BR Surnames

History of Luzerne County, Pa.,

by H.C. Bradsby, 1893

B.A. BRADER, merchant, Plains, was born in Union township, Luzerne Co., Pa., December 15, 1847, and is a son of Charles A. and Caroline M.C. (Gregory) Brader, natives of Pennsylvania, the former of German origin, the latter of English, Irish and Indian. His ancestors were early settlers in the Wyoming Valley. In Charles A. Brader's family there were seven children, of whom Benjamin A. is the fourth. Our subject began life clerking in Morgan's hardware store in Wilkes-Barre, where he remained four years, and then embarked in his present business, where he has since remained. Mr. Brader was married March 22, 1874, to Louisa A., daughter of Andrew J. and Louisa (Mills) Williams, natives of Pennsylvania, and of Welsh and New England origin, respectively. Mr. and Mrs. Brader have five children, viz.: Charles A., Mary E., Leslie A., Jessie M. and Lillie W. Our subject is a member of the Masonic Lodge at Wilkes-Barre; also of the P.O.S. of A., and in politics is a most earnest advocate of the cause of Democracy.

D.F. BRADER, farmer, P.O. Town Line, was born in Union (now Hunlock) township, January 2, 1851. He is the son of Charles A. and Caroline M.C. (Gregory) Brader, the former of whom was born October 1, 1811, the latter July 10, 1816, both in Union township. Charles A. was a son of Jacob Brader, who was a native of Germany,and removed to this county shortly after his emigration, locating in Union township. By occupation he was a shoemaker. He owned one hundred acres of land and was a hard-working man. Jacob Brader was much respected and esteemed in his locality; died when seventy-two years of age, having reared a family of seven children. Charles A., his son, began his business career in Union township as a farmer, and after reaching his majority, bought the old homestead on which he always lived. He was a thorough-going man of business, a practical farmer and an honest and industrious man. He was a strict moral man; although not a member of any church, his sympathies went with the Bapists. He held several township offices with credit. He died in 1876, aged sixty-five years, killed by the cars at Miners Station. His family consisted of eight children, all of whom grew to maturity, and seven of whom are now living. D.F. is the sixth in this family. In early life he learned the carpenter's trade, at which he worked three years. He next entered the mercantile business, at which he continued for another three years, as a general store-keeper at Miners Station. He gave that occupation up on account of his health, and removed to Scranton, where he was engaged in the flour and feed business for one year. He next moved to the Masters' place, near Town Line, on a farm of eighty-five acres, where he now resides, a well-to-do and practical farmer. Mr. Brader married, May 25, 1876, Miss Hannah E., daughter of Peter and Rachel Masters. To this union was born one child, Clifford. Mr. Brader is an energetic business man, gentlemanly and entertaining, whose reputation for hospitality can not be excelled. He is a leading man in his community; he has held the offices of register and township clerk, and has been school director for the last seven years. He is a member of the Grange, while he and his wife are both members of the M.P. Church. Politically he is a Democrat.

JAMES C. BRADER, real estate dealer, and insurance, steamship and foreign exchange agent, Nanticoke, is among the leading business men of that borough. He was born at Beach Haven, Luzerne county, February 12,1856, son of Daniel and Adeline (Campbell) Brader, the former a native of Northampton county, Pa., of German lineage, and the latter a native of this county, of Scotch-Irish origin. Mr. Brader was educated in the common schools of his native town and Wyoming Seminary, and began life for himself as a telegraph operator for the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company, in whose employ he remained one year, when he came to Nanticoke, here accepting a position as shipping clerk for the Susquehanna Coal Company. He followed this business two years, when he was made manager of the Susquehanna Supply Store, being subsequently appointed assistant superintendent. He was one of the promoters of the organization of the First National Bank of Nanticoke, and is at present one of its directors. He was also one of the promoters of the Nanticoke Electric Light Company, and is now serving his second term as director of that corporation. He is a member of the F. & A.M., and in politics was formerly a Democrat, but is at present in the ranks of the Prohibition party.

JAMES H. BRADER, carpenter, Plains, was born in Muhlenburg, Pa., May 21, 1858, and is a son of Charles A. and Caroline (Gregory) Brader, natives of Luzerne county and German origin. In their family there were eight children, of whom James H. is the youngest. Our subject was reared on the farm, educated in the common school, also in the select school of James M. Coughlin, at Muhlenburg, and began life teaming for the Delaware & Hudson Company at Plains, at which he remained two years, then fired one year, and has since followed his present trade. Mr. Brader was married January 17, 1878, to Miss Matilda, daughter of Nathan and Helena (Trumbower) Roberts, natives of Pennsylvania and of English and German origin respectively. Her great-great-grandfather took up nearly all of where Kingston now is; he was killed by Indians, and his wife carried one child back to Connecticut. Mr. and Mrs. Brader have two children: George and Lee. Our subject and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church; he is a member of the P.O.S. of A., and in politics is a Republican.

NATHANIEL D. BRADER, carpenter, Plains, was born in Union township, November 15, 1840, son of Charles A. and Caroline M.C. (Gregory) Brader. There were eight children in his father's family, seven of whom are living, and of whom he is the second. His boyhood was spent on the farm, and he received his education in the common schools of his native township and in Belleville, Wis. At the age of nineteen he went to Madison, Wis., where he worked as a stone-mason, enlisting at that place August 16, 1862, in Company E, Eighth Wis. V.I. He participated in the battles of Corinth, Iuka, Vicksburg, Nashville, Tupulo, Jackson, Mobile, Richmond, La., and many other minor engagements; he also took part in the Price raid through Missouri and Red River expedition, and was discharged at Montgomery, Ala., August 16, 1865. He then returned to Madison, where he followed farming one year; and then went overland by wagon to Linn county, Kansas, where he farmed on a claim of his own, which he bought from its first settler, also following the trades of carpenter and stone-mason for seven years. He then returned to Union township, where he remained one year; next working as stone mason for A.H. Coon & Co., at Plymouth, one year, after which he came to Plains, where he contracted getting out timbers for four years, and has since been employed by the different companies, working at his trade. Mr. Brader was married November 3, 1861, to Miss Sarah, daughter of Jacob and Rebecca (Schuman) Walters, natives of Pennsylvania, of German origin. They have had six children, three of whom are living, viz.: Jennie W., Mrs. William Atkinson, who has three children: George N., Charles B. and William; Charles A., a farmer in Tompkins county, N.Y., and Ida J., who still lives at home, the pride and comfort of her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Brader and their daughter Ida are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he is a member of the official board; he is a member of the P.O.S. of A. and the G.A.R., and is a Republican in politics.

THOMAS BRADER, farmer, P.O. Beach Haven, was born in Salem township, June 21, 1820, and is a son of Jacob and Catherine (Bilhimer) Brader. His paternal grandfather, Adam Brader, formerly of Northampton county, Pa., was a pioneer of Salem township, this county, and cleared the farm now owned by Henry Garrison, and died there. His children were: Jacob, Sarah (Mrs.Michael Coons), Susan (Mrs. David Sink), Polly (Mrs. William Sink). His only son, Jacob, was a farmer, and lived and died in Salem townshp; his wife was a daughter of Christian Bilhimer, formerly of Northampton county, Pa., and a pioneer of Salem township. By her he had five children: Daniel, Stephen, Thomas, Julia (Mrs. Daniel Mensch), and Abbie (Mrs. Henry Garrison). Our subject was reared in Salem townshp, where he has always resided. In early life he taught school, and has been engaged in farming forty years. In 1851 he married Mary, daughter of Jeremiah and Catherine (Fenstermacher) Hess, of Salem township, and has four children: Chester B., Alton B., Thomas W., and Anna M.

W. H. HARRISON BRADER, merchant and butcher, Plains, was born in Union township, January 22, 1841, and is a son of Jonas and Christina (Persen) Brader, also natives of Pennsylvania, and of German origin. In their family were eleven children, of whom W.H. Harrison is the sixth. Our subject received a common school education, and at the age of twenty-two began life at carpentering, which trade he followed fifteen years. In 1873 he embarked in a general merchandise business, which he has since carried on. Mr. Brader was married, July 10, 1885, to Miss Kate, daughter of Perry and Lydia (Jones) Egge, and they have four children, viz.: Lydia C., Daisy, W.H. Harrison, and Ruth C. Mr. Brader is a member of the P.O.S. of A.; politically he has always given his support to the Republican party.

WILLIAM B. BRADER, physician and surgeon, White Haven, was born at Beaver Meadows, Luzerne Co., Pa., July 9, 1858, a son of George and Mary (Chapin) Brader, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German and French origin, respectively. The father, who was a farmer and miller, died February 6, 1887; the mother passed from earth June 2, 1876. Our subject, who is the second in order of birth in a family of three chidren, two of whom are now living, was educated in the common schools, Nazareth Hall, Nazareth, Pa., Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., and at the University of Pennsylvania. In 1885 he opened an office at Nanticoke, Pa., where he practiced for two years, when he gave up medicine, and moved to White Haven. On May 19, 1880, he was married to Miss Eva E., daughter of George and Mary (DeBall) Christiance, of Ithaca, N.Y. Mr. and Mrs. Brader attend the Presbyterian Church. He is past master of Laurel Lodge, No. 467, F. & A.M., and past district president of the South Eastern District of Luzerne county in the P.O.S. of A.; in politics he is a sound Republican.

FRANK BRADIGAN, retired, Inkerman, was born in County Monaghan, Ireland, March 15, 1819, and is the youngest in the family of sixteen children, born to Patrick and Bridget (Marron) Bradigan, natives of the same place. He came to this country in August, 1851, and settled in Pittston, where he was employed as a laborer in the mines until early in 1857, when he removed to the State of Wisconsin, where he bought a farm of eighty acres. He remained there, however, but three years, when he sold his property, returned to his old home, and again labored in the mines until his retirement in 1877. Mr. Bradigan was united in marriage December 5, 1853, with Mary, daughter of Matthew and Mary (Culken) Boylen, natives of County Sligo, Ireland, and their union has been blessed with the following children: James, born October 25, 1856; Matthew, born February 6, 1859; Bridget, born March 16, 1861, married April 23, 1884, to William Devanney, a newspaper reporter of Inkerman; Mary A., born March 17, 1863, married October 9, 1880, to Michael Hughes, a laborer, of Pittston; Kate, born May 14, 1865, married October 14, 1889, to John Kilgallon, grocery clerk, Plymouth, this county; Margaret, born August 20, 1867; Terence, born November 14, 1869; Francis, born November 18, 1872; Theresa, born December 9, 1874, and William, born December 27, 1879. Our subject is a member of the Roman Catholic Church, and in politics is independent.

HARRISON BRANDON (deceased), who in his lifetime was a prominent farmer of Huntington township, was born December 27, 1817, a son of William and Tryphena (Fuller) Brandon, natives of Ireland and Connecticut, and of Irish and English origin, respectively. The father was a son of James Brandon. Our subject, who is the seventh in a family of fourteen children, was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and when twenty-six years of age inherited the present Brandon property from his father, and devoted his whole life to farming. He was married October 6, 1853, to Miss Mary J., daughter of Samuel and Phoebe (Harvey) VanHorn, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German and English origin. She is the second in a family of twelve children, and was born December 15, 1832. This union was blessed with four children, viz.: William D., born April 24, 1855, died November 8, 1858; Anna (who married George Westfield, and had one child, Sherron), born September 19, 1858, died March 13, 1886; Clara (Mrs. Dr. C.A. Long, of Muhlenburg), born June 14, 1862; Virgie, born June 1, 1868, at home. Mr. Brandon departed this life July 10, 1887, aged seventy years. Mrs. Brandon is a member of the M.E. Church. Since her husband's death she has conducted the farm, which is a property of one hundred acres, situated one mile north of Huntington Mills postoffice, and the residence is one of the half-dozen brick buildings in the township.

JAMES BRANDON, farmer, Fairmount township, P.O. Rittenhouse, was born March 11, 1814, in Huntington township. He is a son of William and Tryphena (Fuller) Brandon, natives, respectively, of Ireland and Massachusetts, and of Irish and English origin, respectively. William Brandon came to America in 1809, and settled in Huntington township, where he died in 1856, aged seventy-seven years. Our subject is the fifth in order of birth in a family of fourteen children, ten of whom are now living. He was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and when twenty-two years of age began life for himself as a common laborer. This he followed for two years. In 1842 he purchased his present farm, containing one hundred acres, situated two miles north of Rittenhouse postoffice. He was married, March 3, 1837, to Miss Jemima, daughter of Daniel and Charlotta (Tubbs) Culver, natives of Pennsylvania, and of English origin. This union was blessed with fourteen children, ten of whom are living, viz.: Mary A. (Mrs. William R. Monroe), Charlotta (Mrs. William Marshall), Elizabeth (Mrs. J.W. Sax), Martha (Mrs. J.E. Smith), Adeline (Mrs. Samuel Rosencrans), Henry S. (foreman of a planing-mill in Pittston, married to Rose Blaine), Sterling (a farmer of Huntington township, married to Emma Case), Daniel C. (a carpenter of Fairmount township, married to Martha Wesley), Charles D. (works the homestead farm; he is married to Lydia Wolfinger) and Louisa H. (Mrs. Harvey Wesley). This family are members of the M.E. Church. Our subject has been supervisor of his township for two terms; tax collector, one term, and school director three years. In politics he is a Republican.

JUDD D. BRANNING, a prominent livery-man of Wilkes-Barre, was born at Honesdale, Wayne Co., Pa., November 1, 1869, and is a son of Henry D. and Almira (Maloney) Branning. The father was a native of Pike county, Pa., born September 25, 1844, and is a son of Cornelius and Laura (Smith) Branning, now residents of Dunmore, Pa. Cornelius Branning was a son of Jacob Branning, a native of Connecticut, and one of the pioneers of Wayne county, Pa.; his wife was a daughter of Henry Smith, also a pioneer of the same county. Henry D. Branning, who was reared in Wayne county, Pa., settled in Luzerne county in 1876, and since 1884 has been a resident of Wilkes-Barre, engaged in general merchandising. His wife was a daughter of Asa and Eleanor (Smith) Maloney, of Wayne county, Pa., and by her he had two children, Judd D. and Edith M. Our subject was reared in Wayne and Luzerne counties, and is a graduate of Wyoming Seminary, Kingston, and Wilkes-Barre Business College. On October 1, 1891, he embarked in the livery business in Wilkes-Barre, in which he has since successfully continued. He is a member of the P.O.S. of A., and in politics is a Republican.

THEODORE A. BREISCH, general merchant, Nuremberg, was born in Middleport, Schuylkill Co., Pa., August 31, 1850, a son of Rudolph and Missouri Ann (Zimmerman) Breisch. His paternal grandparents, John and Elizabeth Shuman) Breisch, and great-grandfather, George Breisch (formerly of Bucks county, Pa., and a pioneer of Columbia county, same State), and John and Elizabeth Breisch were pioneers of Catawissa Valley, Schuylkill Co., Pa., and their children were Washington, Rudolph, Jacob, Adam, Henry, Josiah and Susannah (Mrs. John Maurer), of whom Rudolph was reared in Schuylkill county, Pa., was successively a hotel-keeper, farmer, merchant and lumberman, and is now a resident of Mahanoy City. His wife was a daughter of Roland and Elizabeth (Focht) Zimmerman, of Catawissa Valley, Pa., and his children were Barbara E. (Mrs. Benjamin Seltzer), Theodore A., John B., Montgomery R., Jeffry A., Minerva C. (Mrs. Frank Davenport), Jacob W., Oliver A., Oscar C. and Cyrus E. Our subject was reared in Schuylkill County and educated in the public schools and Wyoming Seminary. He began life as a clerk in a general store, in which capacity he served three years, then, in 1871, embarked in business for himself at Nuremberg, in which he has since successfully continued. He married, September 1, 1872, Mary C., daughter of David and Maria (Andrews) Stauffer, of Ringtown, Schuylkill Co., Pa., and has five children, Erdie B., Gertrude M., Lotta L., Edna E. and Williard E. Mr. Breisch is a prominent and enterprising business man; is a member of the Lutheran Church, and in politics is a Republican.

MRS. JOHANNA BRENNAN, widow of John Brennan, hotel-keeper, Larksville, was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, February 28, a daughter of James and Johanna (St. John) Britton, both of whom were born and educated, and passed their lives, in Ireland. Johanna Britton and John Brennan were married in Ireland, February 29. In 1870 they emigrated to the United States, locating in Plymouth township, near Larksville, this county, where he followed the occupation of miner. He was a hard-working, honest and industrious man, whose life was uneventful; he died in 1886. Their family comprised ten children, eight of whom are living: Thomas J., Maggie, William, Edward, Johanna, James, Bridget and John, all yet single. Mrs. Brennan and her husband came to Larksville poor, renting their house in which they lived, and when she lost her husband she had eight children left on her hands to care for, all of whom are well-educated, and possessed of refined taste and manners. She owns fifteen houses and lots, including two hotels, all the result of her good management and remarkable business tact. She keeps hotel and store-house, making both pay profitably, and she is worth at least sixteen thousand dollars. She and her children are members of St. Vincent Roman Catholic Church of Plymouth. Mrs. Brennan and her children are a well regulated family, and enjoy the honor and respect of their neighbors.

JOEL BRENTON, general painter and decorator, Pittston, was born in the county of Cornwall, England, December 4, 1829, and is a son of Francis and Grace (Williams) Brenton, natives of England. They were the parents of six children, namely Henry, Frank, Elizabeth, Richard, Samuel and Joel. Our subject was reared and educated in England, and at the age of eighteen years came to America, settling in New York City, where he learned the trade of decorating. He remained in New York for three years, and then came to Pittston and established the business of painter and decorator, which he has since successfully conducted. He has a large store on North Main street which is well supplied with paints, paper, and, in fact, all kinds of decorating material. Mr. Brenton was among the early settlers of Pittston, having purchased and built in 1856 in West Pittston, where he has since resided. He was married, February 22, 1858, his wife being a native of Sussex county, N.J. Six children have blessed this union, namely: Frank, Willis, Eva G., Carrie M., Ada L. and Aurelia (the two latter being deceased). Mr. Brenton is a member of the following orders: F. & A.M., I.O.O.F., Knights of Honor, Legion of Honor and Sons of St. George. In political matters he is a Republican, and the family are members of the Presbyterian Church.

JOHN BREW, engineer and miner at the Pennsylvania Tunnel, Plains, was born in Durham, England, and is a son of Thomas and Jane (Calkle) Brew, in whose family there were eight children, John being the fourth. Our subject came to America in 1864, and located at Inkerman, this county, where he secured a position at his former business of engineering. There he remained two years, and then removed to Plains, where he has since been engaged in engineering and mining, and was fire-boss for fifteen years. He is a favorite with his superiors and subalterns. Mr. Brew was married in May, 1843, to Miss Sarah, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Bates) Roylay, of Welsh and English origin respectively, and they have had seven children, six of whom are living, viz.: William, a miner in Pettebone, Pa.; John, an engineer in Forty Fort; Elizabeth J. (Mrs. Henry A. Summers), in Plians; Margaret A. (Mrs. L.H. Thompson), in Great Bend; Thomas, a track-layer in Wyoming; and Sarah E. (Mrs. W.G. Prater), in Plains. Mr. and Mrs. Brew are members of the Primitive Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he has been trustee and steward; he is a member of the Sons of St. George. He has been temperate for thirty-eight years, and is a supporter of the Prohibition Party. He has held the office of school director.

EDWARD E. BREYER, brass-moulder, Ashley, was born in Camden, N.J., July 24, 1854, and is a son of Frederick and Sarah (Tompkins) Breyer, natives, respectively, of Liverpool, England, and New Jersey; his father, who was a brass-moulder, reared a family of five children, two of whom are living and of whom he is the fourth. When he was four years old the family removed to Philadelphia, where he was educated in the public schools, and then acted as errand boy in a book-bindery for one year, after which he worked with his father at his trade five years. His father and he then engaged in the foundry business and continued three years, after which he went to Scranton and worked at his trade until 1875, when he removed to Ashley. Mr. Breyer was married February 25, 1879, to Anna M., daughter of Richard and Elvina (Wagner) Cooke, natives of England and America, respectively; they have three children, viz.: Charles C., Frederick S. and Emma Elvina. This gentleman and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church; he is a member of the P.O.S. of A., K. of H. and Rescue Hose Company No. 1; in politics he is a Republican, and has held the offices of burgess, councilman and school director in Ashley borough.

HIRAM M. BRIGGS, retail coal salesman, West End Coal Company, P.O. Shickshinny, was born in Hollenback township, Luzerne county, April 15, 1837, son of William and Elizabeth (Keene) Briggs. His paternal grandfather, John Briggs, was of Quaker stock and a pioneer of Nescopeck township, where he cleared a farm and died. His maternal grandfather, Keene, was also a pioneer of Nescopeck township. William Briggs, father of our subject, was a native of Nescopeck township, and after his marriage settled in Hollenback township where he cleared a farm and resided until his death. His children were John G., Washington, Hannah (Mrs. Michael Weiss), Aaron, Mary Ann (Mrs. Butler Gruver), Jacob F., Hiram M., Maria (Mrs. Herman Gruver), Stephen and Eliza. Hiram M. Briggs was reared in Hollenback township, assisting his father in clearing the farm. He started in business for himself by purchasing a farm in Nescopeck township, which he improved and occupied from 1859 to 1866. He then located in Shickshinny, and embarked in the mercantile business, in which he continued until 1875. He then took charge of the construction of six miles of turnpike, between Shickshinny and Huntington, as foreman; later he was engaged in the quarry business, and since 1881 has been in the employ of the West End Coal Company. He married, September 20, 1857, Sarah, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Fenstermacher) Weiss, of Hollenback township, and has two children living: Dora (Mrs. A. Wellington Stackhouse) and Ella (Mrs. Dr. Willard L. Chapin). Mr. Briggs is a member of the M.E. Church, and has held the offices of chief of police and overseer of poor of Shickshinny; in politics, he is a Republican.

L.W. BRIGGS, farmer, P.O. Briggsville, was born January 3, 1843, in Nescopeck township, on the farm where he now resides, a son of George W. and Catherine (Keen) Briggs. His paternal grandfather, John Briggs, and maternal grandfather, George Keen, were both pioneers of Nescopeck township. George W. Briggs was an agriculturist, and cleared a part of the farm owned and occupied by our subject. His children were Albert G., Mortimer L., John E., Levi W., Maria (Mrs. A. Kirkendall) and Fanny. Our subject was reared in Nescopeck township, and has always resided in the old homestead. In 1875 he married Elmira, daughter of Phineas J. and Rebecca (Hughes) Smith, of Sugar Loaf township. Politically, he is a Democrat.

HENRY BRIMBLE, harness dealer, Pittston. This widely-known business man is a native of Somersetshire, England, and was born June 21, 1844. He received his education in his native land, and at the age of twenty-two came to America, locating at Pittston, Pa., where he was first engaged in working in the mines. After a short time so employed he found work in the then new enterprise of running the street line from the Lackawanna & Bloomsburg junction, in which he remained one year, when he embarked in the hotel business, following same seven years; then, in 1890, commenced the harness business. Mr. Brimble was married in England, in 1863, to Miss Martha Eworth, and they had born unto them one child, George, who was engaged in the United States Mail Service in Tennessee, where he died October 23, 1890. Mr. Brimble is a member of the Sons of St. George; politically he is a Republican.

JOHN J. BRISLIN, county auditor and justice of the peace, Sugar Notch borough, was born in Buck Mountain, Carbon Co., Pa., November 3, 1856, a son of James and Unity (McNelis) Brislin, natives of County Donegal, Ireland. The father came to America about 1840 and located in Carbon county, Pa., where he was engaged in mining until 1866, when he removed to Ashley, this county. Mining was his occupation all his life, and in 1878 he was killed at Sugar Notch Mine No. 10 by a fall of top. His children who grew to maturity were eight in number: John J., Ann (Mrs. Thomas Harvey), Daniel, Edward, Thomas, Ellen, Mary and James. Our subject was reared in his native State, was educated in the public schools, and began life in the breaker at the early age of seven years; he worked in the various grades of mining up to assistant foreman, and was connected with the mines until 1876. He then followed railroading two years, but returned to the mines in 1878. He was badly burned by an explosion of gas at No. 9 Colliery, Sugar Notch, June 16, 1880. He was foreman of a breaker two years, and later clerk in C.M. Conyngham's store, Sugar Notch. He is one of the best-known and most popular Democrats in Luzerne county; is serving his second term as justice of the peace of Sugar Notch borough; was elected one of the auditors of Luzerne county in 1887, for a term of three years, and re-elected to the same office in 1890.

D. CHATFIELD BRITTAIN, farmer and dealer in farm machinery and seeds, Huntington township, P.O. Register, was born September 5, 1845, in that township, and is a son of Jacob and Cassandra (Myers) Brittain, natives of Huntington township, and of Irish and English origin, respectively; the father was a farmer by occupation, and he died in 1872, aged fifty-eight years. Jacob was a son of Joseph and Ann (White) Brittian, natives of New Jersey, who came to Huntington township in 1812 and bought the present Brittain farm. Our subject is the third in a family of four children, was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools and New Columbus Academy, and when twenty-one years of age began teaching school. This he followed for a short time, when he went on the road selling plaster and fertilizers for several years; then returned to his native home, and has since devoted his time principally to farming. Mr. Brittain was married in June, 1880, to Myra L., daughter of Henry A. Hobbs. This union is blessed with two children, viz.: Ada B., born June 8, 1888, and Henry C., born June 2, 1891. Mrs. Brittain is a member of the Methodist Church. Our subject is a member of the I.O.O.F. and P. of H., and politically is a Democrat. The Brittain farm contains fifty-eight acres, one-half mile south of the Register postoffice. He also owns the Wenner farm of sixty-two acres, one mile northwest of the Town Hill postoffice; also a timber tract on the Pine creek.

CHARLES BROAD, wholesale and retail dealer in fruit, Wilkes-Barre, was born at Easton, Pa., October 8, 1853, and is a son of Isaac and Anna (Broot) Broad, natives of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, respectively. They were the parents of three children, of whom Charles is the second in order of birth. Our subject was educated at the public schools at Easton, and at the age of twelve went into his father's fruit store, where he remained until his sixteenth year, when he engaged in the fruit business for himself. During nine years he has carried on his business in Wilkes-Barre, and in the mean time has added three branch stores - one in Scranton, one in Buffalo and one in Syracuse. In 1872 he was united in marriage with Elizabeth, daughter of David Miller, of Easton, of German origin. Mr. and Mrs. Broad are members of the Methodist Church; in politics he affiliates with the Republican party.

FRANK E. BROCKWAY, brick manufacturer and farmer, Beach Haven, was born at Berwick, Pa., in 1845, and is a son of Beckmit S. and Mary (Cobb) Brockway, natives of New London, Conn., and Wayne county, Pa., respectively. The father, who was a shoemaker by trade, settled at Berwick, Pa., about 1838; was foreman on the Pennsylvania Canal many years; was colonel of militia at Berwick, and held the position of State librarian at Harrisburg. He located at Beach Haven in 1845, and died there in 1868 at the age of sixty-two years. His children were three in number: Charles B. (deceased), who served three terms as a member of the Pennsylvania State Legislature; Anna (Mrs. M.P. Lutz); and Frank E. The subject of this sketch was reared in Salem township and educated in the public schools. He was in the Civil War, enlisting in December, 1861, in Company F, Pennsylvania Light Artillery; in 1864 was promoted to second lieutenant, and was honorably discharged from the service in June, 1865. Since 1870 he has been engaged in farming, and in the manufacture of brick since 1872. In 1868 Mr. Brockway married Cora E., daughter of James S. and Alvira (Gilmore) Campbell, of Beach Haven, and they have three children: Elizabeth, Mary and Roland. Mr. Brockway served fourteen years as justice of the peace of Salem township, was deputy sheriff fifteen months, and warden of Luzerne county prison three years - 1889, 1890, and 1891. Politically he is a Democrat.

EMMET BRODHEAD, tanner, Moosic, Lackawanna county, was born in Ulster county, N.Y., April 11, 1837. He is a son of Charles A. and Harriet (Van Wagner) Brodhead, both of whom were born in Ulster county. Charles Brodhead was a farmer of some means, who has lived an uneventful life on his own farm, where he still resides, now at the patriarchal age of eighty-one years. His family numbered nine children, two of whom are living now, Emmet being the elder. Our subject was reared and educated in his native county, and early in life learned the tanner's trade, at which he has always worked, following same in Ulster county up to 1873, when he removed to Nicholson, Wyoming county. In 1875 he came to Dunnings (then in Luzerne county), where he remained seven years as superintendent, and in 1885 he removed to Glen, on Spring brook, his present place of business, where he has an extensive tannery, having a capacity of about twenty-five thousand sides per annum, using fifteen hundred tons of bark, and employing a large force of men. He has a store attached to his premises for the accommodation of his workmen, which is stocked with a general supply of necessaries of life. On September 15, 1859, Mr. Brodhead married Miss Sarah, daughter of John and Catherine Vanleuven, and by her had nine children, five of whom are yet living: Nial C., Charles S., Ira, Carrie and John L. Of these, Nial C. married a daughter of Hon. Latouche, of Moscow, and one child, Hoyt, was born. Charles S. married the daughter of Rev. R. Hanks, D.D., of Daleville, and one child, Dorothy, has been born to them. Mrs. Sarah (Vanleuven) Brodhead was born in Ulster county, N.Y., in 1835. Mr. Brodhead has held several responsible offices in this and other counties. In Nicholson, after the incorporation of that borough, he was one of its first councilmen. He is a genial gentleman, of pleasing manners and refined taste, commanding the respect of his enemies and the love of his friends.

JACOB BRONG, weighmaster, Fairview township, P.O. Mountain Top, was born in Chestnut Hill township, Monroe county, August 5, 1846. He is a son of John and Lydia (Gilbert) Brong, both natives of this State, the former of German and the latter of English and German descent. The father was a farmer and a Company store-keeper, and he reared a family of three children, of whom Jacob was the second oldest. Jacob attended the common schools in Monroe county until he was eleven years old, when his parents removed to Weatherly, Carbon county, where he attended school till reaching manhood. He then accepted a situation with the Beaver Meadow Railroad Company, and remained in that position until after that company became consolidated with the Lehigh Valley Company, being sent in 1867, by that company to Packerton, to act as scale-clerk, which position he held until 1875. Mr. Brong was appointed, in 1876, by the Central Railroad of New Jersey, as weighmaster at Hauto, Carbon county, and was transferred in 1877 to act in the same capacity at Solomon's Gap for the same company, and he still retains that position. Mr. Brong was married in September, 1869, to Anna M., daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth (Whitehead) Graver, of Weissport, Carbon Co., Pa., both natives of Pennsylvania, and of German descent. Mr. and Mrs. Brong have three children, as follows: W. Albert, who works in the same office as his father; Harry E., who attends the Harry Hillman Academy at Wilkes-Barre, and Florence, who is an infant. Mr. Brong and family are members of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. and Mrs. Brong are well-known as people of a stock that live to a ripe old age, as the parents of both celebrated, in 1883, the golden anniversary of their wedding.

GEORGE H. BRONSON, a prominent and progressive farmer of Lake township, P.O. Loyalville, was born in Plymouth (now Jackson) township, this county, December 4, 1830, the adopted son of David Bronson, who cared for him as his own child, but died when the latter was of the young age of eight years. When he was twelve years old the Bronson family was broken up, and the now doubly-orphaned boy was left to battle the world as best he could. The Bronsons were among the first settlers of Jackson township, this county, where David owned 144 acres of land, the farm being now in the possession of the Majors and Myerses. Mr. Bronson was a man of industry and integrity, conscientiously observing the principles of truth, and always living up to the "Golden Rule." He did much in this county for the advancement of agriculture, and improved and beautified his own farm that others might follow the example. He reared seven children out of eight (of which seven three are yet living), and died at a good old age. The parents of our subject were Conrad and Phoebe (Johnson) Hartrum - the father born in New Jersey, the mother in Luzerne county, Pa., and they had one son and two daughters besides George H., their names being Steward S., Catherine and Amanda. The father died when our subject was four years old, the mother a short time afterward, but had previously moved to the western country with the brother and sister of George. For thirty years the latter knew but little about his brother and sister, but having at last ascertained their whereabouts, he commenced a correspondence with them. In 1886 he visited them in California, whither they had gone, nearly half a century having elapsed since he last saw them, and it is scarcely necessary to add that he had a most welcome reception, his visit being altogether of an exceedingly pleasant nature. He found that each had reared a large family, and that they had happy and luxuriant houses. George H. Bronson has made the best use of his limited opportunities, and in spite of many disadvantages he had to contend against, has succeeded in hewing out for himself a comfortable home and acquiring not only property but also a good name, which neither gold nor silver can purchase. He is what the world calls a self-made man. He removed to Lake township in 1842, being then twelve years old. In March, 1853, he married Miss Marcy, daughter of Nathaniel and Marcy (Allen) Ide, and there were born to them seven children, viz.: Perry L., Fallie C., Clara L., Debbie A., Esther J., Charles E. and Marvin C., the first and last being yet single. It is worthy of note here that three of his daughters married three brothers. In the year of his marriage he removed to his present residence. His farm, which contains 175 acres, at that time was wild, unreclaimed land, now it is a model of perfection, which illustrates what can be accomplished by brains and muscle combined. Mr. Bronson is a practical farmer, keeping himself well-posted on matters pertaining to his business, and is fully abreast of the times. He has a very interesting family, all of whom are above the average intelligence, and five of them taught school. They are all members and workers in the M.E. Church. Mr. Bronson himself is a temperance man, not only in theory but also in practice. Politically he is a Republican.

D.W. BRONSON, farmer, P.O. Fades Creek, was born August 3, 1850, in Lake township, where he was reared and educated. He is a son of Jonah and Elizabeth H. (Whitesill) Bronson, the former of whom was born in Jackson township in May, 1818, the latter in Monroe county, Pa., May 31, 1817. Jonah was a son of Ira Bronson, a native of Connecticut, who came to this county about 1810, locating in Jackson township, and in 1840 removed to Lake township. He was a hard-working man, and while in Jackson township he owned and worked a small foundry in conjunction with his trade, that of a blacksmith. Politically he was a stanch Democrat, and an active man in that party. His family consisted of six children, five of whom grew to maturity, and he lived to a ripe old age, after a pioneer life of struggles with the unreclaimed forest. Jonah, his son, was twenty-two years of age when he removed to Lake township, where he lived fifteen years. In 1867 he purchased the farm now occupied by his son, Daniel W., where he remained till 1874, in which year he removed to Forty Fort, where he died in 1876 at the age of sixty-six. He was a worthy man, a loyal citizen, and an exemplary Christian; a member of the M.E. Church, and a class-leader in that body. His family consisted of ten children, five of whom are now living: Ira V., Simeon F., Emma A., Sarah C. and D.W., who is the sixth in the family. William A. and Charles (both deceased) were in the Civil war, and the former died while at the front, the latter of wounds received at the battle of Fort Fisher. D.W. Bronson, the subject of this sketch, always confined himself to farming, and remained at home with his father until he married, in March, 1874, Miss Martha A., daughter of Samuel and Harriet Edwards. There were four children born to this union, three of whom are now living: Lillian E., Stanley Roy and Samuel E., aged (1892) sixteen, eight and five years respectively. Mrs. Bronson was born in Ross township, April 2, 1854. Mr. Bronson is a practical agriculturist and a promising young man; his farm of eighty acres is in good hands and under judicious management. He has made many marked improvements on both fields and buildings. He is a Democrat, and has held several offices, now filling that of supervisor. He and his wife are members of the Christian Church.

JAMES BROOKS, physician and surgeon, Plains was born in Great Bend, Susquehanna Co., Pa., July 4, 1856, and is a son of Dr. James and Lydia Jane (De Bois) Brooks, the former a native of New York and of English and Scotch origin, the latter of Pennsylvania and of French lineage. The father was an eminent physician for many years at Great Bend, and later at Binghamton, N.Y. The grandfather, Pelitiah B. Brooks, was also one of Binghamton's most noted physicians; an uncle, Dr. Pelitiah Brooks, was in the army, and died at Chattanooga; he has one brother, Dr. Walter A. Brooks, who is a specialist on the eye and ear with Dr. Macfarlane at Binghamton. Our subject was educated in the common schools of Great Bend, Binghamton High School and Lowell's Commericial College; he then spent two years in the Syracuse Medical College, and was graduated from the Chicago Medical College in 1877. He practiced medicine one year in Binghamton, one year in Pleasant Valley, Pa., and then located at Plains, this county, where he has enjoyed a large practice. Dr. Brooks was married, January 5, 1881, to Miss Isadore W., daughter of John Mitchell, of Plains, and they have five children: Mary Isabelle, born December 17, 1881; Fannie E., born July 17, 1883; Anna L., born September 2, 1885; James A., born August 3, 1887; and Helen, born July 4, 1890. After eight years of married bliss, discontent found its way into this once happy home, and the family was separated by a divorce in February, 1890. Mrs. Brooks and the children are living with W.W. Amsbry, of Germantown, Pa. Dr. Brooks is a member of the I.O.O.F. and the Elk Lodge; of the Luzerne Medical Society, the Pennsylvania Medical Society, and the International Medical Congress. Politically he is a Republican.

CHARLES C. BROWN, retired farmer, P.O. Nescopeck, was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, May 10, 1831, a son of Abram and Catherine (Hildt) Brown. In 1845, when fourteen years of age, he came to America, locating in Hazleton, this county. He worked for a time in the breaker, and was afterward employed in a brewery and later as a farm hand, in Dorrance township. In 1852 he purchased a farm in Dorrance, a part of which he cleared and improved, residing there twelve years. He then spent a short time in Iowa, then nine years in Wilkes-Barre, seven of which he was in the mercantile business, the other two in a dairy. He then spent one year at Wapwallopen, and for six years worked the John C. Nicely farm at Mocanaqua. In 1886 he purchased a farm in Nescopeck, and since 1891 has resided in Nescopeck village. In 1854 he married Catherine (Ehmann) Amarin, of Wurtemberg, Germany, and has seven children: Jackson F., Alvin, Alice (Mrs. Thomas Lawalt), Agnes, Frances (Mrs. Ira Boyd), Hannah and Maggie. He is a member of the Lutheran Church, and of the P. of K.; in politics he is a Democrat.

CHESTER BROWN, farmer, P.O. Huntsville, was born November 11, 1832, in Jackson township, this county, where he was reared and educated. He is a son of Milton and Ann (Turpin) Brown, the former born in Jackson township about 1780, locating at what is now known as "Brown's Corners." Here he purchased a farm and lived; he was known as "Captain Brown," from his having command of a company of militia which he used to drill. He was born February 9, 1769, and died May 28, 1826. His family consisted of nine children. Milton, his son, retained the old homestead on which he lived, and which he improved during his lifetime; he died June 26, 1862, at the age of fifty six years. There were ten children born to him, five of whom grew to maturity, and three are now (1891) living, Chester being second in the family. Our subject in early life learned the carpenter's trade, although farming is his chief vocation. Mr. Brown has lived on his present little farm for twenty-one years, a faithful citizen of the Commonweath. He has been honored with the offices of constable, supervisor (four terms), auditor, school director, and at one time was elected justice of the peace. On February 20, 1857, he married Miss Marinda, daughter of Joseph and Kate A. Norris, and by her had six children, three of whom are now living: Harrison, Flora and Nettie M. Of these Harrison married Miss Alice Barney, by whom he has three children; Flora and Nettie M. are unmarried.

DANIEL BROWN, constable, Plymouth, was born March 23, 1840, at Littleton, Mass., and is a son of George and Ellen (Maloney) Brown, natives of Ennis, County Clare, Ireland. Their family consisted of twelve children, eleven of whom are living, Daniel being next to the youngest. Our subject was educated in the public schools of the place of his nativity, and was engaged in farming until 1862, when he enlisted in the Eighth Massachusetts Battery, and fought under McClellan and Burnside. He was engaged in the following battles: Fredericksburg, South Mountain, Antietam, and Second Bull Run, serving three years in all. Returning from the war in 1865, he went to Ayer, Middlesex Co., Mass., where he worked as currier until he was given a position as superintendent and foreman of the Grand Tunnel Mines, at Plymouth, Pa., at that time operated by the New England Coal Company. This situation he held until 1867, when he embarked in the livery business, which he followed up to 1881, when he sold out and has since attended to his official duties. In 1867 Mr. Brown was elected constable of Plymouth borough, and was also appointed chief of police, being the first one to serve in the latter capacity, and he has been a constable of the borough ever since. In 1869, while endeavoring to make an arrest at what was then known as "Poke Hollow," this intrepid officer was shot in the left arm by a member of a desperate gang he was endeavoring to capture, and so severe was his wound, that immedicate amputation was found necessary. This officer, as will be seen, served three years in the late Rebellion, coming out unscathed, and often in speaking of the matter to his old comrades and friends, he says that he "lost his arm in the Third Battle of Bull Run," the shooting having taken place near what is called "Bull Run." Mr. Brown was married at Clinton, Mass., November 21, 1861, to Susan Barry, and six children were born to them: William, Arthur and Lillie (all three deceased), George (a traveling salesman), Frank (who is attending the Wyoming Seminary) and Anna (attending the Sisters' School at Wilkes-Barre). In politics Mr. Brown is Democratic. As a soldier his comrades attest to his bravery, and as a civil officer, his fearless character is demostrated by the loss of his left arm in the discharge of his duty.

FRANK L. BROWN, jeweler, Kingston, is a native of Great Bend, Susquehanna Co., Pa., and was born November 17, 1858. His father, George W. Brown, was also a native of Great Bend, and of English origin. The Brown family came to America at an early date. Mr. Brown's great grandparents were among the prisoners taken by the British at the capture of Fort McHenry. His mother's name was Elmira Lewis. She was a native of Kirkwood, N.Y., and was also of English origin, her grandafther Lewis being a member of a very wealthy English family; but, as he was not the oldest son, the primogeniture doctrine of the common law practically debarred him from inheriting any part of his father's estate. He became dissatisfied with the customs and laws of the mother country and came to America, where he became a very successful business man, and accumulated a large fortune. Our subject began the jeweler's trade in Wilkes-Barre at the age of twenty, and served two years of his apprenticeship there. He then went to Philadelphia where he completed his trade, thence returning to Wilkes-Barre, where he worked at his trade two years. In September, 1882, he came to Kingston and established his present business. Mr. Brown is a young man of strict business integrity and an excellent workman. He is the only first-class jeweler in Kingston, and always has on hand everything in his line that his patrons may desire. He is a member of the Masonic Lodge, and, although not a political jobber or an office-seeker, he is decidedly a Democrat of the old "Jacksonian" type.

GEORGE BROWN, laborer, Lehman township, was born November 24, 1809, and was reared and educated in Bucks county, Pa. He is a son of James and Eve (Hoffman) Brown, both of whom were born in Bucks county. James was also a son of James Brown. The Browns were all tillers of the soil. James Brown, father of George, lived an uneventful life and reared a family of three children, all of whom grew to maturity, but one of whom is now living. He lived to be thirty years of age, when he was killed by a runaway team. George is the eldest in the family. In early life he learned the shoemaker's trade, at which he has worked over twenty years. He came to this county in 1840, locating in Plymouth, where he remained twenty-nine years, part of which time he worked at his trade, at other times working in and around the coal mines. On May 7, 1863, he married Miss Frances A., daughter of Miles and Alvina Hall, by whom he has had ten children, seven of whom grew to maturity, and are now living: A.J., James E., William H., Eugene E., Frances V., Edith M. and Minnie M. Mrs. Brown was born in Pincherville, Franklin township, May 25, 1842. Her ancestors were New England people. During Mr. Brown's residence in Plymouth he experienced very poor health, which, about 1869, caused him to move north of the mountains to Lehman township, where he bought a farm of one hundred and twenty acres of good fertile land, well timbered. On this he erected a sawmill, by which he was to manufacture his lumber, but owing to his want of experience in this line and also to the dishonesty of others, it proved a failure. Though losing his property, he regained his health, and is now a hearty man of eighty-two years. In 1881 he moved to Lehman Centre, where he now resides, respected by all his neighbors. He and his wife are consistent members of the Christian Church, believing in Primitive Christianity. He is a strong advocate of the temperance cause, for which he votes through the Prohibition party. He has held various offices in this and Berks county. He was justice of the peace for five years, town clerk for several years, also notary public, all of which offices he filled with honor and ability.

HENDERSON G. BROWN, farmer, P.O. Lehman, was born in Jackson, Luzerne Co.,Pa., May 4, 1838. He is a son of Clinton and Martha (Prindle) Brown, both of whom were born in Plymouth township. Clinton was a son of Jesse Brown, who was a resident and probably a native of Connecticut. He came to this country in its early history, locating in Jackson township, where he lived an even and uneventful life at what is now called "Brown's Corners," where he operated a distillery. He was called "Captain Brown," because he used to drill a militia company in those days; he died at the age of fifty. His family consisted of ten children, five sons and five daughters. His son, Clinton, began life in Jackson township, then moved to Lehman township, where he purchased one hundred acres of land near Lehman Centre. He lived a life of usefulness both to himself and his neighbors, and was a hard-working man and a loyal citizen; he died in 1877 at the age of eighty-three. His family numbered ten children, all of whom came to maturity, and four of them are now (1892) living. Henderson G., who is a twin of the ninth birth, was reared and educated in Lehman, and always confined himself to farming, at which vocation he has proven an expert. At the age of twenty-two he went to California and Nevada, passing most of his time in the latter place. After spending about seven years at various pursuits he returned to Lehman in 1866, where and when he resumed business again as a farmer. At the age of forty, in 1877, he married Mrs. Rachel Frantz, widow of the late William Frantz, and by her he had three children: Stanley H., Clinton J. and Geraldine, all of whom are single. Mrs. Brown was born in Wright township, September 24, 1842, and is a daughter of James and Mary (Dunbar) Meeker. By William Frantz she had three children: Jennie, William A. and Mame E., of whom Jennie married William Atkinson, a farmer in Jackson township, by whom she had two children: William R. and Gracie M. Mr. Brown is a practical and prosperous farmer, believing in the truism that what is worth doing at all is worth doing well. His farm consists of ninety-four acres of good productive land, all under improvement. He erected nearly all the buildings, including an elegant and commodious house, in which he lives. He is a Republican, and has held several responsible offices in the town, which he discharged with much credit to himself and his fellow citizens.

JOHN BROWN, carpenter, Duryea, was born in Providence, R.I., April 27, 1844, and is a son of Austin and Alice A. (Derringer) Brown, natives of England. He was educated in the common schools, and at an early age was employed in a cotton manufactory. In 1864 he went to Boston, Mass., to live with his uncle, Frank Brown, who was a carpenter, and it was here that he learned the trade at which he is still employed. Mr. Brown came from Boston to Scranton in 1873, and resided there until Duryea commenced to boom in 1886, when he took up his residence here. He was united in marriage, October 10, 1872, with Susannah, daughter of Edgar and Eleanor (Case) Dwight, natives of Boston, Mass., and of English origin. Their union has been blessed with two children, namely: Edgar A., born June 10, 1873, and James A., born March 14, 1876. Our subject is a member of the M.E. church, and in politics is a Republican.

JOHN B. BROWN, general merchant, Hazleton, was born in the city of Philadelphia, September 28, 1845, and is the third in a family of nine children of James S. and Mary (Cork) Brown, natives of Scotland. He was reared and educated in Schuylkill county, Pa., and did general work about the mines until 1874, when he came to Hazleton and commenced his present business, which was at first run on a small scale, but which, by fair dealing and enterprise, has rapidly grown until he is one of the leading merchants in the city. His place of business is at No. 59 South Wyoming street, where he has a commodious store well-stocked with all kinds of fresh family provisions, and also a well-regulated dry goods department. Mr. Brown was united in marriage, December 23, 1869, with Miss Margaret, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Taylor) Graham, natives of Scotland, and to this union has been born eight children, namely: Elizabeth J., Howard (deceased), William G. (deceased), Mary (deceased), Harry A., Albert, Robert and Frederick. Mr. Brown votes the Republican ticket, is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and belongs to the Knights of Pythias.

JOHN J. BROWN, carpenter, and proprietor of restaurant, Georgetown, Wilkes-Barre township, is a native of England, of Irish parentage, and is a son of Henry and Mary (Nevins) Brown. He was reared in Bedford, Maine, where he was employed in a cotton-mill for several years, and in 1864 he settled in Wilkes-Barre township, where he has since resided. Here he has worked at the carpenter trade, and since 1890 has also been engaged in the restaurant business. In 1866 Mr. Brown married Lydia A., daughter of Fitch and Sarah (Marshall) Dickinson, of Wilkes-Barre, and by her he has seven children: Sarah (Mrs. William Swartword), Mary (Mrs. William Rogers), Joseph, Susie, Bertha, and John and Jesse (twins). Mr. Brown is a member of the I.O.O.F. and in politics he is a Republican.

JOHN M. BROWN, late foreman in the machine shop of the Central Railroad of New Jersey, at Ashley, died at his residence on Main street, in that borough, November 23, 1891. He was born September 24, 1855, and was a son of William and Margaret (Johnson) Brown, natives of Ireland, the former of whom was a miner, and was burned in the mines so that he died soon after. They reared a family of three children, of whom John M. was the third. Our subject was educated in the public schools of Ashley, and then learned the machinist's trade, which he followed till about a month prior to his death, when he was promoted to the position which he held at the time of his decease. He was married March 15, 1883, to Sallie M., daughter of George and Lucinda (Miller) Blodget, natives of Pennsylvania, and of Yankee and German origin, respectively. This happy union was blessed with two children, Florence and John M. Mr. Brown was a member of the Presbyterian Church, as is his widow. He was a member of the K. of H., and in his politicial views was a Republican, and was once a member of the council in Ashley borough. Though his premature death was a severe blow to his Relatives, he was also deeply lamented by a large circle of friends which he had made by his upright and manly character, and by the communtiy in general. His widow and two bright children are comfortably located on North Main street, Ashley.

ROBERT T. BROWN, D.D.S., Hazleton, was born at Jeddo, Pa., and is a son of Peter and Elizabeth (Turner) Brown, the former a native of Edinburgh, Scotland, the latter born in the north of England. Dr. Brown is the second in a family of seven children, three daughters and four sons. Two daughters and three sons are still livng. Robert T. was educated in the public schools of this county, and, in the fall of 1888 he entered the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery, Philadelphia, where he completed his dental education in 1890. He then came to Hazleton and opened an office at 132 Broad street, where, during the short period in which he has practiced, he has won a place of distinction among the leading dentists of Luzerne county. The Doctor is known, either personally or by reputation, to nearly everybody in Lower Luzerne, and is popular with all.

WILLIAM BROWN, farmer, P.O. Slocum, was born in Mifflin township, Columbia Co., Pa., in 1822, a son of Conrad and Mary (Rarick) Brown, both of whom were born in Moore township, Lehigh Co., Pa., but removed to this county about 1824, locating in what is now Dorrance township. Conrad Brown owned four hundred acres of land, and was a very industrious man, but feeble in health. He was a natural mechanic, and often worked at the carpenter's trade. Like other pioneers, he took his farm out of the wilderness, and from it cleared over eighty acres; he died in 1864, aged sixty-five years. His family consisted of nine children, three of whom are now living, William being the fourth. Our subject was reared in Newport, and in early life learned the carpenter's trade, at which he worked for ten years. In 1857 he removed on his present farm of 145 acres, at that time quite a wilderness, forty-three of which he has thus far cleared. He is an active man, and although feeble, accomplishes a great deal of work. In 1855 he Married Miss Ellen, daughter of Benjamin and Eliza Lear. They have no children. He and his good wife are conscientious church members, he of the Lutheran Church, she of the Evangelical; politically he is a Republican.

WILLIAM H. BROWN, mechanic, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Pottsville, Pa., May 4, 1839, and was reared and educated in his native city, where he learned the painter's trade. He served three years in the Civil war as a member of Company G, Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, First Brigade, Second Division of Ninth Corps, Army of Potomac, and was honorably discharged at expiration of his term of service. In 1871 he located in Wilkes-Barre, where he has since resided. He is a prominent member of the A.M.E. Church, and is one of the popular colored citizens of the city. Politically he is a Republican.

FRANK M. BRUNDAGE, M.D., Conyngham, was born in the village of Conyngham, Luzerne Co., Pa., August 18, 1851, a son of Charles and Catherine (Andreas) Brundage, and is of English and German descent. His paternal grandfather, Moses S. Brundage, a native of New Jersey, settled in Sugar Loaf township in 1820; in 1822 he erected the dwelling now owned and occupied by subject, and resided there until his death; he was a merchant, and accumulated a large property. He was a son of Capt. Israel Brundage who, with two brothers, came from England and settled in New Jersey prior to the Revolution, during which struggle Israel Brundage held a captin's commission. The wife of Moses S. Brundage was Jane Broadhead, daughter of Hon. Richard Broadhead, and sister of Hon. Richard Broadhead, Jr., Ex-United States Senator from Pennsylvania. The children of Moses S. Brundage were: Charles, Marie (Mrs. Dr. T.H. Thornton), William, Asa R., Chester, Amanda (Mrs. Dr. J.R. Casselberry). The father of subject was a Native of New Jersey, a physician by profession, and a graduate of a medical college at Castleton, Vt. In 1850 he began the practice of his profession at Conyngham; in 1858 he located in Union county, Pa., and in 1861 he removed to Stephenson county, Ill., where he was in the active practice of his profession until his death, which occurred in 1891, when he was aged sixty-eight years. His wife was a daughter of Isaac Andreas, of Sugar Loaf township, this county, and by her he had seven children: Frank M., Boyd H., Duke A., Dora E. (Mrs. George Radler), Moses S., Della (Mrs. Howard Price), and Albert. Our subject was reared in Illinois from ten years of age, and educated in the public schools. In 1871 he began the study of medicine with Dr. T.H. Thornton, of Lewisburg, Pa., and was graduated from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in 1874. The same year he located in Conyngham village, where he was in the active practice of his profession until 1889, when he retired. The Doctor married November 19, 1874, Ella M., only child of John and Elizabeth (Roland) Young, of Lebanon, Pa., and has one daughter, Clara E. The father of Mrs. Brundage was editor of the Pennsylvanier, the leading German paper of Eastern Pennsylvania, which he conducted forty years. At the time of his death, the Philadelphia Press and Times, in their editorials, gave him credit for being the oldest and ablest German editor in the State. Dr. Brundage is a member of the Luzerne County Medical Society, and Lehigh Valley Medical Association. While eligible to the Order of the Sons of the Revolution and its offices, he has never availed himself of the honor. He is a stanch Republican; has always taken an active interest in political affairs, but has never sought office.

HERMAN HENRY BRUNING, pastor of St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church in White Haven borough, was born in Baltimore, Md., May 17, 1835, the eldest of seven children, six of whom are still living. His father, Herman Henry Bruning, and his mother, Margaret Sophia, nee Dannettel, of old Saxon lineage, were born in Dupholz, Hanover, under the reign of George III, king of England. They came to America in 1832, and settled in Baltimore, where they married in 1833. Mr. Bruning, Sr., was at first proprietor of a furniture factory, but in later years entered the dry-goods trade. He died in 1853. His widow still resides in Baltimore, eighty years of age. The subject of this sketch was educated privately and in common schools, and graduated in 1852 from Baltimore City College, but remained another year as post graduate in that institution. After this he spent several years in Baltimore as professor of ancient and modern languages, until in 1865 he organized the Conestoga Collegiate Institute for young ladies in Lancaster, Pa., conducting it as principal and proprietor until 1870. In 1860 he entered the ministry of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, adding to his literary duties the work of a home missionary in Baltimore city, and Baltimore and Carroll counties, Md. After his removal to Lancaster, Pa., he had charge of the church in Strasburg, 1866-71, and of the First Lutheran Church in Millersville, 1868-72. In 1872 he became pastor of the First Lutheran Church in Selin's Grove, Pa., and in 1874 of Luther Memorial Church in Erie, Pa. Resigning there, he took a few months of needed rest, and on January 1, 1881, assumed his present charge. He was married in Lancaster, Pa., September 23, 1873, to Miss Frances, daughter of Jacob Gable (deceased), and his wife Maria, nee Buckius, the former of Frederic, Md., and the latter of Lancaster, Pa., both descended from original German settlers. Mrs. Bruning was the tenth in a family of thirteen children, and was born February 6, 1845, in Lancaster,Pa. This happy union was blessed with two daughters: Miriam Evangeline, born in Erie, Pa., May 29, 1877; died March 15, 1887, and Margaret Arnold, born May 15, 1883, died August 7, 1883. Mr. Bruning is the German secretary, and commissioner of Missionary Explorations for the Second Conference of the Evangelical Lutheran Ministerium of Pennsyvlania. He is independent in his political views, and devotes himself entirely to his sacred calling.

JOHN BRUNNER, shoemaker, Ashley, was born in Germany, August 24, 1834, and is a son of Benjamin and Barbara (Kurtc) Brunner, the former of whom was a shoemaker by trade. They reared a family of five children. Our subject came to America in 1855, and located in Jersey City, where he - worked at his trade nine months; then moved to Syracuse, and here followed his trade one year; afterward at Penn Haven, four years. On December 5, 1861, he enlisted at Mauch Chunk, Pa., in Company G, Eighty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers; was wounded in the finger at Fredericksburg, and in the toe at Malvern Hill, and was discharged in February, 1863. Accompanied by his family he then went to Madison, Wis., where he remained four years; thence came to Ashley and established a shop, which he has since operated. Mr. Brunner was married April 11, 1857, to Miss Sophia Reihelderfer, of Weissport, Pa., the issue of which union has been nine chidren, four of whom died young; the others are: George, brakeman on the Delaware & Hudson Railroad, Wilkes-Barre; John, fireman on the Central Railroad of New Jersey, Ashley; Martha (Mrs. Henry Stark, Ashley), Elmer, jeweler, Ashley; and Harry, baker, Ashley. Mr. and Mrs. Brunner are members of the Presbyterian Church. Politically he is a Democrat, and has been a member of the council of Ashley borough. He built his present residence in 1871.

CHARLES BRYANT, farmer, Forty Fort borough, was born October 28, 1835, in Forty Fort borough, a son of Charles and Rebecca (Wilson) Bryant, natives of New Jersey; the father was a farmer by occupation. Our subject is the ninth in a family of eleven children; he was educated in the common schools, and started in life for himself at the age of twenty-five, engaging as farm hand. He purchased a house and lot on River street, which he sold in two years, then bought a lot and built a house, which he sold after four years. He next worked as overseer on a large farm for eight years. He then removed to his house in Forty Fort borough, where he resides at present, and has since engaged in the occupation of farming. On December 5, 1861, Mr. Bryant married Ruth G., daughter of Henry and Margaret (Kreidler) Stroh, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German descent. This union was blessed with five children: George W., coal inspector for the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Company; Alice M., who married John B.S. Keeler, a book-keeper, for the L.V. Coal Co.; Edith M., Chloe S. and Richard R. All are members of the Presbyterian Church. In politics Mr. Bryant is a Democrat.

JOSEPH A. BRYANT, carpenter, Luzerne, was born in England, April 27, 1849. He is a son of Thomas and Lovday (Apps) Bryant, both of whom were born in England, and where they now reside, as well-to-do farmers. Their family consists of nine children living, out of eleven born to them; two of these are living in this country. Joseph A. Bryant is the third of the family in order of birth. He was reared and educated in England, and emigrated to this country in 1869, at the ae of twenty, locating in Carbondale, where he worked at his trade, that of carpenter. He remained there two years, when he removed to Kingston borough, where he remained another two years, after which time he removed to Kingston township, where he has since resided as an active business man, as well as a master mechanic. He married, January 21, 1874, to Miss Susan, daughter of Charles and Susan McKechnie, to which union were born ten children, six of whom are now (1892) living: Charles S., Lovday J., Susan D., Elizabeth A., Joseph A. and John M. Mr. Bryant is a self-made man; beginning with nothing but a pair of willing hands, he has, by hard labor, acquired quite a comfortable home, besides a number of houses which he rents to tenants. He is highly esteemed by his fellow citizens, who have honored him with several offices. He has served as school director for six years, and discharged other offices to his credit. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, in good standing, of which he is also a trustee. He is a member of the K. of P. Politically he is independent. Mrs. Susan Bryant was born in Paisley, Scotland, June 21, 1856.

ANDREW BRYDEN, mine superintendent, Pennsylvania Coal Company, Pittston, was born in the parish of Kirkoswald, Ayrshire, Scotland, January 10, 1827. His father, Alexander Bryden, emigrated to America in the year 1842, and took up his residence in Carbondale, then in the county of Luzerne. The subject of this sketch, with his mother, brothers and sisters, emigrated to America, sailing from Glasgow April 27,1843, on a sailing vessel called the "Superb," which made the passage to New York in twenty-three days. After landing, they took passage by steamboat up the Hudson river to Rondout; thence to Honesdale by canal boat on the Delaware & Hudson Canal; and from Honesdale by coal cars, on the Delaware & Hudson Canal Company's Railroad, to Carbondale (this being the royal route for Emigrants from New York to Carbondale, at that time), May 31, 1843. After coming to this country our subject commenced mining coal, and was engaged in driving the Plane Heading in No. 1 Drift of the Delaware & Hudson Canel Company's mines at Carbondale. At the time of the memorable disaster, which occurred on the morning of January 12, 1846, when about forty acres of land undermined, caved in and imprisoned many of the men, fourteen of whom were instantly killed, but eight of their bodies being recovered. Mr. Bryden and many others were found by Alexander Bryden, his father, who at that time was mine foreman, and conversant with the mine and all its ramifications, and who, after repeated attempts, finally found a passage through which he was enabled to make his way to those imprisoned near the face of the heading in which his son worked. Mr. Bryden has been married three times; His first wife was Ann Law, his second, Isabella Young, and his third, Elizabeth McDougall. By his first wife he had six children, and by his second, five children - eleven in all, of whom but five are now living. In September, 1850, he removed to Pittston, to become mine foreman for the Pennsylvania Coal Company's mines at that place. In April, 1853, he left the service of the Pennsylvania Coal Company, and was employed by the Baltimore Coal Company as mine superintendent at Wilkes-Barre. He remained in that position one year, after which he returned to the employ of the Pennsylvania Coal Company as mine superintendent, and with them he has been employed forty-one years.

NATHAN BUCHMAN, farmer, P.O. Dorrance, was born in Dorrance township, October 3, 1852, a son of Daniel and Susan (Snyder) Buchman, both of whom were born near Slatington, Pa. They removed to this county when young, and located in Dorrance, where they lived for a number of years, and accumulated a large tract of land, comprising 260 acres of timber land, which he subsequently, in 1859, sold to Abraham Guldin. After that he removed to Nescopeck, where he died in 1867, aged seventy-one years; his wife passed away in 1879, aged fifty years; both were much respected in the community. They reared a family of twelve children, six of whom are now living, Nathan being the ninth in the order of birth. Our subject has always followed his natural calling - a tiller of the soil, and lived seven years in Hollenback township. In 1874 he married Miss Civila, daughter of John and Sarah Radler, who bore him four children, three of whom are living: Frank, Sarah and Carrie. Mrs. Civila Buchman was born in Hollenback township. In 1879 Mr. Buchman removed to his present home, a neat farm of fifty-two acres of good land. He is a striving, energetic, honest man of a retiring disposition, well informed in agricultural matters. He and his wife are members of church - he of the Lutheran, she of the Reformed. Politically he is a Democrat.

DENNIS BUCKLEY, livery-man, and dealer in coal, lime and stone, Wilkes-Barre, was born in that city October 15, 1848, a son of Redmond and Mary (Flynn) Buckley, natives of Counties Cork and Kerry, Ireland, respectively, who, about the year 1842, settled in Wilkes-Barre, where they passed the rest of their days. Their children were Thomas (killed by being crushed between car bumpers at Stanton Slope in 1865), James, Dennis, John and Ellen. Our subject was reared and educated in his native city, began life in the mines as a slate-picker, later employed there as a mule-driver, and for fifteen years he boated on the Pennsylvania Canal. Since 1882 he has been engaged in his present business, commencing at the foot of the ladder with but one team, and he has built up an extensive trade now, requiring fifteen teams to carry on his business. Mr. Buckley married, in May, 1874, Margaret, daughter of James and Margaret (Haley) Farrell, of Wilkes-Barre, and formerly of Ireland, and by her he has eight children: Redmond, James, Mary, Margaret, William, Charles, Francis and Ellen. He is a member of the Catholic Church, and in politics is a Democrat.

CHARLES W. BULKLEY, manager West End Store at Mocanaqua, P.O. Shickshinny, was born at Cambra, this county, July 19, 1858, and is a son of Daniel and Mary Bulkley. The father, who was a native of Connecticut, and a son of Levi and Mary Bulkley, came to Luzerne county about 1834, locating at what is now Shickshinny, where he followed the occupation of bookkeeper, and resided until his death, which occurred in 1875, when he was aged fifty-eight years. His wife was a daughter of Evan Thomas, a pioneer of Salem township, and by her he had thirteen children, eight of whom grew to maturity: Rachel (Mrs. Henry Wagner), Abigail (Mrs. E.E. Berry), Jane (Mrs. William Shoemaker), Joseph W., Grace (Mrs. Jesse Sink), Alice (Mrs. James Harris), Charles W. and Levi T. Our subject was reared in Shickshinny, educated in public schools, and began life as clerk in a general store. Since 1887 he has held the responsible position of manager of the West End Store for F.J. Leavenworth & Co., at Mocanaqua. Mr. Bulkley was married September 21, 1881, to Frances, daughter of Peter and Susan (Wyant) Rittenhouse, of Shickshinny, and has one son living, named Williard L. Our subject is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and of the P.O.S. of A.; in politics he is a Republican.

FRED L. BURGESS, farmer and constable, Yatesville, was born in Wyoming county, Pa., December 22, 1839, and is a son of William W. and Jane (Wiggins) Warner, natives of the same place, and of English extraction. Our subject went to work in a lumber yard in Bradford county, Pa., in 1851, remaining there until 1860, when he was employed on the canal until the outbreak of the Rebellion in 1861, at which time he enlisted in Company F, Fifty-second Regiment, P.V.I. He was discharged in 1864, on account of sickness, and he again enlisted, this time in Company A, Fifty-seventh Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until the close of the war. In 1867 he took up his residence in Yatesville, and has followed the vocation of farming ever since. Mr. Burgess was married March 21, 1867, to Catherine, daughter of Jacob and Mary (Hoofmacher) Myers, natives of Easton, Pa., and their union has been blessed with the following children: Cyrus, born March 21, 1870; Almeda, October 15, 1872, married May 4, 1892, to Barney Green, a carpenter, Millen Hill; Frank, born January 24, 1875; Ellen, born May 26, 1877; John, born July 14, 1882, and Josephine, born April 26, 1887. Our subject is a member of the G.A.R.; is a Republican in politics, and is constable of the borough.

BERNARD BURGUNDEN, butcher, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Bavaria, Germany, January 4, 1827, and is a son of Abraham and Caroline Burgunden. He was reared in his native country, and served an apprenticeship at the butcher's trade, at which he began when thirteen years of age. In 1848 he came to America, locating in Beaver Meadow, Carbon Co., Pa., where he worked at his trade ten months. In 1849 he removed to Wilkes-barre, and embarked in business for himself, at which he has since continued with marked success, and he is considered one of the substantial and solid business men of the city. In February, 1848, Mr. Burgunden married Caroline, daughter of Moses and Theresa Hamburger, of Bavaria, Germany, and he has three children: Abram, Herman and Moses. Mr. Burgunden is a member of the Jewish Synagogue; in politics he is a Democrat.

JOHN BURKE, miner, Port Blanchard, was born June 9, 1832, in County Mayo, Ireland, and is second in order of birth of twelve children born to Thomas and Mary (Tigue) Burke. Our subject was educated in the Irish National Schools, and before leaving Ireland worked on the farm. He arrived in this country in March, 1851, and immediately settled in Luzerne county, Pa., where he went to work in 1852 as a laborer in the mines, one year later becoming a miner, and working for the Pennsylvania Coal Company, by whom he is still employed. Mr. Burke was united in wedlock April 6, 1856, with Miss Bridget Temple, daughter of James and Margaret (Quinn) Temple, natives of County Donegal, Ireland, and the following is the issue: Thomas F., born March 25, 1861; Mary A., born February 17, 1862; James J., born September 13, 1864; John E., born September 18, 1866; William C., born November 28, 1868. Our subject is a member of the Roman Catholic Church, and in politics he is a Democrat. He was elected overseer of the poor in 1858, holding that office until 1860; and was a school director from 1874 to 1880.

RICHARD BURKE, section-boss, Central Railroad of New Jersey (now the Reading System), also hotel-keeper, Georgetown, P.O. Wilkes-Barre, was born in County Galway, Ireland, December 12, 1842, and is a son of James and Margaret (Kavanaugh) Burke. He was reared and educated in Ireland, and in 1862 came to America, locating in Carbon county, Pa., where he remained until 1869, during a portion of which time he was assistant section-boss for the Lehigh Valley Railroad Company; also served them in same capacity one year at Tunkhannock, and one year at Mauch Chunk. In 1872 he located in Wilkes-Barre township, where he has since resided, and has held his present position twenty years; has also kept hotel six years. In 1873 Mr. Burke married Hannah, daughter of Dennis and Mary (Hanlon) Glavin, of Wilkes-Barre township, and has four children: Margaret, Mary, Hannah and Richard. Mr. Burke is a member of the Catholic Church; in politics is a Democrat, and has served one term as school director of Wilkes-Barre township.

THOMAS BURKE, proprietor of restaurant, Port Griffith, was born in that place November 25, 1857, and is a son of Michael and Bridget (Barrett) Burke, natives of County Mayo, Ireland. The father came to America in 1840, and located in Carbondale, later in Pittston, and finally in Port Griffith, Pa., where he was killed in the mines by a fall of rock, July 2, 1874, and where his widow lives with her son Michael. The family consisted of seven children, four of whom are living, viz.: Mary (Mrs. John Ford, of Pittston), Thomas, William and Michael. Our subject received a common-school education, and at an early age began working about the mines, which he followed sixteen years. He was then in the bottling business for a short time, and, in 1883, in his present business, building his present place in 1886. Mr. Burke was married, September 30, 1885, to Miss Mary A., daughter of Patrick and Catherine (Cuff) Noon, natives of County Mayo, Ireland, and they had three children, two of whom are living, viz: Michael and Catherine. Mr. Burke and family are members of the Catholic Church. He is a member of the A.O.H., a Democrat in politics, and has held the offices of tax collector, supervisor and treasurer in Jenkins township.

THOMAS H. BURKE, miner, Port Blanchard, was born in County Mayo, Ireland, May 12, 1844, and is the youngest son of James and Mary (Hessian) Burke, natives of the same place. He was educated in the Roman Catholic schools of his native land, and assisted his father on the farm until 1865, when he came to this country, where he first resided in the State of Delaware, working, during his sojourn there, in a stone quarry. He then went to the city of New York, where he stayed for some time, working in a sugar refinery, and afterward was employed at the same business in Philadelphia until early in the year 1869, when he settled in Pittston, this county, where he was employed as a laborer in the mines, since which time he has been a miner in the employ of the Pennsylvania Coal Company. Our subject was united in marriage May 14, 1869, with Bridget, daughter of James and Mary (Burke) Maloy, natives of County Mayo, Ireland. She died April 4, 1887, leaving five children, whose names are as follows: Annie, born May 13, 1873; Thomas, born October 25, 1874; John, born September 28, 1879; Margaret, born March 8, 1882, and William, born March 19, 1884. Mr. Burke was married, the second time on April 16, 1888, to Kate, daughter of Thomas and Mary (Carey) McNamara, of Port Griffith, natives of County Mayo, Ireland. He is a member of the Roman Catholic Church, in politics a Democrat, and is a member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians and the Emerald Beneficial Association.

WILLIAM BURKE, miner, Inkerman, was born in County Mayo, Ireland, June 29, 1843, and is a son of Daniel and Margaret (Sheenan) Burke, natives of the same place. He received his education in Ireland, and in 1860 came to America, locating in New York City. On the breaking out of the Rebellion, he joined Company B, Sixty-ninth Regiment, of New York, connected with the Irish brigade, and was in all the battles in which that valiant and famous corps took part. When the war was over, he returned to New York, and was employed as a longshoreman until early in 1867, when he came to Pittston, this county, and labored in the mines until 1880, since which time he has been employed by the Pennsylvania Coal Company as a miner. Mr. Burke was united in marriage, June 10, 1866, with Ann, daughter of Edward and Mary (McNulty) Brennan, natives of County Longford, Ireland, and their union has been blessed with children as follows: Ann, born May 28, 1867, married January 5, 1890, to John Mullen, carpenter, Miners Mills; William, born February 10, 1869; Ann, born August 10, 1871, and Mary, born May 4, 1873. Our subject is a Roman Catholic, and a member of the A.O.H.; in politics he is a Democrat, and has held the position of constable for two terms.

AARON BURKET, farmer, Newport township, P.O. Glen Lyon, is a native of the county, born in Plymouth January 1, 1836. His parents, Aaron and Beckey (Harris) Burket, were both natives of New Jersey, the former of German, the latter of English descent; the father always followed the occupation of wood-chopper. He had a family of five children, as follows: William, Sarah Ann, Elizabeth, Susan and Aaron. Our subject was married in 1872 to Lydia Miller, a daughter of Peter and Phoebe (Kleinup) Miller, natives of Germany and Salem township, this county, respectively, and they had twelve children, six of whom are living. Mrs. Lydia Burket died in 1890, and he has since married Margaret Hamilton, his present wife. In December, 1861, Aaron Burket enlisted under Capt. Jackson, in Company I, Fifty-eighth Pennsylvania Regiment, and served for four years and eight months; he has received two honorable discharges for his service, and draws a pension under the law which went into effect June 27, 1890. He has been a member of the G.A.R. for a number of years. In religious faith he is a member of the Methodist Church; politically he is a Democrat.

ALFRED E. BURNAFORD, merchant, Nanticoke, was born in Cornwall, England, February 2, 1869, and is a son of William and Eliza (Copp) Burnaford, also natives of England. When he was about one year old his parents came to America and located at New Exeter, Canada, a short time, and then removed to Ashley, this county. After remaining in America about four years, they returned to their native land. They resided at various times in Cornwall and Bristol (England), and Glasgow (Scotland), then in Millom, County of Cumberland, England, residing in those places, in all, about eight years. They then returned to the "land of the free", locating first in Peale, Clearfield, Co., Pa., whence, after a short sojourn, they moved to Nanticoke, where they now reside. There were eight children in the family, seven of whom are living, Alfred E. being the eldest. Our subject worked about the mines in the neighborhood of one year, and then engaged as clerk in a grocery store at Nanticoke. Here he worked nearly a year, and then entered the employ of Hildreth & Co., as clerk in the shoe department, where he remained until April, 1890, when he embarked in the boot and shoe business for his own account, and is now sole owner and manager of the "Keystone Shoe Store," at Nanticoke, which is as well stocked as any store in the county. Our subject was united in marriage October 6, 1891, with Miss Christian, daughter of Charles Nelson, of Wilkes-Barre. Mr. and Mrs. Burnaford are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he is a member of the K. of M., the L.K. of A. and the I.O.H. In politics he is governed by principle and not by party prejudice.

ALFRED H. BURNS, farmer, P.O. Orange, was born on the Mongaup river, in Sullivan county, N.Y., August 1, 1819, a son of George and Jane (Drake) Burns, the former born in the State of New York, and the latter in Deckertown, N.J. George Burns was a son of John Burns, a native of Scotland, and a descendant of Robert Burns, the Scottish poet. He settled in New York State as a farmer, a prosperous one in those days, and reared a family of nine children, all of whom are now dead. George, his son, removed to Wayne county, Pa., when his son Alfred was nineteen years of age. He was a farmer of some means, and a man of intelligence; was justice of the peace, and held many minor offices. In his early life he taught school, and was considered one of the best school-teachers of his day. He lived to be eighty-four year of age, and reared a family of ten children, nine of whom are now living, Alfred H. being the eldest son. Our subject was reared and educated at Port Jervis, N.Y., and in early life learned the carpenter's trade, at which he worked until 1870, when he became an agriculturist. He resided in Wilkes-Barre for twenty years, and in the spring of 1891 he bought of A. Hunlock a farm of 140 acres in Franklin township, to which he moved. Mr. Burns is a self-made man, and what he has accumulated was by hard work and an economical life. He is a man of worth, and an excellent mechanic. Mr. Burns was married to Miss Helen S., daughter of Willis and Lucia Hosford, and by her he had three children: Lucy, Frank and Arthur, all yet living. Lucy married James McDonald, a real estate agent. Mrs. Burns was born in Greene county, New York.

B.J. BURNS, of the firm of Burns & O'Neil, furniture dealers and undertakers, Pittston. This enterprising young business man is a native of Port Griffith, and is a son of Thomas and Bridget (DeLaney) Burns, natives of Ireland. The father came to America in 1845, and now resides at Avoca. Our subject received his education in the common schools of Luzerne county, and at the age of eight years began working around the mines. He followed the mines in various capacities until he was fourteen years of age, when he commenced clerking, at which he was engaged two years, and then took up the butchering business. One year later he went to Colorado, where, for three years, he worked on the engineer corps of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad Company, then to the anthracite coal regions, and engaged in running a locomotive at Avoca. During the smallpox epidemic of 1881 at Pittston, he entered the employ of C. Donnely as undertaker, and a short time after this he worked in the machine shop at West Pittston, and then on the construction of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad as locomotive engineer. In 1884 he came to Pittston and embarked in his present business. On November 29, 1883, Mr. Burns was married to Miss Lulu B. Maher, of Moosic, and they have two children, Charles and Leo. Our subject is a prominent member of the A.O.H., and his political views are decidedly Democratic.

GAVIN BURT, merchant, Miners Mills, was born in Lanarkshire, Scotland, July 10, 1829, and is a son of Peter and Mary (Andrew) Burt; the father, who was a miner, was twice married, and had six children by each wife, our subject being the second in the first family. He came to America in 1868, working about the mines a few weeks at Hazleton, afterward, till 1889, in Plains township and Miners Mills. In 1870 he built his present residence, and in 1882 the adjoining store. Mr. Burt was married December 31, 1851, to Miss Hannah, daughter of Dugald and Jeanette (Sampson) Clark, the fruit of this union being nine children, seven of whom are living, viz.: Jeanette, married to Charles Aikman, a mine-boss at Moosic, Pa.; Peter, a carpenter by trade, residing in Parsons, Pa.; George; Mary A., married to George Walker, a plumber for the Steam Heating Company, Wilkes-Barre; Margaret, married to Reuben Edwards, a locomotive fireman of Miners Mills; Marion, married to Thomas Nankivel, a miner at Green Ridge, Pa., and John H., engaged with George in the hardware business. Dugald was killed in the Waddell Mine at the age of twenty-nine years, by a fall of coal; Gavin was killed in the Pine Ridge mine at the age of twenty-four in an explosion. Mr. Burt and his family are members of the Presbyterian Church; he is a member of the Caledonian Club at Wilkes-Barre; in his political views he is a Republican, and has been burgess of Miners Mills borough three times, at present serving on the council.

GEORGE BURT, hardware merchant, Miners Mills, was born in Glasgow, Scotland, May 26, 1860, and is a son of Gavin Burt. He commenced active life working at the tinner's trade with W.R. Williams, of Wilkes-Barre, with whom he remained seven months, and was then in the same business with Mills & Billings, of Tunkhannock, same State, two years, and with B.G. Carpenter & Co., of Wilkes-Barre, one and one-half years, after which he engaged in business for himself in the store which his father now occupies. He built his present store and residence combined, and removed therein in 1890. Mr. Burt was married, November 25, 1886, to Miss Sarah Tague, of Avery, Pa., who died June 30, 1891, leaving one child, Raymond, and on July 27, 1892, Mr. Burt wedded, for his second wife, Miss Lizzie A. Moore, of Alden, Pa. Our subject was baptized in the Presbyterian Church; he is a member of the K. of P., the I.O.R.M., the Pocahontas, and of the Caledonian Club at Wilkes-Barre. In his political views he is a Republican, and is at present treasurer of Miners Mills borough.

WILLIAM BUSH, engineer in the Wyoming Colliery, Plains, was born in Scranton, Pa., May 25, 1867. His mother dying when he was an infant, his father left him in the care of the family of Fuller Miligan, of Plains, and then disappeared forever. Being thus left in non-kindred hands, our subject, as a consequence, received but few educational advantages, and at the age of eight years he embarked on life's great voyage, working in the breaker. He has since followed the various kinds of work about the mines, chiefly outside, until, by untiring application and honest effort, he has worked himself up to his present position. Mr. Bush was married, September 29, 1887, to Mary A., daughter of Frank and Ann (Kildea) Murphy, of Plains, natives of Ireland. Her father, who was a miner, reared a family of eight children, of whom are living, John J., a brakeman on the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, and residing in Philadelphia; Ellen E., married to Edward F. McGovern, an attorney at law at Wilkes-Barre; Theresa L., one of the successful teachers of Luzerne county, now holding a position in the Plains high school building (at the Teachers' Institute, held in Wilkes-Barre in December 1891, she was voted by her fellow-teachers the handsomest lady teacher in the county, a title which she justly deserves, especially as her beauty consists not only in her pretty face and symmetrical figure, but in her genial disposition; warm heart and sweet, generous soul); the youngest, Mary A., is the wife of our subject. Some time after the death of Mr. Murphy, his widow married Gregory Flynn, with whom she had four children, two of whom are living, viz.: Bridget and James. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Bush is made bright by the prattle of two sweet-faced children, Anna and Theresa. Our subject and family are members of the Catholic Church; politically he is in sympathy with the Republican party, but votes according to the dictates of his own reason, irrespective of party lines, thus setting an example for every upright citizen.

G.F. BUSS, of the firm of Buss & Proud, merchant tailors, Pittston, was born in Hesse, Germany, September 23, 1866, a son of Karl and Anna (Buller) Buss, residents of Germany, where his father is engaged in farming and butchering. They have a family of eleven children, of whom two - Geroge F. and Tobias - are residents of Pittston, the latter being employed as a butcher. Our subject was educated in Germany, and at the age of fourteen was apprenticed to the tailor's trade. In 1884 he came to America, locating at Mauch Chunk, Pa., where he worked as a journeyman up to May 10, 1886, when he moved to Pittston, this county, and entered the employ of Sacks & Brown, with whom he remained eleven months. He was then employed by several other firms in Pittston, and later as cutter for J.W. Minno, with whom he remained until June 20, 1891, when he embarked in business for himself as a member of the firm of Buss & Proud, having had a successful trade from the commencement. Mr. Buss is a member of the I.O.O.F. and Encampment; of the Patriotic Militant Canton Union, of which he is second lieutenant, has been chairman of the Tailors' Union No. 103 from its Organization, and is sergeant of company C.N.G. of Pennsylvania Ninth Regiment; is also a member of the Presybterian Church, and of the Y.M.C.A.

EDMUND GRIFFIN BUTLER is a son of Lord Butler, and was born June 11, 1845. Being a lineal descendant of Col. Zebulon Butler, and of the Slocums, and uniting in his veins the blood of other of the early settlers of the Valley, it may fairly be said that a complete genealogical history of the family would be in effect a complete history of Wyoming, and since that is essayed to be given elsewhere in this book, it will not be attempted here. Suffice it to say, that Mr. Butler is in every way worthy the inheritance of the good name and fame of his brave ancestors. He was educated at the Waverly Institute, Waverly, N.Y., and at the Wesleyan University, Middleton, Conn., having graduated from the last named institution in 1868. He immediately afterward entered the law office of the late E.P. Darling, and was admitted to practice, November 17, 1869. Mr. Butler married, December 22, 1869, Clara F. Cox, daughter of H.W.H. Cox, of Friendsvile, Susquehanna Co., Pa., who was a native of England and emigrated to Susquehanna county. Mr. and Mrs. Butler have three children, all daughters. Mr. Butler is a member of the Methodist Church, and a Republican in politics, though he has never sought office and does not take an especially active part in campaigns.

THOMAS BUTTS, miner, Plains, was born in Devonshire, England, December 18, 1846, and is a son of Thomas and Mary A. (Ball) Butts, the former of whom was a carpenter by trade. They reared a family of seven children, six of whom are living, and Thomas is the fifth. After the father's death, the mother managed the estate with a marked degree of success, and with the assistance of her sons, operated a large flouring-mill for several years. Our subject followed farming chiefly in his native country, but learned the trade of miller, and worked some time about the mines. He came to America in 1872, and located at Scranton, Pa., where he was engaged in sinking a shaft; subsequently he was in the same business at Plymouth, and in 1873 he came to Plains, this county, where he worked three years in rock, afterward in coal. Mr. Butts was married February 11, 1852, to Miss Julia, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Marten) Langdon, and they have had eight children, six of whom are living, viz.: Thomas H., Joseph L., Edith, Elizabeth, Fred and George E. Mr. Butts and family attend the Primitive Methodist church; he is a member of the I.O.O.F., and A.O.K. of M.C., and the Sons of St. George; politically he is a Republican, and has held the office of school director in Plains township three years.

JAMES BUZZA, miner, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Cornwall, England, December 16, 1851, a son of William and Elizabeth (Wyatt) Buzza. He was reared in the counties of Cornwall and Cumberland, England, and, October 1, 1858, when less then seven years of age, began life in the mines, where he served in different capacities until 1882. He then came to America, and spent one year and seven months in the iron ore mines of northern Michigan. In November, 1884, he located at Wilkes-Barre, where he has since been employed as a miner, chiefly at Hollenback Shaft No. 2, for the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company. On November 27, 1873, Mr. Buzza married Annie, daughter of William and Elizabeth Jackson, of Manchester, England. Our subject is a member of the Primitive Methodist Church, and Sons of St. George; in politics he is a Republican.

CON BYRNE, wholesale liquor dealer, Hazleton, was born in County Donegal, Ireland, June 24, 1836, and is the sixth in a family of twelve children born to William and Catherine (McHugh) Byrne, also natives of Ireland. He was educated in Ireland, and reared on a farm, following that vocation until 1862, when he came to America and settled at Audenried, where he worked as a miner until 1866. In this year he came to Hazleton and embarked in the liquor business with a Mr. Brown, under the firm name of Brown & Byrne. This partnership was continued until 1872, when the business was sold, and Mr. Byrne made an extended visit to his native land. After his return he became interested in a distillery at Conyngham, which was operated by his former partner. He was silent partner for two years, and, at the end of that period, the old firm of Brown & Byrne resumed the wholesale liquor business, which they continued until the spring of 1885, When Brown retired from the firm, leaving Mr. Byrne sole owner and proprietor. Our subject was united in marriage, December 26, 1872, with Miss Mary, daughter of Dennis and Sallie (Haggerty) Kennedy, native of Hazleton, and nine children have been born to this union, namely: Kate, Dennis (deceased), Willie, Sarah (deceased), Nelly, Mary R., Belle, Bridget and Margaret. Mr. Byrne is a stanch Democrat; the family are members of the Roman Catholic Church.

 

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