BI - BO Surnames

History of Luzerne County, Pa.,

by H.C. Bradsby, 1893

BENJAMIN A. BIDLACK, farmer, P.O. Hardpan, Huntington township, was born August 1, 1842, son of William W. and Amy (Tubbs) Bidlack, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania, of English origin. William W. Bidlack was born June 18, 1801; he was a farmer by occupation. His death occurred August 25, 1863. He was a son of Phelman and Sarah (Flemming) Bidlack, natives of Litchfield county, Conn. Phelman was a son of James Bidlack, who came to the Wyoming Valley from Connecticut in 1770, with his five sons. He was a captain; one of his sons, Capt. James Bidlack, Jr., was in the army that fought the Indians at the time of the Wyoming massacre. Benjamin A. Bidlack was reared on a farm, and educated in the common schools, and has devoted his life to farming, on the property he now owns. August 29, 1867, he was married to Miss Catherine, daughter of Stephen and Sarah (Mellick) Mellick, natives of New Jersey, of German origin. This union was blessed with five children: William C., born March 3, 1869, died April 9, 1870; Anna B., born January 12, 1871; Sarah A., born October 18, 1872, died August 3, 1891, and Stephen B. and Amy B. (twins), born April 8, 1875. The family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Bidlack is a Democrat in politics, and one of the prominent farmers of his township.

REV. A. BIEMUELLER, pastor of the German Evangelical Lutheran Church, Freeland. This gentleman is a native of Germany, having been born at Mashbach, Bavaria, February 1, 1866. He was reared in his native land, received a classical education at Schweinfurt, Germany, where he graduated in the class of 1883. He then studied theology at Neundettelsau Seminary, where he took a three-years course, and was ordained in 1886. He immediately thereafter came to this country, and engaged in his ministerial work at Davenport, North Dakota, where he remained five years; then in the fall of 1891 came to Freeland, and took his present charge. His congregation numbers 617 souls, and is connected with the Evangelical Lutheran Ministerium of Pennsylvania. This congregation was organized in 1869, and at first there were about twelve families in it. Mr. Biemueller was married, in 1887, to Miss Ida T. Trapp, of Sheldon, North Dakota, and they have three children, viz.: Ottilie Emma, Eugene and Sophia Esther.

JOSEPH L. BILBY, farmer, P.O. Reyburn, was born in New York State, October 18, 1820, where he was also reared and educated. He is a son of Jonathan and Margaret (La Rue) Bilby, both of whom were natives of the same place, but never removed to this county, and but little is known of them by their descendants. Joseph L., at the age of twenty years, removed, in 1840, to this county, locating at Muhlenburg, where he occupied himself as farmer. On January 27, 1841, he married Miss Mary, daughter of Peter and Mary Nevel, who bore him nine children, all of whom grew to maturity, and six of whom are now living: P.C., W.D., E.G., Dorcas E., Frances J. and Mary J. Mrs. Mary (Nevel) Bilby was born in Union township, April 1, 1821. Mr. Bilby resided at Muhlenburg for a number of years, and in 1861 removed to Reyburn, where he bought a property of 110 acres from Peter Nevel, on which he has since resided. He is a man of sound judgment and keen perceptions, a hard worker, and persevering in his efforts to succeed - which he generally does. Politically he is a stanch Democrat, and has held several township offices with credit to himself. He has now retired from active life, having turned the management of his farm over to three of his boys: P.C., W.D., and E.J.

P.C. BILBY was born March 7, 1843, reared and educated in Union township, and is the second in order of birth in his father's family. In early life he learned the mason's trade, at which he labored sixteen years for the D.L. & W.R.R. Co., fourteen of which he had been foreman of that department of their works. In 1862, when rebellion threatened his country, he entered the Union army, enlisting in Company F, 149th P.V.I. (Bucktail Regiment), for the term of three years. He fought valiantly in the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Ann River, and Laurel Run, being wounded at Gettysburg. He served his full time and was honorably discharged. He now draws a pension, and is enjoying the fruit of his faithfulness to this grand Republic. On September 10, 1865, Mr. Bilby married Miss Eliza, daughter of Elisha and Mary Hess, who bore him twelve children, eight of whom are living: Antoinette C., Ida D., Lesly A., Lawson W., Lenie, Charles, Maggie M. and Lola A. Antoinette C. married M.T. Bear; Ida D. married James Hicks; Lesly A. married Miss Sarah Picket; and Lawson W. married Miss Lizzie Hartman. In 1889 he bought a lot in Reyburn, on which he built a store-house, which he furnished with a stock of general merchandise. His store is in neat order, and his plain, honest dealing bring him the custom he deserves. He is, like his father, a genial companion, a man of fine morals, and a stanch Democrat in politics.

WILLIAM D. BILBY, farmer, P.O. Reyburn, was born in Union township, November 14, 1857, where he was also reared and educated. He is a son of Joseph and Mary Bilby. In early life he learned the stonemason's trade, at which he worked about eight years, and is an excellent workman, honest, industrious and sober. He owns a neat little farm situated north of Shickshinny, consisting of forty-five acres of good land, on which he raises a general crop, and on which he now resides. January 1, 1882, Mr. Bilby married Miss Bessie, the accomplished daughter of Abraham and Sarah Gregory. There has been no issue to this happy union. Politically our subject is a Democrat.

SAMUEL BINNEY, assistant inside foreman, Hollenback Mine No. 2, Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, was born in Cornwall, England, March 31, 1848, a son of Francis and Elizabeth (Kellow) Binney. He was reared in England until fifteen years of age, when, in 1863, he came to America, and since 1865 he has been a resident of Wilkes-Barre, where he has since been in the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company. At Hollenback Mine No. 2 he helped sink the first shaft, from which he took the first coal mined there; he has never had an accident, and is the oldest miner in continous employment at the mine. He held the position of inside fire-boss one year, and has been assistant inside foreman since 1890. Mr. Binney married, August 24, 1871, Sarah A., daughter of William and Elizabeth (Davis) Schaukland, of Scotch and Welsh descent, respectively, and by her has nine children living: John H., Birdie, Gertrude M., Rosmond, Edna, Chester G., William Stanley, Maude and Myrtle. Mr. and Mrs. Binney are members of the First M.E. Church of Wilkes-Barre. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., Sons of St. George and the Mystic Chain; in politics he is a Republican.

JACOB BIRK, car inspector, Ashley, was born in Preussen, Germany, September 25, 1839, and is a son of Charles and Mary (Birk) Birk, the former of whom was a cabinet-maker. They reared two children, Jacob and Margaret, who died at the age of thirteen years; the mother, after the death of the father of Jacob, married John Foster, by whom she had two children. Our subject learned the cabinet-maker's trade, which he followed until 1868, when he emigrated to America and located in Wilkes-Barre, where he worked at his trade three years. He then came to Ashley and worked in the Central shops until 1885, when he accepted his present position. Mr. Birk was married in 1854 to Miss Elizabeth Miller, and they had one child, Jacob, who died at the age of three years. This wife died about a year after their marriage, and in 1863 Mr. Birk was married to Miss Catherine Grausemm, by whom he had six children, four of whom are living, viz.: Elizabeth (Mrs. Doney Baltas), Peter, John and William. This wife died in 1878, and our subject married, for his third, October 17, 1879, Mrs. Elizabeth Schneider, daughter of John and Christina (Hess) Cies, natives of Germany, and widow of Peter Schneider, by whom she had three children, John, Henry and Peter. The fruit of Mr. Birk's last marriage was six children, viz.: Margaret (who died at the age of two years), Anna, Chrstina, Jacob (deceased at the age of seven years), Philip (who died at the age of five years), and Mary. Our subject and family are members of the Catholic Church; in his political views he is a Democrat.

THOMAS BIRKBECK. The life and history of Thomas Birkbeck are very closely connected with the historical development of the town of Freeland and vicinity. He is a son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Johnstone) Birkbeck, the former born in Westmoreland, England, May 2, 1802, the latter being also a native of England, born February 12, 1804, at Buck Hill, Stainmoor; they were married in 1826, at Brough's Church, England. In 1834 they landed in New York City, whence they immediately proceeded to Minersville, Schuylkill county, this State, where Mr. Birkbeck secured employment in the mines. After remaining there about two years, they came to Hazleton, where in 1838 he sunk the first slope for Ario Pardee. In 1840 he bought of Edward Lynch a tract of four hundred acres of land in Denison township, which later became part of Foster township and is now the site of Freeland borough. There he constructed a rude log-house. He then returned with his family to his new purchase, a vast and uncultivated wilderness, which possessed all the characteristics of a pioneer farm. This house was the only one within a radius of five miles, with the single exception of that of Korcker, which was situated two miles to the northeast. Here the family spent their winters in lumbering, manufacturing handmade shingles, and cutting down and clearing the forest, and in summer time they cultivated the small patches of land thus cleared. The shingles were carted to Conyngham, and there exchanged for the necessaries of life, as at this time no cash was paid in such transactions. In 1844 Mr. Birbeck sold fifty acres from his four-hundred-acre lot, to one Aaron Howey. Then closely following Mr. Howey came many other settlers, who in time converted the dense forests into fertile farming land. A short time afterward the coal fields were developed in the neighborhood, and the great influx of population necessitated a new arrangement. Mr. Birkbeck accordingly surveyed a large portion of his real estate possessions into town lots, and sold them to the newcomers. This constituted the first move in the laying out of South Heberton and Freeland. Mr. Birkbeck was a man well-versed in the anthracite coal strata in this locatlity, and was the first to prove coal at Highland and Upper Lehigh. He built many roads, and was at all times the leading character in the development of the new country. The family experienced all the trials of a pioneer life which the novelist describes. A story is told of how, during one of those early days in the wilderness, Mrs. Birkbeck killed a full-grown buck deer, with no weapon but an axe. In the Birkbeck family there were twelve children, viz.: John, born September 5, 1827, died in infancy; Joseph N., born July 28, 1829, now residing in Wilkes-Barre; Matthew, born June 28, 1829 (deceased); Jane, born October 31, 1832 (deceased); John (second), born April 26, 1834 (deceased); Matthew (second), born January 7, 1836 (deceased); Jane, born October 6, 1836, wife of William Johnston, of Freeland, Pa.; Betsey, born May 14, 1840 (deceased); William, born October 26, 1841; Mary E., born January 25, 1844 (deceased); Thomas, born June 6, 1846 (subject of this sketch); Agnes, born August 4, 1848 (deceased), and Anna Victoria, born May 12, 1850 (deceased). Joseph Birkbeck died April 19, 1872, Mrs. Birkbeck surviving until May 31, 1887. Thomas Birkbeck was born in the old log house, which was situated about four blocks northwest of his present handsome and cosy residence. During his early boyhood days he attended school at Eckley, during the winter months, and worked at home in the summer. When he was about ten years of age the coal mines were opened at Eckley, and there he engaged in picking slate at twenty-five cents per day. In 1859 he left the mines and entered the employ of Frank Person, a drover of Troy, Pa., and worked for him, driving cattle, for two years. he then worked with his brother, who wa a butcher at Eckley. Here he learned the trade and remained until June, 1863, when he enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, serving until the close of the war. After his return home Mr. Birkbeck worked at blacksmithing a short time at Foundryville, when he went to Auderied and worked as a butcher for Herman Hamburger. In 1866 he engaged in the butchering business for himself, at South Heberton, where he remained one year, when he removed his business to Upper Lehigh, following it there just twenty-one years. In 1886 he removed to Freeland; followed droving a short time, and then engaged in the hardware business, which he still continues. He is also largely interested in real estate in the locality, owning over forty properties in this section. He is also interested in several cottages at the celebrated summer resort, at Wildwood, N.J. He was one of the promoters of the Citizens' Bank of Freeland, also of the Freeland Water Works, being at present a heavy stockholder in both these institutions; he is also interested in many local enterprises. Mr. Birkbeck was married November 1, 1866, to Miss Margaret Sneddon, of Audenried. They have seven children, viz.: Joseph, William, Thomas, Lillie May, Jessie, Margaret and Daisy.

GEORGE BISHER, engineer at the Parrish Colliery, Plymouth. Among the earlyof Luzerne county may be mentioned the Bisher family. Samuel W. Bisher, the father of our subject, was born in 1791 in the State of New Jersey, and settled in Huntington township, this county, in 1824. He was married to Elizabeth VanHorn, who was born in 1801 at Bethlehem, Pa. They settled in this county at a very early period, being one of the pioneer families who were subjected to the hardships of those early times. Nine children were born to Samuel and Elizabeth Bisher, the subject of this sketch being the fourth, born November 24, 1828. He was educated in his native county; the facilities for learning at that time being limited, only those who could pay for tutorship were given instruction. George was reared on a farm, and at the age of nineteen began railroading, having taken a position as fireman on the Beaver Meadow Railroad. He fired for six months and was then given an engine to run. It was one of those early type engines without a cab, the engineer carrying an umbrella in stormy weather. The machine was run on wooden rails or a wooden track, with strap-iron nailed on the top surface for the purpose of protecting the wood from the iron wheels of the locomotive, which ran at the then tremendous speed of six miles per hour. Mr. Bisher remained on this line seven years, taking a position at the end of that time, in 1859, as engineer on the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, which then extended from Scranton to Rupert, Pa. Here he remained two years, then taking charge of the engine that was used to transfer coal from Nos. 4 and 5 to the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad below the Bull Run crossing. He ran this locomotive for six years, leaving the road at the end of that period, and taking charge of the hoisting engines at the Lance Colliery No. 11, where he handled the levers for thirteen years, having begun when the mine was first opened. Mr. Bisher then went to the Parrish Mines as breaker engineer, in which capacity he was employed for three years; at the end of that time he took charge of the fan engine, which position he has since occupied. He was married January 1, 1856, to Hannah J., daughter of Samuel and Huldah (Ives) Pringle, and four children have been born to this union, namely: Geraldine, Francis E., G. Pardee and Daisy. Mr. Bisher is a Republican in politics, and has for thirty-eight years been a member of the I.O.O.F. The family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church.

WILLIAM BISHER, retired farmer, Huntington township, P.O. Huntington Mills, was born April 2, 1821, in Northampton county, and is a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (VanHorn) Bisher, natives of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, respectively, and of German origin. Samuel Bisher was a miller and cooper by occupation, and died in 1877, aged eighty-six years. Our subject, who is the second in a family of ten chidren, eight of whom are now living, was educated in the common schools, and at the age of twenty began life for himself as a farm laborer, which he followed four years. He then engaged as fireman on the Beaver Meadow Railroad, and in six months was promoted to engineer, in which position he served twelve years, and then moved on his farm (having purchased his present property in 1852), and farmed until 1860, when he worked six months on the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad as engineer. He then came back to the farm, remaining thereon two years, when he again ran a locomotive for the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company for eighteen months, at the end of which time he again returned to his farm, where we now find him. Mr. Bisher was married February 7, 1847, to Editha Trescott, daughter of Enos and Mary (Myers) Trescott, natives of Connecticut and Pennsylvania, respectively, which union was blessed with seven children, viz.: Adelia J. (Mrs. James Meekin, of Wilkes-Barre), born December 18, 1847; Theodocia A. (deceased), born Dec 4, 1849; Chesler I., born February 8, 1852 (married Martha A. Blanchard, and works the farm); Emma E. (deceased), born July 25, 1855; Ellen R. (deceased), born January 20, 1857; Ada E. (deceased), born April 7, 1860; Reader C. (deceased), born June 19, 1862. Mr. and Mrs. Bisher are members of the M.E. Church. He is a Republican, and has held the office of school director, assessor and overseer of the poor. The Bisher farm consists of seventy-three acres, situated one mile north of the Huntington Mills postoffice.

AARON BITTENBENDER, farmer, P.O. Hobbie, was born in Nescopeck township in December, 1831, and is a son of John and Elizabeth (Hess) Bittenbender, both of whom were also born in Nescopeck township. John was a son of John, an old pioneer, who kept hotel for a number of years on the turnpike, keeping a first-class house in his time. He was twice married and reared a family of fourteen children. John, his son, began the life of a farmer in Nescopeck township, where he owned 137 acres of good land. He was a practical farmer, well posted in his line of business. He was a man of some influence in his township. Mr. Bittenbender and his wife were devoted Christians, members of the Reformed Church; he died in 1868, aged sixty five years, his wife having passed away in 1845, aged thirty-six years. They reared a family of seven children, all of whom are living. Aaron is the second, and was reared in Hollenback township and educated at the common schools. He has always followed the tilling of the soil, and is an experienced and efficient farmer. He is residing on a beautiful lot of twenty acres, on which is a neat and beautiful house; he owns, besides, a farm of 104 acres, and is a general farmer. Politically he is a Republican, and has held various offices in the township. In 1860 our subject married Miss Sarah A., daughter of William and Rebecca Fenstermacher, who bore him seven children, six of whom are living: Addie E., Wilson K., M.W., H.E., Laura M. and Calvin L. Mrs. Sarah A. Bittenbender was born in Salem township in 1840. Mr. Bittenbender and his wife are both members of the Reformed Church.

FRED T. BITTENBENDER, Nanticoke. This gentleman is engaged in the manufacture of the celebrated Bittenbender's Improved Mining Drill, at Nanticoke. He was born in Plymouth, and is a son of Eli and Elizabeth (Frantz) Bittenbender, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Germany. In this family there were seven chiildren, viz.: Fred T.; George H., a drill manufacturer in Plymouth; Charles M., an engineer in Plymouth; William W., a salesman; Eli G., Jr., a blacksmith in Nanticoke; Ella, and Frank, a painter in Plymouth. Our subject worked in the mines during his boyhood days, and at the age of fifteen engaged as fireman for the D. & H. Company, in which capacity he remained five years. He was then promoted to engineer and remained in the employ of that company until 1884, when he engaged in the manufacture of mining drills on a comparatively small scale, employing but one man besides himself. Since that time his business has developed wonderfully, and he now is running a well-regulated factory, using all the modern machinery in his work and employing several machinists. During 1891 he manufactured over 1,500 of these well-known and highly approved drills of his own invention and make. Mr. Bittenbender was married April 12, 1883, to Miss Matilda L. Sweitzer, an accomplished young lady of Plymouth. This union has been blessed with four children, viz.: Joseph S., Lewis K., Fred Jr., and Theodore. He was one of the promoters of the Nanticoke Electric Light Company, and is a heavy stockholder and one of the directors in that institution.

WILLIAM BITTENBENDER, farmer, P.O. Hobbie, was born in Hollenback township, April 24, 1840, a son of John and Elizabeth (Hess) Bittenbender, being theson by his father's first wife. He was reared and educated in Hollenback township and like his brother, for the most part followed farming, but like all human nature, he got tired of one continual line of duty, and so removed to Nanticoke, where he worked at mining for three years; then growing tired of mining he in 1886 returned to his farm. The first farm he owned he sold to Mr. J. Harter, and then bought the property of Peter Hart, consisting of 115 acres of fine land, seventy-five of which are under cultivation. Mr. Bittenbender is a first-class agriculturist, a perfect gentleman in the full sense of the word, and is practical in everything he does. In 1868 he married Miss Sarah, daughter of Peter and Rebecca Hart, and one child (now deceased) was born to them. Mr. and Mrs. Bittenbender are consistent members of the M.E. Church. Mrs. Sarah Bittenbender was born in Hollenback township, where she now resides. Her father was a man of marked intelligence, and of great influence in his neighborhood. He was a strong Republican, always taking an active part in politics, and had held the office of justice of the peace for thirty years, besides other offices in the township. He died in 1876 aged fifty-nine years. He reared a family of twelve children, six of whom are living.

JOHN BLACK, fire-boss at the No. 5 Colliery, Pennsylvania Coal Company, Inkerman, Jenkins township, was born in the County of Northumberland, England, May 13, 1832, a son of Pearson and Margaret (Atkinson) Black. His father, who was an outside stable-boss at the mines, reared a family of six children, three of whom are still living, viz.: Mary (Mrs. Henry Heffern, Colo.), John, and Jacob, who is a retired railroad accountant in England. Our subject embarked in life, working about the mines, at the age of eleven years, and this has been the occupation of his life. He came to America in 1852, and was engaged in mining for six months at each of the following places: St. Clair, Gold Mine Gap and Sweet Aaron, Pa. He then came to Inkerman, where he followed mining till 1880. From 1880 to 1890 he was fire-boss and miner, and since 1890 he has been fire-boss alone. Mr. Black was married March 8, 1854, to Mrs. Jeanette Latta, daughter of Alexander and Ellen (Henderson) McGregor, natives of Scotland, and widow of Colin Latta, by whom she had four children, two of whom are living. This happy union has been blessed with four children, two of whom are living, viz.: Ellen (Mrs. John B. Evans, Plains), and John P., of the firm of Doyle & Black, proprietors of the Metropolitan theater, Cooper Avenue, Aspen, Colo. Mr. Black is a member of the I.O.O.F. and the K. of H. He is a Republican in his political views, and is at present a member of the board of miner examiners.

A.C. BLACKWELL, jeweler, Pittston, was born in Hazleton, February 1, 1845, a son of Robert L. and Jenetto (Iddings) Blackwell, the former a native of Hanover township, this county, born near the present site of Lee's Mines; the latter a native of Berwick, and of Quaker descent. Robert L. Blackwell was a lumber dealer in Wayne county, but during the latter part of his life he was engaged in the employ of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company as foreman at the Kingston yard; he died in 1885, and in eight months was followed to the grave by his wife. The paternal great-grandfather of our subject must have emigrated from England to this country some time prior to the Revolutionary war, for he was a cavalryman in the Continental army, and his regimentals and saber are now in the possession of the family. Our subject, although born in Luzerne county, was educated and reared in Wayne. At the age of fifteen he began an apprenticeship at watchmaking with C.D. Wells, of Wilkes-Barre, remaining there three years, and then went to Kingston, where he engaged in business for himself. He was there but a short time when he was forced to withdraw from his occupation on account of ill health. He then entered the employ of the Central Railroad of New Jersey, at Ashley, and remained there eighteen years. In 1888 he resumed the jewelry business at Ashley, but was soon after burned out. On June 12, 1890, he came to Pittston and embarked in business. Mr. Blackwell was united in marriage August 20, 1872, with Miss Ellen J. Van Guilder, the adopted daughter of Michael Meylert, one of the pioneers of Sullivan county, Pa., and they have had born to them eight children, viz.: Winfred Josephine (deceased), Guy Percival (deceased), Meylert Lanning, Earl Candes, Gordon LeRoy, Alfred Lester, Thomas Rutherford (deceased) and Tracy Harding (deceased). Mr. Blackwell is a member of the Knights of Malta (twelfth degree) and the I.O.O.F.; he is a quartermaster sergeant on Col. Dean's staff, and his political views are Republican. The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

JOSEPH BLAINE, a prominent farmer of Fairmount township, P.O. Rittenhouse, was born in Morris county, N.J., May 8, 1813, and is a son of John and Margaret (Harviston) Blaine, natives of New Jersey and Ireland, and of German and Irish origin, respectively. Our subject, who is the eldest in a family of five children (he had four half brothers and sisters by his father, and eight by his mother, by the names of Harviston), was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and when twenty years of age, began life for himself as farm laborer, which he followed for four years. He then boated one year, at the end of which time he rented a farm and worked same for nine years. He then came to Fairmount township, this county, and purchased his present farm when it was all timber land, but he cleared it up and to-day he has as fine a farm as there is in his locality. It contains one hundred acres, situated one and three-fourths miles north of the Rittenhouse postoffice. Mr. Blaine was married, in 1832, to Miss Sarah A. Waters, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Lantz) Waters, natives of New Jersey, and of English and German origin. This union was blessed with thirteen children, viz.: Mary A. (Mrs. Zibe Smith), born January 9, 1933; George (see sketch elsewhere); Elizabeth (Mrs. Elias Tubbs), born December 30, 1836; Amanda (Mrs. E.B. Myers), born September 15, 1838; William H., born December 23, 1840 (was a lieutenant in the Civil war, now a farmer in Columbia county); John, born April 30, 1842 (died, June 13, 1863, while in the service of the United States); Jacob, born April 30, 1840 (died while in the United States army, December 11, 1862); Caroline (Mrs. John T. Miller), born May 27, 1846 (is a resident of Grand Rapids, Wis); Rosina (Mrs. H.S. Brandon), born December 3, 1849; Sarah J., born January 6, 1852, died May 16, 1854; Eliza A. (Mrs. J.W. Lanning) born September 7, 1854; Silas W., a farmer of Ross township, born October 1, 1857; Andrew M., born November 20, 1861, lives with his father and works the farm. The mother died September 23, 1880, at the age of sixty-six years. Mr. Blaine is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and has held the office of school director and supervisor. Politically he is a Republican.

GEORGE BLAINE, farmer, Fairmount township, P.O. Rittenhouse, was born February 3, 1835, in New Jersey, and is a son of Joseph and Sarah A. (Waters) Blaine, natives of New Jersey, and of German and English origin, respectively. (See sketch of Joseph Blaine elsewhere.) Our subject is the second in a family of thirteen children, ten of whom are living. He was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and when twenty years of age began life for himself as a laborer, which vocation he followed until the Civil war broke out, when he enlisted in Company C, One Hundred and Ninety-ninth Regiment P.V.I., Capt. H.C. O'Donald. He served four years, and was discharged June 26, 1865. Returning home, he purchased his present property of seventy-five acres of prime land, situated one and three-fourths miles north of Rittenhouse postoffice. Mr. Blaine was married January 14, 1856, to Miss Mary, daughter of Z.P. and Sarah Smith, which union was blessed with eight children, four of whom are living, viz.: Ada (Mrs. Nevel, widow of James Nevel, of Johnstown, N.Y.), Walter, who lives at home, working with his father, and is married to Jennie Sax; Carrie E. (Mrs. Harry Harrison, of Huntington township; and Eliza E., at home. Mrs. Blaine departed this life, November 2, 1889. The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Blaine is a Republican, and has held the following offices in his township: assessor, school director, auditor, which latter he is at present filling.

HUGH BLAIR, foreman on the gravel train, Ashley, was born in County Antrim, Ireland, October 31, 1834, a son of Hugh and Elizabeth (Eaton) Blair, the family being of Scotch lineage. His father, who was a farmer, reared two children, viz.: Hugh, and Mary Jane, who was married to David McGowen, and after his death to James McNeill, by whom she had three children. Our subject received his education in his native country, came to America in 1859, locating in Wilkes-Barre, where he did various kinds of labor about the mines for eighteen months. He enlisted, August 19, 1861, as private in Company H, Eighty-first P.V.I., was discharged as a corporal at Stevensburg, Va., December 22, 1863; he re-enlisted the next day, and was discharged, June 29, 1865, near Washington, with the rank of sergeant. He received a shell wound in the right shoulder at Po River, and escaped by swimming the river, though he could use but one hand. He was also wounded in the left thigh, in front of Petersburg, by a sharpshooter or guerrilla. He was taken prisoner, on May 23, 1863, at Chancellorsville, and remained in the hands of the enemy fifteen days, after which he returned to his regiment and served until the close of the war. He then went to Susquehanna and worked in the machine shop for eight months, after which he came to Ashley and began working on the gravel train. He has been foreman since 1867, except four years, during which he was braking, and two years in care of the oil supply house. Mr. Blair was married, August 3, 1865, to Mary A., a daughter of Robert and Clarinda (Garey) Johnson, a granddaughter of Thomas and Amanda (Blackman) Garey, and a great-granddaughter of Eleaser Blackman, who was thirteen years old at the time of the Wyoming Massacre, and a brother of Elisha Blackman. The issue of this union has been ten children, six of whom are living, viz.: Robert J., studying law with James R. Scouton, at Wilkes-Barre, Elizabeth (Mrs. Robert G. Thomas); Thomas, a brakeman; Marcus G.; Clarinda, and Mary. Mr. Blair and his family are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is a member of the G.A.R., and a Republican in his political views.

REV. SAMUEL BLAIR, Methodist Episcopal minister, Huntington township, P.O. Harveyville, was born in Lewisburg, Union Co., Pa., January 26, 1863, and is a son of Dr. Samuel and Catherine (Hancock) Blair, natives of Florida and Pennsylvania, of Scotch and English origin, respectively. The father, who is a prominent physician of Lewisburg, Pa., is a son of Samuel Blair, who was a planter in Florida. Our subject is the second child in a family of seven, six of whom are living. He was educated in the common schools, also at Bucknell University, and in 1887 began preaching in Chicago for the W.C.T.U. in which connection he remained one year. He then did evangelistic work through Wisconsin, Minnesota, Ohio, Illinois and Pennsylvania for one year, when he united with the Central Pennsyvania Conference, and took charge of a new congregtion at Hazleton, Pa., for two years, and through his efforts the Diamond M.E. Church of that city was built. He came to Harveyville as pastor of the M.E. Church of that town, and by earnest work in his congregation succeeded in rebuilding and furnishing the parsonage which was destroyed by the cyclone that passed through this section in August, 1889. He was married August 7, 1889, to Miss Mary, daughter of George Abdill, of New Castle, Pa., now residents of Virginia. This happy union is blessed with one child, Samuel A., born June 4, 1890. Mr. and Mrs. Blair have a large circle of warm friends, and as an earnest hard-working pastor, he is greatly admired by all. Politically he is a Democrat.

WILLIAM J. BLAKESLEE, farmer, Buck township, P.O. Bear Creek, was born in Bear Creek township, September 8, 1816, and is a son of Jacob and Rachel (White) Blakeslee, the former born in Connecticut of English descent and the latter in Pennsylvania of Irish descent; the father was a farmer and came to Luzerne county in 1811. Mr. and Mrs. Blakeslee had a family of three children, two of whom are living, William J. and Jacob. At the age of eighteen years our subject went out in the world for his own account, starting as a lumberman on the Lehigh river, an occupation he followed until 1881, when he went to live on a farm in Buck township that he had formerly bought; here he intends to spend the remainder of his life. In 1836 Mr. Blakeslee was united in marriage with Mary, daughter of Justin and Elizabeth (Sisko) Simeson, both natives of this county, of German descent. Mr. and Mrs. Blakeslee were blessed with a large family as follows: Elizabeth, Charles, Rachel, Jane, Mary, Lydia, Sarah, Jacob, Justin, William and John. All the children are married, and they and their families are a source of great pleasure to Mr. Blakeslee. In politics our subject is a Democrat, and has held the office of constable for Bucks township three years, and that of school director also three years.

GEORGE BLAKEY, manager of the "Franklin House," Wilkes-Barre, was born in Yorkshire, England, June 13, 1829, and is the son of Henry and Ann (Kitcheman) Blakey. He was reared and educated in his native country, where for some years he worked in the mines, and during five years was engaged in merchandising. In 1869 he came to America, and has since been a resident of Luzerne county; for ten years he was employed in the mines at Nanticoke, and during his residence in that city was a member of the council one term. He was ten years proprietor of a hotel in Plymouth and in 1889 came to Wilkes-Barre where he has since been manager of the "Franklin House." He was three times married, his first wife being Maria Shaw, of England, by whom he had two children: Eliza and Emma; his second wife was Mary Mitchel, who bore him four children: Clara, Eliza, Emma and Walter. His third wife was Anna Gilmour, of Plains township, this county. Mr. Blakey is a well-known citizen of Luzerne county. In politics he is independent.

DAVID BLANCHARD, farmer, P.O. Plains, was born at Port Blanchard, Pittston (now Jenkins) township, March 18, 1825, and is a son of John and Sarah (Lazarus) Blanchard, natives of Port Blanchard and Monroe county, Pa., and of New England and German origin, respectively. He is a grandson of Jeremiah and Martha (Hutchins) Blanchard, and a great-grandson of Jeremiah Blanchard, who came from Connecticut about the year 1770 and took up a large tract of land on the hill southeast of Pittston; he commanded the Pittston fort at the time of the Wyoming massacre, but the Indians having stolen their boats, they were unable to cross and take part in the battle. His father, who was a farmer, settled at Port Blanchard at a very early date, and reared a family of nine children, six of whom are living; his twin brother, George, died at the age of sixteen. Our subject spent his boyhood on the farm, and was educated in the common schools and at the Wyoming Seminary. At the age of twenty-two he secured a position as manager of a store for the Irondale Coal Company, where he remained five years; he then rented and operated a mine for two years, and later was engaged in mercantile business in Pittston sixteen years; he next secured a postion as book-keeper for Patterson & Co. in the lumber factory at Pittston, remaining there two years; worked on a farm in Exeter township one year; was freight agent for the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad at Pittston Junction five years, and in 1878 removed to the Hollenback farm, at Midvale, where he has since lived. Mr. Blanchard was married, March 11, 1850, to Anna E., daughter of James and Jane (Magee) Frick, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German and Scotch origin, respectively; the Fricks settled in Northumberland county (where they are now a very numerous family), at a time when they were obliged to live in forts for protection from the Indians. The fruit of this union was six children, viz.: George F., driller, Hazleton; Clara, married to John Haston, mine superintendent, near Richmond, Va.; Edward, who died at the age of twenty-one; Morgan, deceased at the age of eight years; James, driller, Hazleton, and William M., who lives in Pittston. The mother of these children died February 18, 1864, and Mr. Blanchard was married, December 22, 1866, to Jennie J. Baird, daughter of William and Margaret (Andrew) Baird, natives of Scotland. They have eight children, viz.: Helen M., a dress-maker in Helena, Mont.; Nettie L., hospital nurse, Wilkes-Barre; Grace D., who was educated in the Wyoming Seminary, and is one of the successful teacher of Plains; and Annie E., Emily C., Jennie, Robert and Theodore S., living with their parents. Mr. and Mrs. Blanchard are members of the Presbyterian Church, of which he is elder; politically he is in sympathy with the Republican party, but votes strictly on principle.

EBENEZER S. BLANCHARD, agent Philadelphia & Reading R.R. Company, Port Blanchard, was born March 27, 1827, in the house where he now resides, and is a son of John and Sarah (Lazarus) Blanchard, natives of this county, of New England origin. They reared a family of seven children, of whom Ebenezer S. is the second in order of birth. Our subject was educated in the common schools, and when a boy commenced work on a farm, and in November, 1862, enlisted in the One Hundred and Fifty-second P.V.I., serving three years and two months; the regiment was mustered out in January, 1865, when our subject returned to his home, and was employed as outside foreman at Port Bowkley until 1875. The subject of this sketch was married, February 15, 1855, to Miss Catherine, daughter of Joseph and Mary (Newman) Davidson, of Wyoming, whose ancestors can truly be styled "Americans," they having arrived in this country with the Pilgrim Fathers. This union has been blessed with the following issue: Arthur, born February 10, 1856; Jeremiah, born August 26, 1858; John D., born April 23, 1860; Stanley P., born April 23, 1868, and Grier P., born October 23, 1870. Mr. Blanchard is a member of the G.A.R., and in politics is a Republican.

PHILIP BLAUM, boot and shoe dealer, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Bayern, Germany, August 24, 1848, and is a son of Saul Blaum, a native of the same place. Philip Blaum came to this country when quite a young man, and has resided in Wilkes-Barre for more than a quarter of a century. He was married June 16, 1870, to Lena, a daughter of Edward Wideman, a well-known resident of Wilkes-Barre, and ten children have been born of this union, viz: William, Lottie, Mary, Anthony, Henrietta, Henry, Louisa, John, Paul and Edward (deceased). For twenty-five years Mr. Blaum has been in the boot and shoe trade, but on April 24, 1887, he engaged in the hotel and saloon business in the adjoining premises, and his son William is conducting the shoe store. Mr. Blaum is deservedly popular and successful, and by dint of hard work and self-denial has amassed considerable property.

HENRY F. BODINE, a prominent citizen of Miners Mills, was born in Lower Augusta township, Northumberland Co., Pa., May 15, 1837, and is a son of Levi and Jane (Feaster) Bodine, respectively natives of Greene and Berks counties, Pa., and of French and German origin. In his father's family there were four children, three of whom are living, and of them Henry F. is the third. Our subject received a common-school education, and at the age of eighteen years learned the plasterer's trade, which has been the chief occupation of his life. He came to Miners Mills in 1875, and in 1883 built his residence, now occupied by his son-in-law, John Keats. Mr. Bodine was married, March 6, 1860, to Miss Lucinda, daughter of John and Hannah (Runyan) Swisher, natives of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, respectively, and of English lineage, and very early settlers in New England. They had three children, viz: Howard, who died in infancy, Addie J., and John, who died at the age of three years. Major Ringold, so famous in the war of 1812, was an uncle of Hannah Runyan, and Mr. Bodine's great-grandfather was in the Revolutionary war. Addie J. Bodine, daughter of our subject, was educated in the public school, the Bloomsburg State Normal School, and at Jackson Seminary, New York City. She married John Keats, by whom she has three children, viz.: Olive Adele (who has much elocutionary power for a girl of eight summers), Ethel L. and Harold B. This gentleman and family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church; he is a member of the O.U.A.M. and the G.A.R.; in his political views he is a Democrat.

BENJAMIN C. BODLE, farmer, P.O. Orange, was born in Orange county, N.Y., July 8, 1822, a son of Daniel and Deborah (Story) Bodle, the former born in Orange county, N.Y., in 1786, the latter in Connecticut in 1780. Daniel was a son of Samuel Bodle, who was also a native of New York, and Samuel was a son of Daniel Bodle, a native of the North of Ireland, who emigrated to this country about 1620, locating in Orange county, New York. The Bodles are a numerous family, and have made good citizens, filling various psoitions of trust and responsibility in various parts of the county. Daniel (second) removed from New York to Exeter, this county, where he lived about a year; then, in 1827, bought a farm of 106 acres, in Franklin township, some of which was cleared. He was a man of advanced learning, and in early life taught school; was a stanch Democrat, and held several offices in the town. He lived to be eighty-three years of age, and died November 1, 1863. His family consisted of nine children, seven of whom grew to maturity, Benjamin C. being the eighth in the family. Our subject was five years of age when he came with his father to this county, and here he has since remained. He has always confined himself to agricultural pursuits, and now owns 150 acres of land. Mr. Bodle is a self-made man, and all he possesses he made with his own hands, with the help of his wife. He is much respected by his fellow citizens. In March, 1850, he married Miss Mary E., daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Champion, and there were born to them four children, all of whom are dead. Their only heir is a grandson, Paul Brace, now ten years of age. Mrs. Bodle was born in Providence, Pa., October 9, 1828.

JOSEPH KIRKENDALL BOGERT, late editor and proprietor of the Wilkes-Barre Daily and Weekly Union Leader, and postmaster of the city of Wilkes-Barre, was born at New Columbus, Luzerne county, on July 16, 1845, and was the fifth of nine children - six boys and three girls - of Samuel and Elizabeth Bogert. The family is of Dutch origin, Mr. Bogert's ancestors having been among the earliest emigrants from Holland to America. They settled in parts of New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, and many who bear the name have won distinction in professional and business life. The elder Bogert was a wheelwright, a respected citizen but in moderate circumstances. He died in Wilkes-Barre, July 9, 1881, having attained the age of sixty-eight years, and was survived by his wife who died in the same city seven years later, on August 3, 1888. The subject of this sketch was not unused to manual labor in his earlier days. He attended the public school at New Columbus, and subsequently entered the Male and Female Academy. On June 23, 1863, being then eighteen years of age, he enlisted and was mustered into the United States service as private in the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Militia. This regiment, with others, was on duty in this State and in Maryland during the invasion of the North by the army of Northern Virginia, and had a sharp skirmish with FitzHugh Lee's forces not far from Harrisburg on June 30. The regiment was mustered out July 27, and Mr. Bogert afterward re-enlisted, this time as a private in the United States Signal Corps, and was mustered in April 4, 1864. He was first assigned to duty in the campaign against hostile Indians in Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas and Indian Territory; was afterward in the campaign against Price from the New to the Arkansas rivers on the Missouri and Arkansas border. There were engagements at Little Blue and Big Blue, respectively, on October 21 and 22, and later on at many other points on the route. After the completion of the compaign just mentioned he was sent to the Department of the Northwest, and took part in the Indian expedition up the Platte and Powder rivers, which extended from July 1 to November 4, and covered over 2,500 miles of previously unexplored territory, and was attended by many hardshops and dangers. He was finally mustered out December 9, 1865, at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Upon his return from the army he resumed his studies, and graduated with honor from Lewisburg (now Bucknell) University. He then came to Wilkes-Barre, and studied law for nearly a year with the Hon. Caleb E. Wright (now deceased), supporting himself by service as a correspondent for the Associated Press, the Philadelphia Times, Scranton Times, and other newspapers. He was appointed assistant of George P. Richards, clerk of the courts, and soon afterward was promoted to the position of chief deputy. In 1874, through the influence of Hon. D.L. Rhone, judge of the Orphans' Court, he was appointed deputy clerk of that court, an office of which he was the first incumbent. In 1875 he was the Democratic candidate for register of wills, and was elected by an enormous majority (1,570), although several of his colleagues on the ticket were defeated. In February, 1877, Mr. Bogert and George B. Kulp, Esq., purchased the Luzerne Leader, then recently established at Pittston, and removed it to Wilkes-Barre. In January, 1879, as the Leader Publishing Company, they bought the Luzerne Union, for many years the Democratic organ of the county. The two papers were merged into the Union-Leader, and on October 1, 1879, the publication of a daily issue was begun. Mr. Bogert became sole proprietor in 1880, and in 1884 erected a building at No. 7 North Main street, where he continued the publication of his papers until his death. (See sketch of the Wilkes-Barre Leader, published elsewhere in this volume.) He was an active politician and was twice chairman of the Democratic County Committee. In 1881 he was a candidate for State treasurer, but after nine ballots in convention the nomination went to Orange Noble, the millionaire oil-dealer of Erie. With considerable reluctance Mr. Bogert accepted the chairmanship of the State Committee, an honor conferred upon him by the same convention, and conducted the campaign with such marked ability and energy as won the plaudits of his party throughout the State. Two years later he was urged to stand for the treasureship, and it was conceded that he oculd have the nomination, but he resolutely refused the use of his name in that connection. He frequently represented his party in State Convention, and was a delegate to the National Conventions at Chicago in 1880 and 1884, which nominated Hancock and Cleveland respectively. He was appointed postmaster of the city of Wilkes-Barre by President Cleveland in July, 1885, and took possession of the office on the 1st of August of that year, and was the incumbent at the time of his death. He was at one time president of the Pennsylvania State Editorial Association, and of the Wilkes-Barre Board of Trade, of which latter he was one of the principal projectors. He was a member of the Ely (now Conyngham) Post, No. 97, Grand Army of the Republic, of Lodge No. 61, Free and Accepted Masons, and of several beneficial organizations, among them the Legion of Honor, Heptasophs, etc. Mr. Bogert married, December 31, 1879, at Philadelphia, Pa., Mary E., daughter of Lorenzo D. and Elizabeth J. Patterson, of Sweet Air, Baltimore Co., Md. Mr. and Mrs. Patterson died when their daughter was quite young and she was sent to be educated at the Millersville State Normal School, Pennsylvania. After graduation she accepted a position as teacher in the Wilkes-Barre public schools, where she taught successfully for five years preceding the marriage. Two children were the offspring of this union -Lawrence Patterson Bogert, born August 12, 1881, and died September 6, 1881, and Harold P. Bogert, born March 14, 1883, who still survives. Mr. Bogert died in Wilkes-Barre on Thursday night, February 3, 1887, at 11:15 o'clock after eight weeks of painful illness of pyaemia, preceded by a complication of bronchitis and pneumonia. A meeting of all the newspaper men in the city was held at the Daily Record office on the morning of February 7, and resolutions strongly expressive of their respect and esteem for the deceased were adopted. On Monday, February 7, the obsequies were conducted by the Rev. Henry L. Jones, assisted by the Rev. H.E. Hayden, in St. Stephen's Episcopal Church. Mr. Bogert had been a regular attendant at this church with his wife, who is a member of it. Delegations from Lodge No. 61, Free and Accepted Masons, Ely Post, Grand Army of the Republic, and the editors, publishers and printers of the city attended the funeral. The interment was with military honors in Hollenback Cemetery. After Mr. Bogert's death, which occurred when he had held the postoffice but a little more than a year, his widow was appointed his successor by President Cleveland, the movement to secure her the place enlisting a large majority of the best-known people of that city and county. She retained the position for nearly five years continuously, bringing the work of the office to a high state of efficiency, thus fully justifying the pledges made in her behalf by those who asked for her appointment. She still resides in Wilkes-Barre. Mr. Bogert was in religious faith a Baptist, and gave liberally to the church of that denomination in Wilkes-Barre. As the facts in his history herein briefly set out will amply testify, Mr. Bogert, working almost always against obstacles that would have discouraged a man of less indomitable spirit, achieved a proud distinction for one so young as he was when death came, and gave reliable promise that, had he been spared, he would have attained a still greater prominence for himself and a broader measure of usefulness to his fellow citizens.

JACOB B. BOHLANDER general blacksmith, Sybertsville, was born in Sugar Loaf township, this county, March, 1853, and is a son of Jacob and Margaret (Kohler) Bohlander. His father was born in Hessen Darmstadt, Germany, September 25, 1817, and was a son of Peter and Catherine (Frederick) Bohlander, who came to America in 1847, settling in Sugar Loaf township. Peter died in Wilkes-Barre, his wife in Dorrance township. Their children were four in number, viz.: Catherine (Mrs. Philip Baker), Elizabeth (Mrs. Jacob Krost), Jacob, Gertrude (Mrs. John Weisheimer). Jacob, father of our subject, came to America in 1840, locating in Sugar Loaf township; for twenty-two years he worked in the mines, and since 1862 has been engaged in farming in Sugar Loaf. His wife, Margaret, was a daughter of Peter and Margaret (Lower) Kohler, of Sugar Loaf township, and by her he had eight children: Margaret (Mrs. Martin Balliet), Kate (Mrs. Wilson Houseknecht), Jacob, Henry, John, Peter, William and Rebecca (Mrs. Wesley Foust). Our subject has always resided in his native township. He served an apprenticeship of two and one half years at his trade, worked as a journeyman two years, and in 1877 embarked in business for himself in Sybertsville, in which he has since successfully continued. On March 25, 1876, he married Emeline, daughter of Fred and Matilda (Anthony) Knelly, of Sugar Loaf township, and they have one daughter, Nora E. Mr. Bohlander is a member of the Lutheran Church, and in politics is a Democrat.

PETER H. BOHLANDER, carpenter, P.O. Conyngham, was born in Sugar Loaf township, March 16, 1864, a son of Jacob and Margaret (Kohler) Bohlander. His paternal grandparents, Peter and Catherine (Friedrich) Bohlander, came to America in 1847, and settled in Sugar Loaf township; their children were Catherine (Mrs. Philip Baker), Elizabeth (Mrs.Jacob Krost), Jacob and Gertrude (Mrs. John Weisheimer). Jacob, the only son, came to America in 1840, and settled in Sugar Loaf township; he followed mining twenty-two years, and since 1862 has been engaged in farming. His wife was a daughter of Peter and Margaret (Lower) Kohler, of Sugar Loaf township, and his children were Margaret (Mrs. Martin Balliet), Kate (Mrs. Wislon K. Houseknecht), Jacob, Henry, John, Peter H., William and Rebecca (Mrs. Wesley Foust). Our subject was reared and educated in Sugar Loaf township, served an apprenticeship of two years at the wheelwright trade, and then learned the carpenter's trade, which he has followed since 1886. He married, Janaury 16, 1886, Rettie T., daughter of Daniel and Catherine (Hutchinson) Gearhart, of Sugar Loaf township, now residents of Columbia county, Pa., and he has two children, Samuel E. and Charles T. Mr. Bohlander is a member of the Lutheran Church, and of the I.O.O.F.; in politics he is a Democrat, and has held the office of inspector of election.

JAMES G. BOHLIN, boot and shoe merchant, Freeland, is a native of Gothenburg, Sweden, and was born February 4, 1855. He received his education in the public schools of his native land, receiving the elementary course, followed by the modern course. He then studied civil and mechanical engineering in Chalmers' Polytechnic School, in Gothenburg. In 1872 he came to this counrty and located at Nanticoke, where he worked in various capacities in connection with the mines until the strike of 1875, when he went to Scranton and Plymouth, remaining at these places in all about one year and a half. He then returned to Nanticoke, where he remained but a short time, going to Upper Lehigh. In 1877 he went to Drifton, where he was in the employ of the E.B. Coxe Coal Company until 1883; he also attended Coxe's night school, where he received a certificate of graduation in 1883. During his attendance at this school he won every prize that was offered for excellency of work in his classes. In 1884 he passed the mine foreman's examination and received a certificate. In 1883, with J.P. Williams as partner, he engaged in the boot and shoe business at Freeland, and one year later bought Mr. Williams out, having since continued the business on his own account. Mr. Bohlin is a close study, and has devoted much study to geology, more particularly to that branch of the science which pertains to the formation of anthracite coal. He is now interested in a large tract of coal land, which bids fair to bring fruitful results. His theory in regard to the position and formation of the coal formation in the anthracite regions is original and simple in its demonstration, although rather contrary to accepted theory, but it is founded on the basis of practice and common sense. Mr. Bohlin was married in 1882 to Miss E.L. Misson, of Slatington, Pa., and they have four children: Louisa, Emily, Howard and Mildred. Mr. Bohlin is a member of the American Legion of Honor and other societies. In politics he is a Republican.

JAMES M. BOLAND, general insurance agent, Wilkes-Barre, was born in County Sligo, Ireland, May 9, 1864, a son of James and Ann (Biglin) Boland, who, with their families, came to America in 1865, locating at Scranton, Pa., where the father died March 10, same year, three days after their arrival. The family consisted of four children: Christopher G., John T., William P., and James M. The subject of this memoir was reared in Scranton and educated in the public schools of that city. At ten years of age he began work in the Iron Works there, where he was employed until the strike of 1877, at which time he took a position as cash-boy in the Boston Store, at the same place, which he filled two years, and was afterward a clerk in his uncle's grocery three years. In 1882 he was appointed assistant mercantile appraiser of Scranton, under F.A. Beamish, which incumbency he filled one year; later he was a traveling salesman six months, after which he entered the fire insurance business, continuing same one year. In 1884 Mr. Boland located in Wilkes-Barre and embarked in the general insurance business, in which he has since successfully continued, representing several of the leading insurance companies of the world. On September 2, 1887, he married Mary, duaghter of Daniel and Dora (McGourty) Shovlin, of Wilkes-Barre, and has three children: Loretta, Annie and Ruth. Mr. Boland is progressive and enterprising, and is a well-known and popular business man. He is a member of the Catholic Church, and in politics is a Democrat.

SYLVESTER BOMBOY, farmer, P.O. Berwick, was born in Salem township, April 27, 1859, and is the son of Jeremiah and Elizabeth (Moore) Bomboy, the former of whom was a blacksmith by trade, and was one of the leading and substantial farmers of Salem township. Jeremiah Bomboy was born in Berks County, Pa., October 15, 1824, and was a son of David and Elizabeth (Price) Bomboy. David was a son of Jacob and Barbara Bomboy, natives of Germany, and early settlers of Berks county. David Bomboy was a butcher, and lived and died in Berks county. Jeremiah Bomboy, father of our subject, was reared in Columbia county, Pa. He learned the blacksmith trade which he followed thirty years, has lived in Salem township since 1847, and has resided on the farm he now occupies since 1856. He married, January 25, 1849, Elizabeth, daughter of William and Mary (Hulsizer) Moore, and granddaughter of William and Mary (Kleintob) Moore, and on the maternal side of Benjamin Hulsizer, a Revolutionary soldier - all of whom were pioneers of Salem township. Mr. and Mrs. Jeremiah Bomboy are the parents of eleven children, seven of whom survive: Jacob, Daniel, Sylvester, Charles, Mary (Mrs. Charles Martz), Thomas M. and Jessie L. Our subject was reared in Salem township and educated in the common schools and the Orangeville Academy. After attaining his majority, he taught school for several years, working on the farm during the summer; since 1885 has been engaged in farming, and is salesman for agricultural implements, carriages, etc. He married October 11, 1883, Mary P., daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Rasely) Croop, of Centre, Columbia Co., Pa., and has one son, Jeremiah. Mr. Bomboy is a member of the F. & A.M., P.O.S. of A., and P. of H.; he is a Democrat, and has been tax collector of Salem township since 1887.

BARNES BONHAM, retired miller, Forty Fort, was born in Huntington, Pa., April 6, 1821, and is a son of Solomon and Electa (Fuller) Bonham, natives of Connecticut. The father, who was a miller by trade, reared a family of nine children, six of whom are living, Barnes and James being twins and next to the youngest. Our subject embarked in life learning the miller's trade at Hancock's Mill at Luzerne, where he remained seven years; he then worked in the mill where Maltby now is for one year, and, after working among the farmers for a short time, returned to Hancock's Mill, where he remained one year. He then came to Forty Fort and operated a mill for a year, and, for the next five years, worked among the farmers; thence moved to Kingston, and, after piling lumber in the yard for one year, inspected cars on the D.L. & W.R.R. for three years; and after six years' employment at company work at Swoyer's works, retired from active life. Mr. Bonham was married, August 10, 1850, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Henry and Margaret (Kridler) Stroh, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German origin. They have had eight children, six of whom are living, viz.: Martha E., who resides at home; Milbre B., outside foreman at the Harry E. Coal Works, Forty Fort; Jennie S. (Mrs. William Pettebone); Henry F., a merchant in Fort Fort; Augusta A. (Mrs. Harper Pettebone), and William P., a painter, who lives at home. Mr. Bonham and wife and daughters are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church; he has always given his political support to the principles of the Democratic party.

BENJAMIN BONHAM, carpenter, Town Line, was born in Union township June 30, 1837, being the third child in order of birth, of Joseph and Christine Bonham. He was reared and educated in his native township, where he also learned the carpenter trade, at which he has always worked, in various parts of the county. He is a skilled mechanic and master of his trade. He has lived on his present homestead, a neat house and lot near Town Line, since 1868. In 1859 he married Miss Elizabeth, daughter of John and Christine Hartman, and to them were born five children, all of whom are living: Ida, Linda, Cora, Elias and Ambrose. Ida is yet (1892) unmarried. Mr. Bonham is a stanch Democrat.

EDGAR F. BONHAM, a prominent physician of Fairmount township, having his residence at Fairmount Springs, was born in Union township June 28, 1855, a son of Joshua C. and Armanda (Van Horn) Bonham, natives of Pennsylvania, born of Scotch-Irish and German origin. The father was a carpenter by trade, and was killed by the falling of a scaffold July 23, 1890. He was a son of Joseph and Christiana (Gregory) Bonham, natives of Pennsylvania, the former of whom is still living at ninety years of age, a farmer of Union township. He is a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Arnold) Bonham, natives of Northampton county, Pa., and Litchfield county, Conn., respectively. This Mr. Bonham came to Luzerne county about the year 1800. Our subject, who is the eldest in a family of six children, was educated in the common schools, the Huntington Mills Academy, New Columbus Academy, and the Wyoming Seminary, and began the study of medicine in 1877. He graduated with honors from the University of New York, March 13, 1883, and was appointed house surgeon at Bellevue Hospital, but owing to poor health could not accept the appointment. Returning to his native county, the Doctor entered the office of Dr. E.C. Hice, at Muhlenburg, remaining, however, only a short time; then opened an office at Fairmount Springs, where he enjoys a large and lucrative practice. The Doctor was married October 11, 1887, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of William and Rebecca (Sanders) Werkheiser, natives of Pennsylvania and New York, respectively, and of German origin. Mrs. Dr. Bonham is the eldest in a family of three children, and was born at Plains, Pa., March 21, 1858, was educated at the Keystone Academy, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The Doctor is a member of the Luzerne County Medical Society, and of the Pennsylvania Sportmen's Association; politically he is a Democrat.

GEORGE W. BONHAM, farmer, P.O. Town Line, was born in Union township, November 12, 1842, a son of Joseph and Christine (Gregory) Bonham, both of whom were born in Union township, the father on December 25, 1807, the mother in April, 1813. Joseph is a son of Samuel and Priscilla (Arnold) Bonham, the former born October 7, 1780, in Northampton county, the latter in 1783, in Plymouth, Pa., her parents being natives of Connecticut. Samuel was a son of Benjamin Bonham, who was also of Northampton county, and a soldier in the Revolutionary army. He removed from Northampton to this county about 1799, locating in Union (now Ross) township. He was one of the first pioneers in the township, and did good work in breaking up the virgin soil. He reared a family of six children - one son, Samuel, and five daughters - most of whom lived to be over eighty years of age. Benjamin was a son of Samuel, whose history is lost in the misty past. Samuel (II.), son of Benjamin, was twenty-one years of age when he removed to this county about 1801. He located with his parents, but shortly after took a property of 300 acres of land, on which were some improvements. On this he built, lived, and died. He was a hard working man, of energy and determination, and a practical man of the world, whose life was uneventful, but useful. He died in January, 1863, aged eighty-four years; his wife died April 5, 1844. Their family numbered eleven children, ten of whom grew to maturity, and two are now living. Joseph Bonham, a son of Samuel, began his active life in Union township, where he was reared and educated, and where he has resided all his life. He is now living, at the age of eighty-five, a healthy and robust man, and of his life forty-four years he gave to the Lord's service. He has filled several township offices, with credit to himself, and satisfaction of his constituents. He reared an interesting family of twelve children, eight of whom are living, George W. being the youngest son. Our subject resided at home until he was of age, working under the guiding mind of his father, and at the age of twenty-five, March 15, 1868, he married Miss Asenith Wolf, who was born in Ross township January 28, 1848, a daughter of Jacob and Phoebe Wolf, to which union there were born three children: James A., Francis R. and Phoebe L. In 1870 Mr. Bonham removed to his present farm of fifty acres, on which he erected commodious and elegant buldings - indeed all the improvements which are on the place he made. He is a general and practical farmer, and owns some very fine stock. He is a member of the Grange. Politically, he is a Democrat, and has held the offices of constable and school director with credit.

MILBRE B. BONHAM, outside foreman of the Harry E. Mine, was born May 3, 1853, at Forty Fort, and is a son of Barnes and Elizabeth (Stroh) Bonham, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German origin. Our subject is the second in a family of eight children, six of whom are now living. He was educated in the common schools and Wyoming Seminary, and at the age of fourteen engaged as driver-boy in the Hilman Mine for two years. He then went to work for the Wyoming Coal Company, as docking-boss, at Port Bowkley, after four years being promoted to weighmaster, which position he held for four years. He was then given the position of engineer, in which he remained ten years, and on October 8, 1887, was promoted to his present position at the Harry E. Shaft. Mr. Bonham was married October 8, 1876, to Helen, daughter of William and Martha (Fleming) Hartzell, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German origin. By this union there are six children, viz.: Marian, Gussie, Gracie, Lizzie, Harry and Helen. Mrs. Bonham is a member of the Methodist Church. Mr. Bonham was a member of the borough council for three years, tax collector for one, and is justice of the peace at the present time; he is a solid Democrat politically.

S.H. BONHAM, farmer, P.O. Prichard, was born April 24, 1841, in Union township, where he was educated at the common schools. He is a son of Nelson and Barbara A. (Wilkinson) Bonham, the former born in Union township February 18, 1821; the latter in Ross township in 1818. Nelson was a son of Samuel Bonham, a native of New Jersey, who removed from there to this county, locating in Union township, where he became a prominent citizen and a credit to his town. He was a man of marked ability as a pioneer, and reared a family who afterward became men and women, on whom he could look with pride. His son Nelson was a farmer in Union township, on fifty acres of land. He was a practical man, as well as a practical agriculturist, one whose life was even and quite uneventful. He was a stanch Republican, and a member of the M.E. Church. He died in 1882 aged sixty-one years; his wife passed away in December, 1890, aged seventy-three. Their family consisted of six children, five of whom grew to maturity and two of them are living now: S.H. and E.I. Our subject worked at home on his father's farm until the war of the Rebellion broke out, at which time he lacked one year of his majority. In the following year he volunteered to defend his country's honor at the price of life, if need be, and was mustered into the United States service as private in Company F, One Hundred and Forty third P.V.I., for the term of three years. He displayed fortitude and patriotism in such battles as Chancellorsville, Wilderness, Gettysburg and many other well-contested battles. He was promoted to sergeant and discharged as such. On his return from the army he engaged in agriculture on his own account, in what is now Hunlock township, on one hundred acres of native soil. He displayed his energy and pluck in subduing this wild land and producing out of it a beautiful and productive farm, equipped with buildings of modern style and finish. Mr. Bonham was twice married, first time in 1867, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Amos and Lydia A. Kittle, and she bore him one child, Amos D. This wife died in 1873, and Mr. Bonham, for his second wife, married, in 1874, Miss Frances, daughter of John P. and Elizabeth Wagner, by which union were born four children: Elizabeth, Josiah, May and Hugh. Mrs. Frances (Wagner) Bonham died in August, 1890. In 1889 our subject purchased a house and lot in Nanticoke, to which place he removed, and there remained one and one-half years. He is a worthy gentleman, a practical farmer and a loyal citizen. Politically he is a Republican, and in religious faith he is a consistent member of the M.E. Church.

ALBERT R. BONN, grocer, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Scranton, Pa., February 29, 1862, and is a son of Henry and Pauline (Weber) Bonn, natives of Prussia, who came to America in 1855, and settled in Scranton. Henry Bonn is a watchmaker and jeweler, and since 1855 has been in business in Scranton, where he now resides. He has five children living: Henry, August, Albert R., Adam and Emile. Our subject was reared in Scranton, educated in public schools, and spent fifteen years as clerk in the drug business in his native city. In April, 1888, he located in Wilkes-Barre, where he has since been engaged in the grocery business. Mr. Bonn married April 17, 1888, Rose, daughter of Aloes Leffler, of Wilkes-Barre, and by her had three children: Arthur, Edna and Ethel. Our subject is a member of the Zion Reformed Church, and in politics is a Republican. His paternal grandparents, Nicholas and Margaret Bonn, settled in Scranton, 1851, where they passed the rest of their days.

J. NEWTON BOONE, master mechanic. This pleasant and popular young gentleman was born at Berwick, July 13, 1855, and is the second in the family of five children of Townsend W. and Mary A. (Jacoby) Boone, natives of Columbia county, Pa., and relatives of the famous hunter and Indian scout, Daniel Boone. Our subject was educated in Berwick and Hazleton, and after leaving school learned the carpenter's trade. In July, 1875, he was employed by A. Pardee & Co., to work at his trade, and in 1880 was given charge as foreman, of the carpenter gang of that company. In this capacity he continued until June, 1892, when he was promoted to the position of master mechanic for the same company, which he yet holds, and where he merits the highest esteem and confidence, not only of his employers, but of all who come in contact with him, either in a business or social way. Politically Mr. Boone is identified with the Republican party; socially he is a member of the Order of Red Men. He attends the Methodist Episcopal Church. Townsend W. Boone, father of our subject, has for many years been employed as purchaser of supplies for A. Pardee & Co., and is one of the old and trustworthy employees of that large company, having been employed by them in the same capacity since 1868. The surviving children of Townsend W. and Mary A. (Jacoby) Boone are as follows: Florence A., J. Newton, Ralph (who resides in Nebraska), Harry E. (a resident of Iowa) and Burton D. (traveling salesman representing the Atlantic Oil Company).

L.C. BOONE, carpenter, Nanticoke, was born in Centre township, Columbia Co., Pa., April 3, 1862, and is the youngest child of Cyrus and Amanda (Hayman) Boone, the former is a native of Pennsylvania, and a relative of the celebrated America pioneer, Daniel Boone. In their family there were ten children, of whom L.C. is the eighth. When our subject was seven years of age his parents came to this county and settled at Nanticoke, where his father died in 1881, and where his mother still lives. Mr. Boone is a self-educated man, a thorough student in every particular, and a constant reader of the best literature of the day. At the age of nine years he commenced working around the mines as a slate-picker, and ten years later became a regular miner, as such working about three years; then engaged in the lumber business, as a member of the firm of Cornell & Boone, at which he continued about a year and a half, when he sold his interest to Jones & Bergan. He then was engaged in general building about two years, at the end of which time he embarked in mercantile business at Nanticoke, with a Mr. Pope, under the firm name of Pope & Boone. They remained in business over two years, when Mr. Pope bought Mr. Boone's interest, and has been engaged in business at the same place since. Mr. Boone then commenced working at the carpenter's trade, at which he has since been employed. He was married October 20, 1885, to Miss Lillie, daughter of Henry Cornell, a contractor and general builder at Nanticoke, Pa., and they have had four children: Lena May (deceased), Amelia, Harry and William. Mr. Boone is a member of the K. of M., the Sons of Veterans, and is a firm advocate of the principles of the Prohibition party.

JESSE BOOTH, farmer, Forty Fort, was born September 13, 1856, at Forty Fort, a son of Hyram D. and Ann (Bush) Booth, natives of Pennsylvania, and of Irish and German origin, respectively. The father was a farmer by occupation. Our subject is third of a family of eleven children, seven of whom are now living. He was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools, and at the age of twenty rented a farm and began life for himself. In 1879 he purchased his present home, also four lots on Durkee street, in the vicinity. At the present time he is working land known as the "Judge Shoemaker Farm" Mr. Booth was married December 26, 1876, to Ellen, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Mathewson) Barnett, natives of Ireland, and respectively of Irish and Scotch origin. By this union there are six children: Caroline S., Anna O., Jesse T., Marshall J., Harry L and Wallon W. Mr. and Mrs. Booth are members of the Presbyterian Church; he is a member of the P.O.S. of A., Kingston Lodge No. 234, of the I.O.O.F. May Lodge No. 767, of Wyoming, and the Mortuary Beneficial Society; politically he is a Republican, and was a member of the borough council in 1890.

WELLS BOOTH, farmer, P.O. Trucksville, was born August 22, 1852, and was reared and educated in Jackson township. He is the son of William and Maria (Brown) Booth. The former was born on Long Island, February 13, 1810, and the latter in Jackson township, November 13, 1809, daughter of Captain Jesse Brown, one of the first settlers, after whom Brown's Corners was so called. William Booth was the son of Daniel, who moved from Long Island about 1822, locating at Kingston, where he lived the rest of his life. At his death he left a family of thirteen children. William Booth, his son, was about nine years of age when he came to Kingston with his father. In early life he learned the clothier's or fuller's trade in Wyoming, and worked in that place and vicinity for about fifteen years. After this period be bought a farm in Jackson township consisting of eighty acres, partly cultivated, and to which he added many improvements during his lifetime, building barns and dwelling houses. He held several offices in the township with credit to himself and his fellow citizens. He lived to see his eight-second year, and died August 16, 1891, his wife preceding him to the grave six years; she died March 21, 1885. Their family numbered ten children, eight of whom grew to maturity; six are now living (1891). Wells Booth is the youngest of the family, and always worked on the farm on which he was born, thus showing his subjection to parental rule as a dutiful son. On November 21, 1883, at the age of thirty, he married Miss Martha L., daughter of Philip and Lydia A. Sutton. Five children were born to them, four of whom are living: Nettie, Jennie T., Lydia M. and Charles F. Mr. Booth is a thrifty farmer, following the example of his forefathers, all of whom were honest yeoman. Mr. Booth is a stanch friend of the Republican party.

WILLIAM R. BOOTH, farmer, P.O. Loyalville, was born in Jackson township, August 31, 1841. He is the son of William and Maria (Brown) Booth, the former born on Long Island, February 13, 1810, the latter in Jackson township, November 13, 1809. The Browns are very early settlers, and are numbered among the first families who removed this side of the mountain. William was a son of Daniel and Hamutal (Hallock) Booth, both of whom were born on Long Island. Daniel was a son of another Daniel, who was an old man during the Revolutionary war, too old to serve in the ranks, but not too old to be patriotic, for he sent two of his boys to defend their country against the impositons of England. He was commanded at one time to swear allegiance to the king; this the good old lover of freedom could not do, whereupon his lands were confiscated, and he was compelled to flee to Connecticut for safety. After the close of the war, when the States became a free union, he was tendered the property back again. His family consisted of eight children - five sons and three daughters - all of whom were as patriotic in principle as their father. Daniel, Jr., removed from Long Island to this county, locating in Kingston township about 1820. Previous to this, however, he spent three years in Orange county, N.Y. He purchased one hundred and fifty acres of land in Kingston township, all of which he improved during his lifetime. He was a loyal citizen, a good neighbor and a living father. Mr. Booth and his wife were consistent members of the Presbyterian Church. His family consisted of fourteen children, eleven of whom grew to maturity; only one of them is now living (1892), Joseph A. His son, William, Sr., was reared and educated in Kingston township, where he learned the fuller's trade, which he followed for a number of years, working in various places, but finally settled in Jackson, about 1840. He had a farm of eighty acres, some of which was cleared when he bought it. After he located on his farm he gave up his trade and confined himself to agricultural pursuits. He died in August, 1891, at the age of eighty two years. There were ten children born to him; eight grew to maturity, six of whom are now living. William R. Booth is the oldest son and the fifth in order of birth. He was reared and educated in Jackson township and spent several terms at Wyoming Seminary. He always followed farming from choice. In 1855 he removed to his present home on a farm of one hundred acres, which he has improved and embellished both in houses and land. Mr. Booth is a man of marked intelligence and deep thought, who keeps himself well up with the times. On September 20, 1866, he married Miss Martha C., daughter of Horace and Sarah Hawley, by whom he had five children, all of whom are living; their names are: Mary P., George N., Arthur L., Clara E. and Minnie E. Mrs. Martha C. (Hawley) Booth departed this life in August, 1882. She was born in Lake township. Politically, Mr. Booth is a Republican.

CLEMENT H. BOSSERT, fireman on the Central Railroad of New Jersey, Hanover township, was born in Mauch Chunk, Pa., October 16, 1865, and is a son of John Y. and Sabra M. (Lanthrope) Bossert, of Ashley. He was educated in the public schools of Ashley, and then wiped engines in the roundhouse two and one-half years; was hostler five years, and after filling the position of brakeman two weeks, was promoted to his present position in May, 1889. Mr. Bossert was married, August 9, 1888, to Miss Stella, daughter of William and Clara (Dilley) Richards, natives of England and Pennsylvania, and of English and Dutch origin respectively. They have one child, named Lillie May. Mr. Bossert is a member of the B.L.F., and in his political views is a Republican.

HIRAM B. BOSSERT, passenger-locomotive engineer on the Central Railroad of New Jersey, Ashley, was born in Mauch Chunk, Pa., October 15, 1857, and is a son of John Y. and Sabra M. (Lathrope) Bossert. He was educated in the public school of Ashley, and at the age of thirteen began working in the carpenter machine shop, at same time attending night school. At sixteen he entered the machine shop, and worked at the trade ten years, after which he fired on the road three years, and in 1884 was promoted to engineer. He was married, September 27, 1887, to Miss Mary E., daughter of John and Eliza (McCormick) Van Norman, natives of Pennsylvania, and of early German and Scotch origin, respectively; she is a graduate of the New Columbus Academy, came to Ashley at the age of sixteen, and taught school till she was married. Mr. and Mrs. Bossert have three children, John R., Frank L. and Marian E. Our subject and wife are members of the Methodist Episocpal Church; he is a member of the F. & A.M., B. of L.E. and K. of H., and is his political views is a Republican.

JOHN Y. BOSSERT, who has charge of the pattern department of the Central Shops, Ashley, was born in Sunbury, Pa., October 18, 1829, and is the only survivor of four children of John Y. and Hannah (Miller) Bossert, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German origin. The father, who was a millwright by trade, died October 22, 1830, at the age of thirty-three years; the mother afterward married Oscar Bradford, and died October 3, 1854, at the age of sixty-two years. Henry, brother of John Y., was colonel of the One Hundred and thirty-seventh P.V.I., in the Civil war, afterward taught school and was postmaster at Westport, Pa., at the time of his death. Our subject was educated in the public school at Sunbury, and, after working six months on a farm, learned the trade of carpenter, which he followed till 1851, when he took up that of pattern-maker, which he has since followed. In 1868 he came to Ashley and accepted his present position. Mr. Bossert was married, July 3, 1851, to Miss Sabra M., daughter of Solomon and Marilla (Mott) Lathrope, natives of Pennsylvania and Connecticut, and of Yankee and French origin respectively. The issue of this union was eight children, viz.: Alice V., who died at the age of three months; William H., machinist, Mountain Top, Pa.; E. Elizabeth (Mrs. Warren Newhart); Newton, who died at the age of six months; Hiram B.; Milton B.; John E., a machinist in Ashley, and Clement H. Mr. and Mrs. Bossert are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church; in his political preferences he is a Republican.

MILTON B. BOSSERT, fireman at the Hartford Slope, Ashley, was born in Mauch Chunk, Pa., February 9, 1860, and is a son of John Y. and Sabra M. (Lathrope) Bossert. He was educated in the public schools at Ashley, worked fifteen years in the shops, and in 1890 took up his present occupation. Mr. Bossert was married March 1, 1881, to Miss Viola S., daughter of Ammon Beltz, of Wilkes-Barre, and they had three children: Bessie M., Arthur A., and Hiram A., who died when less than two years old. The mother of these children died May 22, 1888, and Mr. Bossert married October 9, 1891, Miss Alice Gardner, of Ashley, who died January 14, 1892. Our subject is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in his political views is a Republican.

C.W. BOUGHTIN, manufacturer of carriages, wagons, sleighs, etc., Kingston. Among the successful business men of Kingston may well be numbered the subject of this sketch. He was born March 10, 1828, in Orange county, N.Y., where he was educated and served his apprenticeship at Unionville, same county, where he became complete "master of his art." In 1849 he came to Kingston, this county, and established his present manufacturing business, in which, by the excellent quality of his workmanship and his strict business integrity, he has won the confidence and esteem of the public. Mr. Boughtin has been twice married: first time to Mary Ann, daughter of Gilbert Wright, of Orange county, N.Y., and she died in 1869, leaving five children: George, married to Martha Mathews; Kate, married to Charles R. Acker, of Scranton, Pa.; Nelson C., a painter of Scranton; Grace, and Jennie, married to Myron Garman, of Kingston. Mr. Boughtin was afterward married to Miss Martha, daughter of John Bogart, of Belvidere, N.Y. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., Knights of the Golden Eagle, Knights of Honor, and P.O.S. of A. His political views are Republican, and he has held the offices of borough councilman, tax collector, and assessor, which office he now holds.

DAVID T. BOUND, merchant, Shickshinny, was born October 14, 1829, at Conklin (now Kirkwood), Broome Co., N.Y., a son of David and Mary (Brown) Bound, and is of English and Scotch descent. His paternal grandfather, David Bound, a native of England, was one of the first settlers of Bound Brook, N.J., and it was in his honor the place was named. Our subject was reared on a farm until sixteen years of age, then began railroading, and for some time was section foreman at Great Bend, Pa., on the Erie Railroad. In May, 1853, he went west, and was appointed trackmaster for the Lawrenceburg and Upper Mississippi Railroad, and six months later he returned to Pennsylvania, becoming connected with the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, his first work thereon being the laying of switches. In 1856 he was conductor of coal and freight trains between Scranton and New Hempton Junction. The following year he was appointed train dispatcher in the Scranton yard, which position he held until July 20, 1861, when he was promoted to superintendent of the Lackawanna & Bloomsburg Railroad. In March, 1862, he took the running by contract of what was then known as the Pittston Branch of the Lackawanna & Bloomsburg Railroad, and March 1, 1869, was again appointed superintendent of the Lackawanna & Bloomsburg Railroad, holding the position until September 15, 1875. Mr. Bound has been a resident of Shickshinny since 1875, and has since spent most of his time in contracting, stone quarrying, and carrying on a general store. From 1878 to 1881 he was track-master for the Atchison, Topeka & Sante Fe' Railroad. In 1850 he was married to Olive S., daughter of Stiles and Lydia (Beecher) Hotchkiss, of Kirkwood, N.Y., and has two children living: Sarah L. (Mrs. R.B. Nicely) and William S. Mr. Bound is a self-made man, thorough and systematic in business habits, and is one of Shickshinny's representative citizens. In politics he is a Republican, and holds the office of justice of the peace.

JOHN BOWDEN, merchant, Ashley, was born in Cornwall, England, June 6, 1841, and is a son of William and Lucinda (James) Bowden. In 1866, his father, who was a miner, emigrated with one son and two daughters and their families; he was preceded in 1864 by John, and followed one year later by the mother and another daughter. They located in Ashley, where the parents died. The family consisted of five children, viz.: Jane (Mrs. John Bluett, deceased) Elizabeth (Mrs. William H. Rickard, of Ashley), John, William (killed in the Hartford Mine at the age of twenty-one years), and Frances (Mrs. Samuel Matthews). Our subject received his education in his native country, where he also worked in the mines until he emigrated in 1864. He worked three and one-half years in the copper mines about Lake Superior, then prospected for iron ore in New Jersey a short time, when he came to Sugar Notch, where he was engaged for a while sinking a shaft. After this he came to Ashley and accepted a position as mine foreman, which he held till 1870, when he embarked in the mercantile business; this he has since followed with the exception of a year and a half, in 1874-5, when he resumed his foremanship. Although he does a very lucrative mercantile business, it is secondary to his lumbering interests, which have since 1882 been very extensive in Luzerne, Northumberland and Centre counties. The Bowden Block, which is an ornament to the town, was built in 1884, burned in May, 1890, and rebuilt the same year. Mr. Bowden was married, June 7, 1865, to Miss Isabella, daughter of John and Nancy (McCracken) Clark, natives of northern Ireland. They have one adopted child, their niece Jennie. Mr. Bowden and wife early united with the M.E. Church, in which he has repeatedly held nearly all the offices for many years, with much credit to himself and benefit to the church. He is a member of the F. & A.M. and the K. of H. In politics he is a Republican, and has been a member of the council in Ashley borough.

JOHN BOWKLEY, painter and paper-hanger, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Wolverhampton, England, September 19, 1845, and is a son of Isaac and Ann (Deeley) Bowkley. The parents came to America in 1865 and settled at Port Bowkley, this county, which place was named in honor of Joel Bowkley, an uncle of our subject, who sunk the first coal shaft at that place. Isaac Bowkley was a miner, and ran a slope near Port Bowkley for several years. His children were five: John, Alfred, William, Alice (Mrs. Valentine Stritzinger), and Ann M. (Mrs. Edward Knox). Our subject was reared in England, where he learned his trade; he came to America in 1867, and located in Wilkes-Barre, where he has since followed his profession. He is a member of the Episcopal Church, of the F. & A.M., and Painters and Decorators Union of America; in politics he is a Republican.

WILLIAM BOWN, contractor, Duryea, was born in Springfield, Ill., April 7, 1856, and is a son of William and Mary A. (Jeffrey) Bown, natives of Somersetshire, England. They reared a family of ten children, of whom our subject is fifth in order of birth. At the outbreak of the Civil war, in 1861, the family went to England, where our subject remained until 1881, being employed there as a miner. He then returned to the United States, and settled in Scranton, where he followed his trade as a miner for about one year; then came to Duryea and worked in the mines one year, after which he was employed as foreman by the Smith & Bown Construction Company three years, at the end of which time he went into business as a contractor. Mr. Bown was united in marriage August 15, 1882, with Annie, daughter of William P. and Margaret Elizabeth (Allen) Thomas, natives of Pembrokeshire, Wales, and their union has been blessed with the following children: Herbert G., born November 2, 1882; Edward A., born December 12, 1886; William, born February 16, 1888. In politics Mr. Bown is a Republican, and was constable from 1886 to 1888. He is a member of the K. of P. and of the I.O.R.M.

WILLIAM BOYD, psotmaster at Wanamie, and manager of H.H. Ashley & Co.'s (now William Boyd & Co.'s) store, same place, was born in Schuylkill county, Pa., January 30, 1851, and is a son of Archibald and Agnes (Simpson) Boyd, natives of Scotland. The subject of this sketch, who is the fourth in a family of six children, was educated in the public schools of Luzerne (in which county the family had settled in 1861), and at the Bloomsburg State Normal School. After completing his education he embarked in the grocery business for his own account, in which he continued four years; then moved to Plymouth, this county, and was there engaged in mercantile business as clerk until 1885, when he came to Wanamie and took charge of the store (mentioned at opening of the sketch), and which he now owns. In October, 1889, he was appointed postmaster at Wanamie. Mr. Boyd was married January 23, 1875, to Elizabeth J., daughter of Matthew M. Weir, of Plymouth, Pa., to which union have been born eight children, namely: Mary M. (deceased), Gettie S., William C., Agnes L. (deceased), Lillie M. (deceased), Howard D., Lulu, and Ruth. Mr. Boyd is a Republican, is a ruling elder in the Presbyterian Church at Nanticoke, and belongs to the following societies: I.O.O.F., Jr. O.U.A.M., and is a member of the Masonic Fraternity.

C.J. BOYLE, merchant and liveryman, Plymouth, was born at Pittsburgh, Pa., December 3, 1858, and is the younger of the two children of Charles J. and Mary (McClure) Boyle, natives of County Donegal, Ireland. Our subject was educated in the mines, which occupation he followed until 1884, when he embarked in the grocery business, at present having a large store at No. 161 E. Main street, where he carries an extensive and well-assorted stock. He is also owner and proprietor of the livery-stable formerly kept by Honeywell, but which was purchased by Mr. Boyle in October, 1891, and has since been successfully conducted by him. He keeps ten good horses, together with handsome wagons, cutters and harness. Mr. Boyle was married in June, 1883, to Miss Matilda, daughter of James and Matilda Mannin, natives of England, and five chidren came to this union: Mary, born March 12, 1884, died December 8, 1884; James, born April 24, 1887; Bessie, born January 11, 1888; Mary, born January 24, 1890; Charles, born February 7, 1892. The family are adherents of the Catholic faith. Mr. Boyle is a member of St. Vincent's F.A. & B. Society, and also of the C.M.B.A., located at Scranton, Pa. He is a Democrat, and is a member of the borough council, having, at this writing, commenced his second term; he is also a member of Hose Company No. 1 Volunteer Fire Department.

PHILLIP J. BOYLE, Hazleton. This gentleman was born March 19, 1856, at Tamaqua, Pa., and is the third in the family of thirteen children of John J. and Mary (McHugh) Boyle, natives of County Donegal, Ireland. They came to America in 1840, settling at Tamaqua, Pa., where Mr. Boyle followed mining until the opening of the war, when he enlisted as a soldier and served during the great conflict. After the war closed he removed to Hazleton, Pa., where he embarked in mercantile business, which he followed until the time of his death, which occurred at Hazleton, September 28, 1878. The subject of this sketch was reared at Tamaqua, and received his education in the public schools in the neighborhood of his birthplace, and at the Millersville State Norman School. After completing his education he clerked in a dry-goods store owned by his father, for about three years. He then became manager of the "Central Hotel," at Hazleton, for Col. D.J. Matterson, remaining in that position eight years, at the end of which time he engaged in the wholesale cigar business, which he followed two years. He then commenced in the livery and undertaking business, which he has since successfully conducted. Mr. Boyle is an active and adroit politician, and has been auditor on the Republican ticket of Hazleton borough, and poor director for the middle coal field poor district. In 1889 he was nominated by the Republicans as recorder of Luzerne county, and after a bitter contest against Joseph J. McGinty, the latter was given the office; in 1892 he again recieved the nomination for the same office. Mr. Boyle is an energetic, enterprising young man, is loyal to his friends and party, and is deserving of the highest honors that either can bestow on him.

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