. He purchased the property after his father's death; he bought out the heirs and kept on beautifying and embellishing the farm until it has reached its present state of perfection. He has held all the township offices except justice of the peace, and that he refused. He is a member of the F.& A.M., P.H. and I.O.R.M. He is also, in company with his wife, a member in good standing in the M.E. Church of Carverton. Politically, he is an old-time Jacksonian Democrat.

Charles GOOD, merchant and postmaster, Waterton, was born July 10, 1832, in Plains township, this county, a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (COURTRIGHT) Good, natives of Pennsylvania, of German and English origin, the former of whom, a farmer by occupation, died July 18, 1881, aged ninety years. Our subject is the second in a family of seven children, four of whom are now living. He was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and at the age of twenty began life for himself in the lumber business in Clinton county, where he remained two years. He then worked for Good & Davenport, in a general store at Shickshinny, for two years, after which he located on the Pennsylvania Canal, three years, when he embarked in mercantile business for himself at Shickshinny, continuing therein about two years. He then took a trip to California on business, and after a year returned and rented a farm at Town Line, where he carried on agriculture two years. He then moved to Fairmount Springs, thence to Waterton, renting a farm until 1882, when he purchased the property. It contains 200 acres, and is situated on Huntington creek, two and one-half miles below Huntington Mills. Mr. Good opened his store at Waterton in 1889, and was appointed postmaster same year. He married March 19, 1857, to Adelaide, daughter of Stephen and Elizabeth (TUBBS) DAVENPORT, which union is blessed with seven children, viz: Annie, David P., Ira S., Harriy E., Albert R., Luella E. and Jennie A. Mr. Good has been supervisor three years, assessor four years, and school director one term. Socially he is a popular man in his township and politically he is a good Democrat.

Franklin H. GOOD, farmer, P.O. Hobbie, was born in Hobbie, Hollenback township, August 30, 1862, a son of Peter H. and Catherine (FENSTERMACHER) Good, both of whom were born in this county. Peter H. is a son of Anthony Good, of German descent, who had been an early resident of the county, having located in Hollenback township, where he was known as a thrifty, honest and upright man. He lived an uneventful life and died at an advanced age. His son, Peter H., began his active business life in Hollenback township, where he learned the carpenters' trade, at which he has worked for a number of years. At one period of his life he kept hotel at Hobbie, and was a favorite landlord who catered well to the wants of his customers. In 1868 he removed to Dorrance township, on a farm of 150 acres, seventy-five of which he sold to Wilson MOYER, the rest being owned by his son Franklin H. Peter H. has held several offices in the township with credit to his official abilities. His family consisted of four children, all of whom are living, Franklin H. being the third by birth. Our subject was reared and educated in Dorrance township, and has always been a resident of the county. On June 1, 1889, he married Miss Rebecca BALLIET, who was born in Dorrance township in 1870, a daughter of Johan and Sarah Balliet, and to this union were born two children: Foster F. and Carrie V. Mr. Good followed lumbering in former years, but latterly has confined himself to farming exclusively. He is a worthy young man, enjoying the respect and confidence of his neighbors. He and his wife are members of the Reformed Church and politically he is a Democrat.

James GOOD, stable-boss, Jeansville, was born in Carbon county, PA., July 19, 1837, as is the fourth in the family of five children of Abraham and Ann (WINTERSTEEN) Good, also natives of Carbon county. James, the subject of this sketch, was reared partly in Carbon and partly in Luzerne county, and until 1857 followed the vocation of a farmer. In that year he went to White Haven, PA., and worked in a foundry until 1858, when he engaged in the lumber business. In 1859 he removed to Buck Mountain, where he secured a position as stable-boss for Pewter Ferguson & Co., which he held nine years, afterward taking the position of ticket-boss which he filled two years. In 1868 he came to Jeansville and worked as a carpenter; then became stable-boss for J.C. Hayden & Co., which position he now holds. Mr. Good was united in marriage, September 27, 1857, with Miss Mary, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth FUGE, of Nescopeck, PA., and fourteen children have been born to this union, but seven of whom are now living, namely: Edgar O., Truman L., Lillian M., Carrie S., Ollie, John L. and James. In political matters our subject is identified with the Prohibition party, and he is a strong advocate of temperance. He is a member of the Sons of Temperance and O.U.A.M. The family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church.

John J.K. GOODE, engineer at the Terra-cotta Works, Wyoming borough, was born in Coventry, England, November 10, 1845. He is a son of Thomas and Ann (CAPP) Goode, natives of England, who reared a family of fourteen children, six now living. Our subject was the fifth in order of birth; he was educated in the common schools, and began work at the age of twelve in the manufacture of silk, following the same for five years. He then learned the milling business, which he followed for eleven years, when he came to America and worked for the Wilkes-Barre Coal & Iron Company, at Wanamie, for seven years, as engineer; then for John Brown at the Stone Gristmill, of Pittston, for seven moths; then one year for the Lehigh Coal Company, when he accepted his present position. Mr. Good was married December 25, 1868 to Miss Letitia A., daughter of Thomas and Clara (HEMS) HALFPENNY, natives of England. This union was blessed with then children, viz.,: Thomas W., born May 23, 1869; Harry C., born July 22, 1871; Clara A., born September 29, 1873; Harriet L., born April 12, 1876; Emma, born September 10, 1878; George F., born May 17, 1881; John, born October 3, 1883, died November 3, 1883; William O., born October 25, 1884; Scott S., born May 31, 1887, and Florence L., born February 15, 1890. Mr. Good is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and elder in same, and assistant superintendent of the Sunday School; he is a member of the I.O.O.F. and K. of P., and is independent in his political views.; he devotes his entire time to his work and his family.

Edwin GOSS, teamster for Miner & Co., Mineers Mills, was born in Wiltshire, England, January 26, 1856, and is a son of John and Elizabeth (PALMER) GOSS. In their family there are six sons, two of whom are in England, two in Kansas, and two in Luzerne county, Pa. Our subject, who is the fourth, came to America in August, 1872, and for five years labored in the mines of Luzerne county. He then returned to England, where he worked on the railroad and in paint and fuel works for four years, at the end of which time he again came to Plains, and labored in the mines four years. He next engaged with his brothers in the grocery and dry goods business at Plains, and after one year in the same business with John WILTON, with whom he remained five years; and then embarked in his present business. Mr. GOSS was married September 11, 1880, to Miss Elizabeth, the daughter of Charles STEER, of England, who was a soldier in the Crimean war. This happy union has been blessed with three children, viz.: Winnifred, born August 17, 1881; Robert C., born January 11, 1884; and Arthur, born October 14, 1891, and died November 22, same year. Our subject is a member of the Sons of St. George; politically he is in sympathy with the Republican party, but votes for the best candidate and the soundest principles.

Nathaniel GOSS (deceased) was born March 29, 1817, in Huntington township, this county, a son of Nathaniel and Thankful (FORBS) GOSS. He was the sixth in a family of twelve children, was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and learned the miller's trade with his father. When twenty-two years of age he began farming, which he followed up to the time of his death, Marth 5, 1887. In 1833 he was married to Miss Lucy FULLER, who bore him two children and died in July, 1859. He was afterward married July 15, 1875, to Mrs. Harriet L. BARRETT, daughter of Andrus and Sallie (SMITH) FELLOWS, natives of Pennsylvania, of English and German origin respectively. She is the youngest in a family of ten children, was reared on a farm, and February 10, 1856, married Dr. William E. BARRETT, by whom she had six children living, viz.: Oliver W., John C. (a furniture dealer in Cambra) and Sarah M. (Mrs. Dr. P. L. HARTMAN), of Jamison City, Columbia Co., Pa. Dr. BARRETT died April 15, 1878. Mrs. GOSS has full charge of her large farm, situated one quarter of a mile from the Cambra postoffice, being the farm of her father, and on it is the house she was born in. Both her grandfathers were Revolutionary soldiers. She is a member of the M. E. Church.

Orlando GOSS, retired, P. O. Kunckle, was born in Huntington township, December 10, 1825, a son of Nathaniel and Thankful (FORBS) GOSS, the former born in Huntington township, the latter in Connecticut. Nathaniel was a son of Nathaniel GOSS, who came from Connecticut prior to the Revolutionary war, and lived in a block house, the only one left standing by the Indians and Tories. He fled from there before the Wyoming Massacre, just in time to save himself and family from the persecutions of their enemies. He was one of the earliest, if not the earliest, settler in Huntington; was an extensive farmer in those early days, considering they lacked so many facilities we now enjoy, and lived to be sixty years of age. His family consisted of three sons and two daughters. Nathaniel, his son, took charge of the old homestead in Huntington township, containing 150 acres of land, where he built a gristmill which he operated several years. He was a man of influence and worth in his township and county, and was favored with many offices of trust and responsibility, being a member of the "Partition Committee" when the county was divided. He was an expert hunter and loved the chase; he died in 1853, at the age of sixty-seven years. There were twelve children born to him, eleven of whom came to maturity, Orlando being the tenth in the family. Our subject was educated in Huntington township at the common school, and in early life he learned the carpenter trade, which he followed for a number of years. In 1861 Mr. GOSS married Miss Ellen, daughter of Jacob and Grace FISHER, and by her had one son, Hershal, who died in 1885, the mother haveing preceded him to the grave, June 1, 1876. Mr. GOSS is now alone, and is retired from active life. He owns seventy-five acres in this county and 200 in Columbia county, besides other small parcels of land. He is honest, generous, and liberal of his means, which are ample. He built a hall for the Kunckle Grangers, they furnishing the material. He owns the county right of "White's Driving and Farm Gate," a superior piece of mechanism. Mr. GOSS has held several town offices with credit, and is esteemed for his excellent worth.

John W. GRAAF. This well-known and popular landlord of the "Pottsville House," Hazelton, is a native of Hamburg, Germany, and was born June 7, 1846. He was reared and educated in the land of his birth, and served one year in the German navy as a marine engineer, during the Franco-Prussian war. At the age of twenty-five he departed from the land of his birth, and made his way to the more liberal one of the free, where every footstep of his has been crowned with success. He worked in a machine shop in Pottsville, until 1882, when he removed to Hazleton and took charge of the celebrated hotel known as the "Pottsville House," unexcelled for its excellence of famous brands of liquors, choice cigars and well-regulated facilities for boarding. Mr. GRAAF was united in marriage in 1869, with Miss Elsie MUHL, an accomplished young lady, also a native of Hamburg, Germany. This happy union has been blessed with one child, Helena.

John GRADY, postmaster, and assistant superintendent, Prudential Insurance Company, P. O. Port Blanchard, was born August 25, 1842, in Lockport, N. Y., and is a son of William and Catherine (CAIN) GRADY, natives of County Mayo, Ireland, who reared a family of sixteen children, of whom John is fourth in order of birth. Our subject was educated in the common school, and in 1854 went to work as a driver in the mines, which occupation he followed until 1858, when he became a miner, and so worked until April 17, 1861, when he enlisted in Company A, Thirty-first New York Volunteers, being the first man to volunteer from Pittston, after the outbreak of the Civil war. Almost immediately afterward he was sent to the front, and took part in the following battles: First Bull Run, West Point and Gaines' Mills, where he was shot in the left leg and taken prisoner by the Confederates. On being returned to his regiment, after recovering from his wound, he fought in the battles of Cranton's Gap, Antietum, and at Mary's Heights, during the battle of Fredericksburg, where he was again wounded, this time in the right leg above the ankle. After his recovery he returned to Pittston, in September, 1863, where he stayed until March of the following year, at which time he went to Susquehanna county, where he worked on a farm until some time in 1866, when he came to Port Griffith, this county, and here worked for the Pennsylvania Coal Company as a miner until January, 1880, when he was elected road supervisor of the township. On May 9, 1889, he was appointed postmaster by President Harrison, and in May, 1891, he went into the insurance business; he is now assistant superintendent of the Prudential Insurance Company. Mr. GRADY was united in marriage January 15, 1867, with Sarah, daughter of Henry and Ann (RILEY) GIBBONS, natives of County Mayo, Ireland, and their union was blessed with the following children: Kate, born October 18, 1868; Mary, born July 27, 1870; William H. born November 20, 1871; Edward J., born June 17, 1873; John J., born May 18, 1875, and Thomas F., born January 27, 1878. Mr. GRADY is a Roman Catholic in religion, and in politics is a Republican. In 1876 he was elected school director for three years, and in 1878, tax collector, which office he held until 1882.

James GRAY, fire-boss in the Pine Ridge Mine, Miners Mills, was born in the county of Durham, England, June 20, 1853, and is a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (BROWN) GRAY. The father, who was a miner, came, in 1869, to America, along with his brother Matthew, followed by the rest of the family three months later, and located in Ashland, where he engaged in mining; the family consisted of four children, viz.: Peter, Matthew, James and Elizabeth (Mrs. Isaac DAVENPORT). Our subject received a common-school education, and began life working about the mines, which occupation he has always followed. He was married, December 18, 1878, to Miss Anna, daughter of Lewis LEWIS, of Miners Mills, and they have four children, viz.: Joseph, Howard, Elizabeth and Ada. Mr. and Mrs. GRAY are members of the Presbyterian Church, of which he is a deacon and trustee; he is a member of the Sons of St. George, and in political preferences is a Prohibitionist

Peter GRAY, brattice-man in the Delaware Shaft, Hudson, Plains township, was born in the County of Durham, England, June 5, 1842, and is a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (BROWN) GRAY. The father, who was a miner, came to America in 1871, and located in Miners Mills, this county, where he died in 1884 at the age of seventy-three years; the mother is still living at the age of seventy-eight years. The family consists of five children, viz.: Peter; Ellen, married to Edward WALTON, a miner in Australia; Matthew, mine-boss at Olyphant, Pa.; James, fire-boss in the Pine Ridge Shaft; and Elizabeth, married to Isaac DAVENPORT, miner in the Keystone Shaft. Our subject, who had been a miner, and for five years a fire-boss in England, came to America in 1879, and located in Miners Mills, this county, where he worked at Company work till 1882, when he was promoted to fire-boss, a position he held for ten years, during which time he never had a man hurt, or received any injury himself. Mr. Gray married, for his first wife, Miss Margaret STARK, daughter of Anthony and Dorothy STARK, the fruits of which union were twelve children, of whom are living Anthony, Polly (Mrs. Harry MC CLOSKEY), Dorothy B. (Mrs. Thomas BELL), Nicholas T., Peter, James E. and Margaret E.; one son named Matthew was killed in the mines at the age of twelve years. The mother of this family died and Mr. GRAY married, for his second wife, Mrs. Senia M. JOHNSON, daughter of John KENSON, a native of Denmark, and widow of Peter JOHNSON, by whom she had one child, Caroline (Mrs. Charles CURRY). Mr. and Mrs. GRAY have one child, Matthew. Our subject and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church; he is a licensed local preacher of more than ordinary ability, and has preached for over twenty years in England and America in some of the best churches. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and in his political views is a Prohibitionist.

William GRAY, farmer, P. O. Silkworth, was born July 14, 1825, and reared and educated in Kingston township. He is the son of James and Elizabeth (DYER) GRAY; the former born in Massachusetts, the latter in Connecticut. They were married in the East, and removed from there to this county about 1808, locating near Wyoming. James was a miller by occupation, and worked at that most of his lifetime. He removed from Wyoming to Carverton, where he followed milling. Several years later he removed to Dymond Hollow, and after a few years' labor there, ceased work, his health being very poor. His death was finally caused by rapid consumption when he was seventy-five years of age. He was a good mechanic in his day, and a man highly esteemed by his fellows. His family comprised twelve children, ten of whom grew to maturity. Two of this number are living: Samuel and William, the latter being the ninth in the family. The subject of our sketch always followed agricultural pursuits, to which he seems thoroughly adapted, and began his active life in Kingston on a farm which he worked on shares. However, he soon removed toDallas township, where he farmed for a few years; then removed to Lake township and bought some property. He finally sold out, removing to Lehman township, where he now resides. His farm comprises twenty-five acres of land, and the many improvements made on his property prove him to be a practical farmer. Mr. GRAY, in 1848, married Miss Jane, daughter of Jonathan and Cindy HUGHSTEAD, and of this union were born two children. One of these children, Horace J., is now living. He married Miss Nora, daughter of Frank HOMEL, and by her had five children, viz.: Emma J., Mary S., Lulu M., William F. and Arthur. Mrs. James GRAY died July 14, 1891, at the age of sixty years. Mr. GRAY is a consistent member of the Baptist Church.

George F. GREBEY, Sr., locomotive engineer, Hazleton. This pioneer railroad man was born at Iba, Germany, September 22, 1836, and is the eldest in a family of ten children born to Frederick W. and Anna C. (BERGE) GREBEY, also natives of Germany; they came to America in 1848, settling at Hazleton, Pa., where the children were reared and educated. Our subject began life as a driver in the mines, following this for three years. In 1856, when railroading was in its primitive state, when the rails were made of wood, protected by strap-iron, our subject began railroading, on the road then operated by A. Pardee & Co., at that time known as the Hazleton Railroad. He worked as brakeman until 1858, when he began firing; after two years' service in this capacity he was, in 1860, promoted to engineer, running on the Hazleton division. He ran here until August, 1863, when, in response to his country's call, he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Ninety-eighth Pennsylvania Reserves, under command of Col. SICKELS. He served one year and ten months, participating in most of the battles fought by the army of the Potomac. After the expiration of his first enlistment he re-enlisted in the same company and served until the close of the war, being mustered out June 9, 1865, at Philadelphia. After returning from the war Mr. GREBEY again mounted the foot-board, and has been on all the divisions of the Lehigh Valley Railroad between Elmira and New York City. He has pulled passenger, freight and coal trains, and has in all his experience been in but one wreck. Mr. GREBEY was united in marriage, August 19, 1860, with Miss Martha, daughter of August and Elizabeth (SHUGARD) WALPER, natives of Hazleton, and eight children have been born to this union, namely: Sophia, Cassie (deceased), George, Margaret, John, Annie, William and Henry. Mr. GREBEY is a member of the following orders: Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, I. O. O. F. and Hari Gari, which admits those of German birth only. The family attends the German Reformed Church.

James D. GREEN, retired merchant, Wyoming borough, was born in Benton township, Luzerne Co., Pa., April 26, 1834, and is a son of Hiram and Eliza (DEAN) GREEN, natives of Pennsylvania, and of English origin, who reared a family of nine children, three of whom are now living. Our subject, who is the fourth in order of birth, was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools and high school of Waverly, Lackawanna county, and began life as clerk in a general store at Lynn, Susquehanna county, where he continued eight months. He then clerked at Waverly one year, at the end of which time he came to Wyoming and engaged with SWETLAND & PETTEBONE, remaining with them four months. In August, 1855, he began work for Thomas F. ATHERTON, and continued with him until 1859, when S. J. SHARPS and he purchased the stock, and as equal partners, conducted the concern for one year. Then S. J. SHARPS sold his interest to John SHARPS, who, with Mr. GREEN, carried on the business six years, when Mr. SHARPS sold his interest to Mr. GREEN, who continued the business till 1878. He then sold out his stock to William HANCOCK, after which he and W. D. GREEN, a brother, carried on a store for a few years, and then sold to H. P. and W. S. JACOBS. Mr. GREEN then engaged with the Pittston Engineer Machine Company as treasurer, with whom he mremained till 1891, when he retired. On October 31, 1861, he was married to Miss Fannie, daughter of Jesse B. and Jane (BREESE) SCHOOLEY, which union was blessed with one child, Clara E., who was married to H. M. IVES, clerk in a bank at Scranton. Mrs. GREEN died July 12, 1867, and Mr. GREEN married, October 15, 1868, Martha, daughter of John and Mary (STARK) SEARL, by which union there is one child, Mary S. Mrs. GREEN is a member of the Episcopal Church of Pittston. Mr. GREEN, in his political preferences, is in sympathy with the Republican party.

James P. GREEN, engineer at the Old Slope, Plains, was born in Scott township, Lackawanna Co., Pa., June 12, 1850, and is a son of John B. and Elizabeth (CISCO) GREEN, natives of New York, and of English and German origin respectively. The father came to Luzerne county about 1845, and worked at the carpenter's trade. He reared a family of two children, of whom James P. is the elder. Our subject obtained a common school education, and at the age of sixteen went to work at the carpenter's trade, which he followed about six months, when he began working around the machinery at the mine. In 1877 he became an engineer, and has since worked in that capacity for various companies at Plains. Mr. GREEN was married, August 16, 1875, to Effie E., daughter of Sylvanus and Huldah J. (CRANDALL) WESTEGATE, of Susquehanna county, Pa., and they have five children, viz.: Robert A., Huldah J., Elizabeth, Mary B. and Fred. Mr. and Mrs. GREEN are members of the Free-Will Baptist Church; he is a member of the P. O. S. of A., and in politics is a Republican.

John D. GREEN, treasurer and general manager of the superior Stove Company, Pittston. This gentleman, who stands well toward the front among Pittston's business men, was born in Scranton, Pa., July 1, 1850, a son of Alfred and Laura (Moore) Green, the former a native of Somersetshire, England, the latter of Dutchess county, New York. The father came to the United States in 1845, and located in Scranton, where he occupied the position of mine superintendent for many years. The parents are both living, residing in Scranton. They had a family of four children of whom John D. and one sister, Belle, are the only ones now living. Our subject was educated in the public schools of Scranton, and at the Wyoming Seminary. Leaving school in 1869, he engaged in the drug business at Scranton for two years, and then entered the office of Henry O. Silkman, stove manufacturer, of Scranton, as bookkeeper, in which capacity he served four years; then, in 1873, came to Pittston and entered the office of the Pittston Stove Company, as bookkeeper. In 1875 he was promoted to treasurer and general manager of that large manufacturing establishment being also a heavy stockholder in the company. In 1890 Mr. Green was largely instrumental in organizing a company for manufacturing stoves, the plant to be located in Superior, Wis. This company secured large land interests in that thriving city, and erected a plant there, the main portion being 387x75 feet, with an "L" 40x60 feet. This he filled with new and improved machinery, which will give them a capacity for manufacturing 15,000 stoves and ranges yearly, and working a force of 225 men. Mr. Green will assume the office of treasurer and general manager of this company, of which he is a heavy stockholder. He was married November 8, 1872, to Hattie A. Jones, a daughter of George K. Jones, a prominent merchant of Carbondale, Pa., and this union has been blessed with four children; Nellie, Hattie, Fannie and Natalie. The family worship a the Episcopal Church, West Pittston. He is a member and past master of Valley Lodge No. 499 F. & A. M., past high priest of Pittston Chapter No. 442, past eminent commander of Wyoming Valley Commandery No. 57, and first lieutenant commanding Keystone Consistory Scottish Rites, and is a member of the Mystic Shrine. Politically, he is identified with the Republican party.

W. H. GREEN, of the firm of Herrman & Green, merchants, Hazleton, was born at Scranton, Pa., October 5, 1862, a son of Simon Green, a native of Germany. Our subject was educated in the public schools of Scranton, and at the age of seventeen began working in an insurance office in the city of his birth, as bookkeeper and corresponding secretary. After remaining there about one and a half years he engaged in the gent's furnishings business as clerk, at Scranton, where he remained three years; then went to Tamaqua and clerked in a clothing house two years. He then accepted a position as manager of a store at Langford, Pa., remaining there until 1887, when he came to hazleton and engaged in the mercantile business with Mr. S. M. Herrman. This house in one of the largest and most prosperous in the city, and it may well be, for these young men are all enterprise and push. Mr. Green is a Democrat in his political proclivities.

Abraham L. GREENBURG, one of the leading and prominent dealers in general merchandise in Wilkes-Barre, was born in the Province of Groningen, Holland, May 23, 1847, a son of Leonard and Minnie (Waarburg) Greenburg, the latter a native of Oldenburg, Germany. Our subject was reared in his native country, where he received a high-school education, and in the fall of 1866 came to America, residing four years at Dunnings, Luzerne (now Lackawanna) county, Pa., where he was employed in a tannery. In 1870 he settled in Wilkes-Barre, embarking in the grocery business on a small scale, but in 1879 he engaged in general merchandising, in which he has successfully continued, carrying one of the largest stocks of goods in the city. He has accumulated a large property, both in Luzerne and Wyoming counties. Mr. Greenburg was married, December 24, 1872, to Sarah, daughter of Norman and Rose (Jacobs) Greenburg, of Germany, and by her has four children; Leonard, Harry, Louis and Seigfried. Mrs. Greenburg died July 12, 1891. Mr. Greenburg is a member of the Reformed Jewish Temple, Free Sons of Israel, Kascher Shel Bassal, and in politics is a Republican.

C. D. GREGORY, a miller, Dallas, was born in Union township, this county, August 16, 1857, a son of Benjamin and Emma (Muchler) Gregory, both of whom were born in Luzerne county. Benjamin Gregory is a son of Peter Gregory, who came to this county in its early settlement, locating in Union township, where he always afterward resided. His son, Benjamin, began life in his native town as a merchant, at which he continued for about twenty years, at the expiration of which he turned his attention to horticultural pursuits, at which he is yet engaged. He is a man of influence in his town, and has held most of its public offices, among them secretary of the school board. He reared a family of seven children, all of whom are now living, C. D. being the fifth. Our subject received his first training in the common school of his native town, and afterward in the Columbus Academy, finishing at the Kingston Seminary. In early life he confined himself to bookkeeping, at which he continued up to 1885, when he went into mercantile business at Centre Moreland, Wyoming county. In 1888 he removed to Dallas, where he erected an extensive steam gristmill, suitable for chop purposes, with a capacity of 800 bushels per day, and put in a 40- horse-power engine the same year. On the completion of the mill, he associated with him, as a business partner, C. H. Heitsman, and they are now doing a thriving business. At the age of twenty-five Mr. Gregory married Miss L. J., daughter of Rev. George and Ruth Winters, the former of whom was a Baptist minister, and by her he had five children, three of whom are living, viz.: Claude, Ruth and Laura. Mrs. C. D. Gregory was born in Centre Moreland, Wyoming county, in 1860. Our subject is a worthy citizen, held in great esteem in the community. He and his wife are members of the Baptist Church, in good standing.

Jacob GREGORY, farmer, P. O. Prichard, was born in Union township, February 24, 1821, a son of George and Amy (Roberts) Gregory, the former born in Berks county, Pa., the latter in Connecticut. They were farmers and people of respectability. George was a son of Peter Gregory, who was also a native of Berks county, and at a very early day removed to this county. He located near Shickshinny, where he purchased 400 acres of land on which he built the first gristmill in the township. He was a thorough-going business man a good practical farmer, and held several township offices. His son George began his business life on the old homestead, and followed in the footsteps of his father. He owned 228 acres of land, and, like his honored parents, was a practical agriculturist and a far-seeing business man. In conjunction with his farm he owned and operated the mill his father had built. Politically he was a Federalist. He died at the age of fifty-six years, having reared a family of ten children, all of whom grew to maturity and five of them are now living, Jacob being the youngest son and the seventh child in order of birth. Our subject was educated in Union township at the common schools. He Is a general and practical farmer and has always followed agriculture, beginning his active live on the old homestead, part of which he owned and on which he lived until 1872, when he removed to Hunlock township, onto a farm of eighty- seven acres. In 1841 Mr. Gregory married Miss Ellen, daughter of Joseph and Ann Moore, and to them were born six children, live of whom are yet living: Chester, Charlotte, Charles, Luella and Manemia. Mrs. Ellen Gregory was born in Union township, December 13, 1821. Mr. Gregory is a worthy citizen, and has been appointed to some township offices of trust which he has filled with credit to himself and satisfaction of his constituents.

William N. GREGORY, jeweler, Nanticoke, was born in Muhlenburg, Luzerne county, April 27, 1856, son of Nelson and Sybol (Monroe) Gregory, both atives of Pennsylvania, the former of Scotch and the latter of New England origin. William N. is the youngest of six children. He was educated in the common schools of his native village and when fourteen years of age he went to Wilkes-Barre, in the employ of R. W. Haight, as an apprentice at watchmaking. He remained there three years, afterward going to Bloomsburg, where he completed his trade in the employ of Lewis Bernard, a prominent jeweler of that place. After remaining in Bloomsburg about one year and a half he returned to Wilkes-Barre, where he followed his trade about one year. He then went to Plymouth, and remaining there but a short time, again returned to Wilkes-Barre. After a stay of one year he went to Scranton, where he remained another year. In 1880 Mr. Gregory came to Nanticoke and engaged in the jewelry business for himself, where, by the excellent manner of his workmanship and he superior grade of the articles he handles, his business has increased until he now constantly carries a large and handsome stock of almost everything in the jewelers' line. Mr. Gregory was married March 1, 1880, to Katie E., daughter of Thomas H. Bochman, of Wilkes- Barre. They have two children: Lena Sybol, born February 1, 1881, and Ralph Bernhard, born April 19, 1883. Mr. and Mrs. Gregory are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he is a trustee. He is a member of the Knights of Malta, the American Legion of Honor, and the American Mechanics, and politically is a Republican.

George GREICH, farmer, P. O. Orange, was born in Germany about 1820. He is the son of Joseph Greich who emigrated to this country about 1831; his wife died previous to his coming. He had two sons, Joseph and George. They located first in New York City, then moved to Paterson, N.J., where they became engaged in a cotton-mill. In the course of time the father married again, after which the two sons left home, removing to Franklin township, where they conjointly purchased a lot of 125 acres of unimproved land on which they built a log cabin and began the work of pioneers. They endured many hardships in those days, but by hard and honest toil succeeded in clearing a beautiful farm. George married, for this first wife, Catharine Chandler. For his second wife he married Miss Sarah, daughter of Garrett and Mary Besterder. There were no children by either marriage. Mrs. Greich, the latter, was born in North Moreland, Wyoming county, in 1842. After the brothers married they desired to separate the homes, the land was divided and now each has his own home. They are both worthy citizens, and honest and industrious men. Politically, they are Democrats.

George T. GRIFFIN, of the firm of Griffin & Colburn, prominent photographers of Wilkes- Barre, was born at Moscow, Lackawanna Co., Pa., July 8, 1858, a son of Alonzo and Fannie (Schwartz) Griffin. His father was a native of Plymouth, this county, and a son of Jackson Griffin, formerly of Dutchess county, N. Y., who was one of the pioneer teachers of the Wyoming Valley; he died at Plymouth. The father of our subject is a carriage-painter by trade and has been a resident of Wilkes-Barre since 1884; his wife was a daughter of George Schwartz, of Moscow, Pa., and by her he has three children: Sadie (Mrs. Ira D. Rosencrans), George T. and Charles L. Our subject was reared in Wyoming county, Pa., and educated in the public schools. In 1872 he began an apprenticeship at photography with W. O. Look, of Meshoppen, Pa., serving two and one-half years, and has since been in business for himself, with the exception of four years that he was in the employ of Lee Stearns, at Wilkes- Barre. Since 1890 he has been in business in Wilkes- Barre, as a member of the firm of Griffin & Colburn; the work done by this firm can not be excelled in the State. Mr. Griffin was married, December 10, 1884, to Sophia L., daughter of Zachariah Gray, of Tunkhannock, Pa., and has one son, Ned G. He is a member of the F. & A. M., R. A. M., and K. T.; he is a Republican.

David D. GRIFFITH (deceased) was among the most prosperous mine contractors of the anthracite regions. He was born in Wales, March 14, 1841, a son of David and Margaret (Davies) Griffith, also natives of Wales. He was reared and educated in his native land, and in 1861 came to America and engaged in mining at Pittston (although residing in Hyde Park), where he remained a short time and then removed to Bellevue, Lackawanna county. He remained there until 1864, when he went to Plymouth, where he engaged in mine contracting, sinking shafts, etc. In 1883 he came to Kingston, where he resided until his death, which occurred January 31, 1891. Mr. Griffith was engaged in agriculture for a short time, but at the same time chiefly devoted his attention to contracting. He was twice married; first, to Miss Elizabeth Phillips, by whom he had four children, viz: Sarah Ann, Mary, Reese (who is a student at the University of Pennsylvania), and Margaret. About three years after the death of his first wife, Mr. Griffith was again married, this time to Miss Jane, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Davies) Williams, natives of Wales. She was born at Neath, Bradford Co., Pa., where her parents resided until their death. At her husband's death, Mrs. Griffith was left with three children, viz: Bessie, Nellie and Guy. Mrs. Griffith and her family are members of the Presbyterian Church, of which she is a firm supporter and a faithful attendant.

John T. GRIFFITH, insurance agent, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Caernarvonshire, North Wales, December 25, 1824, a son of Thomas and Dorothy Griffith, who emigrated to America in 1830, spending one year in New York City, and in 1831 locating at Minersville, Schuylkill Co. Pa. They resided in the county until their death and both are buried at Pottsville, Pa. Our subject has been a resident of Luzerne county forty years, thirty-two of which have been spent in Wilkes-Barre. For fourteen years he was in the employ of the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, as inside superintendent of mines, and in 1877 was badly injured by an explosion in the Stanton Mines. In 1878 he was elected treasurer of Luzerne county, serving one term of three years; since 1887 he has been engaged in the insurance business. His wife was Mary, daughter of John G. and Mary (Davis) Roberts, and by her he had four children, vis.: Kate (Mrs. Dr. J. Harris Jones), Thomas R., John R., and Lizzie (Mrs. Carl Koerner). Mr. Griffith is a popular and well-known citizen of Wilkes-Barre, is a member of the First Welsh Presbyterian Church, and in politics is a stanch Republican.

Thomas H. GRIFFITH, wholesale dealer in cigars and tobacco, Wilkes-Barre, was born near Pottsville, Schuylkill Co., Pa., June 5, 1849, a son of Nanthaniel and Catherine (Evans) Griffith, natives of Wales. He lived in his native county until fifteen years of age, of which five years were spent in the breaker. His education was received at night schools, and one year at Wyoming Seminary, Kingston. For twelve years he was bookkeeper ofr C.M. Conyngham, and for eight years engaged in general merchandising at Wilkes-Barre, and embarked in his present business in 1890. January 2, 1875, Mr. Griffith married Miss Mary, daughter of Morgan B. and Catherine Williams, of Wilkes-Barre, and has six children living: Kate, Morgan, Thomas H., Ray, Alice, and Ora. Mr. Griffith is a selfmade man and after beginning life at the lowest round of the ladder has accumulated a competency. He ranks among the leading business men of the city, is a member of the Welsh Presbyterian Church and he is a Knight Templar. Politically he is a Republican, and has served two terms as city auditor.

David R. GRIFFITHS, retired contractor, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Glamorganshire, South Wales, January 2, 1826, a son of William R. and Rachel (Owen) Griffiths. He was reared and educated in South Wales, where he learned the trade of stone cutter and mason, and prior to that worked at the tinsmithís trade. He did a large business as a contractor in sinking shafts in the coal mines of Wales. In 1860 he came to America and spent ten years in Illinois and Missouri, and in 1870 located in Wilkes-Barre, where he has since resided. For eighteen years he was a contractor under the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, retiring in 1888. In 1856 he married Miss Ann, daughter of Morgan and Elizabeth (Davis) Thomas, of Wales, by whom he had seven children: Elizabeth (Mrs. John Johnson), William M., Rachel, John, Olive (deceased), Edith, and Lee. His second daughter, Rachel, was a teacher in the Parrish Street Public School ten years, two years as assistant superintendent of the same, and since 1889 has been a teacher in the Wilkes-Barre Business College. Mr. Griffiths is a member of the Second Welsh Presbyterian Church of the I.O.O.F., of the Foresters and American Protestant Association. In politics he is a Republican.

David P. GRIFFITHS, general merchant, Wilkes-Barre, was born at Narberth, Pembrokeshire, South Wales, February 7, 1855, a son of John and Sophia Griffiths. He was reared on a farm in his native country until fifteen years of age, and during that time served a two-yearsí apprenticeship in a store. In 1869 he came to America and located in St. Clair, Schuylkill Co., Pa., where he worked as a clerk for three years. In 1872 he came to Wilkes-Barre, where he has since resided, and the nine months was clerk in a hardware store, and fourteen years was engaged in mining. He then embarked in general merchandising, in which business he has since successfully continued. In November, 1877, Mr. Griffiths married Mary A., daughter of John and Elizabeth (Reese) Haycock, of Wilkes-Barre, formerly of Wales, and has five children living: Sadie, Elizabeth, Kate, John, and an infant son. Our subject attends the services of the Welsh M.E. Church; he is a member of the I.O.O.F., and in politics is a Republican.

Samuel GRIFFITHS, inside foreman, Empire Mines, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Carbon county, Pa., February 8, 1857, a son of Griffith and Elizabeth (Howell) Griffiths, natives of Brecknockshire, Wales. His parents came to America about 1853, first locating at Carbondale, Pa., later in Carbon county, and in 1875, settled in Luzerne county, where the father died. He was a miner by occupation, and the last fifteen years of his life were spent in Wilkes-Barre, where eh died in 1884. His children were: William, Samuel and John, all of who grew to maturity. Our subject has been a resident of Wilkes-Barre since 1869, received a limited education in the public schools, and began work in the mines when twelve years of age. He served as assistant and has been inside foreman since 1890. April 6, 1881, Mr. Griffiths married Miss Hannah, daughter of Lewis S. and Anna (Meredith) Jones, of Wilkes-Barre, and has five children living: Bertha, Edward, Winifred, Lewis Byron, and an infant son. Mr. Griffiths is a popular and well known citizen of Wilkes-Barre and politically he is a Republican.

James GRIMES, engineer at the Washington Colliery, Plymouth. This bright young engineer was born in Mahanoy City, Schuylkill Co., Pa., Mary 4, 1870, and is the fifth in the family of twelve children of Edmund and Catherine (Heffron) Grimes, also natives of Pennsylvania. In 1871 the family removed to Plymouth, this county, where the father was engaged as a practical miner, working at that business the greater part of his life. The children were reared and educated in Luzerne county, where the subject of our sketch early began working about the mines. He went to firing at the Delaware & Hudson Mines No. 3, and continued there until October, 1891, when he was given charge of the breaker engine at the Washington Colliery, wehre he has since been employed. Mr. Grimes is yet a single man and lives with his respected mother at Plymouth. He is a member of the Catholic Church, and of the Father Mathew Society; politically he votes the Democratic ticket.

John GRIMES, engineer, Colliery No. 3, Delaware & Hudson Canal Company, Plymouth. The great responsibility of handling the immense hoisting engine at No. 3 develoves upon the young man whose name opens this sketch. He was born at Mahonoy City, Pa., April 11, 1864, and is the fifth in the family of Edmond and Catherine (Heffron) Grimes, natives of County Tipperary Ireland. After receiving his education at the public schools of Luzerne county, our subject was employed at the Delaware & Hudson No. 4, as fireman, remaining there three years, and from running pumps he was promoted; and given charge of the hoisting engine at this colliery, where he has been employed since November 9, 1888. Mr. Grimes was united in marriage, September 12, 1888 with Adelaide Emily, daughter of Frank M. and Maggie (Morrison) Girton, the former of Pennsylvania birth, the later born in New York, of New Jersey extraction. This union has been blessed with one child, Edmund, who was born December 19, 1889. Politically Mr. Grimes is a Democrat; socially he is a member of the Father Mathew Temperance Society. The family are members of the Catholic Church.

Thomas GRIMES, engineer at the Delaware Colliery, Hudson, Plains township, was born in Hindley, Lancashire, England, January 1, 1845, and is a son of William and Alice (Walker) Grimes. His father, who was an engineer and overseer in a cotton factory, reared a family of five children, two of whom are still living, viz.: Anna (Mrs. Thomas McLean, in England) and Thomas. Our subject came to America in 1869, located first at Hudson, New York, and later at Schaghticoke, where he fired in a woolen mill for over four years. He then came to Mill Creek, where he fired and ran a fan-engine for three years, then a double hoisting engine and a breaker engine for eight years, and accepted his present position in 1884; in 1883 he built his present residence. Mr. Grimes was married in 1870 to Miss Hannah, daughter of Frank and Martha Vernon; they had two children vis.: Frank V. and William T. Mrs. Grimes died in 1876, and he was again married November 7, 1877, to Miss Permelia, widow of John Dils (by whom she had three children), and daughter of Daniel P. and Phebe (Billings) Mills, natives, respectively of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, and of Irish and Yankee origin respectively. She is granddaughter of Cain and Huldah Billings, who were early settlers of Pennsylvania. In her fatherís family there were seven children, three of whom are living, vis.: Louisa (Mrs. A.J. Williams, Plains), Permelia and John Mills of Parsons. Mr. Grimes and his wife attend the Primitive Methodist Church, of which she is a member; in his political views he is a Republican.

Daniel M. Grover, carpenter, P.O. Rick Glen, was born in Black Creek township, April 1, 1863, a son of Nathan and Elizabeth (Swank) Grover. His father was a native of Mifflin township, Columbia Co., Pa., and for thirty years was engaged in farming in Black Creek township. He is now a resident of Hazleton. His children were Samuel, George, Edward, Hattie (Mrs. James Totten), Lettie (Mrs. Freas Rhone), Daniel M., Fannie (Mrs. Herman Myers), Minnie (Mrs. Samuel Turnbach), and Ollie. Our subject was reared in Black Creek township, and educated in common schools, serving an apprenticeship of four years at the cabinet making and carpenter trade, and since 1887 has worked as a journeyman carpenter. He married, October 2, 1884, Sarah, daughter of Michael and Fannie (Lutz) Hetler, of Mifflin township, Columbia Co., Pa. To this union have been born two children: Iva and Carrie. Mr. Grover is a member of the M.E. Church, and in politics is an advocate of the principles of the Prohibition party.

Harry L. GROVER, baggage master and express agent, Kingston, was born at Beech Grove, Pa., October 15, 1864, and is a son of Paul and Harriet (Heck) Grover, natives of Pennsylvania, of New England origin. In his fatherís family there sere six children, viz.: Sherwood (deceased); Stanley W., a stenographer at Wilkes-Barre, with residence at Kingston; Harry L. (the subject of this sketch); Lizzie E., a professional nurse at Kingston, Pa.; Sadie, who resides at home; and Charles J. (deceased). Mr. Grover was educated in Luzerne county, and in 1889 accepted a position as baggage master for the D.L. & W. R.R., and as express agent for the United States Express Company at Kingston, where he has since been employed. He is a man who commands the confidence of his employers and the respect of their patrons. Our subject was married June 10, 1889, to Miss Maggie M., daughter of William and Celestia (Bowman) Miller, natives of Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Grover are members of the M.E. Church. He is a member of the P.O.S.ofA., and I.O.O.F., and in his political views is a Republican.

Lincoln GROW, Ashley, fireman on the Central Railroad of New Jersey, was born in Plymouth, this county, February 9, 1866, a son of Jacob and Sarah (Kissinger) Grow, natives of Pennsylvania and of German origin. The father, a locomotive engineer on the Central Railroad of New Jersey, left home in 1876 and not being heard from is supposed to be dead. The family consisted of nine children: William, engineer, Denver, Colo.; Catherine (Mrs. Charles Beltz); George, train despatcher, Council Bluffs, Iowa; John, engineer, Texas; Samuel, killed at the age of nineteen years by being run over by a gravel train while braking thereon; Elizabeth (Mrs. John Betzler), Lincoln; Edward, fireman, Denver, Colo., and David, brakeman, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Our subject was educated in the public schools of Ashley, and when nine years old worked in the breaker for one year. He had charge of the breaker machinery for two years, afterward wiped engines at night in the Ashley round house for five years, was on the day shift six months, acted as hostler one month, and was promoted to his present position in 1884. He has knowledge of machinery rarely found outside the finished and apprenticed mechanic, and has made several valuable inventions, among which is an improvement on the Westinghouse air-brake for which he has been offered large money. March 16, 1887, Mr. Grow married Miss Minnie, daughter of Frederick and Rachel (Hall) Kegley) natives of Germany and Pennsylvania, and of this union has been born three children, vis.: Harry E., William D. and Emery Erl. Mr. Grow and his family worship at the Methodist Episcopal Church of which his wife is a member. He is a member of the B. of L.F. and the Jr. O.U.A.M.; and is a Republican in his political views.

Andrew GUARD, miner, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Cornwall, England, September 16, 1857, a son of William and Elizabeth (Waters) Guard. He was reared in England, until fifteen years of age, where he received a limited education in the common schools. In 1872 he came to America, locating in New Jersey, where he engaged in mining there, four years. In 1876 he removed to Plymouth, this county, and was employed in the mines here two years. In 1878 he went to Colorado and worked in the gold mines, of Central City and Leadville, four years. In 1882 he returned to Luzerne county and has since been a resident of Wilkes-Barre, engaged in mining for the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company. Mr. Guard married July 1, 1876, Susan, daughter of John and Mary I. (Davey) Jones, of Plymouth, this county, and has three children: William A., Minnie and Arthur S. He is a member of the First M.E. Church, and of the Sons of St. George; in politics he is a Republican.

John GUINEY, agent for the Moosic Powder Company, Wilkes-Barre, was born in County Cork, Ireland, December 12, 1847, a son of Nicholas and Catherine (Rouch) Guiney. The parents emigrated to America in 1850, locating in Upper Canada and removed in 1859 to Wayne County, Pa., whence, in 1871, they came to Luzerne county. Our subject settled in Wilkes-Barre in 1862, remaining there four years, when he returned to Wayne county, where he engaged in railroading and boating up to 1872. He then entered the employ of the Moosic Powder Company, and since 1875 has been their representative in Wilkes-Barre. Mr. Guiney married, April 8, 1874, Bridget, daughter of John and Mary (Jordan) Walsh, of Moosic, Pa., and formerly of Ireland, by whom he had one son, Edward, who was drowned May 21, 1886. Mr. Guiney is a member of the Catholic Church, and of the Columbia Club; politically he is a Democrat, and is now serving his second term as councilman of the city of Wilkes-Barre.

G.G. GUINNIP, veterinary surgeon, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Damascus, Wayne Co., Pa., November 3, 1840, and is a son of David and Parmelia (Dunn) Guinni0p, being of English and Welsh descent. He was reared and educated in his native county, and in 1873 located in Wilkes-Barre, where for nine years he was engaged in the livery business, and since 1883, has practiced veterinary surgery, in which he still successfully continues. Mr. Guinnip was married November 1, 1883, to Margaret Gilmore, a daughter of James McLellan, of Wilkes-Barre, and they have one daughter, Alice. He is a member of the F.&A.M. and in politics is a Democrat.

Edward GUNSTER, Wilkes-Barre, was born January 10, 1836, in Lockweiler, Germany, and emigrated to this country with his parents and brothers in March, 1853, settling in Scranton, Lackawanna Co., Pa., March 11, 1853. He learned the cabinet making trade with his father, who at that time operated one of the largest cabinet shops in that section. He has six brothers as follows: Joseph H., a retired banker; Henry, a contractor; Peter, furniture dealer; Fred W., additional law judge, Lackawanna county; P. Francis, a physician; John, an attorney-at-law, but at present engaged in boat building at Jamestown, N.Y. On February 5, 1860, Mr. Gunster married Miss Mary Weiskerecher, daughter of Andrew and Katherine Weiskercher, of Pittston, Pa., and eight children were born to them, four of whom are living, vis.: Edward, August, Andrew and Katie. Of these, Katie married George C. Rasbridge a telegraph operator in the employ of the Lehigh Valley Railroad Company, and lives in Wilkes-Barre; Edward, Jr., married Miss M.S. Bowman, and also resides in Wilkes-Barre; the other two children are unmarried. In 1871 our subject was elected treasurer of Luzerne county on the Democratic ticket, being the first German ever elected to that office. He is a member of the F.&A.M. and of various other Societies; was one of the charter members of the Concordia Singing Society, the leading one of its kind in Wilkes-Barre. He is at present engaged as a wholesale dealer in cigars.

Edward GUNSTER, Jr. was born in Scranton, Pa., November 8, 1860, received his early education at a private school in that town, and after removing to Wilkes-Barre, in 1871, attended the public schools for two years, then the preparatory school at Nazareth, Pa., where he graduated in 1876. He has filled various positions as bookkeeper, and in 1888 opened an office in the Loomis Building as a public accountant; in 1890 he removed to the Coal Exchange, where he occupies three offices, and does a general type writing and copying business, audits books and does office work of all kinds, employing seven people. He is a member of the Institute of Accounts, of New York City.

William A. GUSTIN, outside foreman, Miners Mills, was born in Bethany, Wayne county, Pa., August 19, 1840, son of Austin and Permelia (Sanders) Gustin. He is a grandson of Timothy and Elizabeth (Hough) Gustin, who came from Sussex county, N.J. to Cherry Ridge, Wayne Co., Pa., in 1810, the family originating from the island of Jersey, and coming to America as early as 1675. His maternal grandparents were David and Maria (Whitaker) Sanders, who came from New England in 1802, and settled in Pennsylvania. His father who was a farmer, reared a family of five children as follows: Francis, died at the age of eighteen months; William A.; Louisa, married Oscar Moon, a locomotive engineer, LaGrande, Ore.; Edward died in Hornellsville, N.Y. at the age of nineteen years; and Mehetable, married Frank Hall, railway conductor, Hornellsville, N.Y. William A. Gustin passed his boyhood on the farm and in attending the public schools, and then prepared himself for teaching, a vocation he followed for six terms. He enlisted, at Honesdale, Pa., in the spring of 1863, in the army of the Republic, but was sent home at the end of six months, resuming teaching and doing secret service for the Government, which he followed till the close of the war. He then found employment running cars and braking for the Delaware & Hudson Coal Company, till 1867, when he was appointed outside foreman at Olyphant, Pa., which position he held till 1871, when he accepted his present position, with the same company. Mr. Gustin was married, September 12, 1865, to Miss Augusta, daughter of Z.B. and Elizabeth (Miller) Vastbinder, natives of New York and Pennsylvania, respectively and of German origin. The issue of this union was seven children: Charles H., a carpenter; Eva C., who died at the age of four years; Emma J., who died at that age of six years; Edward M., a coal inspector; Clara I.; Elwin J., and kWalter A. He and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church; he is a member of the F.&A.M. and the K. of H. and a Republican in his political views.

Jacob GUTENDORF, P.O. Wilkes-Barre, was born in Heimbach, Germany, April 4, 1849, a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Lock) Gutendorf. His parents came to America in 1854, locating in Wilkes-Barre, where his father, a stonemason, worked at his trade, and followed mining until his death in 1883. Our subject was an only child. He was reared in Wilkes-Barre from five years of age, educated in the public schools and Harvey Academy, served an apprenticeship of three years at the coach-painterís trade, and afterward followed this trade three years. From 1878 to 1889 he engaged in the hotel business, and next was jobber in cigar trade for a year. March 22, 1886, Mr. Gutendorf married Miss Kunnegunde, daughter of George and Margaret (Zimmerman) Long, of Bavaria, Germany, and by her had two children: Jacob and Fred W. He is a member of the German Catholic Church, Schuetzen, Wyoming Benefit Association, and German Young Menís Benefit Association. In politics, he is a Democrat, and has served one term as alderman of the Thirteen Ward in Wilkes-Barre, 1874-9.

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