YATESVILLE BOROUGH

Was formed from Jenkins Township, May 20, 1878. The first borough election, June 1 following, resulted as follows: Burgess, T. T. Hale; council: George Faircloth, president; Thomas Nattrass, secretary; John Shields, William Learch, Alexander Frazer, Alfred Day; street superintendent, John H. Monk; chief police, Mathew Harrison; collector, W. D. Hale. T. T. Hale was re-elected burgess.

Present officers: Richard Bostock, burgess; council: John Harding, John Pierce, John T. Reid, William Carpenter and Leopard D. Schooley. Secretary and assessor, Edwin S. Monk; treasurer, Charles Hale, tax collector, Thomas W. Haines; street commissioner, Thomas Lloyd; chief police, Jasper S. Pierson.

Joel Hale, in 1809, built the first frame house in Yatesville, occupied by John Monk. Mr. Hale owned most of the borough site. The settlers following Mr. Hale were H. Fredrick, George Day, David Reese, James Cooper, Isaac and George Naphus, Joseph and John Stout and James Thompson. These came in 1809 or 1810. William D. Hale built the first tavern in the place on the corner of Main and Stout Streets, in 1859, afterward kept by John H. Monk. The first store was opened in 1855. A schoolhouse was built in 1851. From 1812 to 1825 the added families were, John and Isaiah Hale, John Yates, Asa and Morris Naphus and Francis Yates, Sr. The borough was name for this Francis Yates, an Englishman who came to America in 1817. When he came he bought ninety acres of land of Theophilus Brooks, on which was a log cabin. His widow survived to a great age.

It is believe that Francis Yates and the Hale brothers were the first to mine coal. They found an outcrop and then by stripping they pursued the business of taking out coal with a sled and ox team.

The railroads have depots at this place; three stores and a water reservoir of the Pennsylvania Coal company for the supply of their works and the town. Population 437, domiciled in ninety dwellings. The people are engaged in mining.

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This Town History was donated by Marge Gray .

1997-2010 by Mary Ann Lubinsky for the PAGenWeb Project, and by Individual Contributors

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