Ca-Ch Surnames

History of Luzerne County, Pa.,

by H.C. Bradsby, 1893

 

CHRISTIAN CADWALADER, farmer, P.O. Hunlock Creek, was born in Chester county, Pa., March 19, 1825, a son of Adam and Christina (Ladner) Cadwalader, both of whom were born in Germany; they emigrated to this country in 1820. Adam located in Chester county, Pa., where he lived until his children were all grown up, when he broke up housekeeping and made his home with his daughter. He was a miller and millwright by occupation, and a business man of good sound judgment. His farm was small, but well cultivated. He died in Shickshinny in 1870, aged eighty, the father of six children, three of whom are living. Christian Cadwalader was reared and educated at the common school in Chester county, near Phoenixville, and in early life learned the stonemason's trade, at which he worked for twenty years. In 1861 he migrated from Chester county to Shickshinny, and after three years removed from there to Larksville, where he resided fourteen years. He then came to Hunlock township, settling on a farm of 150 acres, forty of which are improved. Mr. Cadwalader married, January 13, 1850, Miss Catherine, daughter of Amos and Mary Richardson, and twelve children have been born to them, nine of whom are living: George W., Anna R., Joseph H., Sarah C., James A., Rosetta E., John A., Amos C., and Elizabeth I. Seven of this number are married and well-to-do in this world's goods. On September 5, 1864, Mr. Cadwalader was mustered into the United States service as a private in Company K, Two Hundred and Third P.V.I., and proved himself a valiant soldier for his country's cause. He was wounded at Port Fisher, at the close of the war was honorably discharged, and he now enjoys a pension. Politically he is a Democrat.

JAMES CAHALAN, retired miner, Luzerne, was born in County Roscommon, Ireland, July 6, 1835. He is a son of William and Sarah (Mangan) Cahalan, both of whom were born in Ireland, where their entire lives were passed. They were people of respectability, and much thought of in their native place. They reared a family of five children, four of whom are now living. James is the third in the family in order of birth. He was reared and educated in his native land, emigrating to this country in 1864, at the age of twenty-nine years. He engaged in farm work for a short time in New York, and also in New Jersey. In 1865 he removed to Wilkes-Barre, where he embarked in the mining business, at which he has proved financially successful, in 1882 retiring from active life. His mining experience was uneventful with the exception of two accidents of an unimportant nature. In 1869 Mr. Cahalan bought himself a home in Jenkins township, where he resided seven years. In 1876 he sold it, and bought a property in Kingston township, where he now resides; he also owns a lot in Pleasant Valley. In 1866 he married Miss Mary, daughter of John and Bridget Kearney, by whom he has had six children, all of whom are living (1892): William, John, Mary E., Sarah, James and Margaret. All are single, and members of the Roman Catholic Church. Mr. Cahalan has held several township offices with entire satisfaction, and enjoys the full confidence of his fellow citizens. He is an honest and trustworthy man of sound principles. Politically he is a Democrat.

HARRY E. CAIN, the popular proprietor of the "Hess Hotel," Beach Haven, was born in Centre township, Columbia Co., Pa., January 23, 1868, and is a son of Philip and Hattie (Hoptler) Cain. His paternal grandfather, Thomas Cain, was a native of the Isle of Man and an early settler at Lime Ridge, Columbia county. His wife was Jane Strawbridge. The father of our subject, who is a native of Columbia county, Pa., for forty-seven years followed the Pennsylvania Canal, and for the past eight years has been lock-tender at Beach Haven. His children are five in number, viz.: Clara (Mrs. Henry Farringer), John B., Annie (Mrs. Harry Pringle), Harry E. and Bessie (Mrs. Harry Rabert). Our subject was reared in Danville, Pa., and educated in the common schools. He has been a resident of Beach Haven since 1884, and proprietor of the "Hess Hotel" since 1890. He married August 21, 1888, Florence, daughter of John I. and Elmira (Everhard) Hess, of Beach Haven, and has one daughter, Louise. Mr. Cain is a member of the P.O.S. of A., and is president and leader of the Beach Haven band. In politics he is a Republican.

JOSEPH L. CAKE, president and general manager of the Clear Spring Coal Company, West Pittston. This successful and energetic coal operator was born at Port Republic, N.J., and is a son of Joseph P. and Anna E. (Blackman) Cake, also natives of New Jersey. Our subject, who is the eldest son in a family of three children, was reard in his birthplace, and educated at the Pennington New Jersey Seminary and the Polytechnic Institute, Philadelphia, Pa. In 1866 he came to Pittston in the interests of the West Pittston Coal Company, and remained here two years, when he became identified with the Lehigh Valley Coal Company, with whom he continued ten years, at the end of that period taking a contract with the Bound Brook Railroad Company for the construction of their division. The Work was completed in sixteen months, and Mr. Cake immediately went South, locating in North Carolina, where he was engaged in mining for two years, afterward coming to West Pittston, where, in 1882, with A. McDeWitt, opened up the Clear Spring Coal mines, and Mr. Cake has also recently assumed the management of the Stevens Coal Company. The success of the Clear Spring Coal Company is due largely to the good management and business tact, combined with the large experience of its two principal stockholders. Mr. Cake was united in marriage September 24, 1868, with S. Helena, daughter of Joseph B. Cramer, of Burlington county, N.J., and this union has been blessed with two children, namely: Anna and J. Paul. In political matters our subject is an ardent Republican; socially he is a member of the F. & A.M. The family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Cake is a representative self-made man, having made his own way in the world, and commands the respect and esteem of all with whom he associates, both in a business and social way. He has made West Pittston his home for the last ten years.

JOHN CALLAGHAN, miner, Port Blanchard, was born June 29, 1848, in County Mayo, Ireland, and is the youngest of ten children: his parents were Patrick and Mary (Robinson) Callaghan, who owned a farm in that county. The subject of our sketch was educated in the Irish national schools, and when old enough worked on the farm; he emigrated to this country early in 1861, settling in Pittston, this county, on May 30, of that year, when he went to work in the mines; here he labored until 1869, and then worked as a miner in the employ of the Pennsylvania Coal Company, in which capacity he is still employed by this firm. On July 19, 1864, Mr. Callaghan was united in marriage with Ann, daughter of Edward and Sarah (Brennan) McNulty, natives of County Sligo, Ireland. Their union has been blessed with the following children: Mary T., born June 27, 1867, married on April 4, 1888, to Owen Rooney, of Pittston, this county; Patrick J., born April 1, 1867; Ann J., born April 23, 1869; Edward F., born May 23, 1871; John S., born December 1, 1873; Catherine B., born January 6, 1876; Elizabeth, born August 4, 1880; and Ellen, born July 28, 1883. Our subject is an active member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians and the Catholic Total Abstinence Society. In religion he is a Roman Catholic, and in politics a Democrat.

JOHN C. CALLAHAN, miner, Plains, was born in County Cavan, Ireland, in 1846, and is a son of Michael and Bridget (Pryor) Callahan, the former of whom was a farmer. They reared a family of ten children, of whom John C. is the fifth. Our subject came to America in 1861, and located first at Boston, Mass., where he was employed in a cotton-mill for one year. He then came to Wilkes-Barre, this county, and secured employment about the mines. He followed mining for twenty-five years, and in 1868 removed to his present residence. In 1869 Mr. Callahan married Miss Bridget, daughter of Thomas and Mary (McCole) More, natives of County Donegal, Ireland, and they have five children, viz.: Mary A., James A., John J., Sarah A., and Patrick M. Mr. Callahan and family are members of the Catholic Church; politically he is a Democrat.

P.P. CALLARY, merchant, Plymouth, was born at Oldcastle, County Meath, Ireland, March 17, 1851, and is a son of Robert and Bridget (Sheridan) Callary, also natives of Ireland. There were seven children, four boys and three girls, in the family, of whom our subject is the eldest. He was educated at St. Finian's Seminary, located at Navan, County Meath, Ireland, receiving a very thorough course of instruction at this famous seminary. In 1869 he came to America, and first engaged as a clerk with Patrick Smith, of Newtown, Luzerne Co., Pa., remaining there three years. He was then appointed teacher of a school in the second district of the city of Wilkes-Barre, which position he occupied six years, and at the end of that time he came to Plymouth and established his general store, where he now carries on a very extensive business. Mr. Callary was united in marriage October 16, 1874, with Miss Ella C., daughter of Peter and Ann (Hart) Morrow, natives of Sligo, Ireland, and there have been six children born to this union, the three eldest, Robert M., Frank and Jessie, being deceased, and the three youngest, Edwin M., Stanley and Gerald M., yet living. Mr. Callary and family are members of the Catholic Church, and our subject is a Democrat.

THOMAS R. CALLARY, general merchant, East Main street, Nanticoke, was born at Oldcastle, County Meath, Ireland, March 3, 1861. He began life for himself in the grocery business in 1875, at Dublin, Ireland, and in 1880 emigrated to America and engaged as clerk for John M. Ward & Co., on the public square in Wilkes-Barre, where he remained until 1883. He next went to Plymouth, where he and his brother, P.P. Callary, conducted an extensive business in the general merchandise line, and in 1885 they opened a branch store in Nanticoke, and four years later T.R. took sole charge of the store at the latter place, and has since continued to do a good business. His stock embrances everything in the general mercantile line, and of him it may be truthfully said that he is one of Luzerne county's most progressive business men. He was married in February, 1891, to Miss Lillie McGann, one of Wilkes-Barre's most popular and respected young ladies. This union has been blessed by one child, a son, born March 3, 1892. Mr. Callary is a member of the St. Aloysius Society and the A.O.H. At the national convention of the latter, held in New York City in May, 1892, he was elected national treasurer of the Order, which position he now holds. He takes an active part in the best interest of the town. He is an ardent worker in St. Francis Catholic Church, of which he is a member.

JOHN I. CALLENDER, a prominent farmer, Huntington township, P.O. Huntington Mills, was born December 28, 1845, on the farm he now owns. He is the son of Edmond and Maria (Ide) Callender, natives of Pennsylvania, of English origin; the father was a farmer by occupation; he died December 30, 1873. His parents, Darius and Lydia (Woodworth) Callender, were natives of Connecticut, and came to this section about 1796. John I. is the only child of his parents; he was reared on the farm he now owns, being educated in the common schools and Wyoming Seminary. He worked for his father on the farm until the latter's death, when the property became his, and he has since operated same. He married December 30, 1866, Miss Esther A. Hartman, daughter of Fredrick and Sarah (Steel) Hartman, natives of Pennsylvania, of German and English origin, respectively. This union was blessed with three children, viz.: Edmond E., born March 10, 1869, a clerk at Pottsville, Pa., (he married Mattie Wolf, and they have one child, Daisy L.); Fredrick W., born March 16, 1871, clerk in a store at Dunkirk, N.Y.; and Florence L., born June 22, 1873. The family attend the M.E. Church. Mr. and Mrs. Callender are members of the P. of H., and he is serving as school director. The Callender farm contains one hundred and ten acres, and is situated one mile north of the Huntington Mills postoffice. Politically, Mr. Callender is a Republican.

CHARLES P. CAMPBELL, assistant clerk, Orphans Court, Shickshinny, was born at Beach Haven, Luzerne Co., Pa., January 13, 1862, a son of William A. and Alice (Post) Campbell. He was reared at Shickshinny, educated at State Normal School, Bloomsburg, Pa., where he graduated in 1877, and at Swarthmore College, where he was graduated in 1882. After that he spent nine years in his father's store at Shickshinny, and since January 1, 1891, he has held his present position. On June 3, 1891, Mr. Campbell married Florence F., daughter of Lot and Irene (Fellows) Search, of Shickshinny, and they have one daughter, Irene Alice. Mr. Campbell is a member of the Presybterian Church, and of the F. & A.M; in politics he is a Democrat.

J. HIRAM CAMPBELL, collector for the Pennsylvania Canal Company, Beach Haven, was born in Nescopeck township, this county, March 4, 1843, and is a son of Joseph and Catherine (Kester) Campbell. He was reared in Salem township, educated in the common schools, and took a commerical course of instruction at a New Haven (Conn.) business college. Mr. Campbell began life as a clerk in the office of the commissioners of Luzerne county, and later learned the wagon-making trade, which he followed seven years at Shickshinny and Hobbie, this county. In 1875 he was appointed foreman of the canal, by the Pennsylvania Canal Company, continuing as such ten years, and has held the position of collector for the company at Beach Haven since 1885. He took part in the Civil war, enlisting August 18, 1862, in Company F, 143d P.V.I.; was orderly sergeant of the company two years; was wounded at battle of Gettysburg and the engagement at Weldon Railroad, and was honorably discharged June 12, 1865. On May 30, 1868, Mr. Campbell married Melissa, daughter of Lewis and Mary (Benscoter) Post, of Union township, this county, and they have five children living, viz.: Frank (who married Ida Eddy, and has one daughter, Irene), Bertha, Gertrude, Edmund D. and Earl. Mr. Campbell is a member of the M.E. Church and of the G.A.R. In politics he is a Democrat, and is now serving his second term as school director of Salem township, and has been the secretary of the board since elected in 1889.

JACOB W. CAMPBELL, carpenter, P.O. Berwick, was born in Nescopeck township, November 3, 1841, and is a son of Joseph and Catherine (Kester) Campbell. (For genealogy of Campbell family, see sketch of William A. Campbell, Shickshinny.) He was reared in Salem township, educated in the common schools and Wyoming Seminary, and at the age of eighteen taught school. He followed teaching as a vocation eight years. At the age of twenty-six he began the carriage-making trade, under instructions, and followed the business seventeen years, at Shickshinny and Beach Haven. In January, 1883, he located at Berwick, where he was engaged as foreman of the foundry of W.B. Freas & Son five years, and since 1888 has been in the employ of the Jackson & Worden Manufacturing Co. On April 12, 1862, he married Margaret J., daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Rabert) Thomas, of Salem township, and has five children living: Harry E., Samuel T., Elizabeth (Mrs. Walter Sult), Ella and Thomas B. Mr. Campbell is past master in the F. & A.M., and in politics he is a Democrat.

JOHN CAMPBELL, supervisor, Duryea, was born in Ayshire, Scotland, January 12, 1835, and is a son of Robert and Elizabeth (Hart) Campbell, natives of the same place. They reared a family of fifteen childen, of whom our subject is second in order of birth. He was educated in a private school, and was employed as a locomotive fireman, and later as an engineer. In May, 1870, he came to America, and settled in this county, where he worked first as fireman, and afterward as engineer at the mines until 1876, when he was employed as a miner until 1890, in which year he retired. He was united in marriage February 28, 1857, with Agnes, daughter of James and Lillian (Gilbraith) Stuart, natives of Scotland, and their union has been blessed with the following issue: Lillian, born December 29, 1857, (married May 8, 1875, to William Jones, a miner of Scranton; he died June 30, 1879, and she afterward married November 10, 1884, Owen Burleigh, a miner in Wyoming Territory); Robert, born October 17, 1859; James, born August 7, 18--; John, born September 1, 1863; Elizabeth, born October 8, 1865 (married August 17, 1883, to Johnson B. Randall, a carpenter in Lackawanna); David, born April 22, 1868; Agnes, born May 10, 1870 (married August 3, 1889, to Rudolph Gottwalls, a wheelright in Lackawanna); Ellen, born July 2, 1873 (married August 27, 1890, to John White, a teamster in Lackawanna); Alexander, born June 7, 1874; William (deceased at the age of fifteen years, ten days); Jane (deceased when six months old), and Joseph, (deceased when an infant of two days). Our subject is a member of the M.E. Church, and in politics is a Republican.

JOSEPH W. CAMPBELL, contractor and builder, No. 112 Gaylord avenue, Plymouth, was born in Chester county, Pa., March 1, 1850. He is a son of William and Harriet (Butter) Campbell, both of whom were also natives of Chester county, the former of whom was a cabinet-maker by trade, thoroughly conversant with his craft. He was a son of William Campbell, who was a native of Scotland, and who came to this country to enjoy the freedom so much loved and coveted by Scotia's sons. William Campbell, father of our subject, had a family of ten children, nine of whom are now living, Joseph W. being the eighth. He was reared in Chester county, educated at the common schools of his district. In early life he was a farmer boy until his country called for volunteers, then his young heart beat with enthusiastic patriotism; but youthful years debarred him the privilege of striking for freedom until 1864, when he was permitted to enter Companyh B, One Hundred and Eighty-seventh P.V.I., for the term of three years. Here he displayed the herosim characteristic of his ancestors, who fought for Liberty amid the "Highlands" of their native land. Although a boy, Mr. Campbell took the place of a man in the army of the Potomac. He showed his undaunted courage as he faced the enemy in the following severely contested battles; Wilderness, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Weldon Railroad and many other engagements of minor importance. At the close of the struggle he was honorably discharged, and came home to adorn society as a citizen of the commonwealth he fought to defend. After his discharge Mr. Campbell served at the carpenters' trade in York county, Pa., where he became an adept in his profession. He first came to Plymouth in 1871, and worked in the planing-mill for Harvey Bros. for ten years. He then conceived the important idea of being his own master, and if there were any profits in business he would reap those profits. He succeeded even beyond his most sanguine hopes. Beginning at the first round in the ladder of success with nothing but two honest hands and a young and buoyant heart, Joseph W. Campbell has made himself independent, thus showing to the world what a young man can do by close attention to business, and the observance of those principles which make business a success, namely: honesty, energy, economy and a large stock of "go-aheadativeness." He now owns six double houses on Gaylord avenue, a street which he was the means of making and beautifying. He also owns five single houses on Randell street. Mr. Campbell is yet a single man. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Politically he is a Republican, and has acceptably discharged the office of councilman for two terms.

LOFTUS CAMPBELL, retired, Sebastopol, P.O. Inkerman, was born December 25, 1832, in County Carlow, Ireland, and is a son of Andrew and Ester (Hagar) Campbell, natives of the same place, and of Scotch and English extraction respectively. The family came to this country and settled in Carbondale, Pa., in 1847. Our subject was educated in the common schools, and in 1850 went to work as driver in the mines, where he stayed until 1852, and then preceded to California. In those days it was a more difficult matter to travel to California than it is at present. Mr. Campbell drove an ox-team twelve hundred miles of the way, and rode the remainder on a wild mule, which the party had captured on the plains. They were five months on the road from Carbondale to Sacramento, in which latter city our subject remained, working in the gold mines until 1860. He then returned home and went to work for the Pennsylvania Coal Company, on the Gravity road. In 1862 he once more visited California, where he stayed until 1864; he then returned home and once more took a position with the Pennsylvania Coal Company as train dispatcher on the Gravity road. Shortly afterward he took charge of No. 6 Breaker for the same company, which position he held until his resignation early in 1892. Mr. Campbell was united in marriage, November 12, 1878, with Louisa, daughter of Gideon and Mary A. Cadman, natives of Wolverhampton, England; she died May 17, 1886. Our subject is a member of th Episcopal church; is a member of the F. & A.M., and in politics is a Republican.

WILLIAM A. CAMPBELL, hardware merchant, P.O. Shickshinny, was born at Nescopeck, this county, August 13, 1837, a son of Joseph W. and Catherine (Kester) Campbell. His paternal grandfather, who was of American birth and Scotch parentage, was a pioneer of York county, Pa. Joseph W. Campbell was a native of York county, Pa., and settled in Luzerne county about 1830. For twenty-five years he was division superintendent of the Pennsylvania Canal, and was for several years engaged in farming in Salem township, but spent the last twelve years of his life at Nanticoke. His wife was a daughter of Jacob and Catherine (Washburn) Kester, and granddaughter of Daniel Washburn, who came from Connecticut to Luzerne county prior to the Revolution, and carried a musket at the Wyoming Massacre. Daniel Washburn was at that time a resident of Plymouth, but after the massacre spent some time in Northampton county; he later removed to Nescopeck, this county, and, died, in what is now Conyngham township, when over ninety years of age. The children of Joseph W. Campbell were William A., Charles H., Jacob W., Joseph and Sarah (Mrs. Wrighter Thomas). Our subject was reared in Luzerne county, educated in the common schools and Wyoming Seminary, and from 1855 to 1872 taught school. In 1872 he was elected superintendent of schools for Luzerne county, and served two terms (six years). In 1879 he embarked in the hardware business at Shickshinny, in which he has since successfully continued. He was married in January, 1861, to D. Alice, daughter of Lewis and Mary (Benscoter) Post, of Union township, this county, and has six children: Charles P., Bruce, Kate, Blanche, John and Grace. Mr. Campbell is a past master of Sylvania Lodge, F. & A.M., No. 354, and past grand of Shickshinny Lodge, No. 180, I.O.O.F. He served four years as postmaster of Shickshinny, under President Cleveland's administration, and has held the office of school director fourteen years; in politics he is a stanch Democrat.

MICHAEL CANFIELD, proprietor of restaurant, and supervisor, Plains, was born in County Galway, Ireland, in October, 1830, and is a son of John and Bridget (Cochran) Canfield, the former of whom was a farmer. They reared a family of three children, of whom Michael is the youngest. Our subject came to America in 1859, and engaged with a farmer in Dutchess county, N.Y., to work eight months; he then went to Charleston, S.C., where he remained six months, after which he preceded to Elizabethport, N.J., where he worked on the coal docks three years. He then came to Plains, this county, and mined in the Port Bowkley Shaft five years, and twelve years in the Henry Shaft; then was twelve years engaged in outside labor at the same place. He then loaded coal at the Enterprise Shaft two years. In 1879 he embarked in the saloon and boarding-house business. Mr. Canfield was married, May 1, 1856, to Miss Bridget, daughter of Henry and Bridget (Ward) Burk, natives of Ireland, and they have had born unto them ten children - five sons and five daughters - six of whom are living, viz.: John, in the West; Michael, driver-boss at the Henry Shaft; Hannah, married to Frank Hailey, of Elizabethport, N.J., by whom she has had five children, four of whom are living, and Delia, Ella, Catherine, all three living at home. Mr. Canfield and family are members of the Catholic Church; he is a member of the A.O.H., and politically he is a Democrat. He built his present place of business in 1874.

B.J. CANLAN. This well-known Pittston man was born in Jenkins township October 21, 1858, and is a son of Peter and Winifred (Lovelle) Canlan, natives of Ireland, the former of whom came to this country in 1854, working chiefly in the lumber business, and now resides at Pittston; the mother died in 1892. In the family there were two children: B.J., and Patrick, who died at the age of seven years. Our subject was educated in the public schools of Luzerne county, and at the age of fifteen went to Scranton and served an apprenticeship at tinning and plumbing, and learning the general hardware business. After this he took a course in the Wyoming Seminary, and Millersville State Norman School. He was then engaged in teaching in Lancaster county, where he remained one year, at which time he came to Pittston as principal at the Oregon schools, and there remained three years; then was principal of the Junction schools four years. In 1888 he engaged in the hardware business in Pittston, which he has since successfully conducted. On August 29, 1887, he married Miss Ellen Manly, of Plains township, and they have two children: Anna M. and Ellen. Mr. Canlan is treasurer of the Pittston Industrial Co-operative Association, is a very active member of the Father Mathew Society; is a member of the Catholic Benevolent Association, and in politics he is a Democrat.

MICHAEL CANNON was born March 22, 1844, at Inniskeel, County Donegal, Ireland, and was less than a year old when his parents came to this country. His father was James Cannon, an early settler at Summit Hill, Carbon Co., Pa., having located there in 1832. In September, 1839, having previously declared his intentions, he became a citizen of the United States, and the following year he revisited Ireland and married Rosa, a daughter of Hugh McAloon, and who is the mother of the subject of this sketch. Mr. Cannon subsequently returned to this country, and resided at Summit Hill and Hazleton up to the time of his death in 1892. Michael Cannon was educated in the public schools and subsequently became a teacher in the borough of Hazleton and in Wilkes-Barre, studying law in the meanwhile in the office of the late David R. Randall and Michael Reagan, of Wilkes-Barre. He was admitted to the Luzerne county bar January 25, 1873. In January, 1865, Mr. Cannon enlisted in the United States navy, doing duty on the monitor steamer "Canonicus," and was at the storming of Fort Fisher. He married, November 25, 1873, Nettie McDonald, youngest daughter of the late Patrick McDonald, of Wilkes-Barre City, Luzerne Co., Pa., she having been a teacher for several years in the schools of said city. Mr. and Mrs. Cannon have six children: Nettie, Stella, Laura, Edna, Celestine and Regina. Mr. Cannon, it will be observed, is another of the numerous class of attorneys who began active life in the school-room. He is a representative, also, of those who have got along in the world without other education than that afforded by the common schools. The disadvantage arising from lack of college or university training is often more than compensated by the spirit of independent self-reliance that has its birth and growth in those exigencies that come with dependence upon our own energies for a livelihood. Mr. Cannon was a worker as well as a teacher, and in the latter capacity achieved an enviable reputation, as those who knew him, and had an opportunity of judging his qualifications and estimating the result of his effort at the time, freely attest. His enlistment in the nation's service, when he was not yet quite of age, brought him experiences which have, doubtless, been valuable to him in later life. In the practice of his profession Mr. Cannon is noted among his brethren for both application and energy, qualities that are certain to unlock the repositories of the legal knowledge necessary for the successful prosecution of a client's cause. He is a Democrat in politics and a fair orator, and has been frequently called to effective service on the stump in his party's behalf.

PATRICK J. CANNON, proprietor of the "Homestead Hotel," Sugar Notch, was born in County Donegal, Ireland, March 14, 1864, a son of James and Catherine (Maloney) Cannon. The family came to America in 1864, and located in Frenchtown, this county, where the father died; the mother lives with our subject's sister Margaret. The family consisted of eleven children, six of whom are living, viz.: Bridget (Mrs. Patrick Dawson, in Ireland), Mary (Mrs. Frank Gallagher, in Wilkes-Barre), John (who resided in Hazleton), Margaret (Mrs. James Clair, in Wilkes-Barre), Patrick J. and Catherine, the latter of whom lives with her mother; James died while a student in college and Francis was killed in a breaker. Our subject was educated in the public school at Frenchtown and Audenried, and then worked nine months in No. 9 Breaker, after which he became an athlete, and for a long time was the swiftest runner in the Wyoming Valley. In 1882 he took a clerkship in the Company store at Audenried, where he remained two years, and then engaged in the hotel business in Wilkes-Barre for three years, after which he tended bar in Shenandoah, Pa., two years, and then returned to Wilkes-Barre, where he was engaged in the saloon business with John Lehman for eighteen months, at the end of which time, in 1892, he embarded in his present business. Mr. Cannon was married, January 20, 18--, to Miss Mary, daughter of Peter and Mary (McGeehan) Dufey, natives of County Donegal, Ireland, and they have two children, James and Peter. Mr. Cannon and family are members of the Catholic Church, and in his political views he is a Democrat.

THOMAS F. CANNON, baggage master on the Central Railroad of New Jersey, was born in Carbondale township, Lackawanna Co., Pa., February 7, 1853, and is a son of James and Ann (Clark) Cannon, natives of County Mayo, Ireland, whence they emigrated to this coutry in December, 1850, and located in Carbondale township, Lackawanna County, in January, 1851, where the father died December 13, 1885; the mother died February 8, 1886, at Ashley. In their family there were ten children, eight of whom died young, the surviving two being Thomas F. and Walter J., the latter of whom is firing a stationary engine at Mayfield, Lackawanna county. Our subject was educated at the public schools of his native township, and there worked for Poor & Mills in the lumber woods for three years; then for John Jermyn, loading coal at his breaker No. 2, at Jermyn; then went to work as laborer in the mine at Powderly's slope for John T. Jones and Michael Cearney, of Carbondale, Pa., continuing there three years, or until May, 1872. Leaving Carbondale, he preceded to Ashley, and worked on the Plains one month, then, in June, 1872, commenced braking on the coal cars, in which he continued until June, 1880, when he was promoted to brakeman on a passenger train, and then, May 22, 1872, was further promoted to his present position. On February 20, 1879, Mr. Cannon was married to Miss Johanna, daughter of Daniel and Johanna (McMahon) Doyle, natives of County Clare, Ireland, and they have had six children, viz.: James A., Daniel E., Mary, Walter, Joseph (who died at the age of three years, three months and five days), and Gertrude. Mr. Cannon and his family are members of the Catholic Church, and in his political views he is a Democrat.

WILLIAM HARRISON CAPWELL, publisher of the Plymouth Tribune, is a native of Clinton Township, Wyoming Co., Pa., and first saw the light on March 25, 1843. His father was Jabez G. Capwell, who came of Rhode Island stock. His grandfather; Frederick Capwell, came into that part of the country from Rhode Island in 1801, and was a member of the second family who settled in Clinton township. The mother of our subject was a daughter of David S. Niver, of Broome county, and received a fair common-school education, commencing to teach at the age of seventeen and following that profession for several years. When sixteen years of age he had a severe attack of rheumatism, which developed into a white swelling which crippled him for life, and this perhaps caused him to devote his time to teaching and journalistic and other prusuits. He learned the printer's trade, and is considered a good job printer, having been foreman of an office for some years. In 1885 he purchased the Nanticoke Tribune, and carred it on Successfully until July 1, 1891, when he removed the office to Plymouth and established the Plymouth Tribune. In politics he is a Republican, but of sufficient independence to support only those whom he deems most honest and best qualified for office. Mr. Capwell has been, for a number of years, a member of the M.E. church, and also takes a great interest in the Young Men's Christian Association, having been the first president of the Nanticoke Y.M.C.A. Mr. Capwell, amid the duties of a busy life, found time to fall in love, and on August 11, 1867, was married to Miss Alpha S. Wells, daughter of John Wells, Esq., of Factoryville, Wyoming Co., Pa., who has proved a worthy partner in the ups an downs of life. No children have blessed their union, but an adopted daughter, Gertie, now fourteen years of age, holds a loving place in their affections. His home is at Kingston. The Plymouth Tribune was established by William H. Capwell in July, 1891, the first issue bearing the date of the 17th of that month. It was the outgrowth of a desire of the publisher for a better field than Nanticoke, where for nearly six years he had published the Nanticoke Trubune, a seven-column folio, founded in 1883 by Minott C. Andreas. The Plymouth Tribune is a six-column quarto, devoted to home and general news; it has a fair circulation among the most intelligent people in Plymouth, Nanticoke and other towns in the lower end of the Wyoming Valley. Its pages are well filled, and its advertising patronage shows that its work is appreciated. A good job office in connection adds to the income of the proprietor. It is provided with a heavy Cottrell Cylinder press, a Washington hand press, once owned by "Brick Pomeroy," and two job presses.

OWEN CARABINE, farmer, P.O. Inkerman, born June 9, 1832, in County Mayo, Ireland, is a son of Neil and Nancy (Healy) Carabine, natives of the same place, who reared a family of three children, of whom Owen is second in order of birth. Our subject came to the United States in 1855, and settled immediately at Pittston, Pa., where he obtained employment as a laborer in the mines. From 1857 to 1865 he was employed in sinking shafts. He then went to work as a miner under the Pennsylvania Coal Company, retaining that position until 1887, when he bought the farm on which he now resides. Our subject was united in marriage with Bridget, daughter of Edward and Elizabeth (McGlone) Cain, natives of County Mayo, Ireland, and the issue of their union is as follows: Margaret, married August 10, 1885, to Thomas Smith, car-builder, Kansas City, Kans.; John J.; Thomas; Michael J.; Elizabeth, married December 10, 1886, to James Williamson, yardman, Pennsylvania Coal Company, Pittston; Mary; Belinda, and Nellie. In religion Mr. Carabine is a Roman Catholic, and is a member of the Father Mathew F.A.B. Society, and of the St. John's Literary Association. In politics he is a Democrat, and in 1888-9 he was supervisor of his township.

HIRAM CAREY, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Hanover township, February 16, 1836, and is the son of John A. and Polly (Bennett) Carey, and a grandson of Benjamin Carey, who was a brother of Samuel Carey who took so active a part in the Indian battles, and of Nathan and Ann (Hoover) Bennett, the former a brother of Ishimal Bennett, who was a horseman in the Wyoming battle. The father was born April 8, 1809, died January 13, 1892; the mother still lives with her son Stewart on the homestead in Ashley. The family consisted of nine children, viz.: Hiram; Susan (Mrs. Henry Stein, Chicago); Charles, who died at the age of four years; Rufus, who died at the age of two years; Sarah (Mrs. Christian F. Leaser); Jane (Mrs. Charles T. Lahr); Stewart; John, who lost a leg on the railroad, and died June 7, 1892, and Nathan, a painter in Oakland City. Our subject was educated in The public schools of Hanover township, and then fired three years on the Ashley Slope, and in 1857 removed to Wilkes-Barre, where he attended a lock on the canal several years, since when he has followed various occupatons there. He built his residence on Ash street in 1891, and he also owns three blocks on Cinderella street. Mr. Carey was married January 18, 1857, to Miss Susan, daughter of Fred and Elizabeth (Sawits) Zeigler, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German origin, and they have twelve children, of whom we have record of: Mary (Mrs. Andrew Smith), Frank, Eugene, Edward, Rebecca (Mrs. David V. Thomas), Elizabeth (Mrs. Peter Wagner), William, and Frederick (who died August 3, 1892). Mrs. Carey departed this life January 31, 1881, and Mr. Carey was married May 1, 1889, to Mrs. Martha McCasey, daughter of Moses and Susan (Belles) Tamany (natives of Ireland and Pennsylvania, and of Irish and German origin, respectively), and widow of Michael McCasey, by whom she had three children: William, Edward and Harry. Our subject is a Republican in his political views, but votes independent of party lines.

HARRY S. CARKHUFF, ladies' hair-dressing parlors, Welles Building, Public square, Wilkes-Barre, was born near Flemington, Hunterdon Co., N.J., June 26, 1864, a son of Amos S. and Emily (Lee) Carkhuff, and of French and German extraction. He was reared in Easton, Pa., until nineteen years of age, receiving a public-school education. In 1863 he located in New York City, where he spent five years learning the trade of ladies' hair-dressing, and in 1888 came to Wilkes-Barre, where he established the first ladies' hair-dressing parlors in the city, which business has been a success from the start, and is constantly increasing. In connection with his parlors, he carries a stock of all the paraphernalia pertaining to ladies' hair and toilet goods, and has made diseases of the hair and scalp his speical study. Mr. Carkhuff is a member of the M.E. Church, and is a Republican in politics, in which he takes an active part.

LYMAN H. CARLE, who has charge of the steam heat at the Ashley Shops, was born in Jackson township, this coutny, January 19, 1844. He is a son of Miner and Susan (DeReamer) Carle, the former a native of Jackson township and of Irish origin, and the latter a native of Ithaca, N.Y., and of French and German lineage. Our subject is a grandson of Peter and Mary (Brown) Carle, who came to Luzerne county with one of the Connecticut colonies. His father, who was a farmer, reared a family of six children besides our subject, viz.: Amelia (Mrs. Barney Honeywell Levi), who was fatally poisoned by mistake while clerking in a drugstore in Kingston; Sarah (Mrs. James Honeywell), of Dallas; Austin, who was killed by a train, at the age of fourty-four, while acting as foreman on the Factoryville tunnel; Ira, who was killed at the age of nineteen at Northumberland, while acting as brakeman at the Bloomsburg Railroad; Elizabeth, who died at the age of twenty-one, and Emma Delphine, who died in infancy. Our subject received a common-school education, and was then successively engaged in braking, firing and engineering on the Bloomsburg and Pennsylvania Railroads, three years as engineer of a passenger train; he was then engineer on the Central Railroad two years, and stationary mine engineer three years, after which he had charge of the machinery four years. He was then outside foreman for the Hillside Coal & Iron Company at Carbon Hill, Pleasant Valley and Forest City for five years, and returned to Ashley in 1880, where he acted as engineer in different places for three years, after which he engaged in the ice business, which he has since followed. He was also engaged in contacting for streets, paving and sewers until 1887, when he accepted his present position. Mr. Carle was married October 4, 1864, to Miss Ellen, daughter of Cornelius and Mary (McLaughlin) Dougherty, natives of Inishowen, County Donegal, Ireland. The issue of this union has been twelve children, viz.: Charles W., a physician, now deceased; Nellie M., who taught several terms of school, and is now a student in the Philadelphia Dental College; Samuel, who died young; Mary E. (Mrs. Reuben Dill); Laura B., a school-teacher at Ashley; Edith; Jennie, who died young; Lyman E.; Leona M.; Stanley M.; Austin R., and Olive E. Mrs. Carle is a member of the Catholic Church. The father and some of the children are Members of the Presbyterian Church. He is a member of the F. & A.M. and the K. of H. In political preference Mr. Carle is a Democrat, and has held the offices of tax collector, councilman and school director in Ashley borough. He was in the commissary department of the army of the Potomac for one year.

BENJAMIN GARDNER CARPENTER (deceased), late contractor and merchant, of Wilkes-Barre, was born at Plains, Luzerne Co., Pa., July 2, 1827, a son of Samuel and Nancy (Gardner) Carpenter, natives of Orange county, N.J., and of English origin. The father was a farmer by occupation, who reared a family of four children, viz.: Benjamin G., Martha, Kate and Emery. Our subject was reared on a farm, educated in the schools of Plains and Carbondale, Pa., and after serving an apprenticeship in 1845 he became a partner of Theron Burnett, in a store near where the Osterhout building now stands. After a time they moved to North Franklin street, and from there to West Market street, where Mr. Carpenter purchased Mr. Burnett's interest, and took in, as a partner, his brother, Emery Carpenter. In 1873 they erected the building now occupied by the firm at No. 51 West Market street, and after a time our subject purchased his brother Emery's interest, and admitted Francis Dunsmore and A.H. Mulford as partners. At Mr. Mulford's death, in 1875, Walter S. Carpenter, eldest son of our subject, was admitted into the firm, and later the two younger sons, B. Harold and Edmund M., were taken into the firm, which became known as B.G. Carpenter & Co. Up to the time of his death, November 11, 1889, our subject was trustee of the Wyoming Seminary, the Franklin Street M.E. Church; was president of the Wilkes-Barre Water Company, and director of the Scranton Stove Works, Scranton, Pa. Mr. Carpenter married March 24, 1852, Miss Sallie A., daughter of Samuel and Mary Digman (Kyte) Fell, natives of Wilkes-Barre and New Jersey, and of English and German origin, respectively. This happy union was blessed with five children, viz.: Walter Samuel, born April 5, 1853, married to Belle Morgan; Charles Drake, born May 6, 1855, was drowned in the Susquehanna river, at Wilkes-Barre, May 14, 1864; Jesse Gardner, born October 6, 1857, died at Wilkes-Barre, July 21, 1891; Benjamin Harold, born July 16, 1860; and Edmund Nelson, born June 27, 1865. The three living members of this family, viz.: Walter S.B., Harold and Edmund N., together with Francis Dunsmore, compose the firm of B.G. Carpenter & Co., No. 51 West Market street, dealers in steam, hot water and hot air heating apparatus, house furnishing goods, tin, plumbing, gas-fitting, and galvanized iron work. Our subject, B.G. Carpenter, during his life was a member and active worker in the Franklin Street M.E. Church. He was an honorable, conscientious gentleman, and one of the best-known businessmen of this section.

JOHN S. CARPENTER, retired, Pittston, was born August 11, 1872, in Kingston, where he was reared and educated. He is the son of Isaac and Elizabeth (Sharps) Carpenter, both of whom were born in Warren county about 1806, locating in Wilkes-Barre, where the father resided two years as hotel-keeper. He then removed to Kingston, where he accumulated some property, and where he also lost some through going security for friends. He next removed to Exeter, where he bought coal property now owned by his grandson, Jesse B. Carpenter. Here he resided for a number of years as hotel-keeper, and as such was well-known, for, in conjunction with his hotel, he also worked his farm, which supplied his table on which were placed dishes to satisfy the most epicurean taste. He soon moved back to Kingston, where he remained a few years. He next went to Wilkes-Barre, where he had first located, and resided for a short time on new property he had purchased, but becoming lonely for old associates, he finally removed to Exeter, where he died in 1845, at the age of sixty-five years. He was much respected and had a host of friends. His family consisted of four children, only one of whom is now living, John S., who is the third in order of birth. He always confined himself to agricultural pursuits, living with his father till he reached his twenty-sixth year, when he married, February 9, 1839, Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph P. and Margaret (Barber) Schooley. To this happy couple were born four children, two of whom grew to maturity and only one, Jesse B., is now (1892) living. Our subject removed to Exeter in 1847, where he kept hotel for sixteen years in one of the oldest houses in the Valley. Like his father, he kept a good house, and worked a farm of eighty-five acres. In 1866 he removed to West Pittston, where he is now retired, enjoying the result of his early activity. Mr. Carpenter was for some years president of the Pittston Bridge Company, of which he was always a director. Mrs. Elizabeth (Schooley) Carpenter was born in Exeter, September 3, 1818. Her father, Joseph Schooley, removed to the Valley in the same year. Her grandfather Barber, a native of New Jersey, was a soldier in the English army during the Revoltionary war. Both her great-grandfathers Schooley and Barber were natives of England. Mrs. Carpenter owns an eighth interest in 100 acres of good coal land, on the proceeds of which she recieves a royalty of twenty-five cents per ton.

JESSE B. CARPENTER was born in Kingston, January 23, 1840. In 1847 his father removed with him to Exeter, where Jesse B. was reared and edcuated, finishing with a few terms at the Wyoming Seminary. Like his father and grandfather, he always confined himself to agricultural pursuits. In 1861 he entered the army as private in company N, Twenty-eighty P.V.I., for the term of three years. At the battle of Antietam, September 17, 1862, he received a wound in the arm which disabled him, causing him to receive an honorable discharge. On his return to citizenship, and about 1866, he again took to farming, raising vegetables for the Pittston market, and soon his taste inclined to plants and flowers. As his experience increased, so did his business. Year after year he kept adding to his hot-houses and green-houses, until now his green houses are composed of eight thousand feet of glass, having all the modern facilities. He owns about one hundred and eighty acres, eighty of which he devotes to his gardening and flower beds. Mr. Carpenter owns the second largest establishment of his line in the Valley. He is a thorough-going business man of sound principles, and is much respected by his neighbors. He has held several offices in the township, and is now a member of the borough council. He is a member of the G.A.R., I.O.O.F., F. & A.M. and K. of H. In 1872 he married Miss Catherine E., daughter of James D. and Patience Laird, and by her he had four children, three of whom are now (1892) living: J.S., Elizabeth and Jessie. Mrs. Carpenter was born in Wilkes-Barre, January 12, 1848.

M.A. CARROLL, M.D., physician and surgeon, Plymouth, was born at Silver Lake, Susquehanna Co., Pa., September 25, 1866, and is a son of James and Bridget (McGrath) Carroll, also natives of Pennsylvania. There were nine children in this branch of the Carroll family, viz.: Francis P., a machinist in Sayre, Pa.; John J., a physician at Scranton, Pa.; Dennis, now known as "Brother Ephebus James," of Brooklyn, N.Y.; Mary, deceased; Catherine, now wife of William Farrell, of Scranton, Pa.; Mathew, deceased; M.A., our subject; Julia, who resides at home, and James, deceased. The subject of this sketch was educated first in the common schools of his native county; then at the high school at Scranton, and later at Wood's Business College. He subsequently took a course of Latin under private tutorship, and also studied medicine under his brother, J.J. Carroll, of Scranton. From there he entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Baltimore, graduating from ther an M.D. in March, 1888. He soon after passed the exacting examination required by the State Board of Examinations to the Medical Chirugical College of Philadelphia, and then entered the City Hospital at Baltimore, where he remained one year, coming from there to Nanticoke, Pa., where he practiced some time. Removing from there to Plymouth, he has since been practicing his profession. Dr. Carroll is a member of the Luzerne Medical Society, and is an adherent of the Catholic Church.

ROBERT H. CARTER, proprietor of the "Hudson Hotel," Hudson, was born in Providence, Pa., July 14, 1856, and is a son of Henry and Elizabeth (Hindmarch) Carter. (See William J. Carter's sketch.) Our subject remained at home and assisted his father until the age of eighteen, when he began working about the mines, which he followed seven years, and was then employed as a brakeman on the Delaware & Hudson Railroad for five years. In 1888 he engaged in his present business in his father's old stand. Besides his hotel, he owns two other properties in Plains township. Mr. Carter was married October 28, 1879, to Patience E., daughter of William and Elizabeth (Cobley) Williams, of Parsons, natives of England. Mr. And Mrs. Carter had one child that died at the age of eleven months; they have an adopted daughter, named Fannie M. In his political views our subject has always stood by the principles of the Republican party.

THOMAS CARTER, proprietor of the "Central Hotel," Plymouth, was born in Cornwall, England, December 16, 1848, and is a son of Charles and Jane (Richards) Carter, also natives of England. The subject of this sketch was educated in his native land, and in 1866 came to America, where he followed mining ten years, after which he engaged in the hotel business at Avondale, Pa., where he catered to the wants of the public for several years. Afterward he moved to Luzerne, where he was the proprietor of what is now known as the "Luzerne House." From here, after one year, he removed to what is known as the "Central House," at Kingston, Pa., at which place he remained but a short time, coming from there to Plymouth, where he erected a neat three-story brick block. He now ministers to the wants of his many patrons in a genial, hospitable way, which is a leading characteristic of the gentleman under consideration. Mr. Carter's marriage occurred April 28, 1872, when he was united to Mrs. Ann Sage, daughter of John and Margaret (Jones) Appleton, natives of Wales. Our subject is a communicant of the Episcopal Church; a member of the I.O.O.F. and Sons of St. George; in politics he is an adherent of the Republican party.

WILLIAM J. CARTER, Hudson, conductor on the Delaware & Hudson Railroad, was born in Schuylkill county, Pa., August 25, 1850, and is a son of Henry and Elizabeth (Hindmarch) Carter, natives of Jarrow, Durham, England. The father came to America in 1848, and was engaged in shaft-sinking and boring, successively as follows: in Schuylkill county, five years; Pittston, three years; Rockwell's Hill, one year, and Taylorsville, five years. In 1867 he removed to Mill Creek, where he was engaged in the saloon business till 1873, when he retired from active life; he died September 23, 1886, at the age of sixty-nine years. His family consisted of three children: William J., Isabella (Mrs. Peter Hines) and Robert H. (whose sketch appears above). Our subject began picking slate when but ten years of age, and worked about the mines in all thirteen years. He then began braking on the Delaware & Hudson Railroad, which he followed three years, and was then promoted to his present position. Mr. Carter was married September 26, 1874, to Elizabeth A., daughter of Daniel and Mary (Davis) Howells, natives of Merthyr Tydvill, South Wales, and they had three children, one of whom survives, Mary. Our subject is a member of the O.R.C., and in his political views he is in sympathy with the Republican party, but votes strictly on principle.

A.J. CASE, farmer, P.O. Cease's Mills, was born in Cease's Mill, Pa., January 13, 1846, a son of Absalom and Jane (Lamareaux) Case, the former born in Plymouth, the latter in Jackson township, this county. Absalom is a son of Thomas Case, who was a native of Connecticut, and came to this county about 1780 or 1800, being one of the first settlers in what is now Jackson township, then a part of Plymouth. He first located in Plymouth, where he resided for a number of years, and then removed to Jackson, where he died, leaving a family of eleven children. His son Absalom made his home in Jackson township, where he remained all his life, an honest and industrious farmer and owner of a large tract of land, which he kept improving to the day of his death, which occurred in 1879, when he was aged eighty-two years. He had the respect and confidence of his neighbors, and held all township offices with entire satisfaction to everyone. His family numbered eleven children, seven of whom grew to maturity, and six of them are now living, A.J. being the youngest in the family. Our subject was educated at the common schools of Cease's Mills, and although he belongs to a line of farmers worthy of the name yet he is a mechanic as well, of high skill, one who never served a day at a trade; he is a first-class carpenter and blacksmith, at which trades he has worked continually for seven years. Indeed, he is what we would call one of Nature's mechanics, in the full sense of the term. He has built a palatial residence, all of which he planned and executed himself, both inside and out, and now stands as a model of excellence in the line of mechanics. On May 2, 1873, Mr. Case married Miss Lydia K., daughter of William and Clara Ransom, and there were born to them the following-named twelve children (eight of whom are yet living): Clara J., William H., Olive A., Harry W., Frank M., Emma B., Verney M., Stanley R., Loranza D., Adda M., Dora P., and Nellie. Of these, William H. died March 4, 1871, aged two days; Olive died February 2, 1872, aged five days; Dora died November 20, 1890, aged three years and two months; Nellie died April 3, 1891, aged three days. Clara J. married George A Hale, a photographer. Mr. Case, in connection with farming, pays special attention to hay-making. His live stock is of the best Holstein blood, and his farm contains 118 acres of prime land, which, under the watchful eye of its owner, is a model one. Mr. Case is a member of the Order of United American Mechanics; in politics he is a Democrat, and has been honored with most of the town offices, which he held with credit.

MAJOR C. CASE, a farmer and mechanic, P.O. Cease's Mills, was born in Jackson township January 11, 1825. He is a son of Absalom and Jane (Lamareaux) Case, the former of whom was born in Plymouth, the latter in Jackson township. Absalom was a son of Thomas Case, a native of this county, and Thomas was a son of Absalom Case, who moved into Luzerne county prior to the Revolutionary war, and was a blacksmith in the army; the anvil on which he forged his work is now in the possession of our subject. The Cases moved into and settled in the Valley, and were farmers and mechanics. Absalom Case, the younger, and son of the pioneer of the same name, had a family of ten children, seven of whom came to maturity, and all of them are now living, Major C. being the eldest in the family. Our subject was reared and educated in Jackson township, and in early life learned the shoemaker's, wagon-maker's and blacksmith's trades. At the age of twenty-three he married, for his first wife, Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Lefford and Jane Schooly, and by her he had three children, two of whom are now living. For his second wife Mr. Case married Miss Amanda, daughter of David and Pattie Austin, by which union there were ten children, seven of whom are now living, all married but one. Mr. Case is a self-made man, and carries on general agriculture on a farm of seventy-five acres of fertile land, made so by hard labor and patient toil. He is a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he has held responsible offices, and he is a great Sunday-school worker. In addition to his farm and trade he keeps a small grocery store, supplying the necessary wants of his neighbors. Mr. Case is respected and honored by his fellow citizens, and has held various offices in his own township. Politically he is a Democrat.

CALVIN W. CASE, farmer, P.O. Lehman, was born in Plymouth (then Jackson) township March 16, 1812. He is the son of Thomas and Catherine (Carskaen) Case, both of whom were born in Orange county, N.Y. They moved to Plymouth where they passed the remainder of their lives, suffering all the inconveniences of pioneer life. Thomas Case was born August 16, 1771; Catherine, his wife, July 11, 1777. They wre married January 9, 1793, and their family numbered thirteen children, ten of whom grew to maturity. Calvin W., the subject of this sketch, is the only survivor. He was reared in this township and educated at the common schools, making such good use of his advantages, limited as they were in those days, as to become competent to teach in the common schools of his birthplace. Mr. Case has the full confidence of his fellow citizens. He has held the office of justice of the peace for twenty years, during which time he made marked progress in the study of the law, his counsel being much sought after. He has also held other offices of trust and responsibility. In 1835, at the age of twenty-three years, he married Miss Olive, daughter of Thomas and Mary Lamareaux. They have no children. Mr. Case is a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and has held all the leading offices in that religious body. Politically, he is a Democrat, with Prohibition tendencies.

THOMAS CASSEDY, junior member of the firm of Conyngham, Schrage & Co., wholesale and retail merchants, Wilkes-Barre and Ashley, and manager of the store at the latter place, was born in Wilkes-Barre June 21, 1853, and is a son of Thomas and Susan A. (Mutchler) Cassedy, the former a native of Springville, Susquehanna Co., Pa., and the latter born in Luzerne county, a daughter of George Mutchler, and of German and French lineage. The father passed his boyhood on the farm where he was born, and when about sixteen years of age accepted a postion in a coal office in New York City, where he remained fifteen years. He then went to Reading, Pa., as sales agent, and after acting in this capacity a few years came to Pittston as mine superintendent, which position he held for several years. He then went to the Blackman Mines as superintendent, and was engaged in the coal business and in speculating and dealing in coal lands the remainder of his active life. Mr. Cassedy was one of the few men of his time who possessed a Thorough knowledge of the coal business in all its details, and was one of the pioneer operators who developed the anthracite coal fields of the Wyoming Valley, and determined its wonderful wealth and extent. He died in Shenandoah, Pa., September 6, 1875, at the age of sixty-two years. By his first wife, Catherine (Bishop) Cassedy, he had two children, both of whom are dead; by his second wife, who is still living at Cherryville, Pa., he had four children: George R., register and recorder of Fremont county, Canon City, Colo.; Elizabeth (Mrs. Osborne Knecht), Treichlers, Pa.; Susan (Mrs. George R. Shaeffer), Salt Lake City, and Thomas. The grandfather of our subject was born in the parish of Inver, County Donegal, Ireland, in 1775. In 1793, during the war between England and France, he emigrated to America, and while on the voyage their ship was hailed by a man-of-war, and eighteen of the crew and passengers pressed into the British service, he being saved only by the kindness of the captain, who concealed him between the two beds upon which his wife was confined, in which situation his escape was nearly at the cost of suffocation, it being in July. He subsequently settled in Springville, Susquehanna Co., Pa., then a comparative wilderness, where he participated in all the trails and privations of pioneer life. He boldly faced all barriers, and founded a comfortable home for himself and family. He was an extensive reader, and a man of rare intelligence; was well-versed in history, and once revisited his native country. He died December 28, 1853. Our subject was educated in the public schools of Schuylkill county and at the Commerical College of Philadelphia, after which he studied telegraphy for a few months at Shenandoah, Pa. He then came to Wilkes-Barre, where he held a position as clerk for Conyngham & Paine, four years, and bookkeeper in their Ashley store, six years. When C.M. Conyngham succeeded Conyngham & Paine, he was appointed manager, which position he held five years, and the present firm was formed January 1, 1884. Mr. Cassedy was married March 15, 1877, to Miss Emma L. Roper, daughter of J.J. Roper, of Brooklyn, Susquehanna Co., Pa., and the issue of this happy union is four bright children: George F., Fred F., Susan E. and Thomas, who is the seventh Thomas Cassedy in a dirct line of descendancy. Mr. Cassedy is a member of the F. & A.M., a Republican in his political views, and was appointed oil inspector of Luzerne county, January 26, 1892.

HARRY BRUNDAGE CASSELBERRY, M.D., was born in the village of Conyngham, Luzerne Co., Pa., December 19, 1863, a son of Dr. Jesse R. and Amanda (Brundage) Casselberry. He was brought up in the place of his birth until 1871, when his paents removed to Hazleton, where he has since resided. He attended the public schools of the borough until the fall of 1880, when he entered Williston Seminary at East Hampton, Mass., where he remained one year. During his stay at this school he, with six other students, founded the "Iota Zeta Fraternity" (now such a popular secret society at Williston and other preparatory schools), and at the first annual reunion in New York City, in 1886, he was elected "Grand President" of the Alumni Lodges. In 1881 he entered Lafayette College, taking the scientific course at that institution. He then registered as a student of medicine in his father's office, and was finally, April 2, 1886, graduated with the degree of M.D. from Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia. During his college course he gave particular attention to the eye, ear, nose and throat, and after graduating spent a considerable time in the hospitals of Philadelphia devoted to those branches. In the spring of 1887 he sailed for Europe to continue his studies, and for a time attended the various eye hospitals of the Frederichs Wilhelm University, of Berlin, Germany, under the famous professors, Schweigger and Hirschberg. At the completion of his studies in Germany, he made a tour of Europe, and then spent several months in St. Mary's College Hospital, London, England, under Professors Juler and Critchett. Returning to Hazleton, he began the practice of his profession, in which he still continues. Dr. Casselberry has alwasy shown a great fondness for literary work, and has contributed many articles, relating to his profession and otherwise, to the prominent journals of the day. His literary work, however, has been mostly confined to subjects connocted with music and the drama. He has been for a number of years the dramatic critic of the Hazleton Sentinel, and his articles written under the nom-de-plume of "The Man with the Opera Glass" have gained him an enviable reputation in this line. As a critic he aims to tell the truth, and while often severe, no one is quicker to give credit when it is due than he. He is also a staff correspondent of a number of musical journals. Secret societies have always seemed to exercise a fascination for the Doctor, and he is now connected with a number of secret and social organizations. By virtue of his revolutionary descent, he is a member of the Sons of the American Revolution Society, and is an enthusiastic Odd Fellow, besides holding membership in the A. and I.O. of Knights of Malta and Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He is also a director of the Hazleton National Bank. Even before coming of age Dr. Casselberry was much interested in politics, and now he is numbered among his party's most active workers. He is an uncompromising Republican of the Stalwart type, and his own familiar remark: "I do all my kicking before the nomination is made," is thoroughly indicative of the man. He has represented his party in many conventions, and being a ready speaker is much sought after in public meetings. When Hazleton became a city in 1892, he was nominated by the Republicans of the Eighth Ward for Select Council. Without any solicitation on his part the Democrats of the Ward assembled in convention and endorsed his nomination; so at the succeeding election he was elected, receiving every vote cast. This was the first campaign for city officials, and when the first Select Council was organized April 4, 1892, although he was the youngest member, on account of his wide knowledge of parliamantary law he was made the President of that body, which position he still holds. He was also prominently mentioned as a suitable candidate for State Senator during the campaign of 1892, but took himself out of the fight by a peremptory declination. He is a politician without any desire for public office. He is unmarried.

T.P. CASSELBERRY, M.D., Nescopeck, was born in Butler township, this county, August 9, 1851, a son of Thomas M. and Julia A. (Potts) Casselberry, both natives of Montgomery county, Pa., and who, about the year 1848, settled in Butler township, this county, where the father taught school for several years. Later he kept store in Conyngham, after which he contracted for the carrying of the U.S. Mail over different routes in the State, and for twelve years was engaged in the livery business at Hazleton. He is now a resident of Philadelphia, and an extensive dealer in horses. Our subject was reared in Luzerne county, and educated in the public schools. In 1879 he began the study of medicine with Dr. J.R. Casselberry at Hazleton, and was graduated from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in 1882. He immediately located at Hazleton, where he remained four years; then removed to Wapwallopen, where he resided six years, and in 1891 came to Nescopeck, where he has already succeeded in building up a lucrative practice. In 1888 Dr. Casselberry married Alta, daughter of Aaron and Martha (Keen) Harter, of Nescopeck. The Doctor is a member of the P.O.S. of A., and in politics he is a Republican.

ASA CASTERLINE, farmer, P.O. Orange, was born July 2, 1842, in Franklin, where he was reared and educated. He is a son of James and Eliza (Allen) Casterline, both born in Sussex county, N.J., the former of whom was a son of Robert Casterline, also a native of Sussex county, where he died. James removed to this county in 1832, locating in Franklin township, where he owned 500 acres of land, 200 of which he cleared and improved, or caused to be improved, during his lifetime. He was a blacksmith by trade, which he commenced at as soon as he arrived. His work was in great demand, and he did much toward the advancement of civilization, both by his trade as a mechanic and his enterprise as a pioneer farmer, for he carried on agricultural pursutis in conjuction with blacksmithing. During the years of his life, and at various times, he disposed of some of the original 500 acres. He reared a family of nine children, seven of whom grew to maturity, five of them now living. He died in February, 1884, at the age of seventy-five. Asa, his sixth son, in early life learned the Wheelwright's trade, which he followed for several years, and at different places, serving time in various establishments in order to perfect his trade. On March 17, 1868, he married Miss Mary, daughter of Jerome and Margaret Blakslee, and by her had three childen, two of whom are living: Walter, who is fitting himself for the practice of medicine, and Frank, a farmer, both bright and promising boys. Mrs. Casterline was born in Luzerne borough, in November, 1848. The Blakslees are New Englanders; well-informed people, representing various professions, including the bench, bar, and pulpit. After his marriage he removed to Scranton, where he remained two years; then removed to Wilkes-Barre, where he remained four years; thence proceeded to Pittston, and here remained eleven years, working at his trade at all these places. Finally, in 1881, he came to Franklin township, where he bought a part of the old homestead, consisting of 100 acres, on which he now resides. On August 4, 1891, his house caught fire and burned down. He now has a fine residence on the old site, of modern style and finish. Mr. Casterline is a live business man, and a practical farmer, having a special view to stock raising. Socially he is a member of the I.O.O.F. He and his wife are both members of the M.E. Church.

HIRAM CASTNER, farmer, P.O. Dupont, was born in Plymouth, May 26, 1840, a son of Elijah and Margaret (Hoover) Castner, both of whom were born in New Jersey. They removed to this county in 1848, locating in Mill Hollow, where the father pruchased 200 acres of unreclaimed land, some of which he cleared, and afterward he sold it all at a profit. He removed to Plymouth, when he also engaged in farming for a number of years, and finally went to Ohio, where he now resides, a well-to-do farmer. He is a man of large experience in agricultural pursuits, and a thorough-going man of business. His family numbered ten children, eight of whom came to maturity, and are yet living, Hiram being the fifth by birth. Our subject was reared, and educated at the common schools of his native town, and, having regarded farming as his special calling, has confined himself to it more or less all his life. He was stable-boss for the Butler Coal Company about sixteen years, and for the Lehigh Valley Company five years. On August 26, 1864, he entered the United States service to defend his country, and protect the union of the States. He was a member of the Two Hundred and Third P.V.I., serving honorably till the close of the war, having participated in the battles of Fort Fisher, Deep Bottom, and many others. In 1858 he married Miss Catherine Sullivan, who was born in Ireland in 1840, a daughter of Jeremiah Sullivan, and there were born to them ten children, all of whom are living: Jane, Lizzie, William, Mary M., John, Jeremiah, Elijah, Kate, Anna, and Della. Of these, Jane married William Kester; Lizzie married Edward Keating; William married Miss Kate Divers; Mary M. married Peter Kennedy; John married Miss Mary Taugher. Mr. Castner removed on his present place of 104 acres of improved land. He is a practical farmer, and a man much esteemed in his own locality, because of his worth as a neighbor and as a man. Politically he is a Republican, and has held some township offices with much credit.

SILAS CAVENEE, farmer, Huntington township, P.O. Town Hill, was born January 22, 1835, in Columbia county, and is a son of James and Nancy L. (Hedden) Cavenee. They were natives of Pennsylvania, and, respectively, of Irish and German origin; the father was a laborer by occupation, and died in June, 1874, aged seventy-nine years. Silas Cavenee is the only one living of a family of ten children. He was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and when ten years of age began working out at farm work, continuing in this until August 12, 1862, when he enlisted in Company I, One Hundred and Forty-third P.V.; he participated in the battles of Chancellorsville, Petersburg, Weldon R.R., and other minor engagements, receiving his discharge June 12, 1865. He returned to Huntington township, and worked on rented farms until 1879, when he bought his present place, containing twenty acres, one-half mile west of Town Hill postoffice. Mr. Cavenee was married, February 26, 1871, to Miss Orselia, daughter of Fredrick and Sarah Hartman. This union was blessed with three children, viz.: Calvert R., born April 8, 1872; Alfred E., born August 15, 1876, and Sarah A., born October 7, 1881. Mrs. Cavenee is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; our subject is a member of the G.A.R., and is a Democrat politically.

GEORGE CEASE, retired farmer, P.O. Cease's Mills, was born in Beach Haven, Luzerne Co., Pa., August 24, 1810, a son of Henry and Mary (Sonber) Cease, the former born in Northampton county, the latter in Luzerne county. Henry was a son of Henry Cease, a native of Germany who came to America when about eighteen years of age, landing in Canada, whence he moved to New York City, then to Hunlock Creek, this county. He was a tailor by trade, but engaged in farming and other occupations pursued by early settlers. His famly consisted of four children - three sons and one daughter - of whom Henry, in about 1820, located in Plymouth, about four miles north of the river, where he engaged in farming, and lived until 1856, in which year he died at the age of sixty-seven years. His family consisted of fourteen children, twelve of whom grew to maturity, and nine are now living, George being second in the family. Our subject was reared and educated in this county, and August 7, 1837, he married Miss Jane, daughter of Thomas and Mary Lamareaux, by which marriage there were born twelve children, ten of whom are now living: Almira, Elijah, John, Emily, Thomas, Benson, Maritta, Ira, Diana and Mary. Mr. Cease came to his present neighborhood when the county was comparatively new, and helped to make the township what it is. In his early life he was extensively engaged in lumbering. His son, Thomas, now occupies the old site. Henry Cease, father of our subject, built in 1825 the sawmill which is now owned by his son Josiah, who is also a manufacturer of lumber. Henry also built in 1846 the first gristmill, now owned by Sydney Gregory. Mr. George Cease has had the respect and confidence of his fellow citizens, holding several township offices. He is a consistent member of the Baptist Church; politically he is a Democrat.

JOSIAH CEASE, farmer and lumberman, P.O. Cease's Mills, was born in Jackson township, this county, March 3, 1833, a son of Henry and Mary (Sonber) Cease, the former born in Northampton county, the latter in Luzerne county. Henry was a son of Henry Cease, a native of Germany, who came to America when about eighteen years of age, first landing in Canada, whence he moved to New York City, thence to Hunlock Creek, this county, where he remained the rest of his lifetime. His family numbered four children - three sons and one daughter. In his early life he learned the tailor's trade, but later in life he was a tiller of the soil. Henry, his son, located in Plymouth township in 1820, about four miles north of Nanticoke, where he lived as a farmer until he died in 1856, at the age of sixty-seven years. His family consisted of fourteen children, twelve of whom grew to maturity, and nine are now (1891) living, Josiah being the youngest in the family. Our subject was reared and educated in Jackson township. In his early life he confined himself to farming and lumbering, which gave him a knowledge of machinery, at which he became an expert. He now owns and operates a sawmill, located on the same site on which his father built in 1825. He is engaged in the manufacture of lumber and rollers for mine purposes. In August, 1854, he married Miss Sarah Jane, daughter of Oliver and Amanda Ide, by which union there were born seven children, five of whom are now living: Henry E., Celestia A., Morgan A., Amanda L. and Thomas J., all married except Thomas J. Mr. Cease has the entire confidence of his fellow citizens. He was justice of the peace ten years, a school director thirty years, clerk of the town ten years and is now postmaster. Politically he is a Democrat, and he is a consistent member of the Baptist Church.

WILLIAM H. CEASE, blacksmith, West Nanticoke, was born in Plymouth township, October 17, 1844, a son of Jacob and Emma J. (Van Loon) Cease, early pioneers of Luzerne county. The subject of this sketch is the fourth child in a family of twelve. He was reared and educated in Plymouth township, and, during his early life, he was engaged in farming and lumbering, engaging in 1874, as an apprentice to the blacksmith trade at the Avondale, where he finished his trade. He remained there thirteen years altogether, when he began business for himself at West Nanticoke, where he has since continued to do a thriving business. He was joined in marriage in 1865 with Miss Susanna, daughter of William and Lydia (Hummel) Reed, natives of Salem township, Luzerne county. Twelve chldren have been born to this union: Clarence E., Sanford D. (deceased), Hendrick (deceased), Jacob, Calvin (deceased), and Emma J., James M., Anna M., Birdie, William H., Lavina (all living), and Aliva (deceased). Mr. Cease attends the Methodist Episcopal Church, and politically is an ardent worker in the cause of the Democratic party.

WILLIAM CHALLENGER, proprietor of the "Cambryae House," Nanticoke, was born in Monmouthshire, England, in 1845, and was educated in his native land. In March, 1869, he came to America, locating at Erwin Station, Pa., a small place near Pittsburgh, where he was engaged in mining three years, at the end of which time he moved to Macon, Ohio, where he followed mining, and remained until 1870, when he proceeded to Frostburg, Md., and was engaged in mining there also a short time. In 1870 he came to Nanticoke, where he worked as miner until 1882, and from 1882 to 1884 as fire-boss. He then engaged in the hotel business, and has since given that his entire attention. Mr. Challenger was married in 1772, to Miss Elizabeth John, of Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and they have two children, William and Mary. Our subject is a member of the I.O.O.F., K. of P. and Royal Society of Good Fellows; in politics he is a Republican.

NATHAN D. CHAPIN, farmer and carpenter, Huntington township, P.O. Hardpan, was born in that township October 10, 1846, and is a son of Warren S. and Elizabeth (McBeth) Chapin. He is the third of a family of five children, was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and when twenty-one rented some land from his father, and farmed same for two years. He then farmed the Millick farm for one year, when he went to Hunlock Creek and engaged in the lumber business for five years; thence removed to Fishing Creek, Columbia county, and worked a rented farm one year; then back to Huntington township, on the Larned farm, one year, when he purchased his present farm of sixty acres, one mile south of the Hardpan postoffice, on the Huntington creek, and has since devoted his time to his farm and his trade, also running a threshing machine. He was married, December 15, 1867, to Miss Elizabeth A. Emory, who was born January 13, 1847, a daughter of John and Catherine (Kindig) Emory. This union was blessed with eight children, viz.: John W., a farmer of same township, born July 18, 1869, Married Jennie Ridall; Lillian G., born March 8, 1871; Charles A., born July 23, 1873; William O., born January 23, 1875; James D., born December 4, 1877; Hannah C., born November 29, 1879; Walter S., born October 12, 1882; and Eddie Grover Cleveland, born November 20, 1884. The family are members of the M.E. Church. Politically our subject is a Democrat.

WARREN S. CHAPIN, farmer, Huntington township, P.O. Waterton, was born on the farm he now occupies, September 21, 1818, son of John and Phoebe (Tubbs) Chapin, natives of Connecticut, and of English origin. The father came to the Huntington valley in 1788, with his father, who settled on the same farm now owned by Warren S. Our subject is the youngest of a famly of five children, two of whom are living. He was reared on the farm he now owns, educated in the common schools, and at the age of twenty-one years began working the farm for half. This he continued for nine years, when he bought fifty acres just north of his father's, and farmed the same until 1864, when he purchased the homestead which he has since conducted. He was married, January 3, 1859, to Elizabeth McBeth, daughter of James and Lucy (Kingsbury) McBeth, natives of Pennsylvania, of English origin. This union was blessed with five children, viz.: Lucinda A. (Mrs. S.B. Sutliff, of Berwick, Pa.), born March 4, 1840; Hannah, born March 16, 1842, died February 25, 1845; Nathan D., born October 10, 1846, married Elizabeth A. Emery; Alford T., born November 19, 1850, a furniture dealer and undertaker of Jonestown, Pa., married to Mary E. Buckalew; Amy E. (Mrs. J.N. Arnold), born June 27, 1855. Mr. and Mrs. Chapin are members of the M.E. Church. The Chapin farm consists of one hundred and twenty acres two and one fourth miles below Waterton postoffice, on the Huntington creek. Politically, Mr. Chapin is a Democrat.

MILTON Z. CHARLES, proprietor of the "Charles Cafe" and the leading and popular caterer of Wilkes-Barre, was born in Norristown, Montgomery Co., Pa., August 31, 1858, son of Abram M. and Emeline (Zepp) Charles, and is of German descent. He was reared on a farm in his native county, and educated in the common schools, locating at the age of seventeen in Philadelphia, where he was clerk in a restaurant for five years and eight months. During this time he was also the manager for four years and eight months. In 1881 he took possession of the lunch counter and restaurant at the Lehigh Valley depot, Bethlehem, which he managed four and one-half years. He then purchased the business and conducted it one year, during which time he was proprietor of a lunch counter at Tamaqua, dining-room and restaurant at the Philadelphia & Reading depot at Reading, and also conducted the lunch counter at Wayne Junction, near Philadelphia, from 1887 to 1889, residing in Reading. In July, 1889, he sold all these enterprises with the exception of the one at Bethlehem, and remained there until March, 1890, when he removed to Wilkes-Barre and took possession of the Lehigh Valley restaurant, which he conducted until April 1, 1892. At this time he opened his present popular resort, which is patronized by the elite of the city. He married, December 16, 1879, Amanda, daughter of Reuben Landis, of Collegeville, Montgomery Co., Pa. They have three children living: A. Milton, Rollin L. and Hattie A. Mr. Charles is a Knight Templar; is recent eminent commander of Lodge No. 20, I.O.O.F., of Allentown, and is also a member of the P.O.S. of A. and the Elks.

WILLIAM CHARLES, manager for Michael Langer, Hazleton. The gentleman whose name opens this sketch was born near Hazleton January 6, 1839, and is a son of S. S. and Anna (David) Charles, the former of whom was a native of Sugar Loaf township. The father was a blacksmith by trade, and lived his entire life in the vicinity of Hazleton, he died in 1886, at the age of seventy-eight. John Charles, the grandfather of William, was also a blacksmith, and lived in Sugar Loaf township. At one time he was offered the entire tract of land where the city of Hazleton is now situated, in consideration of shoeing a team of oxen one year, but its value being unknown to him he refused to take it. Our subject was educated in the public schools of Hazleton, and at the age of ten years began picking slate. He worked around the mines about two years, and at the age of twelve commenced his trade in Wilkes-Barre with W.W. Loomis. After remaining there five years, he moved to Bethlehem, where he tarried a short time, and then came to Sugar Loaf, where he engaged in the harness business for himself, in the manufacturing and retail branches. He remained in business there twenty years, and then came to Hazleton, where he worked as journeyman until 1889, at which time he took charge of Mr. Langer's store, where he is still engaged. In 1860 Mr. Charles married Miss Catherine Valenrath, a native of Germany, which union has been blessed with four children, viz.: Minor Ellsworth, a druggest in Philadelphia; Lizzie May, married to Martin Still, Hazleton; Carrie May and Annie. Mr. Charles is a Republican, and was postmaster of Sugar Loaf nine years.

THOMAS CHARLTON, inside superintendent for M.S. Kimmerer & Co., Sandy Run. This gentleman, who is one of the veteran anthracite coal men, was born in New Butler, County of Durham, England, April 4, 1827. He was reared and educated in his native land, and began working in the mines when only about eight years of age. After going through the entire preliminary drill, he became a miner at the age of fifteen, and worked in the mines of England until 1850, when he came to America. At first he located at Mill Creek, Schuylkill Co., Pa., where he worked in the mines one year. He then went to Mt. Jeffry, where he remained twelve years, being fire-boss there about seven years. He then went to Highland, and in 1875 came to Sandy Run, in the employ of M.S. Kimmerer & Co. When he first came here he was prospecting for that company. He contended from the first that there was coal at Sandy Run, but his theory was rejected by the majority of the anthracite prospectors; still Mr. Charlton continued with his work, and in 1875 proved coal and conducted the sinking of a slope, and two years later the mine at Sandy Run was in full operation. Mr. Charlton's field of labor has not been confined to Sandy Run; but he proved coal of over half of the Shamokin Mines at Mt. Carmel, and many other places, and is constantly Engaged in prospecting throughout the anthractie coal regions. Since the mine was opened at Sandy Run he has had charge of the inside work. Mr. Charlton was married, November 22, 1848, to Miss Margaret Wilson, a native of Bancroft, England, and they have had seven children, viz.: William, a miner, at St. Clair; Thomas (deceased); Lizzie, married to Joseph Seaicks, of Sandy Run; Thomas, an engineer, in Alden; Margaret J., married to Clarence T. Hoover, of Mead Valley; Mary, married to Nathan Hoodmacher, also of Mead Valley, and Isabella, married to Richard Redton, of Sandy Run.

EDWARD H. CHASE, a prominent attorney of Wilkes-Barre, was born in Haverhill, Essex Co., Mass., February 28, 1835, and is a son of Samuel Chase, a native of Hampstead, New Hampshire. His paternal grandfather, Benjamin Chase, a native of Newbury, Mass., was a musician during the Revolutionary war, whose ancestor, Aquilla Chase, emigrated from Cornwall, England, in 1640, and in 1646 settled in Newbury on a grant of a four-acre house-lot, in consideration of his services as a mariner to the colony. His progeny have since overrun the States, and from him the numerous families of Chases throughout the United States derive their ancestry. Our subject was educated at Union College, Schenectady, N.Y., where he was graduated in 1855. He then taught one year in the Aurora Academy (now Wells College) at Aurora, N.Y., and in 1857 removed to Pennsylvania, entered the law office of Hon. Edmund L. Dana, at Wilkes-Barre, and January 4, 1859, was admitted to practice. At the breaking out of the Civil war, he was a member of the Wyoming Light Dragoons, and left with his company for the seat of war April 18, 1861. On April 22, they were organized as Company E, Eighth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and were enrolled for three months, Mr. Chase being appointed colonel's clerk. On June 19, he was taken prisoner at Falling Waters, on the Potomac river, while reconnoitering in sight of camp; was taken to Winchester, and thence to Richmond, where he was on parole two weeks. After the battle of Bull Run he was transferred to Raleigh, and thence to Salisbury, N.C., where he was finally surrendered without exchange May 22, 1862. In April, 1865, he was appointed postmaster at Wilkes-Barre, but was removed by President Johnson in July, 1866. During the years 1868, '69 and '70, he was clerk and Attorney for the borough of Wilkes-Barre, and when the place became a city was appointed attorney and clerk, in which capacity he served in 1871, '72 and '73. In October, 1873, he was appointed United States collector of Internal Revenue, which office he held until 1885. His district comprised twenty counties including Luzerne. He has been a member of the State or County Republican Committee since 1862. He has served as director of the Wilkes-Barre City Hospital, and Wilkes-Barre Academy, and has also been a trustee of the First Presbyterian Church of the city. On June 18, 1863, he married Elizabeth, daughter of the late Hon. Edmund Taylor, of Wilkes-Barre, and by her he has four children - two sons and two daughters.

THOMAS JEROME CHASE, a scion of an old New England family, was born in the township of Benton, Luzerne (now Lackawanna) county, Pa., May 26, 1844. He is the son of the late Elisha W. Chase, a native of East Greenwich, Kent Co., R.I., who removed with his father, Gorton Chase, when a boy of six years of age, to Abington, Luzerne (now Lackawanna) county, Pa. He died in 1862. Gorton Chase died in 1835. His wife was Freelove Potter, of an old Rhode Island family. The maternal grandfather of T.J. Chase was Thomas Phillips, a native of the city of Bath, England, where he was born February 22, 1769. He removed to Abington in 1812, and died there in 1842. His second wife, the maternal grandmother of the subject of our sketch, was the widow of Curtis Phelps. Her maiden name was Betsy Patterson, and she was a native of Litchfield, Conn., born in 1781; she died in 1848. The mother of Mr. Chase was named Welthea. Mr. Chase was educated in the common schools of Benton, in a select school taught there for two years, and studied a brief term in the Madison Academy, Waverly, Pa. When not at school he did the ordinary work of a farmer's son until the age of eighteen years, when he enlisted, in August, 1862, in Company B, One Hundred and Thirty-Second Regiment, P.V. He participated in the battle of Antietam, and was mustered out at the expiration, of his term of service in May, 1863. In 1864 he entered upon the study of law in the office of A.H. Winton and A.A. Chase, at Scranton, and was admitted to the Luzerne county bar November 12, 1866. He then entered the office of the late E.S.M. Hill (then mayor of Scranton), and remained until April, 1867, when he removed to Nicholson, Wyoming Co., Pa., and practiced until 1876, when he came to Wilkes-Barre, where he has been in continuous practice since. While at Nicholson he was elected and served as justice of the peace; was also one of the school directors of that borough. During a portion of the time he was reading law he taught a public school in order to secure the means to enable him to continue his legal studies. Mr. Chase married, September 10, 1874, Czarina A. Reynolds, daughter of S.P. Reynolds, a native of Benton, and they had one child that died in 1879, at the age of four years. Like a large proportion of the leading men, especially the professional men, of the Wyoming Valley, Mr. Chase, it will be noted, traces his ancestry to the hardy pioneers of New England, and, more remotely, to Old England. They were a hardy, determined and courageous people, these first settlers of the Yankee States, and have given to their children, and their children's children, qualities of mental and moral manhood and womanhood which go far to evince to the present generation that such was the case. Their flight from kingly persecution for refuge in a wilderness of itself tells a tale of devotion to religious conviction, of keen appreciation of the rights of manhood, and of willingness to bear heavy burdens and incur great sacrifices for the right of opinion; and the stalwart men and lovable, loyal women who have descended from their loins renew in their capabilities and virtues the testimony to those of so proud and self-independent an ancestry. Like most of the others in our series of sketches "Tom" Chase, as he is familiarly called, is a worthy son of worthy sires. He has earned and fully merits the glorious title of "good fellow," which men apply to those in whom there is an ever-present readiness to suffer almost any loss rather than harm another by so much as a thought. He was a good soldier, though but a boy at the time of enlistment, and his superiors give willing attestation of his manly and dutiful bearing at every period of his term of service, and at every task it imposed or emergency it brought. He is a lawyer of no mean attainments, though totally indisposed to the "fuss and feathers," so to speak, which not a few in other professions seek to palm off upon their patrons as evidence of deep knowledge and the ebullitions of genius - in other words, he is not a showy advocate, but is a safe adviser.

HUGH CHESWORTH, manufacturer and coal operator, Wyoming borough, was born January 21, 1843, in Wales, and is a son of Thomas and Ann (Wiggins) Chesworth, natives of England and of English origin. Thomas and Ann Chesworth reared a family of four children, three now living, of whom our subject was second in order of birth. He was educated in the common schools of England, and began work at the age of fourteen, in the terra-cotta works, receiving thirteen cents a day; this work he followed until 1870, in which year he came to America and worked one year at brick making in Scranton, Pa. He then worked five years in the mines in that vicinity, when he moved to Wyoming, Pa., and worked in the Wyoming terra-cotta works for about ten years, then purchasing an interest in the works from Mr. Hutchins, his employer; the style of the firm is now Hutchins & Chesworth. Soon after this the firm purchased some coal land from Samuel R. Shoemaker, and opened a mine known as the Morning Star, in which they employ about 100 men and boys. Mr. Chesworth was married, March 12, 1865, to Sarah, daughter of Thomas and Mary (Hughes) Roberts, natives of Wales. This union was blessed with nine children, viz.: Thomas N., born December 1, 1866, works in the terra-cotta works at Lock Haven, Pa.; Anna (Mrs. Harry Saunders), born February 8, 1868; Sarah, born October 1, 1869; John E., born August 15, 1872; Mary, born January 6, 1875; Joseph, born April 27, 1877; Emma, born April 7, 1880; Alice, born October 3, 1882, and Arthur, born March 5, 1883. The family are members of the Methodist Church. Mr. Chesworth is a member of the I.O.O.F., and is independent in his political views.

BRADLEY CHILDS, lumber dealer, White Haven borough, was born in Luzerne county, December 5, 1819, a son of Archippus P. and Margaret (Sax) Childs, natives, respectively, of New York and Pennsylvania, of English and German origin, respectively. The father was a millwright by occupation; he died in 1862, his widow surviving till June 11, 1892, when she too passed away, at the patriarchal age of ninety years. Our subject is a grandson of Captain Timothy and Amy (Parish) Childs, whose names were prominently connected with the Revolution. Bradley Childs is the eldest in a family of nine children, was educated in the common schools, and, at nineteen years of age, engaged with P.A. Philips to learn the trade of millwright. He worked for five years with Mr. Philips, and then, after building a mill for Esquire Blakesley, built a lath and picket mill, which he conducted for five years, and then sold to Joseph Yardley. He then followed his trade for about five years when, with several other gentlemen, he purchased a large timber business, and devoted his time to lumbering until 1882, after which he spent a few years handling lumber at wholesale. He then purchased from his son the fruit and confectionery store he now carries on. On January 4, 1849, Mr. Childs was married to Margery S., daughter of Alexander and Elizabeth Wilson. This union has been blessed with five children, three of whom are now living: Nora (Mrs. G.W. Koons); Archie P. (married to Miss Ella Bechtell, of Allentown), and Bradley W. (married to Addie F. Redfield, of Philadelphia). The family attend the Presbyterian Church, and politically Mr. Childs is a sound Republican.

E.G. CHRISMAN, station agent at the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad depot, Luzerne, was born in Columbia county, Pa., January 24, 1864, and was educated in his native county. He began his career by studying telegraphy in an office at Bloomsburg, where he served for a period of nine months. He afterward removed to Plymouth, where he was employed for two years as operator, at the end of which period he came to Luzerne, and has been employed as station agent at that place ever since. Mr. Chrisman is the son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Esseck) Chrisman, natives of Pennsylvania. He was married, June 10, 1891, to Miss Ella Sterner, daughter of William Sterner, and they have one child, a girl. Mr. Chrisman is a member of the I.O.O.F., Plymouth Lodge No. 642, and in politics is a champion of the principles of the Democratic party.

GEORGE S. CHRISTIAN, Freeland, is a native of Bradford county, Pa., born in Tuscarora township, November 30, 1864. He is the son of M.V. and Helen (Spaulding) Christian, the former a native of New Jersey, and the latter of New England. Mr. Christian received his education in the public schools, at the Susquehanna Collegiate Institute, and at the State Normal School, at Mansfield. He taught school four terms in Bradford county, afterward securing a position as bookkeeper for H. R. Lacey & Co., commission merchants, at Wilkes-Barre. He remained in that city three years, when he came to Freeland as agent for H.R. Lacey, who was handling Armour's Chicago dressed beef at Wilkes-Barre. He worked here for Mr. Lacey a short time, when, in March, 1891, he entered into partnership with him, under the firm name of the Freeland Beef Company. They carry on a large trade in all kinds of western meats, including dressed beef. The territory which their trade covers extends around Freeland for a radius of ten miles. Mr. Christian was married June 8, 1892, to Miss Sarah Oliver, of Drifton. In politics he is a Democrat.

ADDISON C. CHURCH, manufacturer, Luzerne, was born at Forty-Fort, September 25, 1841, and is a son of Anson A. and Fannie (Smith) Church, natives of Pennsylvania, and of New England origin. Our subject was educated at the State College, located at Bellefonte, Pa., where he was graudated in the class of '61, which was the first class to be graduated from that institution. He then returned to Luzerne county and engaged in the coal trade; in 1891 he embarked in the manufacturing business. Mr. Church was married, December, 1866, to Miss Deborah, daughter of Andrew Raub, of Luzerne, and they have two children, Harry and Laura. He is a member of the F. & A.M., and his political views are Republican.

I. MONROE CHURCH, lessee and operator of the Shickshinny Stone Quarries, P.O., Shickshinny, was born at Danville, Pa., April 29, 1869, and is a son of Austin H. and Mary M. (Monroe) Church. The paternal grandfather, William A. Church, was a farmer at Forty Fort, this county, and the maternal grandfather, Isaac S. Monroe, of Catawissa, Columbia Co., Pa., was a prominent lumberman, manufacturer of powder kegs, agent for E.I. Dupont Powder Company, and served one term as associate judge of Columbia county. The father of our subject was a native of Forty Fort, this county, and for years was a prominent railroad contractor. He died at Ashland, Schuylkill county, October 18, 1888, and left a family of three chldren: Lizzie (Mrs. H.W. Search), I. Monroe and Ellen M. Our subject was reared in his native State, educated in public schools, and at the age of nineteen took up the business of railroad contracting, which he followed three years. In February, 1892, he located in Shickshinny, where he has since operated the Shickshinny Stone Quarries. He is a member of the Episcopal Church, and in politics is a Republican.

JOSEPH CHYNOWETH, Port Griffith, was born in Cornwall, England, June 7, 1856, and is a son of John and Mary (Oliver) Chynoweth. The father, who is superintendent of the New Granada Gold Mine, Bolivia, South America, reared a family of five childen, viz.: Sampson (a blacksmith in Australia), Eliza J. (Mrs. Elisha ?yrell, in California), John (drowned at Mount Hope, N.J., at the age of eighteen years), Mary (Mrs. Sampson Chynoweth, in Jacob City, Utah), and Joeph O. The father emigrated in 1856, the mother and children in 1872. Our subject located at the Hibernia Mine, New Jersey, where he remained till 1884, when he came to Wyoming and to Port Griffith in 1886. Mr. Chynoweth was married March 12, 1876, to Mrs. Jane Pascal, daughter of William and Mary (Moyle) Searle natives of Cornwall, England, and widow of Edward Pascal, by whom she had three children, viz.: Joseph, William and Richard. Mr. and Mrs. Chynoweth are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., and in his political views is a Republican.

 

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