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CAMPBELL CHRISTY CLYMER COCHRAN COLE COLLIER CONROY COWAN

 

 

CAMPBELL

William CAMPBELL died in 1854.

On Monday Oct. 23. in Rostraver township, Westmoreland Co, William Campbell, formerly of this place, in the 70th year of his age.The deceased was born in Hagerstown, Md., and came to this town with his father, the late Benjamin Campbell, in the year 1792. He learned the printing business in the office of the first paper printed in the county, by Stewart & Mowry. He afterwards edited a paper in Brownsville, and subsequently the Fayette and Greene Spectator here. About 1811 or '12, he married and moved to the farm on which he died, where he lived until his death, except for for a short time that he edited a newspaper in New Lisbon, Ohio. Some years before his death he connected himself with the Presbyterian Church at Rehoboth, and from that time to the day of his death gave satisfactory evidence of having experienced the new birth. He died in the full hope of a blessed immortality through the merits of the Saviour. The Genius of Liberty., Uniontown, Pa., November 2, 1854. Contributed by Roy Lockhart.

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CHRISTY

Peggy CHRISTY died in 1881.

Aunt PEGGY CHRISTY, the oldest inhabitant of Westmoreland county, died a few days ago, at the age of one hundred years and eight months. Keystone Courier. May 27, 1881. Contributed by Harold Spaugy.

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W. B. CLYMER

W. B. Clymer Dead.

One of Monessen's Leading Citizens Passes Away.

W. B. Clymer, a prominent contractor of this city, who has been battling for life for the past three weeks with a severe attack of typhoid fever, succumbed to the ravages of that dread disease at his home on Reed avenue, this morning at 12:30 o'clock. Mr. Clymer was in the 33rd year of his age and leaves a wife and four children , besides a mother, brother and four children to mourn their loss. He was born and raised in Garardford, Green county, where he spent most of his life until coming to this city three years ago. On October 21, 1891 he was happily united in marriage to Miss Gerty Mauer, to which union there was added four children, Russell, aged 10 years past; Raymond, aged 8; Blanche, aged 5 and Alma, aged 2 years. Mr. Clymer had a host of friends and was well and favorably known. He was prominent in lodge circles and a member of Monessen lodge, Royal Arcanum, in which he carried insurance. The sympathy of the community is extended to the family and Mrs. Clymer in their sad bereavement. Funeral services will take place from his late home at 11 o'clock a.m., Thursday, interment at Belle Vernon cemetery. Daily Independent, Monessen, Pennsylvania, Tuesday, November 11, 1902, page 1, column 3 and 4.

 

Daily Independent, Monessen, Pennsylvania, November 13, 1902, page 1, column 4.

Laid to Rest.

The funeral of W. B. Clymer this morning was largely attended. Relatives and friends were many, and the Royal Arcanum, of which the deceased was a prominent member, were out in full numbers. The services were held at the family residence, Rev. J. W. Mouer of the U. B. church officiating. Many floral tributes were in evidence, among them being a floral pillow bearing the name of the order in its center. Mr. Climer (as typed) was a man of sterling character, well liked by all and prepared for his family after death as well as before. He was insured in the N. Y. Life and Royal Arcanum.

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COCHRAN

J. R. COCHRAN died in 1925.

J. R. COCHRAN dies from Heart Failure (date of death - May 27, 1925)

Death Recalls Fact That Man of Similar Name Died in Winter

J. R. Cochran ,a prominent resident of Salem Twp., died at his home two miles north of Delmont at 1 o'clock Wednesday afternoon. Mr. Cochran was 67 years, 7 months and 10 days old. He had been ill for 2 1/2 years and his death Wednesday was due to heart failure. Mr. Cochran is survived by his widow and by 9 children: Mrs. Baine Stark, Homer Cochran, Mrs. Florence Ralston, Mrs. E. A. Steinwedel of Baltimore, Mrs Harry Patterson of Washington D.C., Mrs. Stanley Vernam of New Kensington, Lloyd Cochran and Erma Cochran at home and Mrs. Robert Garth of TN. One brother, J. B. Cochran of near Greensburg and 2 sisters, Ella and Margaret Cochran of Wilkinsburg also surviving. Mrs. S. I. Stout of Greensburg, a sister died a short time ago. Funeral services will be held at 2:30 o'clock Friday afternoon in the Delmont Presbyterian Church. During the holiday season, a Mr. Cochran of Export died. His initials were the same as those of J. R. Cochran of near Delmont. Many friends received the news and confused identities of the men.Mr. Cochran's home was visited by many people who came to pay their last tribute to him and were pleasantly astounded to find the man they believed to be dead, receiving them cordially at the door. Contributed by JoAnn Cupp, joanncupp15566@att.net.

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COLE

Charles Poole COLE died in 1926.

DEATH CLAIMS TWO OF RUFFSDALE FAMILY WITHIN HOURS.

Mt. Pleasant July 31- Most distressing yesterday were the deaths of two children of the family of Mr and Mrs Robert Cole of Ruffsdale. DOROTHY MARIE COLE , seven months and 21 days old, died at her home at 2:39 o'clock yesterday morning. The babe some time ago had been ill with whooping-cough and her death came from the complications resulting. A short time later, a son, CHARLES POOLE COLE, five years and six months old, with some other children was playing in a vacant store. The boy had climbed into a window and was accidentally pushed out where a pane of glass had been broken. He suffered concussion of the brain, dying at noon. A double funeral will be held at Mount Lebanon Church at tarr on monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock and interment will followat Irwin-Union cemetery. Weekly Courier, Aug 5, 1926. Contributed by Harold Spaugy.

Dorothy Marie COLE died in 1926.

DEATH CLAIMS TWO OF RUFFSDALE FAMILY WITHIN HOURS.

Mt. Pleasant July 31- Most distressing yesterday were the deaths of two children of the family of Mr and Mrs Robert Cole of Ruffsdale. DOROTHY MARIE COLE , seven months and 21 days old, died at her home at 2:39 o'clock yesterday morning. The babe some time ago had been ill with whooping-cough and her death came from the complications resulting. A short time later, a son, CHARLES POOLE COLE, five years and six months old, with some other children was playing in a vacant store. The boy had climbed into a window and was accidentally pushed out where a pane of glass had been broken. He suffered concussion of the brain, dying at noon. A double funeral will be held at Mount Lebanon Church at tarr on monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock and interment will followat Irwin-Union cemetery. Weekly Courier, Aug 5, 1926. Contributed by Harold Spaugy.

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COLLIER

George D. COLLIER died in 1961.

Obituary of George Dewey Collier, Sr. - 8/21/1961

George D. Collier, 62, formerly of Jeannette, died Monday in Miami, Fla., after being in failing health for several months. He was the father of Mrs. Ruth Taylor, Jeannette Florist. For many years Collier was a building contractor in Jeannette and in later life was an employee of Pennsylvania Railroad before moving to Florida. He was born in Bellwood, PA, Oct. 11, 1898, a son of the late Lewis S. and Laura Collier. Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Mary Mitchell Collier and these children: Mrs. Taylor, Mrs. Andrew (Nellie) Lesnick, Jeannette: Mrs. Willima (Verna) Bushyager, Mrs. Del (Mary Lou) Nunnery, Florida; George Jr., Fred, Philadelphia; 12 grandchildren; one great-grandchild; one sister, Mrs. Charles (Alice) Denhart, Gaithersburg, Md., one brother, Lewis (Dick) Collier, Jeannette. The body is expected to arrive by plane Wednesday. Friends will be received 2 - 5 and 7 - 10 Miller-Whitlatch Home, Jeannette. Note: Burial in Brush Creek Cemetery, Irwin, Westmoreland County, PA. Contributed by Susan Nunnery, slnunnery@hotmail.com.

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CONROY

John E. CONROY died in 1938.

John E. CONROY, aged 37, in charge of transportation of mail here for the Uniontown post office for the last five years and a veteran of the World war, died suddenly at 3:30 Wednesday afternoon, March 9, 1938, in the Uniontown hospital where he had been a patient since Monday. He had been suffering from heart disease. Mr. CONROY was born April 18, 1901, in Westmoreland county, a son of the late James and Rose O'ROURKE CONROY. He became a postal employee in 1933, and was under contract to transport mail from the railroad and West Penn stations to the local post office. He served with the Medical Corps and was stationed at Coblenz, for 18 months during the World war. He was a member of Uniontown Post No. 47, Veterans of Foreign Wars. Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Alverda JOBES CONROY; two children, Jean and Vivian; three brothers, Michael, Footedale, Joseph, Filbert, and William, Edenborn; and three sisters; Mrs. Mary LANDMAN and ??? (remaining text cut off). Contributed by Marilyn Tolentino and Carol Clarke and transcribers.

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COWAN

Edgar COWAN

EDGAR COWEN CALLED FROM HIS EARTHLY EMPLOYMENTS, the great ex-senator breathes his last surrounded by his family-Reminiscences of a long and busy life. Ex-Senator Cowan, of Greensburg, has yielded to the deadly cancer that has been steadily drawing on his vitality for almost a year. He died on Saturday with all his family about him except his son, Dr. Frank Cowan, who was last heard of at Sydney, Australia. Senator Cowan's death has been the occasion of universal sorrow and respect in his native county of Westmoreland, and indeed throughout the state, whose able representative he was. The first appearance of the cancer that caused his death was discovered about a year ago, and was thought at first to be only a guin-boll.Becoming alarmed at the increasing unfavorable symptoms he consulted the eminent Doctor Sands, of New York, who was then in attendance on General Grant. Doctor Sands informed him that he had a cancer and that his case was somewhat similar to that of General Grant's. He advised the Senator as to the means to prolong his life. For months past Mr Cowan has been resigned to his fate. The cancer increasing in growth, prevented his swallowing, except with great difficulty. For the past two months his sole nourishment has been egg-nog, and his death was caused by malnutrition. His funeral took place on Tuesday afternoon, and was the largest ever seen in Westmoreland county. All business houses were closed from 2 o'clock to 3 o'clock p.m., in Greensburg, and the court house and church bells were tolled during that time. The Westmoreland bar, of which the deceased was a conspicuous member, had charge of the funeral arrangements. General Richard Coulter, Hon. Jacob Turney, James F. Woods, John Armstrong, D. S. Atkinson, Esqs., of the Westmoreland bar, and W. D. Moore, of the Pittsburgh bar, acted as pall bearers. The remains were interred in St. Clair cemetery.

HIS BOYHOOD. Edgar Cowan's boyhood was spent in a frontier cabin in Sewickley township, on the banks of the Youghiohheny river, for his life began way back in 1815, when Western Pennsylvania was little better than a wilderness and frontier cabins were the rule in Westmoreland county architecture. The boy had never known the guiding hand of a father, and his life was a struggle against untoward circumstances and the hardships incident to that early period. But he was of the material that lasted and indeed seemed to thrive on adversities. He came of revolutionary stock on his mother's side, his grandfather having been a captain in the patriot army, and saw service through the war for independence with a company raised in Cumberland county. From this source, the boy inherited his steadfastness in defense of human rights which so distinguished him in later years. The advantages for obtaining an education in those early days were meagre, even for those more fortunate than Edgar Cowan. His mother was his first tutor and taught him to read at so early a date that he often said he did not remember when he could not read. As he grew up he engaged in the various occupations of farming, boating on the Ohio river and working at the carpenter trade, meanwhile attending the district school in the winter season. He also taught school for several terms. Finally he determined to be a physician and went to West Newton to become a student under a physician there. After several years of private study he entered the Greensburg Academy, a noted institution at that day, and remained a short time. So well grounded did he become that he was able to enter Franklin College, Ohio, in 1838, in the senior class and graduated with honors the following year. After his graduation he read law with Henry D. Foster, his purpose to become a physician having been given up. He taught school at intervals to support himself through his law course and was admitted to the bar in 1842. Before this time he had achieved considerable political prominence, of which it is our purpose to speak.

HIS PUBLIC CAREER. As a boy he had been a democrat, taking his democratic tendances from his family and surroundings. But during Van Buren's administration he became divorced from the democracy and supported William Henry Harrison for president in the famous hard cider campaign of 1840. Harrison was elected and Cowan's political career was begun. He immediately became prominent in his party in his section of the state. But he did not neglect his law practice for politics, and having bought out an established lawyers business in Greensburg, was soon in possession of a lucrative practice, for he was industrious as well as talented, and held the practice of his predecessor, while he made accessions to it. At that time the Westmoreland bar included such names as Judge Coulter, afterwards on the supreme bench, Hon, Albert G, Marchand, Hon, Henry D. Foster and the names of many other prominent men on his lists. But among them all Cowan soon began to take rank as an equal. He henceforth enjoyed a profitable practice and acquired property, although he never became wealthy. His generous habits and lack of more money ambition prevented his gathering wealth, but he was comfortably well off at the time of his death. Mr Cowan took a prominent part in the conversation that nominated Henry Clay in 1844, but for a long while thereafter pursued his profession without interruption, until the slavery question came up to be settled forever. During the events that led up to its final and violent settlement, the Dred Scott decision, the Kansas Border war and the debates in congress, he was prominent in his party and the stormy campaign of that period. He was an excellent stumpspeaker, for besides a ready expression and large fund of general information, he had the advantages of a magnificent deep voice and a commanding presence, valuable qualities in public speaking. In the winter of 1860-61, he was elected by the Pennsylvania legislature to the United States Senate for the full term beginning March 4th, 1861, the same eventful day in which Abraham Lincoln took the oath of office as president. His senatorial experience was one of warning for his opinions , and these opinions often led him into opposition with members of his own party even. He opposed the legal tender act, and was bitter in his denunciation of the confiscation act, and other extreme measures growing out of the war, and finally when he saw that Andrew Johnson's policy as president was the proper one, he broke with his party and supported the administration. This course put an end to his political hopes in republican Pennsylvania, but he preferred this to a sacrifice of his honest opinions .He returned to private life at the end of his term and never sought or held office afterwards. He has since that time been identified with the democratic party. He supported Greeley in 1872 and Tilden in 1876. He was a delegate to the convention that nominated Hancock, and with that his public career may be said to have closed. Contributed by Harold Spaugy.

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