SA - SH Surnames

History of Luzerne County, Pa.,

by H.C. Bradsby, 1893

TOM SAGE, hotel proprietor, Luzerne, was born in Monmouthshire, England, May 23, 1858, and is a son of George and Ann (Appleton) Sage, natives of England. Our subject was brought to America with his parents when only five years of age, and was educated in Luzerne county. He commenced life as door tender in the old Grand Tunnel (this county); then at Avondale (same place) as car runner for the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Coal Company; then for one year was in the huckstering and confectionery business, after which for seven years he carried on a livery business, but losing same by fire he went to work "outside" for John C. Haddock; then as stationary engineer; then with W. Y. Payne as breaker engineer; afterward with Simpson & Watkins, Northwest Coal Company; then returned to J. C. Haddock, and worked as fireman, afterward as engineer on slope engines; thence to Joseph Tyrrel as engineer. Coming afterward to the borough of Luzerne, he here opened his present well-known and popular hotel. Mr. Sage was married July 22, 1880, to Mary Elizabeth, daughter of Freeman and Julia (Poole) McCarty, natives of Pennsylvania, and to this union have been born four children, viz.: George F., William P., Ina E. and Fred A. In politics Mr. Sage has always been identified with the Republican party.

JOHN T. L. SAHM, Wilkes Barre, was born in Greencastle, Franklin Co., Pa., September 6, 1843, and is a son of Rev. Peter and Susan (Tritle) Sahm. His paternal grandfather was John Sahm, a native of near Manheim, Lancaster Co., Pa., who was a farmer and distiller by occupation. Rev. Peter Sahm, D. D., father of subject, was born near Manheim, in 1809, and educated at the Lutheran Theological Seminary, Gettysburg, Pa., where he was graduated in 1831. He began his ministerial career in 1832, as a clergyman of the Lutheran Church, and after forty-four years' service in the ministry, died at Laurelton, Union Co., Pa., March 14, 1876, at the age of sixty-five years. His wife was a daughter of John Tritle, a farmer of near Chambersburg, Pa., and granddaughter of Jacob Tritle, a native of Bavaria, Germany, who was a pioneer of Franklin County, Pa., where he engaged in the business of farming and distilling Our subject was prepared for college at Somerset Academy, and was graduated from the Pennsylvania College, at Gettysburg, in 1862. He afterward read law with B. McIntyre, at New Bloomfield, Pa., and in April 1865, was admitted to the bar of Perry county. He then located in Mifflintown, and in 1866 was elected district attorney of Juniata county, serving his term of three years, after which he formed a legal partnership with Ezra D. Parker, under the firm name of Parker & Sahm. This partnership existed until 1873, when Mr. Sahm removed to Wilkes Barre, and was admitted to the bar of Luzerne county in April of the same year. In December following, he engaged as clerk in the prothonotary's office. in which capacity he has served until the present time, being chief deputy prothonotary since January, 1880, and although a Democrat in politics, has retained his position under all the administrations of the office, for a period of eighteen years. Mr. Sahm was married September 17, 1872, to Minnie S., a daughter of Joseph Rothrock of Fermanagh, Juniata Co., Pa., and has four children living: Frank Basil Rothrock Sahm, Raymond Paul Rothrock Sahm, Ruth Victoria Rothrock Sahm, and Minnie Constance Rothrock Sahm.

CHARLES SALVAGE, miner, Box 389, Plymouth, was born in Wales, July 31, 1840, a son of Charles and Elizabeth (Kinson) Salvage, the former of whom was born in England, December 26, 1811, and the latter in Wales in February, 1802. Charles Salvage, Sr., was a miner by occupation in his native country, and he and his wife emigrated to this country in 1864, locating in Oswego, N.Y., where he lived till his death, which occurred February 28, 1881, when he was aged seventy-five years. While in this country Mr. Salvage followed the occupation of mason; was also a local preacher, and, for a man of limited or no education, was remarkable for his ability and force. In his own country he followed preaching for twenty years, and was a strict temperance man. He reared a family of four children out of seven, two of whom are now living, Charles, Jr., being the third in order of birth. In his early life our subject was apprenticed to a shoemaker, but finally took to mining as the vocation of his choice. When he was forty years of age (in 1880), he came to this country, locating in Pleasant Valley, Pa., with his wife and family of seven children, aned here following mining. In the same year he removed to Plymouth, and has lived here ever since; he now owns two blocks, the result of hard and honest toil. Mr. Salvage was married twice: first, in 1861, in Wales, to Miss Helen Faughtner, who bore him sixteen children, six of whom are living, viz.: Anna, Lizzie, Henry, John, George and Willie. Of these, Anna married John Rescolla; Lizzie married James Morgan, and Henry married Miss Estella Johns. For his second wife Mr. Salvage married, July 28, 1890, Mrs. Joyce Hobbs, a native of Wales. She is the mother of four children by a previous marriage, two of whom are living: Mary and Jesse. Mr. Salvage is a member of the Protestant Association. He and his good wife are members of the English Congregational Church, in good standing. Politically, he is a Republican.

JOHN J. SAMPSON, merchant, Duryea, was born in Cornwall, Englann, February 10, 1861, and is a son of James P. and Margery (Reynolds) Sampson, also natives of that place. They reared a family of six children, of whom our subject is the eldest. The family came to the United States in 1867, and settled in Jermyn, Lackawanna county, where Mr. Sampson is at present tax collector. Our subject received his education in the common schools. In 1873 he was employed by Mr. Jermyn as cash boy, advancing along the line until he became chief clerk of one of the departments. In 1884 he resigned his position with Mr. Jermyn, and accepted the more lucrative one of buyer for the store of Jone, Simpson & Co., at Archbald, where he remained until 1887. He then took the management of the store of Jermyn & Co., at Rendham, and in 1889 came to Duryea, as manager of the store of William Connell & Co. In October, 1891, he built the store he now occupies, and where he is doing a thriving business. Mr. Sampson was united in marriage November 17, 1884, with Ella G., daughter of John B. and Elvira Lack, natives of Chester, England, and Minersville, this county, respectively. Their union has been blessed with one son, J. Lack, born March 8, 1887. Our subject is a member of the M. E. Church, and in politics is a Republican. He is a member of the I.O.O.F. and Royal Arcanum.

THOMAS SAMUEL, inside foreman, Dorrance Colliery, Lehigh Valley Coal Comapny, Wilkes Barre, was born in Swansea, Glamorganshire, South Wales, July 25, 1840, and is a son of Lot and Catherine (Francis) Samuel. The father came to America in 1868, locating at Providence, Luzerne (now Lackawanna) county; later removed to Emporia, Kan., and died there. His children were four in number: Eliza (Mrs. William R. Jones) and Hannah (Mrs. John D. Davis), both residents of Emporia, Kan., and William and Thomas, both residents of Wilkes Barre, the former inside district superintendent for the Lehigh Valley Coal Company. Our subject was reared in his native country, where he received a limited education in the public schools. In his eighth year he began work in the iron ore mines of Wales, and later was a coal miner. In 1861 he came to America, locating for seventeen months in Nova Scotia, being engaged there in gold mining. He then came to the United States and worked in the coal mines at Providence, near Scranton, Pa., until 1876, during five years of which time he was fire-boss. In 1876 he removed to Wilkes Barre, where he has since resided, and was in the employ of the Lehigh Valley Coal Company as fire-boss from 1876 to 1878, since which latter year he has been inside foreman. Mr. Samuel married March 2, 1865, Mary Meredith, a native of Pennsylvania, and daughter of Thomas & G. Almeda (Evans) Meredith, of Susquehanna county, Pa., formerly of Wales, and by her he had eight children: Katherine, Talisen (deceased), G. Almeda (deceased), Meredith, Viola (deceased), Cerwiden, Otis (deceased) and Idris (twins). Mr. Samuel is a member of the Welsh Congregational Church, of which he is a trustee and treasurer; is also a member of the K. of P. and Ivorites; in politics he is a Republican. His paternal grandparents were William and Catherine Samuel, and his maternal grandfather was Thomas Francis; they are prominent citizens of Wales.

JOHN H. SANDEL, M.D., physician and surgeon, Plymouth, was born near Danville, Montour Co., Pa., in 1854, and is a son of Jacob and Catharine (Snyder) Sandel, also natives of Montour county. Our subject received his early education in the common schools, and later attended the State Normal School at Bloomsburg, where he studied the languages and sciences. After completing his higher education, he taught school in Columbia and Montour counties for four years. He then began the study of medicine in the office of Dr. F. E. Harpel, at Danville, and later entered the Hahnemann Medical College at Philadelphia, where he graduated in the class of '82. He began practicing at Girardville, Pa., and in 1887 located at Plymouth, where he has since been permanently established. Dr. Sandel was united in marriage with Miss Margaret, daughter of William K. and Emma (Tomkinson) Vickery, natives of Philadelphia, Pa., and to this union was born May 23, 1890, a son. Dr. Sandel is a Republican in politics, and in religion is a Presbyterian. He is a member of the State Homeopathic Medical Society, and of the Homeopathic Medical Society of Northern Pennsylvania, of which he has been President. The Doctor's sterling qualities have, undoubtedly, done much toward his success as a medical man, and what he has done is due to his own exertions.

A.S. SANTEE, farmer, P. O. Town Line, was born in Union township, April 10, 1820, where he was reared and educated. He is a son of John and Jane (Moore) Santee, the former of whom was born in Nazareth, Northampton Co., Pa., the latter in Cecil county, Md. John wa a son of Valentine Santee, whose father was a Frenchman. Valentine was one of the old settlers of Salem township, and did much for the advancement of agriculture in those days. He was a good business man and a sturdy pioneer. His family consisted of eleven children. His son, John Santee, father of our subject, began his active life in salem township, on a large tract of land given to him by Pennsylvanians, but their authority to grant land being ignored by the Yankees, he consequently lost his land with his title. He then removed to Union township, locating near Town Line on a farm containing one hundred and fifty acres of unimproved land, which he improved to a great extent during his lifetime. He died in 1850, aged seventy-seven years, having been preceded by his wife in 1835, aged sixty-two years. Their family consisted of ten children, nine of whom grew to maturity, and two of whom are now living: A. S. and Sarah Jane. A. S. is the ninth in the family. In early life he learned the carpenter's trade, at which he worked ten years. In 1849 he married Miss Sarah, daughter of Robert and Phoebe Davenport, and to them were born nine children, three of whom are living: A. C., M. H. and Grace. A. C. Santee is a practicing physician in Orange county, N. Y. Mrs. Sarah Santee was born in Plymouth, September 17, 1826. In 1853 Mr. Santee removed to his father's farm, on which, with the exception of one year, he has since resided. He is a practical farmer, a thorough going business man, and a clear thinker, whose hands and means are always ready to push on the car of progression for the advancement of civilization and the expansion of the mind. He is a member of the P. of H., and of the M. E. Church, in which he is a trustee. Politically he is a Republican.

A. William Santee, general merchant, farmer and lumberman, and postmaster at Sybertsville, was born in Butler township, this county, October 16, 1843, a son of Philemon and Elizabeth (Balliet) Santee. His paternal grandfather, Philemon Santee, a native of Northampton county, Pa., was a descendant of Col. John Santee, of French-Huguenot stock, who was a colonel in the Revolutionary War, and died during that struggle at Easton, Pa. Philemon, Sr., was a pioneer of Butler township, and his children were: Faon, Simon, Reuben, Joshua, Hannah (Mrs. John Barlet), Catherine (Mrs. Andrew Kesten), Mary (Mrs. Samuel Thrasher), and Philemon. Of these, Philemon (father of subject) was a native of Northampton county, Pa., was a prominent farmer of Butler and Sugar Loaf townships, and died in the latter of 1884, at the age of sixty-eight years, after a continuous residence there from 1833. His wife was a daughter of Abraham and Mary (Baranger) Balliet, of Butler township, and by her he had four children: Maria (Mrs. S. D. Yost), A. William, Amanda (Mrs. W.S. Miller) and Lizzie (Mrs. Daniel Zelner. Our subject was reared in in Butler and Sugar Loaf townships, was educated in the common schools, and began life as a farmer, in which he still continues. He has been engaged in lumbering since 1887 and has been in the mercantile business at Sybertsville since 1868; was assistant postmaster in Sybertsville from 1870 – 1886, and has been postmaster since 1886. In 1864 Mr. Santee married Maria, daughter of Abraham and Mary (Yost) Miller, of Sugar Loaf township, and they have three children: Sula L., Winifred and Jennie M. Mr. Santee is a member of the Reformed Church: in politics, he is independent.

Ephraim A. Santee, M.D., Wapwallopen, was born in Union township, this county, July 8, 1837, a son of John and Rebecca (Adleman) Santee, and comes of Huguenot stock. His paternal grandfather, John Santee, whose wife was Jane Morre, was the fourth son of Valentine and Margaret (Funstain) Santee, who, with five sons and three daughters, was among the pioneers of Salem township, Luzerne county. Valentine was a son of John and Catherine (Smith) Santee, of Easton, Pa.: his father entered the ranks of the Federal army during the Revolution, rose to be colonel, and died of fever at Easton, Pa. while home on a furlough. John Santee, grandfather of subject, settled in Union township about 1802; was a farmer and stock-raiser, and in his day was a prominent class leader of the M. E. Church. John, Jr., his third son, and father of subject, was born in Union township, July 11, 1814, and spent most of his life in Union township, and was a farmer; in later life, he removed to Fishing Creek, Columbia county, Pa. where after four years residence he died in 1887. His wife was a daughter of Adam and Mary (Beaver) Adleman, of Union township, and his children were Mary J. (Mrs. George Major); Ephraim A., Susan A., Sophia (Mrs. A.M. Marvin), Helen (Mrs. A.G. Major), Theodore M., and Alice. Our subject was reared in Union township, and received an academical education at New Columbus, Pa. In 1861, he began the study of medicine with Dr. A. L. Cressler, now of Wilkes-Barre, and was graduated from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in 1869; during the war of the Rebellion he was a medical cadet of the regular army; and did duty as assistant surgeon. In 1866 he began the practice of his profession at Shickshinny, where he remained four years, then located to Hobbie. In 1885 he removed to Wapwallopen, where he has since been in active practice. In 1862, the Doctor married Thankful R., daughter of Lewis and Mary (Benscoter) Post, of Union township, and they have three children; James F., Susie G. and Charles L. Dr. Santee is a member of the F. & A. M. and is in politics a Democrat.

Nelson Santee, farmer, P.O. Prichard, was born January 1, 1835, in Union (now Hunlock) township, where he was reared and educated. He is a son of Isaac and Mary (Gregory) Santee, the former born in Luzerne county (exact locality not known), October 1, 1802, the latter in Union township, November 6, 1811. Isaac Santee removed to Huntington when a boy, and was always a resident of the county, dying in 1869 at the age of sixty-seven years. He was a poor but honest, hard-working industrious man, whose life was plain and uneventful. His widow resides with her son, Nelson. They reared a family of eight children out of twelve born to them, Nelson being the third in the order of birth. Our subject has always been a resident of the county, and has confined himself to agricultural pursuits. On October 30, 1864, he married Miss Sarah I., daughter of Martin and Susan Bonning, and to them were born eight children, seven of whom are living: Charlotte, Jennie, Susan, Josiah, Lizzie, Nellie and Frances. Of these, Charlotte married George Culp,; Jennie married W. Evans; Susan married Lorenzo Cragle. Mrs. Sarah (Bonning) Santee was born in Jackson township, September 29, 1846. Mr. Santee, in 1870, removed to the farm on which he now resides, and which comprises eighty acres. He is a general and practical farmer, well-versed in agriculture. He is a good citizen, an obliging neighbor and a loyal citizen. He is a member of the Democratic party, and he and his wife are consistent members of the Baptist Church. Mr. Santee’s house stands in the track of the dreadful cyclone that visited Luzerne county, August 19, 1890, causing serious damage to his property, especially to the old orchard, also buildings, all of which were carried away except the house and barn, and one of his mules was so injured, that it died a few days later, besides which much other damage was done.

Lewis L. Sarge, assistant superintendent, Mocanaqua Mines, P.O. Shickshinny, was born in Lebanon, Pa, October 6, 1845, a son of David and Margaret (Ax) Sarge and of Irish and German descent. His paternal grandfather , Stephen Sarge, a native of Ireland, was at one time a resident of Pennsylvania. The father of subject spent most of his life in Lebanon, Pa., was a forgeman by occupation, and died in 1884. Our subject was reared and educated in Schuylkill county, Pa., began work in the mines when fifteen years of age, and worked himself up to the position of mine foreman, which he held one year at Keystone Mines, above Wilkes-Barre; three and one-half years at Mocanaqua; one and one-half years as district superintendent for the Lehigh and Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, where he had charge of three collieries, and since February, 1891, has held his present position. He was twice married, his first wife being Sidney Zerby of Lykens, Dauphin county., Pa; his second wife was Amanda J., daughter of Joseph Baich, of Dillsburg, York Co., Pa., and by her he has three children living, Minnie, Ralph and Edna. Mr. Sarge is a member of the F. & A. M. and in politics is a Republican.

James A. Sargent, Wilkes-Barre, conductor on the Central Railroad of New Jersey, was born in Rutland, Mass., October 20, 1841, a son of Hezekiah and Nancy L. (Moore) Sargent, and is of English descent. He was reared and educated in his native town, and learned the shoemaker’s trade with his father, which he followed until seventeen years of age, then serving at three years’ apprenticeship at sash and blind making. On April 20, 1861, he enlisted in Company E. First N. H. V., and after serving three months was honorably discharged. In May, 1862, he again enlisted, this time in Company I, One Hundred and Thirty-Second Pennsylvania Volunteers, at Scranton, Pa. and was honorably discharged after nine months service. Since 1861 Mr. Sargent has been a resident of Luzerne county, where with the exception of the time he spent in the army, he has been engaged in railroading, since 1872 with the Central Railroad of New Jersey; he has held his present position since 1876. In 1866, he married Clara A., daughter of Godfrey and Ann Benscoter, of Wilkes-Barre. Our subject is an attendant of the Presbyterian Church; he is a member of the Railroad Conductors’ Society, of the G.A.R. and I.O.R.M.; politically he is a Republican.

Daniel L. Saul, telegraph operator, Fairview township, P.O. Mountain Top, was born October 2, 1869 in Perry township, Berks Co. PA., the second youngest of eight children born to Daniel and Caroline (Dorr) Saul, both natives of this State, and of German descent. The father is a music teacher. Daniel L., the subject of this notice, attended school until he was eighteen years old, when he entered the telegraph office of the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad at Maiden Crock to learn telegraphy, and after two months study was given a position by the same company as operator in their office at Germansville, Lehigh county, where he remained but nine months, accepting a similar charge at Glen Summit Switch for the Lehigh Valley Railroad Company. He was here but a short time when they gave him charge of their office in Fairview, where he remained for nearly three years being then transferred to the dispatcher’s office at Wilkes-Barre where he is still employed. Mr. Saul was married June 15, 1889 to Edna Luckinbill, of Perry township, Berks Co, Pa; she is a native of above county and of German descent. Mr. and Mrs. Saul are members of the Lutheran church. In politics, Mr. Saul is a Democrat.

Mark Saunders, proprietor of hotel at Plymouth, was born in England May 9, 1852, where he was reared and educated. He is a son of John and Mary (Leath) Saunders, both of whom were also born in England, where they lived and died, the former December 12, 1869, at the age of sixty-two years; by occupation was a blacksmith, and was a skilled mechanic. Their family consisted of ten children, eight of whom are living, Mark being the youngest. On August 22, 1881 he emigrated to this country, landing on September 8, following, and located in Johnstown where he remained for one year. He then came to Plymouth township, this county, where he bought some property, and where he has since resided, employed as a miner and hotel keeper, in which latter business, he has been engaged for six years, keeping a good and orderly house. He owns three houses in Plymouth township. Mr. Saunders was married May 18, 1874 in England, to Miss Emma, daughter of William and Louisa Raddaford, to which union there was born one child, Jesse Willie, aged 8 years on June 22, 1892. Mrs. Saunders is a member of the I.O.O.F. They are people of eminent respectability.

George SCHAEFER, proprietor of the "Valley Hotel," the famous theatrical headquarters, Hazleton, was born at Ashland, Schuylkill Co., Pa., August 26, 1857, and is a son of John and Elizabeth (Dreshman) Schafer, natives of Germany. Our subject was educated in the public schools of Schuylkill County, and at the age of eight years was engaged in the well-known vocation, "slate-picking." He worked around the mines in various capacities until the age of thirteen, when he went to Tamaqua, Pa., and engaged as bartender at the "Columbia House," remaining two years, and then returned to Ashland, where he learned cigar-making. At this trade he worked in Bethlehem for about one and one half years, when he engaged in the wholesale grocery business for a short time; then again came to Ashland, and worked for Peter Burk, after which he bought the Burk Cigar Factory in Hazleton in the "Luzerne House Block," soon afterward moving to the "Valley Hotel Block." In 1880 he leased the "Valley Hotel," of which he has since been proprietor, and he is regarded as one of the most popular hotel men in that locality. In March 1883, he purchased an adjacent lot of Charles Hampel, thereby making him one of the leading property holders of the city, he is also the owner of the ground where the Opera House stands, and is treasurer of the Opera House Company. Mr. Schaefer was United in marriage in 1880, with Miss Kate Ludwig, of Eckley, this county, and there have been born unto them five children, viz.: Leona, Abraham, Henrietta, Katie and George Jr.

Henry SCHAEFER, proprietor of restaurant at No. 48 E. broad Street, Hazleton, was born at Ashland, Schuylkill County, July 12, 1862. He is the youngest in a family of six children born to John and Elizabeth (Dreshman) Schaefer, natives of Germany, who came to America and settled in Schuylkill County in 1854. Henry was reared and educated in the town of his birth, and at an early age, learned the cigar-maker’s trade. He worked at it thirteen years, the greater part of the time in Hazleton. In 1888, Mr. Schaefer opened his present place of business, and he has without exception the finest bar in the city of Hazleton, where is kept the choicest liquors and most fragrant cigars to be found in the region. Mr. Schaefer was United in marriage in December 1881, to Miss Minnie H. Ringleman, of Hazleton. Three children have been born to this union, namely: Alfred, Oscar and Raymond. Mr. Schaefer is a member of the I.O.R.M., Knights of the Mystic Chain, Jr. O.U.A.M., also of the Fire Company. The family attend the German Lutheran Church.

Thomas W. SCHAFFER, farmer, P.O. Weston, was born in Northampton County, Pa., march 5, 1834, a son of John Jacob and Mary (Webber) Schaffer, and is of German descent. He was reared in Bucks County, Pa., receiving his education in the common schools of same, also attending the Normal School at Quakertown, and afterward taught school sixteen terms. He was in the mercantile trade at Bethlehem ten years and also spent ten years in Schuylkill County, where he held the office of justice of the peace in North Union Township, and engaged in farming. He was twice married. His first wife was Lydia A., daughter of Samuel Haring, and by her he had one daughter, Rose A. (Mrs. Brunner). His second wife was Lydia Ann, daughter of John Johnson, by whom he has four children: John Jacob, James M. Cora E. and Sadie A. Mr. Scahffer is a member of the Lutheran Church and I.O.O.F. In politics he is a Democrat, and is at present serving his first term as supervisor of Black Creek Township, and he has also served as justice of the peace since 1889.

Michael SCHAPPERT, butcher, Hanover Township was born in Bavaria, Germany, February 17, 1842, a son of Anthony and Margaret (Rhinehart) Schappert. The father, who was a hotelkeeper, reared a family of eleven children, nine of whom are living. The family after coming to America, in 1854, located in Newtown, where the parents died. Our subject was educated in Germany and America, and at an early age picked slate in the breaker for two summers. He then learned the trade which he has since followed, and has been in business for himself since 1867. At present he occupies the old homestead, and in 1890 built the "Newtown House" which he still owns. January 14, 1866, Mr. Schappert married Miss Amanda, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Hoakrider) Smolder, natives of Germany, and by her had nine children, six of whom are living, viz.: Catherine (Mrs. Nicholas Knauper), Mary, Matilda, Margaret, Elizabeth and Michael. Mr. Schappert and his family are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a Democrat in his political views.

Peter SCHAPPERT, proprietor of "Schappert’s Hotel," Wilkes-Barre was born in Bavaria, Germany, April 30, 1840, a son of Anthony and Margaret (Reinhart) Schappert. His parents came to America in 1854, and settled in Wilkes-Barre, but removed to Hanover Township, and the father, who was a merchant, resided in Luzerne County until his death. Their children were eleven: Anthony, John, Catherine (Mrs. Anthony Reber), Henry, Joseph, Elizabeth (Mrs. John Schaab), Margaret (Mrs. Adam Scheidel), Jacob, Peter, Michael and George. Our subject was reared in Wilkes-Barre from fourteen years of age, and embarked in the hotel business in 1866, a business that he has successfully continued. He has been the popular proprietor of his present hotel since 1885. October 6, 1864, Mr. Schappert married Miss Sophia, daughter of Peter and Catherine (Thom) Smith, of Wilkes-Barre, and of this union have been born six children: Amelia (Mrs. Fred Stegmaier), Lavina, Peter, Emma, Louis and Louisa. Mr. Schappert is a member of the Catholic Church, and in politics is a Democrat.

Jacob M. SCHAPPERT, coal operator, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Hanover Township, this county, June 29, 1864, and is a son of Jacob and Margaret (Beline) Schappert. His maternal grandparent, Thomas Beline, a native of Germany, was for some years manager of the late Judge Conyngham's farm in Wilkes-Barre, now comprising Derr’s addition to the city, and afterward purchased a farm in Jackson Township, where he died. His father located in Wilkes-Barre in 1854. For twenty-eight years, he was associated with Conyngham & Paine (now Conyngham, Schrage & Co.) as clerk, manager, and as a member of the firm, and since April 1891, has been in the grocery business for himself. His children numbered seven, six of whom are living: Lucy (Mrs. John C. Hessa), Jacob M., Amanda (Mrs. John Kaschenbach), Emma (Mrs. Henry Kosek), Frank and George. Our subject was reared in Wilkes-Barre, and educated in private and German schools, graduating at fourteen years of age. For several years thereafter he was clerk and assistant bookkeeper of C.M. Conyngham, Esq.’ From December, 1886 until 1891, he was assistant clerk and deputy register of wills for Orphan’s’ Court, since which time he has been engaged in mining and coal operating. October 19, 1887, Mr. Schappert married Miss Margaret, daughter of John E. and Susannah (Slater) Kirkhuff, of East Mauch Chunk, Pa. Mr. Schappert is a member of the Catholic Church, while his wife is a Methodist. Politically, he is an independent Democrat.

Justus SCHAUB, builder and general lumber dealer, Hazleton, was born September 6, 1851, in Germany. He came to America at the age of fifteen, and located in Hazleton, Luzerne County, where he has resided ever since. After working one year at the breaker, he commenced the carpenter’s trade. In 1883, he embarked in business for himself as builder and lumber dealer, and has carried it on successfully to the present day. Politically, Mr. Schaub is a Democrat.

Harry SCHEIDEL, proprietor of the "Commercial Hotel", Wilkes-Barre, was born in that city, October 16, 1857, a son of Adam and Margaret (Schappert) Scheidel, natives of Bravura, Germany. The father was a carpenter by trade, for eighteen years was in business as a contractor and a builder, and for eleven year engaged in farming in Jackson Township, this county, the mother, a daughter of Anthony and Margaret (Reinhart) Schappert, who settled in Wilkes-Barre in 1854. Their family consisted of fourteen children, ten of whom survive: harry, Margaret, (Mrs. Adam Gabel), Peter, Cassie, Joseph, George, Lucy, Lizzie, Adam, and Fred. Our subject was reared in Luzerne County, and educated in the public schools. He learned the carpenter’s trade with his father, and followed it eight years. Later he served as clerk in a hotel three years and eight months, next kept the "Windsor Hotel," Pittston, one year and ten months; has been in the hotel business in Wilkes-Barre since 1882, and proprietor of the "Commercial" since April, 1891. In 1880 Mr. Scheidel married Miss Carrie, daughter of F.X. Blessing, of Reading, Pa., and has five children, living: Francis, Mary, Agnes, Katie, and Adam. Our subject is a member of the Catholic Church, and in politics is a democrat.

H.A. SCHEIDY, general merchant, Butler Township, P.O. Saint John’s, was born December 25, 1843, near where he now resides. He is a son of John and Elizabeth (Beaner) Scheidy, the former a native of Butler Township, born in 1809, and died in 1869. He was engaged in farming and lumbering during his entire life. His father came to Butler Valley from Berks County in 1792 and died there at the age of seventy-five. Elizabeth Benner was born in Lancaster County, this State, in 1814 and died in 1890. Her parents were of English origin. Mr. Scheidy is one in a family of nine children, seven of whom are living. He was reared and educated in Butler Valley, and worked with his father until he reached the age of twenty-three years, when he went to Hazleton, where he remained three years. He then returned to Butler Valley, and worked with his father until he reached the age of twenty-three years, when he went to Hazleton, where he remained three years. He then returned to Butler Valley, and worked with his father until he reached the age of twenty-three years, when he went to Hazleton, where he remained three years. He then returned to Butler Valley, and was engaged in farming two years. He then engaged in the mercantile business, which he has since followed. He has also been engaged in the mercantile business, which he has sine followed. He has also been in the real estate business and has devoted much of his time in lumbering. Mr. Scheidy was married in 1878, to Miss Della, the accomplished daughter of the late George Hughes, of Hughesville, (now saint John’s); Mr. Hughes died July 23, 1892, at the age of eighty-two years. He was one of the oldest and most highly respected citizens of the Valley. Mr. and Mrs. Scheidy have born to them one child, Florence, a bright seven-year-old daughter. The family are members of the Reformed Church, in politics he is a Democrat.

August SCHENCH, foreman, Hazleton, was born in the Kingdom of Saxony, Germany, June 25, 1847, and is a son of Andrew and Elizabeth (Craup) Schench, also natives of Germany. Our subject, who is the youngest child in a family of three, was educated and reared in Germany, and at the age of eighteen, came to this country, locating at Hazleton, Pa., where he worked as a carpenter for A. Pardee & Company, continuing in their employ for several years. He then did contracting and building on his own account for six years. He then did contracting and building on his own account for six years, retiring at the end of that period to his old position. In 1882, he was given charge of a large force of men who are engaged in stripping for coal. He was first untied in marriage, July 4, 1869, with Martha Heckroth, of Hazleton. Five children were born to this marriage, namely: henry, Lizzie, August, Willie and Albert, of whom August was killed by a locomotive at the stripping August 18, 1892. The mother of this family died May 5, 1882 and Mr. Schench was married, November 7, 1886, to Miss Catherine Buchenan, of Hazleton, Pa., by which union have been born two children, Kate and Rose. In politics Mr. Schench reserves the right to vote for the best man, and in church matters he stands with the German Lutheran Brethren. He is a member of the following orders: Godd Brothers, I.O.O.F., and Knights of the Mystic Chain. He is assistant chief of the Fire Department, chairman of the team committee of the Fire Department, and is a member of the Hazleton Liberty Band.

Jacob W. SCHILLING, Wilkes-Barre, conductor, Philadelphia & Reading Railroad System was born in Wilkes-Barre, November 12, 1848, a son of Joseph and Susan (Hutmaker) Shilling. His father was a native of Bavaria, Germany, a son of Jacob Schilling and coming to America in 1854, settled in Wilkes-Barre, where he was engaged as a contractor and builder until his death, which occurred January 14, 1876, his mother, a daughter of Jacob and Dolly (Siglin) Hutmaker, of Ransom Township, Luzerne (now Lackawanna) County, Pa. Their family consisted of twelve children of whom five survive: Dollie (Mrs. William H. Hofford), Jacob W., Katie (Mrs. Philip Huntzman), Thomas E., and Sarah F. Our subject was reared in his native city, educated in the public schools and St. Vincent’s College, Lathrope Pa. He worked two years at the carpenter’s trade with his father, and began life as a clerk. Later, he was employed as brakeman for the Lehigh Valley Railroad for six years, fireman seven months, and since 1886 as conductor. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., Jr. O.U.A.M., William J. Byers’ Council, Number 282, of Wilkes-Barre. Politically he is a democrat.

Karl SCHIMPFF, pianist and teacher, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Scranton, Pa., September 28, 1862, a son of Jacob, Sr., and Caroline (Robinson) Schimpff, natives of Germany, who settled in Scranton in 1861. Our subject was reared in his native city, where he received a public-school education. At quite an early age he displayed a remarkable aptitude for music, and when he was twelve years old he play a number of difficult pieces on the piano; at sixteen he decided to make music his profession, and went to the home of his uncle J.B. Schimpff, in Germany, with whom he obtained elementary instructions in harmony and qualified himself for the celebrated Stuttgart Conservatory of Music. Mr. Schimpff’s progress at the Conservatory was rapid and thorough, and in the year 1881, at a concert given in honor of the King of Wurtemberg, he was honored with a place on the programme, and the Tagblatt, in the course of a critical notice of the entertainment, said of him, that he was not only a well-instructed pupil, but that "his playing and fine execution revealed the coming artist." This was high praise indeed, form a source so scrupulous, and in a newspaper that prided itself on not being over prodigal with its compliments. Mr. Schimpff’s diploma shows that his course at the Conservatory was eminently successful. He has in his possession letters of which any artist might be proud, from the following eminent masters of Germany: Professor Dr. Wilhelm Krueger, pianist to the court of Wurtemberg. Mr. Schimpff settled in Scranton in 1882, and removed to Wilkes-Barre in 1891. Upon this removal the Scranton Truth had the following to say: "Karl Schimpff, Scranton’s talented young pianist, has removed his studio to Wilkes-Barre, and is comfortably located in a pleasant suite of rooms in the Hollenback Coal Exchange, corner of River and West Market Streets. In making this change Mr. Schimpff has yielded to special inducements of a most favorable character. Without diminishing his income he has more time that he can call his own, and which he is anxious to apply to study. Scrantontians will wish Mr. Schimpff abundant success in his new filed. He is an accomplished artist, and has created a decided taste for classical music in this community. The Truth regrets his departure from Scranton, but will be pleased to learn of his progress wherever he goes. The music loving people of Wilkes-Barre are to be congratulated upon Mr. Schimpff’s removal to that city." Mr. Schimpff is greatly appreciated in Wilkes-Barre, where he has a class of enthusiastic young ladies and last year gave a series of six pianoforte recitals with pronounced success before the most refined and cultured people of the place. At these delightful musicales, Mr. Schimpff played from memory nearly one hundred compositions of classic and modern piano literature. His success as a teacher has been remarkable.

Fred SCHLEPPY, foreman, Lattimer Mines. This promising and enterprising young gentleman was born at Drum’s, Pa., June 1, 1865, the youngest of the seven children of Abram and Elizabeth Schleppy, early settlers in Butler Valley. Mr. Schleppy was reared and educated in his native town, and at the age of eleven years he began work in the mines in the summer months, attending school during the winter. He did general work about the mines until 1886, when he entered the breaker as screen-boss, remaining for about six months. He again entered the mines, continuing there until 1888, at which time he was given charge of the gang at nos. 1 and 2 Lattimer Mines, where has charge of fifty men and two stream shovels. March 4, 1884, Mr. Schleppy married Miss Hattie, daughter of James and Marie (henry) Green, natives of Luzerne County, and of this union have been born three children, viz.: Earl, Garnet, and Leon H. In political matters our subject is a decided Democrat, and he is a member of the P.O.S. of A.

Carl F. SCHMITT, teacher of music, was born in Wilkes-Barre, January 29, 1867, and is a son of Fred G. and Charlotte (Rittersbacher) Schmitt. His father, who was a native of Germany, was a machinist by trade, and came to America in 1861. He was a native of Germany, was a machinist by trade, and came to America in 1861. He was a volunteer in the Civil War, was a member of the Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry. He has been chief bookkeeper of the Vulcan Iron Works since 1867, and treasurer of the same since 1890. His wife was a daughter of Jacob and Margaret (Habelt) Rittersbacher, also natives of Germany, who settled in Wilkes-Barre in the "thirties". The children of Fred G. Schmitt were four in number: Carl F., Julius (deceased), Frieda (deceased) and Fred. Our subject’s paternal grandfather, Carl Anton Schmitt, was a soldier under Napoleon the great, and participated in all his campaigns. Carl F. Schmitt was reared in his native city, educated in the public schools, and received his musical education at the Royal Conservatory of Music, Leipzig, Germany, where he was graduated in 1888. In September of same year he began his career as a teacher of vocal and instrumental music, in Wilkes-Barre, and is one of the most successful teachers in the city. He is the organist of the First M. E. Church, a member of the Concordia Musical Society, and in politics is a Republican. On August 17, 1892, Mr. Schmitt married Miss Mary E. Coddington, youngest daughter of John and Susan (Keller) Coddington, the former of whom was of French-English descent, the latter’s parents being of Pennsylvania German descent. Mrs. Schmitt is a graduate of the Mansfield (Pa.) State Normal School, class of 90; a member of St. Stephen’s Protestant Episcopal Church, and was, until her marriage, a teacher in the public schools of Wilkes-Barre. She was born August 14, 1872, in Wilkes-Barre.

JOHN A. SCHMITT, stone and brick contractor, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Oberkirchen, Prussia, August 15, 1848, and is a son of Jacob and Barbara (Forve) Schmitt, who came to America in 1852, and in April of the same year settled in Wilkes-Barre, where the father still resides. The latter was a stone-cutter and stone-mason by trade, and for many years was engaged as a contractor in Wilkes-Barre. He was the father of six children who grew to maturity, viz.: John A., Peter, Jacob, Otto J. (deceased), Henry H. and Nicholas. Our subject was reared in Wilkes-Barre from four years of age, and received a limited education in the public schools. He is a stone-mason, stone-cutter and brick-layer by trade, which he has followed for twelve years; since 1878 he has done an extensive business as a con-tractor of stone and brick work, and among the principal buildings he has erected in Wilkes-Barre may be mentioned the First M. E. church, St. Nicholas Catholic church, Hollenback Coal Exchange, the Anthracite Building, the Loomis block, Y. M. C. A. building, and many others. Mr. Schmitt was married October 15, 1874, to Victoria Kenly, step-daughter of Mr. Martin Ruf, of Wilkes-Barre, and has eight children: P. John, Mary B., Mathias, Otto (deceased), Frank, Elizabeth, Frederick, and Lena (deceased). He is a member of the Catholic Church, and in politics, is a Republican.

OSCAR WILLIAM SCHNELL, foreman of the Delaware & Hudson Colliery, No. 3, Plymouth. Coal mining has at the present day reached such a stage of develop-ment, and has been systemized to so great an extent, that in selecting a man to oversee and superintend the intricate workings of a mine with all its appurtenances, it is necessary to chose one who not only has practical experience, but who has theoretical knowledge as well, and the young man whose name opens this sketch belongs to that class. He was born at Berwick, Pa., April 9, 1860, and is the fourth in the family of six children of Augustus and Wilhelmina (Kroeller) Schnell, natives of Dillenburg, Germany. The father emigrated to this country from Ger-many in 1848, locating at Philadelphia, where he remained but a short time, after-ward coming to Berwick, Pa, where he was interested in a paper-mill. Here he remained four years, at the end of which time he came to Plymouth, where he took charge, as outside superintendent, of the Old Grand Tunnel Mine, then operated by W. L. Lance. Afterward he was outside superintendent at the Lance Colliery (now the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre No. 11), until 1870, when he assumed charge of the Fuller Shaft, remaing there nine years. In 1854 Mr. Schnell was married at Philadelphia to Wilhelmina, daughter of Earnest D. and Louisa Kroeller, natives of Germany, and six children were born of this marriage, viz.: Emma H., now Mrs. Fred Hedrich, of Scranton; Julia J., a teacher in the Plymouth schools; August L.; Oscar W.; Lizzie H., wife of Charles Keller, Wilkes-Barre, and William L., deceased. The father of this family died June 6, 1886, and Oscar W. is living with and caring for his aged and respected mother. he was educated in the public schools of his native town, and at an early age of eight years began life as a slate-picker, which occupation he followed four years. From the age of twelve to seventeen he did nearly all kinds of outside work connected with mining, and at that age took charge of a stationary engine, which he ran until 1883, when he went on the repair corps for a short time. In 1884 he accepted the position as weigh-master, which he held until 1889, when his promotion to foreman took place, which position he has since occupied. There are employed 125 men and boys outside at this colliery, and there are mined on an average 1,000 tons daily, hoisted from a depth of 350 feet. In politics Oscar W. Schnell, like his father before him, is a Democrat. The family attend the Presbyterian Church.

HENRY N. SCHOOLEY, miller, Luzerne. This gentleman was born in Wyoming, March 4, 1842, and is a son of Jediah and Cornelia (Belding) Schooley, the mother a native of Canandaigua, N.Y., and the father, of Warren county, N. J. The latter was one of the early settlers in the Valley, and at one time owned a large powder-mill in this vicinity. He died in 1848, his wife in 1863. Mr. Schooley was edu-cated in Luzerne county, and lived with J. Sharp from 1848 until April 24, 1861, when he became apprenticed to David Polen for the purpose of learning the black-smith's trade. After completing his apprenticeship in 1864, when he accepted a position as clerk in a sutler's store, where his service continued until April 10, 1865, when he engaged in the oil business at Pit Hole City, Pa. This he discontin-ued the following autumn, one once more became a member of the Sharp family, where he remained and took a business course at the Commercial College at Kingston, from which he was graduated April 1, 1866. In May, the same year, he was employed by the East Boston Coal company in the weighing office and as fireman, but subsequently took charge of the mines as outside foreman, a position which he filled until July, 1871, when he purchased the mill property formerly owned by John Bartholomew. He continued business there until July, 1891, when he pur-chased the David Atherholt property, where he is now doing a prosperous business. Mr. Schooley was married September 3, 1867, to Miss Mary, daughter of George and Rhoda (Lamareaux) Snyder, natives of New Jersey, and has three children living and one dead: Eugene R., the eldest, is in partnership with his father; Newell died November 8, 1877; Stanley is at present taking a course at the Wyoming Semi-nary; and Edna is aged three years. Mr. Schooley is a stanch Republican; a member of the Presbyterian Church; and is a Freemason.

JACOB SCHOOLEY, lumberman, Cease's Mills, was born in New York, May 16, 1847. He is a son of Peter P. and Sarah E. (Sickler) Schooley, the former born in New Jersey in 1812, the latter in Exeter [twp], Wyoming county, Pa. Peter P. is a son of Nathaniel Schooley, who moved from New Jersey to this county about 1813, locating in Carverton, where he successfully engaged in farming. He reared a family of eight children, all of whom grew to maturity. Jacob, the subject of this sketch, is the sixth in the family, and was reared in this township and educated at the common schools. Mr. Schooley had but limited educational advantages, and may be classed among our self-educated men. He always confined himself to the lumber business, learned the sawyer's trade by actual experience in his business, and is proficient in the manufacture of lumber, shingles, etc. In 1878 he built a sawmill on Harvey's creek, about four miles north of Nanticoke, where he has facilities for turning out 5,000 feet of lumber and 5,000 shingles, and can plane 3,000 feet of flooring per day. He also manufactures fence pickets and lath. Mr. Schooley is a man of push and energy, who, by patient application of business prin-ciples to his lumber trade, has built for himself not only a large trade, but also a reputation for honesty and industry. On August 12, 1871, he married Miss Liva, daughter of Samuel and Sarah McKeel, by whom he has three children, all of whom are living. Mr. Schooley and wife are members, in good standing, of the Baptist Church.

JESSE B. SCHOOLEY, who was in his lifetime a prominent citizen and coal operator of Wyoming borough, was born April 1, 1811, a son of Joseph P. and Margaret (Barber) Schooley, natives of Greenwich, Warren Co., N. J. They came to this county in April 1918, and purchased a large farm at Wyoming (then called New Troy); the father was born August 17, 1785, in New Jersey, and educated in the common schools. He was married, December 12, 1809, to Miss Margaret Barber, and they reared a family of nine children, viz.: Jesse B. (our subject), Jediah (deceased), Mary Ann (deceased), William (deceased), Elizabeth (Mrs. J. S. Carpenter, of West Pittston), Mehitable (deceased), Joanna (a maiden lady of West Pittston; she was born July 3, 1823, educated in the common schools, and a few years after the death of her father, built her cozy home at the corner of Wyoming avenue and Warren street, West Pittston, where she has since resided), Joseph P. (deceased) and Margaret (deceased). Joseph P. Schooley was a son of Jediah, a grandson of John, who came from Lancashire, England, about 1700, and settled in Sussex county, N. J.; Joseph was a man of many sterling qualities, and was greatly missed after his death, which occurred January 28, 1875. Our subject was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools, and at an early age, learned the carpenter's trade, then engaged in boating on the Morris & Essex Canal for a short time. He then became a merchant at Wyoming and later at Pittston; he was also largely interested in the coal works at Pittston. Mr. Schooley was married February 20, 1838, to Eliza J. Breese; they reared a family of eight children, three of whom are living, viz.: Joseph P., Jessie B., and James M. Mr. Schooley died December 15, 1884.

Jesse B SCHOOLEY, a prominent resident of Wyoming Borough was born March 20, 1854, and is a son of Jesse B. and Eliza J. (Breese) Schooley, natives of Pennsyl-vania, and of English origin. They reared a family of eight children, three of whom are living. Our subject, who is seventh in order of birth, was educated in the common schools and at the Wyoming Seminary. At the death of his father, which occurred in 1884, he purchased the homestead from his mother and brothers, and has since devoted himself to the management of his general business interests in and about Wyoming. He was married, November 4, 1884, to Miss Minnie E., daughter of C. Martin and Marie Steel, which union was blessed with two children, viz.: Arthur B., born April 26, 1886, and Allan D., born July 9, 1890, died August 18, 1892.

James M SCHOOLEY, a prominent property owner of Wyoming borough, was born March 7, 1857, at Wyoming, His parents Jesse B. and Eliza J. (Bresse) Schooley natives of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, respectively, and of English origin reared eight children, three of whom are now living. Our subject is the youngest of the family in order of birth. He was educated in the common schools and Wyoming Seminary, and since the death of his father which occurred December 15, 1884, has given his entire life to the management of his portion of the large estate which he left. He was married November 2, 1881, to Helen M., daughter of John D and Rebecca (Herberling) Hopper, natives of Pennsylvania, and of English and German origins respectively. Mr. Hooper was foreman of the Delaware Lackawanna & Western Cars Shops at Kingston, where he resided. Mr. and Mrs. Schooled attend the Presbyterian Church at Wyoming. Mr. Schooley owned a large portion of the coal lands of his section; he is a strong Republican in politics, and has the love and respect of all that know him.

Christian A SCHOOLEY, farmer P. O. Truckville, was born April 9, 1826, reared and educated in Kingston Township. He is a son of Isaac and Catherine (Atherholt) Schooley, the former a native of New Jersey, the latter of Buck’s county Pa. Isaac was a son of Nathaniel who moved from Schooley’s Mountain N. J. to Franklin Township, Luzerne County. He owned 100acreas of land which is no the property of the De Witts. Nathaniel Schooley was a wagon and patternmaker by occupation, and a man of large experience, whom influence was felt and sought after. He reared a family of ten children of whom are now living Isaac Schooley began his life on the Kingston Mountain, where his son William C. now resides. His farm comprised 130 acres, to which he added fifty more; he also owned a fifty-acre lot in another place, the latter being timberland. He possessed considerable genius being a mechanic by nature and practice, and following the trade of wagon-maker. He was a man of sound principles and sterling qualities, and had a large share of common sense. By his labor and directions he succeeded in clearing a farm of 120 acres. He reared a family of seven children five of whom are now (1892) living. Christian A. is the second of the family in order of birth, and has always followed agricultural pursuits. He resided at home till he reached his twenty-seventh year, when, March 31, 1853, he married Miss Sarah daughter of Joseph and Fanny Wilcox by whom he has had nine children, seven of whom are now living: Elizabeth, Marvin L., Ruben L., George, Mary, Ezra, and Ida. In 1853 Mr. Schooley removed from the old homestead to his present farm comprising Fifty-six acres. He is a practical farmer, doing with his might whatsoever his hands find to do, and doing it well. He is a Christian in religious faith, a Democrat politically, and a perfect gentleman in the true sense of this word.

W. C. SCHOOLEY, farmer, P. o. Carverton, was born in Kingston township, December 28, 1834. He is son of Isaac and Catharine (Atherholt) Schooley, the former born in Morris county, Pa., N. J., on what is known as Schooley's Mountain, July 25, 1796, the latter in Bucks county, December 28, 1799. They removed to this county about 1826, locating in Kingston township, north of Luzerne borough, on 120 acres of land, to which they added fifty more. This land was unimproved when Mr. Schooley located on it; during his lifetime he brought under cultivation about fifty acres, showing himself to be a hard-working and industrious man. He was a man of some political influence, and believed in the principles of the Democratic party. He lived to be seventy-six years of age, and died in 1878, being followed by his widow, Catherine, on May 8, 1882. Their family consisted of seven children, five of whom are now living. William C. is the fourth of the family, and has always confined himself to agricultural pursuits. He and his brother George live on the old homestead, which they work in partnership. They are both practical farmers and excellent neighbors. The condition of their farm shows taste and refinement in the minds which guide the working of the place. W. C. is a single man, preferring single blessedness to a life in wedlock. He is a man of marked ability and sound judgment, whose influence is felt in his own and adjacent localities. He has been chosen school director, and gives much attention to educational matters; he was treasurer of the board for eight years. He has also been township treasurer. George is the sixth in the family, born July 20, 1835, and has always lived at home and worked with his brother hand to hand, shoulder to shoulder. On February 11, 1866, he married Miss Mary E., daughter of Charles and Jane A. Shafer, to which union have been born two daughters: Kate A. and Estella J., both living at home. Mrs. Mary A. Schooley was born in Kingston township. Politically they are both Democrats.

JOHN F. SCHREINER, proprietor of "Schreiner's Hotel," Wilkes Barre, was born in Baden, Germany, February 20, 1846, a son of John F. and Barbara (Hansser) Schreiner. He was reared and educated in Germany, where he learned the cooper's and brewer's trades, and followed those occupations there until 1870, when he came to America, and worked at his trades in New Jersey and in New York City until 1872. He then located in Wilkes Barre, where he has since resided. For thirteen years he was in the employ of Charles Stegmaier, and for one year with Reichard & Company. In 1885 he embarked in the hotel business, in which (with the exception of one year) he has since successfully continued. On February 4, 1874, he married Catherine Niedermier, of Wilkes Barre, formerly of Germany. He has an adopted daughter, Kate. Mr. Schreiner is a member of the Lutheran Church, his wife of the Catholic Church. He is a member of the K. of P., I.O.R.M. and Harugari; in politics he is independent.

HERMAN SCHROEDER, butcher, Luzerne, was born in Germany April 4, 1858. He came to this country in 1874, locating at Plymouth, Luzerne Co., Pa., where he engaged in mining, which occupation he followed six months. He then journeyed to Beaver Run, where he was engaged in farming for six years, at the end of which time he removed to Wilkes Barre, this county, where he entered the employ of Mr. Reichard, with whom he remained several years, coming subsequently to Luzerne, where he opened a meat market, and has since been serving the people of the place and neighborhood with all the delicacies to be found in his line. Mr. Schroeder is a member of the Lutheran Church, of the I.O.O.F. and I.O.R.M.; politically he is a stanch follower of the Democratic party.

CHARLES C. SCHULTZ, farmer and lumberman, Fairmount township, P. O. Fairmount Springs, was born in Columbia county, Pa., November 24, 1863, and is a son of Elisha and Mary (Wolf) Schultz, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German origin. The father, who was a farmer and carpenter by occupation, departed this life December 10, 1875, aged fifty-one years. Our subject, who is the youngest in a family of six children, four of whom are living, was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and when fourteen years of age went to work for an uncle, with whom he remained two years; then went to live with a brother, working summers and going to school winters, until he was twenty years of age. At that time he and I. N. Harrison rented a farm, and worked the same for two years, when our subject entered into partnership with Mr. Harrison in the lumber business, in which he is doing business to-day. In 1888 he purchased his home, situated two miles southeast of Fairmount Springs postoffice, and containing eighteen and one-half acres. Mr. Schultz was married December 31, 1885, to Miss Mary E., daughter of Isaiah and Lottie (Lutz) Harrison, which union has been blessed with one child, Ray, born August 13, 1888. Mr. Schultz is one of the sound young men of his section, and politically he is a Republican.

FRED J. SCHWAB, a prominent tobacconist, of Wilkes Barre, was born at Birkenfeld, near Bingen-on-the-Rhine, Germany, August 1, 1835, a son of Carl and Dorothea (Schummer) Schwab. He was reared and educated in his native country, where he served an apprenticeship of two and one-half years at the trade of tobacconist. On November 5, 1854, he landed in New York, after a voyage of thirty-five days, and came to Scranton, Pa., where he remained four months. He then located in Wilkes Barre, this county, and here worked at his trade three years, at the end of which time he removed to Tunkhannock, and embarked in business on his own account, remaining there three years. In 1861 he returned to Wilkes Barre, where he has since conducted a successful tobacco business, and since 1865 has been located at his present stand on South Main street. In 1857 Mr. Schwab married Elizabeth, daughter of Nicholas and Mary M. (Baab) Goerlitz, of Wilkes Barre, and has four children: Jacob A., Mary F., John N. and Charles F. He is a member of the German Lutheran Church, and of the F.& A.M.; politically he is a Democrat.

MATHIAS SCHWABE, butcher and drover, South Heberton, P. O. Freeland. This gentleman stands in the front rank of business enterprise of Luzerne county. He is a native of Prussia, born October 4, 1849. At the age of twenty he came to America, and located in Lehighton, Pa., where he remained about one year, when he removed to South Heberton, and has since made butchering and droving the chief occupation of his life; he carries on an extensive traffic in this line, handling about forty head of cattle per week. To give an estimate of the amount of business he does, we can state that during the year of 1890 his books show over $187,000 worth of business transactions. He is also interested in real estate, owning the old Dunop homestead in Freeland, and over twenty-five tenement houses. Mr. Schwabe is a lover of blooded horses, and does a great deal of horse dealing, sometimes buying blooded horses by the carload. He is a man who never hesitates to support any worthy public enterprise. Mr. Schwabe was married in 1871 to Miss Margaret Sophia Landmesser, and to this union have been born five children, viz.: George, Francis, Gertrude, Emile and Matilda. In politics our subject is a Republican, but is not bound by party lines and prejudices.

ALEXANDER SCHWARZ, chiropodist, and proprietor of Russian and Turkish baths, Wilkes Barre, was born in Germany, June 24, 1858, and is a son of Louis and Frederica (Alexander) Schwarz. He was educated at the Gymnasium College, Germany, and immigrated to America in 1873, locating in New York City, where he worked at the barber's trade two years. On January 5, 1876, he came to Wilkes Barre, and here followed his trade until September, 1878, at which time he opened a barber shop with but very little capital, and by his courteous manners and recognized skill has built the finest and largest trade in the city. In 1879 he revisited Germany and brought his parents to America. Soon afterward he rented and stocked a store at Nanticoke for them, where they are now living. In 1889 he went to New York, where he studied chiropody at the Lafayette Turkish baths, having for his instructor Professor Levy, and then returned to Wilkes Barre, and on February 1, 1890, opened Turkish bath rooms, which are the largest and best in northern Pennsylvania. Mr. Schwarz was united in marriage, May 5, 1886, with Lillie, daughter of David and Amelia (Rossman) Davidsburg, who are of German descent, and to this union was born one child, Ralph D., now (1892) aged five years. Mr. and Mrs. Schwarz are members of the Jewish Synagogue. He is a member of the B.P.O.E., Y.M.H.A. and K. of H.

HORACE SCHWEPPENHEISER, dealer in flour, feed, grain, hay, etc., Hazleton, was born at Mifflinville July 15, 1836, and is a son of John J. and Rebecca (Sutton) Schweppenheiser, who settled in Mifflinville at the time when the primeval forest stood in the vicinity, and when wild animals prowled within view of the homestead. They suffered many hardships, and their entire existence was one of rigorous self-denial. The subject of this sketch was the youngest in a family of nine children. He was reared and educated in Columbia county, and followed the occupation of a farmer until 1876, when he came to Hazleton and established his present business. He was united in marriage, December 31, 1860, with Miss Frances C., daughter of Reuben and Lydia (Longringberger) Seybert, natives of Pennsylvania. To this union have been born two children, namely: Lydia Eudora and John Melvin. In politics Mr. Schweppenheiser sympathizes with the Democratic party; the family attend the German Lutheran Church. As a business man, Mr. Schweppenheiser has the best facilities for obtaining supplies, and he is known to be trustworthy and honorable in all his dealings.

MRS. CATHERINE SCOTT, nurse, Plymouth, was born in Kingston, mary 14, 1837, and is a daughter of Stephen and Julia Ann Scott, both born in Connecticut and who, after their marriage, in that State, removed to Kingston, this county, about 1818. They were farmers of some skill and experience, who passed the remainder of their lives in this county. Mr. Scott was an honest and industrious man, diligently attending to the duties of his own farm. he died in 1855; his wife, Julia Ann, survives him, and is ninety-four years of age. Their family consisted of six children who are now living. Mrs. Scott, the third in a family, was rearedand educated in her native town, and was married, in 1857, to Andrew Pringle, by whom she had seven children, five of whom are living, viz.: John, Ellen, Samuel, Orange and Estella. Of these, John married Miss Regina Stires, and Ellen married Francis Randell; the others remain single. Mrs. Scott was divorced from her husband several years ago, the action having been commenced by her and sustained by the court. She has always had, and now bears, a name beyond reproach. She owns a house and lot, has raised her children, and carries on her business with marked ability. Though she has resumed her maiden name since her divorce she is better known by the name Pringle than Scott. She is a consistent member of the Christian Church of Plymouth.

J. W. SCOTT, farmer, P. O. Plains, was born in Wilkes Barre, August 25, 1851, and is a son of Frank and Martha (Williamson) Scott, natives of Ireland, who came to America in 1849, locating at Ashley, where they remained till 1859, and then removed to Wilkes Barre, where the father died in 1860. The family consisted of seven children, of whom four are now living, and of whom John W. is the eldest. At the age of fifteen our subject began working on a farm, where he remained four years, after which he was employed in the mines, running out cars; from 1871 to 1889 he was a full-fledged miner, and has since been employed on the truck farm of Evans Brothers, Plains. Mr. scott was married, April 23, 1871, to Alice A., daughter of John and Catherine (Heron) McNeal, of Shickshinny, and of Irish and Dutch origin, respectively. Mr. and Mrs. Scott have six children, viz.: Luella C., who was educated in the common schools and Wyoming Seminary, normal course, and is at present teaching at Plains; Frank L., who workes for Evans Brothers; Bessie M.; William H.; Burton G. and H. Lee. Our subject and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church; he is a member of the I.O.O.F. and the A.O.K. of M.C. His son, Frank L., is a member of the church, the A.O.K. of M.C., and the O.U.A.M.; Luella C. is a member of the church and of the Epworth League. Mr. Scott has always given his support to the Republican party.

JAMES R. SCOUTON, attorney at law, Wilkes Barre, was born at Elwell, Bradford Co., Pa., September 26, 1858, a son of William W. and Lura A. (Robinson) Scouton, and of New England origin. He was reared in his native town, and educated at Wyalusing, Camptown Collegiate Institute, Towanda, Wyoming Seminary, Kingston, Pa., and entered the law department of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, october, 1884, where he graduated and received the degree of Bachelor of Laws, July 2, 1886. He was then admitted to the bar of Washtenaw county, Mich., and immediately received a certificate entitling him to practice in the supreme court of that State. In September, 1886, he was admitted to the bar of Sullivan county, Pa., and in October, 1886, located at Wilkes Barre. he was admitted to the bar of Luzerne county, January 5, 1887, and has since continued to practice his profession in Wilkes Barre, where he first located for the purpose of ascertaining if it was a desirable locality, and has succeeded far beyond his expectations. Though taking no active part in politics, our subject has always been a stanch Republican. October 20, 1891, Mr. Scouton married Miss Mercy E. Brunges, of Tunkhannock, Wyoming Co., Pa., a daughter of Jacob and Rebecca Brunges, born in Eaton township, Wyoming county, December 20, 1862. She was educated at Tunkhannock graded school and at Kingston Seminary, and after graduating taught school several terms.

LOT SEARCH, retired, Reyburn, was born in Union township, May 4, 1815, son of William and Susan (Belles) Search, who were born in Hunlock Creek. William's father, also named William, located in Shickshinny, where he kept a hotel. He was an energetic man, and a good caterer, whose greatest desire was to please his patrons. He lived to be seventy years of age. His family consisted of five children, all of whom are dead. William Search began his business career as a farmer in Union townhsip where he owned 100 acres of land, seventy-five of which he cleared during his lifetime. He was a man of influence and held several township offices. Like his father he was a practical farmer, and lived to be sixty-eight years of age. His family consisted of eight children, of which Lot is the eldest. He was reared and educated in Union township coming hither when but one year old, and here he has since resided, a faithful citizen of the commonwealth. In 1836 he married Miss Catherine, daughter of Henry Craigle. There were six children born to them, three of whom are now living: F.D., Mary E. and Emma J. His farm consists of 100 acres, on which he raises a general crop. Mr. Search and his family are consistent members of the M. E. Church. His son, F. D., superintends the farm. He married Miss Rose Masters, who bore him six children, three of whom are living. Politically, Lot Search and his son are Democrats.

LOT SEARCH, miller, Shickshinny, was born in Union township, Luzerne Co., Pa., November 17, 1820, a son of Lot and Christiana (Fink) Search. His paternal grandfather, James Search, a son of William and Mary (McMasters) Search, was among the pioneers of Nescopeck; his wife was Elizabeth Moore. In later life he removed to what is now Hunlock township, where he died. His children were William, Polly (Mrs. George Miller), Margaret (Mrs. Jacob Miller), Rachel (Mrs. Silas Harvey) and Lot. The latter is said to have been the first white child born in Nescopeck township. he followed the blacksmith trade, and spent most of his life in Union township, where he died. His wife was a daughter of George Fink, of Union township, and his children were William, George, Lot, Ellen (Mrs. William Kremer), Christiana (Mrs. Jesse Wolf), Elizabeth (Mrs. A. C. Nicely) and Thomas. Lot Search Jr., was reared in Union township and educated in the common schools; at the age of sixteen he began work at a stone quarry near Shickshinny. He soon after became clerk in a general store, and when only nineteen years of age was made manager of a store at Beach Haven, Pa. Before attaining his majority he embarked in general merchandising with his brother, George W., a mile above Shickshinny; they conducted this business together for twelve years, after which he conducted it alone for eight years more. In 1855 he was elected treasurer of Luzerne county, serving his term of two years; during this period he, with others, purchased the site where Shickshinny now stands. In 1858 he embarked in the mercantile business in Shickshinny, continuing five years. In 1865, with his brother, George W., he erected the gristmill and sawmill in Shickshinny, which they have since conducted, and from 1869 to 1889 he also engaged in grain-raising; from 1848 to 1856 he was postmaster of Shickshinny. He was twice married; his first wife was Rosaline, daughter of James A. and Hannah (Wall) Gordon, of Wilkes Barre, and by her he had four children: Emily (Mrs. Warrick Miller), Mary B. (Mrs. W. B. Poust), Frances T. and Millennia D. His second wife was Elizabeth, daughter of Andrus Fellows, of Huntington township, by whom he has two children living: Florence (Mrs. Charles P. Campbell) and May. Mr. Search is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and in politics is a Democrat.

GEORGE W. SEARCH, miller, Shickshinny, was born in Union township, this county, December 6, 1816, a son of Lot and Christiana (Fink) Search. He was reared in Union township, educated in the common schools, and in early life followed teaching. Later he clerked in a general store, and in 1842 he embarked in general merchandising above Shickshinny, continuing in same until 1850. In 1851 he was appointed superintendent of the Pennsylvania Canal, between Northumberland and Lackawanna, and held the position nine years. In 1857, with his brother Lot and others, he purchased the present site of Shickshinny, laid it out in lots, and erected a gristmill which he and his brother Lot have since conducted; and from 1860 to 1888 he was also engaged in merchandising. In May, 1847, Mr. Search married Ann Eliza, daughter of John R. and Polly (Stuckey) Nicely, of Salem township, and has three children: Amanda (Mrs. Charles A. Boone), Hendrick W. and Florence A. (Mrs. Rev. Arthur Johnson). Mr. Search is a member of the Presbyterian Church and of the F. & A.M. In politics he is a Democrat.

HENDRICK WRIGHT SEARCH, Shickshinny, was born in Shickshinny, June 30, 1855, a son of George W. and Ann Eliza (Nicely) Search. He was reared in his native town, and educated in the public school, and for three years was clerk in the store of G. W. and L. Search. In 1882 he was appointed clerk of commissioners for Luzerne county, which office he held three years, and in 1885 was made assistant clerk of the Orphan's Court, which he filled two years. In 1886 he was elected sheriff of Luzerne county by a majority of2,808 running 1,000 votes ahead of his ticket; he served from January 1, 1887, to January 1, 1890, since when he has devoted his time to his private interests in Shickshinny and Florida, and the First National Bank of Nanticoke, of which he is vice-president. Mr. Search was married October 8, 1883, to Elizabeth M., daughter of Austin H. and Mary (Monroe) Church, and granddaughter of Judge Monroe, of Columbia county, Pa. By her he has four children: Ann E., Mary M., George A. and Hendrick M. Mr. Search was one of the organizers of the Shickshinny & Huntington Valley Railroad, of which he is treasurer and director. He is a member and trustee of the Presbyterian Church; a member of the F. & A.M. He was a delegate to the Democratic State Convention in 1882, 1886 and 1890, the National Convention held in St. Louis in 1888, and was alternate at the National Convention held in Chicago in 1892.

THOMAS R. SEARCH, P.O. Huntington Mills, was born in Union township, this county, February 9, 1864, and is a son of James and Sarah J. (Sorber) Search. His paternal grandfather was William Search, who was a son of Lot, who was a son of James, he being a son of William and Mary (McMasters) Search, pioneers of this county. The father of our subject is a farmer of Huntington township; his wife is a daughter of Andrew Sorber, and by her he has seven children: Rosa (Mrs. Hiram Cole), Thomas R., William H., Lillie M., Fred O., Clyde and Jessie. Our subject was reared in Union township, and educated in the common schools, and has, since attaining his majority, been engaged at various occupations. Since the spring of 1892 he has resided in Huntington township. He was married, May 21, 1887, to Cordelia H., daughter of DeWitt C. and Henrietta (Culver) Koons, of Fairmount township. They have two children, Harry K. and A. Leroy. In politics Mr. Search is a Democrat.

J. M. SEEBOLD, contractor, Luzerne, was born in Germany, September 19, 1832, and is a son of Andrew and Maria (Bratesner) Seebold, both of whom were born, reared and educated in Germany, where they passed their entire lives. John M. emigrated to this country in 1872, going first to Omaha, Neb., but neither the climate, nor the scenery, nor the society impressed him very favorably, and in six months he returned east and located in Nanticoke, where he resided one year, thence removing to Luzerne where he was engaged as miner for fourteen years. During this time, he laid up enough money to buy himself some property on which he built. He is a shrewd man of business, taking advantage of circumstances where it is honorable to do so. He soon began to build houses by contract, and although not a carpenter nor even a mechanic in any craft, yet he so conducted the business, that he prospered well in it. As he expresses it himself, he is Aa good figurer. He now owns three houses in Prindleville, one in Luzerne, and two in Wilkes-Barre. In May, 1863, Mr. Seebold was married, in Germany, to Miss Anna B. Meyers, and there were thirteen children born to this union, five of whom are now living: John S. (married to Miss Lula Blackman), Mary M., Leonard, Lizzie and Charles. Mr. Seebold is a very popular man in his township, and, at one time, was elected township treasurer, his limited knowledge of the English language, however, prevented his accepting it. During his mining experience, he met with many serious accidents, though none proved fatal. He and his family are members of the German Lutheran Church; he is a member of the K. of H., and politically is a Republican.

HENRY J. SEELY, farmer, P. O. Beach Haven, was born in Salem township, on the farm he now occupies, April 19, 1847, and is a son of Jacob and Leah (Keen) Seely. [See sketch of Philip H. Seely.] He was reared in Salem and Fairmount townships, has always followed farming as an occupation, has been a permanent resident of Salem since 1865, and occupies the old homestead of his maternal grandfather, Frederick Keen, which the latter cleared and improved. In August, 1868, he married Mary, daughter of Reuben and Lydia (Longenburger) Seybert, of Salem township, and has eight children: Reuben M., Anna H., Frederick E., Harry O., Ella E., J. Arthur, Ada M. and Francis M. Mr. Seely is a prominent farmer and citizen of Salem township; is a member of the German Lutheran Church; is a Republican in politics, and has held several offices in the township, at the present time serving his fifth consecutive year as school director.

PHILIP H. SEELY, farmer and justice of the peace, P. O. Beach Haven, was born in Salem township February 23, 1835, and is a son of Jacob and Leah (Keen) Seely. His paternal grandfather, John Seely, was a native of Penn township, Sussex Co., N. J., and a son of Michael Seely; both settled in Salem township in 1801. Michael was a farmer, and a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and had three sons--John, Samuel and Jacob--besides several daughters. John was a farmer, spent most of his life in Salem township, and died in 1833 in Fairmount township. He married Mary Weltz, and his children were five in number: Jacob, Desire (Mrs. Samuel Pollock), Elsie (Mrs. David Cope), Mary (Mrs. Henry Harmon) and Huldah (Mrs. Adam Driesbach). The father of our subject was the only son that grew to maturity, and was born in Salem township July 24, 1803. He cleared a farm, spent all his life in Salem township with the exception of ten years residence in Fairmount township, and died May 30, 1874. He married Leah, daughter of Frederick and Mary (Stump) Keen, of Salem township, by whom he had eleven children who grew to maturity: Frederick K., John W., Samuel P., Philip H., Edwin C., Martha A. (Mrs. Dr. J. E. Patterson), Rachel (Mrs. Thomas E. Edwards), Leah D. (Mrs. M. W. Hess), Henry J., Minerva J. (wife of Wilson Hess) and Cecelia E. (Mrs. C. B. Smithers). Our subject was reared in Salem township, educated in the common schools, and prior to 1876 was engaged in merchandising in Fairmount township, boating on canal, and also milling. Since 1876 he has been engaged in farming in Salem township. He was in the Civil war, having enlisted September 3, 1864, in Company D, One Hundred and Ninety-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was honorably discharged June 28, 1865. He married on July 4, 1876, Sarah E., daughter of Solomon and Mary (Bloss) Harmon, of Salem township, and has eight children: Jacob A., Bertha V., Mary A., Thomas K., Sarah M., Leah M., Philip H. and Martha H. Mr. Seely is an attendant of the Lutheran Church; he is a member of the F. & A. M., R. A. M., K. T. and G. A. R. He was a member of the Pennsylvania Legislature in 1881-82, and is now serving his second term as justice of the peace of Salem township; in politics he is a Republican.

SAMUEL P. SEELY, farmer, P. O. Beach Haven, was born in Salem township, this county, April 28, 1833, and is a son of Jacob and Leah (Keen) Seely. [See sketch of Philip H. Seely.] He was reared in Salem township, where, with the exception of six years, he has always resided, and has been principally engaged in farming. During the Civil war he was a member of Company F, One Hundred and Forty-ninth P. V., joining in August, 1862, was honorably discharged on account of disability, by special order of the War Department. On March 10, 1872, he married Mary E., daughter of William and Anna C. (Kline) Patterson, of Columbia county, Pa., and has four children: Millie, Mary, Leslie B. and Belva. Mr. Seely is a representative farmer of Salem township. He is a member of the P*resbyterian Church, and of the F. & A. M.; in politics he is a Republican.

GEORGE SEIWELL, foreman of the Reading Railroad, Hazleton division, Hazleton. This competent and experienced railroad man was born at the beautiful and picturesque ASwitzerland of America, Mauch Chunk, Pa., September 17, 1837, and is a son of Michael and Mary (Warner) Seiwell, natives of Carbon county. There were nine children born to Michael and Mary (Warner) Seiwell, George being the eldest. He was reared and educated in the Tomhicken Valley, and when yet a young man was engaged by the Lehigh Valley Railroad Company as foreman of a grading gang at Tomhicken, where he was employed for two years. He then became section boss for the same company, continuing with them in that capacity for eleven years. In 1880 he removed to Unionville, Mich., where he engaged in farming, which occupation he followed there seven years, after which he came to Hazleton and took charge of the floating gang for the Lehigh Valley Railroad, where he has since been employed. In 1861, Mr. Seiwell enlisted for three months in the Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and, at the expiration of his term, re-enlisted in what was known as the ABucktail regiment, serving there two years, during which time he was engaged in the fiercest battles of the Rebellion, such as Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Drainesville, and the Seven Days Fight before Richmond. At the fierce battle of Fredericksburg he was taken prisoner, and was never exchanged. Mr. Seiwell has been twice wedded, his first wife being Miss Sarah E., daughter of Michael and Catherine Clark, natives of Schuylkill county, Pa., and to this union were born seven children, viz.: Gertrude (deceased), William, Calvin, Robert H., Franklin, Jennie and Stanley. This wife dying, he was married, the second time, in 1890 to Catharine Zacharias, of Stroudsburg, Pa. In political matters our subject is a stanch Democrat; the family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church.

VALENTINE SEIWELL was born in Black Creek township, this county, November 2, 1844, a son of Michael and Mary Ann (Warner) Seiwell, who settled in Black Creek township about 1840, cleared and improved a farm and there died. Their children were George, Charles, Martin, Valentine, William, Jacob, Michael, Tobias and James. Of these, Jacob was scalded in a railroad wreck about eighteen years ago, and died a day or so after the accident. Our subject was reared in Black Creek township; spent twenty years at Leighton, Carbon Co., Pa., and in 1887 returned to Black Creek, where he passed the rest of his days. On October 2, 1892, he departed this life, his death being caused by an accident. He was loading a stone when he was struck with an iron bar with fatal results. His wife, Violetta, was a daughter of Daniel and Mary (Koehler) Rex, of Carbon county, Pa., and he had nine children: Mary, George, Lillie, Almira, Harry, Oliver, Laura, Howard and Garrett. Mr. Seiwell had been supervisor of Black Creek township, and at the time of his death was township treasurer. In politics he was a Democrat.

JAMES M. SENN, farmer, P. O. Conyngham, was born in Sugar Loaf township, this county, July 27, 1848, and is a son of John and Mary (Smith) Senn. The father, who was a native of Germany, came to America when about twelve years of age, and spent nine years at Beaver Meadows in the employ of a coal company. About 1845 he settled in Sugar Loaf township, where he engaged in farming, and died there August 18, 1870. His children were: James M., Amanda, Jane (Mrs. Miles Hufford), John S., Annie (Mrs. Charles Helt), Cyrus Y. and Ida (Mrs. Miles Shelheimer). Our subject was reared in Sugar Loaf township, where he has always resided. His wife was Marietta, daughter of John and Lydia (Musselman) Keim, of the same township, and he has two daughters, Caroline and Mary F. Mr. Senn is a prominent and enterprising farmer. In politics he is a Republican, and held the office of school director several terms.

MRS. ANGELINE SERFASS, P. O. Orange, was born March 9, 1833, in Franklin township, where she was reared and educated. She is a daughter of Stephen and Phebe Ann (Hallock) Lord, natives of this county, the former born in Franklin. The maternal grandfather of our subject was Peter Hallock, a captain in command of a band of soldiers who enlisted in the Wyoming Valley, he taking them to Quebec, in Canada; his wife (the maternal grandmother of Mrs. Angeline Serfass) was Miss Lavina Vail, who lived in Rochester and Poughkeepsie, N. Y., prior to coming to Pennsylvania. Peter Hallock died in 1838, his wife thirty years later. Stephen was a son of Alexander Lord, who was a soldier in the war of 1812, and did good service as a drummer. He was one of the early settlers of Franklin township; reared eight children, and lived to a good old age. His son Stephen lived on his fathers farm at Flat Rock until after his majority, when he moved to the farm, containing 116 acres, now occupied by his two sons, J. D. and Lyman, to which property he added ninety-four acres before he died. He was a skillful carpenter, and a successful man of business. He was married twice: First time to Miss Phebe Ann Hallock, by whom he had six children, and, secondly, to Miss Elizabeth De Witt, by whom he had five children; eight of his children are yet living. He died March 21, 1891, aged eighty years. Miss Phebe Ann Lord had passed away August 7, 1848. The subject proper of this sketch, when a young lady, was married to James Randall, by whom she had four children, all yet living: Amos, Rose, Mortimore and George. For her second husband she married Jonas Serfass, who was born May 18, 1824, in Polk township, Monroe, Pa., where he was reared and educated. In early life he learned the blacksmiths trade, at which he worked for about fourteen years. In 1851 he moved to this county, locating in Franklin township on a farm of 172 acres. This he sold to his son William, by a former marriage, and now residing on a small farm adjoining. Mr. Serfass made many improvements on his former place in buildings, fences, etc. In 1868 his house was accidentally burned down, but he soon replaced it with another of greater dimensions. Mr. Serfass first settled at Mt. Zion, in 1861, and in 1865 removed to Franklin township, on his farm; then, in 1885, came on his present place. He had married, for his first wife, Miss Catherine Christman, by whom he had nine children, five of whom are yet living. He is a member of the Lutheran Church, his wife of the M. E. Church, both in full fellowship.

A. D. SERFASS, farmer, P. O. Pittston, was born in Monroe county, Pa., February 14, 1847, a son of Jonas and Kate (Christman) Serfass, also natives of Monroe county, and who were prosperous farming people. They removed to this county in 1860, locating in Exeter township, where Jonas bought a farm on which he lived four years, when he sold out and removed to Franklin township, there purchasing another tract of 180 acres of improved land, the property on which his son William now resides. Mr. Serfass is now residing in Franklin township on a small farm adjoining that of his son William. His family consisted of eight children, six of whom are now living. Mrs. Serfass departed this life in 1883, and Mr. Serfass has since married again. A. D. Serfass, the subject of this sketch, was reared and educated in the county in which he was born, and always confined himself to agricultural pursuits, at which he has proven himself to be an adept. He worked at home with his father till he reached the age of twenty-five years, when he married, in February, 1872, Miss Amanda, daughter of Aaron and Susan Driesbach, to which union have been born seven children, all of whom are living: Charles F., Archie F., Llewellyn, Lena M., Lily, Gerty and Ida. Mrs. Amanda (Driesbach) Serfass was born in Carbon county in 1848. In 1868 Mr. Serfass moved to his present farm consisting of 135 acres of land. He has been engaged in the milk business since 1872, at one time as a retail, now as a wholesale dealer. He is a practical farmer, his farm being principally devoted to Atruck and grass crops. He is also an extensive apiarist, having as many as 130 hives. He has held several township offices with much credit; he is a member of the Lutheran Church, in good standing. Mr. Serfass owns and operates a diamond drill, his services being in great demand, making test holes in coal regions. It is supposed that there is coal on his farm, though at considerable depth.

BARNET SERFASS, farmer and stock-raiser, Bear Creek township, P. O. Bear Creek, was born November 19, 1841, in Chestnut Hill township, Monroe county, and is a son of David (a shoemaker) and Sarah (Everette) Serfass, both natives of this State, of German descent. They reared a family of nine children, seven of whom are living, Barnet being the sixth eldest. When our subject was nine years old, his father died, and as the family was large the widowed mother could not support all, so Barnet was obliged to eke out a living for himself. He secured employment from a farmer in his native county to work for his board and clothing, with a chance to go to school for a couple of months during the winter, and with him stayed till he was fifteen years old. He then went to work in the old Picket mill, on Mud run, Monroe county, saving his money during the summer, and attending school in the winter. This he did for three years, and then hired out as a farm hand, working as such until 1862. Though he never spent his Atime at the trade, yet he hired as a carpenter on the building of the old Pittston bridge, on which he worked for about a year. Giving up the trade, he went to work in a sawmill in White Haven, and followed same for twelve years between there and Spring Brook. During this time he saved enough money to build a property in Pittston, but in 1874 he sold it, and with the proceeds purchased the place he now lives on. It was then known as ASeven Miles Jakes, and was a wild, uncultivated tract of 700 acres with nothing on it but an old log hut and barn. Now he has over a hundred acres under cultivation, and has built a large hotel equipped with all the modern improvements, also two large barns. Mr. Serfass was married February 28, 1869, to Johanna, daughter of Adam and Elizabeth (Dorshumer) Kresge, both natives of Pennsylvania, of German descent. Mr. and Mrs. Serfass have had four children, three of whom are living: Sarah J., Augusta E. and Lyman, all at home. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church. In politics Mr. Serfass is a Democrat, and has held the office of secretary of the school board, five years; auditor, four years; and has been overseer of the poor ten years.

DELANSON SEWARD, a prominent merchant and lumberman of Huntington township, P. O. Harveyville, was born in that township August 9, 1845, a son of Freeman and Lucinda (Baily) Seward, natives of Pennsylvania, and of English origin. Freeman Seward, who was a farmer and foundryman, died February 20, 1869. He was a son of Levi and Thankful (Wilkinson) Seward, the former of whom was a native of Connecticut, born April 13, 1778, and came to Luzerne county with his parents Enos and Sarah (Goss) Seward, about the year 1793. Sarah Goss was a daughter of Philip Goss, Sr., of Huntington township, who built near where the home of the late Nathaniel Goss now stands, where he (Philip) and family lived. At the time of the Indian and Tory invasion of 1778, two of his sons, Soloman and Comfort, went with Capt. John Franklins company to Forty Fort, and were detained in the fort as prisoners of war on the memorable third of July, having reached the fort too late to march further to the battle (or massacre). Enos Seward and Sarah Goss were married, and had a large family before they moved to Huntington township. Our subject if the second in a family of seven children, three of whom are now living. He was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools and at Columbus Academy, and at the death of his father, May 10, 1869, opened the store he is now owner and proprietor of. He also acted as administrator of his fathers estate, and conducted the homestead farm for two years. Mr. Seward was married February 16, 1868, to Sarah A., daughter of Merril and Sallie (Edwards) Harrison, which union has been blessed with two children, John F., born August 29, 1869, who operates, and is interested with his father in, a planing-mill in Dorranceton (he married Minnie Fitzgerald); and Florence Virginia, born June 20, 1871, the pride and joy of her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Seward and daughter are members of the M. E. Church. Mr. Seward has held the offices of school director and auditor, and is now a justice of the peace for his second term. He is one of the sound men of his section, doing a fine mercantile business and dealing largely in lumber. His home is a model of comfort, and his store is the headquarters for all the surrounding farmers in need of supplies. Mr. Seward, by fair dealing and close attention to business, has won for himself and family the comforts of this life, and a host of warm and admiring friends.

HIRAM SHAFFER, farmer and dairyman, P. O. Nescopeck, was born in Briar Creek township, Columbia Co., Pa., February 23, 1838, a son of David and Maria (Fester) Shaffer. His paternal grandfather, Henry Shaffer, a pioneer of Briar Creek, cleared a farm and died there, as did also the father of our subject. David reared a family of seven children: Polly (Mrs. Daniel Kleintop), Dietrick, Levi, David, Lena (Mrs. Levi Foster), Hiram, and Sarah (Mrs. Daniel Kelkner). Hiram Shaffer was reared in Briar Creek township, removing to Nescopeck township in 1857, and locating on the farm where he now resides. He married, March 24, 1860, Elizabeth, daughter of Philip and Mary (Creasey) Hetler, of Mifflin township, Columbia Co., Pa., and has two children living: Elmer F. and Mary V. Mr. Shaffer is a member of the Lutheran Church; in politics he is a Democrat, and has served as school director three terms.

J. O. SHANNON, farmer, P. O. Harding, was born in Susquehanna county, Pa., January 1, 1845, a son of George and Electa (Chamberlain) Shannon, both of whom were born in Montrose, N. Y. George Shannon was a carpenter of some repute, following his trade in his younger years. In 1849 he removed to Archbald, where he also worked at his trade, residing there till 1877, when he removed to Wilkes-Barre, where he lived for about seven years. During this time he accumulated some property and erected several buildings, one of which he exchanged for a farm near Muhlenburg, to which he removed, remaining thereon until his death, which occurred in October, 1890, when he was aged seventy-three years. His family consisted of eight children, four of whom grew to maturity, and are now living. J. O. is the third in the family, and was reared and educated in Archbald. He learned the profession of engineer, which he followed up to 1890, and he worked for Parrish & Co., in Wilkes-Barre, for a few years. At the opening of the Civil war he served his country for nine months in the State Militia, from which he was honorably discharged. In 1864 he again showed his patriotism in offering his services, and with them his life on the altar of his country, as a member of Company F, Fifty-first P. V. I., for the term of three years. He participated in several severe battles, displaying courage, valor and coolness that might be envied by an old veteran. He served to the close of the war, and was honorably discharged, again entering on his chosen vocation in the service of the AIron Coal Company in Wilkes-Barre, where he remained till 1867, in which year he removed to Scranton, where he remained three years. He next moved to Pittston, where he remained till 1890, when he removed to his farm of seventy acres in Exeter township, about one mile from Harding postoffice, on the Susquehanna river, on which he has erected a magnificent mansion, and made many other visible improvements. He and his wife have three fine buildings in Pittston, also one in Scranton. They also own valuable property in Georgia and Alabama. In 1867 he married Miss Anna C., daughter of Elisha and Sherline Hitchcock, and to them were born two daughters, one of whom (Ida) is now living; she if the wife of C. C. Roselle. Mr. Shannon is a pleasant man, of mild temper and amiable disposition. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and in politics votes the Republican ticket.

JOSEPH SHARP, miner in the Pine Ridge Colliery, Miners Mills, was born in Monmouthshire, England, August 8, 1849, and is a son of Joseph Sharp; the father was twice married, the first family consisting of seven children, five in Australia and two (who are shepherds) in England; in the second family there were also seven children, viz.: George, a puddler in Pittsburgh, Pa.; Lucy (Mrs. Jacob Woodward), in England; Samuel, a miner in Ashley, Pa.; William, who died in England at the age of twenty-eight; Joseph; Jane (Mrs. Samuel Smith, in England); and Sarah, who is also married and living in England. Our subject came to America in 1880, and located in Miners Mills, resuming his former vocation of mining, which he has since followed; he built his present residence in 1888. Mr. Sharp was married, October 5, 1869, to Miss Margaret, daughter of George and Mary (Davis) Pullin, of English and Welsh lineage, respectively, and they have one child, William, who is engaged in loading coal at the Pine Ridge Breaker. Our subject and family are members of the Primitive Methodist Church, he and his son both being local preachers; he is a member of the I.O.O.F. and the Sons of St. George, and is in sympathy with the principles of the Republican party.

DR. WILLIAM H. H. SHARP, eldest son of Andrew and Marcia A. Sharp, and fourth in the order of birth of nine children--four boys and five girls--was born March 26, 1841, in the old farm-house upon the estate of the late Peter Baer, in Hunlock township, Luzerne Co., Pa. His parents were born, passed their childhood, and were married in Montgomery county, N.Y., near the village of Mapletown. In 1835 they emigrated to Pennsylvania, and the same year were followed by the families of the respective parties. Andrew Sharp purchased and settled upon the premises above mentioned. His father-in-law, William Hubbs, with his family, composed of Edrei, his wife, one single daughter and his aged father, Alexander, purchased the adjoining farm known as the "Hubbs Farm". Alexander Hubbs, the grandfather of Mrs. Sharp, died the year following their arrival in Pennsylvania--in 1836, aged ninety-three years. Mrs. Edrie, mother of Mrs. Sharp, died in 1848, aged seventy years; her husband died in 1858, aged about eighty years. The principal occupation of the families was that of agriculture. The ancestors of Andrew Sharp came from Holland early in the history of the New York settlements; those of Mrs. Sharp were of English extraction, having also emigrated to America several generations before. Alexander Hubbs and family settled near Long Island, residing there at the time of the Revolution, and there he and those of his sons old enough entered the service of the Government, went out and took part in the war, during which their families suffered much at home from the attacks of the Indians and Tories. The poisoning of their wells and wheat stacks were among the atrocities performed. Later, after the close of the war, the sons and father removed to Montgomery county, and entered upon the entailed estate of the Clarks, clearing up portions of the then dense forest under lease, but which reverted to the estate with all improvements without recourse (or pay for improvements). Coming as they did, early in the progress of the county, and with little means with which to commence life, the struggles to secure a livelihood while clearing up homes were hard in the extreme. The facilities for obtaining money were so meager that to secure the amount needed for taxes was sometimes very difficult. Hard toil and plain living were the order of the day. As little employment could be gotten during the winter, every hour of available time needed to be husbanded during the producing part of the year. The winter seasons were occasions for such schools as could be supplied. "The master keeping" the school as often as teaching it, and enforcing his authority by the very potent influence of athletic exercise. William vividly remembers the uncomfortable contiguity of his head to the brawny hand of the master because, from a kind of constitutional obtuseness, he was unable to keep pace with others of his class. The text books then in use were the "Cobbs Speller," "English Reader," "Kirkham's Grammar," etc., succeeded finally by the "National Readers," "Bullion's Grammar," and "Green leaf's Arithmetic." The writer well remembers also the dread that the announcement of the commencement of school in his earliest schools days always brought; still with the latter series of books and an improved system of teaching and better informed teachers, who realized that explanation would be more successful than physical demonstration, the chances of the poor rural pupil somewhat brightened, so that by the aid of the pine torch in the old fireplace, young William was enabled to worry out his arithmetic and grammar lessons by taking a good part of the nights for its accomplishment. His father died September 10, 1852, after a life of the most incessant toil for the support of his large family, and William still recalls the grief of that occasion, and the years that followed while he toiled to try to obtain bread enough to supply his mather's family through the long winters; and how often he dreamed that his father had returned from a long absence, and would again resume his care of the duties at home and relieve his often heart-sick son. Thus matters went until unexpectedly the little farm was taken from his mother by a claim of ownership believed to have been entirely unjust and illegal; but the mother and her family, never having the least idea of legal defense, and frightened at the threats of legal costs and the sheriff setting her goods--what little she possessed--out of doors, she was compelled to leave the old shelter and commence anew with her children--those that survived, two sisters and an infant brother having borne their part of life's battle and died before the ordeal came--within a piece of unbroken forest, where William at the head, and two small brothers to assist, built a new barn and cleared several fields toward the new home, living meantime upon neighboring premises. Thus things were moving at the outbreak of the war, when partly through the prevailing enthusiasm and partly from a desire to obtain the much-needed army pay, William concluded to go to war. Two vivid and painful scenes--the one his mother's anguish when he announced his purpose to her, and the other, the grief of his dear brother John, who had toiled with him so willingly from infancy in the effort to obtain a livelihood--have always since remained indelibly impressed upon his memory, and for years he was loth to hear his brother's name mentioned. He entered the Fifty-eighth Infantry, and in 1863 died in Virginia. In October, 1861, William entered the Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry, and served until March 16, 1865. When in the batle of Averysboro, N.C., his left leg was shattered, and amputated upon the field. Thence he was sent to Davids Island, N.Y.; thence to Central Park to a hospital, now changed to "St. Vincent Hotel," where he remained until August, 1868, when he was discharged. During his confinement in bed, and by the use of books procured by his dear hospital chaplain, Rev. Robert Lowry, of New York City, he commenced the study of medicine, and thence devoted every energy to that profession, taking one year for the reviewing of his old studies in Kingston, and taking additionally such as came within the province of his intended profession. In the fall of 1866, he took his first medical lectures which he continued, each course successively until 1870, returning home to practice during the summer seasons. In 1870 he took the degree of M.D., having previously found it out of his power to bear the additional expense of a graduating fee, and having few friends willing to loan so unpromising applicant. The student at one time asked a neighbor for a hundred-dollar loan, but not succeeding he never asked another. In these struggles, however, he had one friend, but did not make his acquaintance util he had been settled in practice. That friend was Dr. William Barret, of Cambra, Pa. The Doctor was a broad-minded, noble-hearted man, and kndly offered his council whenever needed. It has often been the lot of one to meet men who laid greater claim to philanthropy, but rarely to find those possessed of more. Under his suggestion the Doctor's business grew until he could, as a rule, have done little more.

In October, 1870, was celebrated Dr. Sharp's marriage with Miss Abbie R. Dodson, who was the only daughter of Nathaniel and Rosanna Dodson, the former a son of Richard and Rhoda Dodson, the latter a daughter of Jonathan Wilkinson, of Huntington township, Luzerne Co., Pa. The grandfather of Nathaniel Dodson had, about the year 1800, purchased a large tract of land in Union township, and had divided it among his sons, Richard receiving that part now occupied by his son Nathaniel and his heirs, Abagail and Almon. In 1879, weary with the care and labor of practice, the Doctor took another course of lectures in Bellevue, N.Y., and in the spring of 1880 returned to his practice, which he has continued since, though as a necessity with much less activity, and from the laboriousness of country practice moved to the town of Nanticoke, Pa., where he still resides with his wife, one adopted daughter, Lydda, and one young child, William H. H. Sharp, Jr., an interesting son of twenty months. His father-in-law also resides with him. His dear aged mother died in 1883 of heart disease aged sixty-seven years. She left an only sister to survive her, Mrs. A. VanHorn of Hunlocks, who is now eighty-five years old, a widow, her husband having passed away in 1890. Mrs. Van Horn still retains her usually brilliant mental faculties, though so advanced in life. One other statement, and we close. From the time of the Revolution down to the last war the Doctor's ancestry have been represented in every service--his great- grandfather and sons in the Revolution--his uncle in the Mexical war, and also in the Civil war with another brother of his uncle, both giving up their lives to the cause. The Doctor himself, and his only brother old enough to go, were also in the Civil war. The Doctor alone of the four of the name Sharp, returning, and he dismembered, leaving one leg in North Carolina.

A.B. SHAVER, farmer, P.O. Dallas, was born in Dallas township, April 23, 1838, and was reared and educated at the common schools. He is a son of James and Louisa (Montanye) Shaver, the former born in New Jersey, the latter in Kingston township. James was a son of Philip who came from New Jersey in 1804, and located at Forty Fort, residing there until 1813, when he removed to Dallas township, where he owned a large tract of about a thousand acres of land. He confined himself to the manufacture of lumber on his own lands, also farming to a great extent. He was not a man who sought the smiles and favors of others, but attended to his own affairs. He reared a family of seven children. His death was the result of an accident, the crushing of his arm in a cider mill. James Shaver, the father of our subject, was three years old when he came to this county with his father, who came overland by wagon, on the same road used by Sullivan's army. He always lived in Dallas, and was of a retiring disposition, like his father, never seeking publicity. He confined himself to farming; he lived to be seventy-six years of age and died in 1877. There were fifteen children born to James and Louisa Shaver, twelve of whom grew to maturity. A. B. is the eighth in the family, and like his father has always confined himself to agricultural pursuits. His farm consists of fifty acres of fertile land, and is devoted to general farming. Mr. Shaver married, December 28, 1865, Miss Elizabeth W., daughter of Isaac and Catharine Kirkendall. They have no children. Mrs. Elizabeth Shaver was born in Kingston township December 4, 1845. Mr. Shaver is a Freemason in good standing, having received all the degrees up to K.T., and was the first master of Dallas Lodge. Politically, he is a Democrat.

E.W. SHAVER, farmer, P.O. Huntsville, was born June 21, 1830, in Dallas, where he was reared and educated. He is a son of George and Rachel (Van Camp) Shaver, both of whom were born in Wyoming. George was a son of Philip, who was supposed to be a native of Northampton county, Pa., and who moved to this county shortly after the Wyoming Massacre. George moved from Wyoming to Dallas township, where he lived all his life. The Shavers were all farmers, content to toil patiently though severely for their living. He moved to Lehman township, where he died in 1875, at the age of sixty-nine. His family numbered eleven children, nine of whom grew to maturity, and six are now (1891) living. E. W. is the third in the family, and has always lived and worked on a farm. On October 7, 1849, he married Miss Catharine, duaghter of Jacob and Mary France, and seven children were born to them, six of whom are living: Asher, Edgar, Walter, Rose, Ella and Munson. Mr. Shaver moved on his present place in 1857. He bought of Trueman Atherton an unimproved farm of ninety-six acres. Mr. Shaver is an industrious farmer, who has, by economy and perseverance, accomplished marvelous results in clearing and bringing under cultivation what was once so wild and barren. His buildings are large and comfortable, his house being neat and tastefully constructed, all having been built by the present owner. He has the full confidence of his fellow citizens, and was at one time elected supervisor, an office he filled to the satisfaction of all. Politically he is a Democrat. His family are all married, as follows: Asher married Miss Catharine Bonnywitts (they have four children); Edgar marrie Miss Josie Blair (two children were born to them); Walter married Miss Olive Johnson (they have six children); Rose married Frank Lord (two children were born to them); Ella married Frank Bonnywitts (they have four children); Munson married Miss Lizzie Corbit (he works on his father's place).

ISAAC N. SHAVER, Dallas, was born in Dallas, this county, in 1846, and is a son of Joseph and Jane (Allen) Shaver, the former of whom was born March 15, 1818, in Dallas township, in the village that is now called Shavertown. Joseph is a son of John P. and Sarah (Montanye) Shaver, the former born in Sussex county, N.J., the latter in this county. John P. was a son of Philip Shaver, who was one of the earliest settlers of this county, locating in Dallas, where he always carried on business as a lumberman, and to a great extent farming, owning a large tract of land at various times and places. He built the first sawmill in his neighborhood, and was a man of push and energy. He lived to be about seventy years of age, and his death was indirectly caused by the crushing of his arm in a cider-mill. He reared a family of seven sons and one daughter. John P., his son, followed the example of his honored father in confining himself to farming and lumbering, in which he was assisted by his son Joseph. About the year 1839 they erected a new mill on the site of the one built by their progenitor, where they manufactured lumber. John P. owned 130 acres of land, and was a man of sterling worth and large experience. He lived to the good old age of eighty-two years, and reared a family of thirteen children, five of whom are living. Joseph, like his ancestors, confined himself to lumbering and farming, especially the former, at which he became an adept. In 1862, with his sons, he moved to their present residence on the extreme south line of Dallas borough, where, in company with the late A. Ryman, they purchased about 400 acres of timber land, there being an old mill on the place which they used until 1870, when they abandoned the old for a new structure having a capacity of 12,000 feet per day. In August, 1881, this mill burned down, and they immediately built another with better facilities and a larger capacity, with plaining-mill attached. It is reported that there were six mills built on this site. In 1852, a steam mill was built here, which was equipped with the first engine in this region of the country--"back of the mountains," as they say. Joseph, in 1851, in carrying out a desire to go West, was obliged to travel to Great Bend in order to take the cars; now trains run regularly through his door-yard. Joseph Shaver has been twice married: first time to Miss Jane Allen, by whom he had six sons, viz.: F.A., Joseph C., Isaac N., W.H., Elmer B. and Ralph A. Mr. Shaver's second marriage was with Mrs. Mary A. Snyder (nee Bartron), by whom he had six children, three of whom are now living: Scott L., Maggie R. and John B. Joseph Shaver has retired from active life; his former partner, Mr. A. Ryman, is deceased and the sons of the old firm are carrying on the business. Isaac N. Shaver, the subject proper of this memoir, is general bookkeeper, and attends to the milling business. He is a man of recognized refinement and extraordinary business qualifications, which have been increased and re enforced by experience and observation while on a tour, in 1878, in Europe, on which occasion he visited England, Ireland, Scotland and France, and while in the latter country he attended the Exposition held in Paris that year. He has been in the business continually since 1862. In his political affiliations he is a stanch Republican. Mr. Shaver has not yet enlisted in the army of Benedicts.

G.R. SHAW, carpenter, Irish Lane, was born in Ross township, October 1, 1863, and is a son of Jesse R. and Hannah (Crockett) Shaw, the former born in Northampton county, the latter in Ross township, this county. Jesse R. removed to this county with his mother when about twenty-one years of age: after the death of his father, his mother married again. They settled in Huntington township, where Jesse R. engaged in mercantile business; but his health failing he abandoned it, and went to clerking for William Davenport, assuming a position where the responsibility was not so great. He owned 150 acres of land, which was divided between his children after his death, G. R. receiving forty-eight acres, upon which he now resides. He was a worthy man and possessed of fine business qualities. He died June 25, 1877, aged forty-nine. His family consisted of four children, two of whom are living: Mary E., wife of Thomas Rummage, and G. R., who is the third in the family. G.R. Shaw was reared in Ross township, at the common schools of which place he received his education. In early life he learned the carpenter's trade, at which he continues to work, and is a first-class mechanic. Mr. Shaw married, in 1888, Miss Lydia C., daughter of George F. and Minerva Long, and to them were born two children, one of whom is now living, Frances C. Mrs. Lydia C. Shaw was born in Ross township in 1861. Mr. Shaw is not only a good mechanic, but a fair farmer. He erected a very large barn on his place in 1892, and looks well after general improvements.

JOHN W. SHAW (deceased), who in his lifetime was a prominent farmer of Huntington township, was a son of William and Hester Shaw, natives of New York State, of Irish origin. John W. was the second in a family of four children, and was reared on a farm, receiving his education in the common schools. When about seventeen years of age he came to Wyoming county and farmed for a short time, then moved to Huntington township, where he purchased a farm. This he sold after two years and moved to Kingston, working as street commissioner for six years, when he returned to Huntington and purchased the present Shaw property, where he died July 24, 1890, aged sixty-two years. He was married, January 16, 1851, to Miss Arminda, daughter of Cornelius and Cyntha Van Scoy. By this union there were four children, viz.: Mary E., Mrs. William E. Walton, of Lehman, Pa.; William W., a marble salesman, also of Lehman; Alexander C., a farmer, on the homestead, and Minnie C., at home. The Shaw property contains 100 acres, situated one mile south of Town Hill.

WILLIAM W. SHAW, farmer, P.O. Lehman, was born in North Moreland township, Wyoming county, March 30, 1855. He is the son of John W. and Arminda (Von Scoy) Shaw, the former of whom was born in Mount Hope, Orange Co., N.Y., the latter in North Moreland township, Wyoming county. John W. is the son of William, who was a native of Mount Hope, and whose father came from Ireland to this country in its early settlement. John W. Shaw, his son, began life as a farmer in Wyoming county, and owned 300 acres of land then uncultivated, but, by giving attention to those facilities within reach, and putting into operation the physical force and power of mind with which he was blessed, he succeeded in subduing the wild land and causing it "to blossom as the rose." He built a house commensurate with the well-improved fields, the whole thus making a harmonious scene. Mr. Shaw was a public-spirited man, and took an active part in educational matters. The training of the young mind was something very sacred with him; therefore, a man of his intelligence was always in demand on the school board. He was an excellent farmer in the true acceptation of that term, his surroundings displaying taste and refinement. His family consisted of four children: Mary E. (now Mrs. Walton), William W., Alexander C. and Minnie C., all of whom are yet (1891) living. He died July 24, 1890, at the age of sixty-three years.

JOHN F. SHEA, Wilkes Barre. Prominent and popular at the bar of Luzerne county stands this gentleman. He is a son of Patrick and Mary (Burke) Shea, both natives of Ireland, but born in different parts of that country. The father came to America with his father, James Shea, when he was eighteen years old; the mother, when she was but a girl of thirteen summers, emigrated alone to this country, landing at New York, unable to speak English, and without any friends. In course of time they met, and were married in Wilkes Barre, this county, and have seven children, as follows: Mary, now the wife of Joseph Kellar, and Ella, now Mrs. John Hughes, both of Wilkes Barre; James H., Frank J., Maggie (deceased at the age of two years), John F. (the subject of this sketch) and Alice, in Wilkes Barre. John F. Shea was born March 25, 1870. He received most of his education at the Parochial School, of Sisters of Mercy, in Wilkes Barre. In June, 1882, then thirteen years old, he received at the Sisters' Academy a silver medal for music--piano--and following year a gold medal for same. The Sisters refusing to teach boys over fourteen years of age, he was obliged to leave that school, and he then spent two terms at the Wyoming Seminary, Kingston, Pa. He worked in the colliery in the summer time while at the Sisters' School, and clerked in stores during vacations while at the Seminary. After leaving the latter he passed the teachers' examination under James Coughlin, superintendent of schools for Luzerne county, and, although but sixteen years old, secured a position as teacher in the city schools. After his term as a teacher expired, he took a course in the commercial college department at Wyoming Seminary, from which he graduated in a remarkably short time. He was with Hon. (now Judge) John Lynch, when he ran for Congress, and on September 4, 1888, he passed a very successful examination for registration as a student in law. He then entered himself as a law student with John T. Lenahan, Esq., one of the most noted lawyers of the bar of Pennsylvania. Remaining in Mr. Lenahan's office until May 3, 1890, with the exception of about three months, he took the examination for admission to the bar, having pursued his studies for only seventeen months. The result of that examination is evidenced by the special certificate set forth below which was granted to him in addition to the ordinary certificate granted to applicants who pass the examination. The special certificate as found of record in the courthouse reads as follows: "That he registered as a law student in the office of John T. Lenahan, on the 4th day of September, 1888. That he pursued the study of the law in the office of his preceptor until the 23d day of May, 1890, when he passed the required examination for admission. That since that time he has continued the study of the law in the office of his preceptor. That under a strict construction of the rules he would not be entitled to admission until the 4th of September, 1891, but, inasmuch as the applicant passed a most excellent examination and is especially well qualified to practice law in our opinion, and, inasmuch as he has continued the study of the law since passing the examination, we believe that it would be well to waive the rule of court in this case and do recommend that he be admitted at the present time. Signed. Very respectfully, Thomas H. Atherton, John S. Harding, Andrew H. McClintock, Board of Examiners. February 2, 1891." On March 9, 1891, this report was handed to Judge Stanley Woodward, who was then holding court, and on motion of John T. Lenahan Mr. Shea was admitted to the bar. The next morning the following notice appeared in the Wilkes Barre Record (March 10, 1891), a stanch Republican paper, under the heading "The Youngest Lawyer ever admitted:" "John F. Shea was admitted to practice as an attorney in the Luzerne County Courts yesterday. He is the youngest attorney ever admitted to the Luzerne County Bar. He began the study of the law in September, 1888, in the office of John T. Lenahan and after steady application for a year and a half passed a brilliant examination before T.H. Atherton, J. S. Harding and A. H. McClintock, the board of examiners. There is a rule of court that requires attorneys to be at least twenty-one years of age before being admitted to the bar. Mr. Shea, however, passed such an excellent examination that the board recommended that the rules be suspended and he be admitted to practice at once. The application was granted by Judge Woodward, and the young lawyer enrolled as a member of the profession. Mr. Shea is a young man who has worked his way upward under difficulties that would have discouraged many another and deserves no little credit for the fine showing he has made as a student. He was the recipient of many warm congratulations yesterday and begins his chosen calling under most favorable auspices. Under the rules, Attorney Shea could not be admitted until next September." Mr. Shea is a strong Democrat, and was a delegate by proxy to the State Convention which met at Harrisburg, Pa., and sent a Cleveland delegate to Chicago, although Mr. Shea, like the rest of the Luzerne delegates, was a stanch supporter of D. B. Hill for the Presidency. He has acquired a very lucrative practice, both civil and criminal. He is a member of the Democratic City Committee.

REV. BENJAMIN SHEARER, retired Baptist minister and farmer, of Huntington township, P.O. Waterton, was born in Wayne county, Pa., January 1, 1823, is a son of John and Matilda (Nichols) Shearer, natives of New York, and of Scotch and German origin, respectively. John Shearer, who was a farmer by occupation, died in 1886, aged eighty-six years. Our subject, who is the second in a family of nine children, three of whom are now living, was reared on a farm, and educated in the common schools. When eight years of age he went to work on the Delaware & Hudson canal as driver boy, working in the lumber woods during the winters. This he followed for about seven years, and here he imbibed those Christian principles which governed his after life. Going to school for a few months, he desired to preach the Gospel, and when twenty-nine years of age he began to exhort. He has held charges in the following places: Of the church in Jackson, Luzerne county, seven years; charge of the Jackson church in Columbia county, eight years; Lehman, Union, North Moreland, Lake, East Union and several others. Owing to failing health he retired in the spring of 1891. In 1866 he purchased his property, consisting of sixty acres of land situated one mile west of the Waterton postoffice. Mr. Shearer was married December 17, 1843, to Lydia E. Baisley, by whom he had six children, two of whom are living, viz.: Layton L., a minister in Idaho, and Roe, a farmer in Dakota. This wife dying January 27, 1856, Mr. Shearer, July 18, 1858, married Elizabeth Fritz, by whom he has six children, viz.: Friend B., a farmer of same township; A. N., a painter at Berwick; George B., a lawyer at Hammond, Ind.; Matilda M. (Mrs. George R. Gregory); Mary B. (deceased), and John M., who is still at home on the farm. In politics Mr. Shearer is a Prohibitionist.

E. R. SHEPHERD, engineer, Pittston, was born in Pittston, May 16, 1862, son of William and Harriet Shepherd, natives of England. His father is also an engineer in Pittston. Our subject received his early education in the public schools of Pittston. He worked around the mines in various capacities when a young boy, and in 1878 began running an engine for the Pennsylvania Coal Company, and is still in their employ as an engineer. In 1886 Mr. Shepherd married Miss Levina Harris, of West Pittston, and this union has been blessed with three children, viz.: Lizzie, Ida and Rosett. Our subject is a member of the I.O.R.M. and his political views are Republican.

WILLIAM SHEPHERD, miner in the Delaware Colliery, Hudson, Plains township, was born in Wallsend, Northumberland, England, May 8, 1832, and is a son of Richard and Alice (Heppell) Shepherd. His father, who was a miner, came to America in 1862 (whither he was preceded ten months by his sons, James and Richard), accompanied by his wife and six children, and followed one year later by William H. and Alice. The family consisted of eleven children, viz.: Mary A. (in England), William H., Richard, Ellen, Alice, Margaret, James, Timothy, Elizabeth (Deceased), Esther and John. Our subject located first at Taylorsville, Pa., where he resumed his former occupation, mining, and remained four months; then resided in Schuylkill county, three years; Mill Creek, six years. He next went to the State of Ohio, where he remained five years, and in 1878 returned to Mill Creek, where he has since resided; he built his residence in 1882 and occupied it the same year. Mr. Shepherd was married in England, in 1852, to Miss Margery Elsender, by whom he had three children, all of whom are deceased. His wife died in 1859, and he was again married, in 1860, this time to Miss Mary J. Lightley, by whom he had ten children, three of whom are living, viz.: Mary A. (Mrs. William Forsey), William, a miner at Green Ridge, and Frances A. (Mrs. Charles Vanderburg). Mrs. Mary L. Shepherd died in 1881, and Mr. Shepherd was married, July 29, 1882, to Mrs. Adeline Connor, daughter of John and Ann (Harper) Hine, and widow of Abel Connor, by whom she had had six children, four of whom are living, viz.: James W., Ross, Belle, Eva May and Calvin. Mr. Shepherd has always given his political support to the Republican party.

EDWARD SHERIDAN, track-layer in the Henry Mine, plains, was born in County Mayo, Ireland, in March, 1839, and is a son of Patrick and Bridget (Moran) Sheridan. The father, who was a farmer, reared a family of four children, of whom Edward is the second, and the only one now living; there were two older half brothers: Thomas Sheridan, who died in Illinois, and James Sheridan, now living in Missouri. Our subject came to America in 1860 and located in Scranton, where he worked in the mines nine years, thence coming to Plains, where he has since followed his present occupation. He was married, October 15, 1862, to Mary A., daughter of Thomas and Anna (Lee) Howley, natives of County Sligo, Ireland; she died, March 29, 1889. The fruits of this union were four children, viz.: Catherine F. (Mrs. Michael Moran); Thomas J., carpenter, Honesdale; Anna B., for five years a successful teacher in Plains township (she still shares her father's fireside, where her pleasant smile, loving heart and willing hands do much to lighten the burden and make glad the weary hours of his declining years); and Belinda, who is now Sister Mary Gerald in the Sisters of Mercy Convent, Wilkes Barre. Mr. Sheridan and family are members of the Catholic Church; he is a member of the A.O.H., and in political matters casts his ballot for the best candidates and the best principles, irrespective of all party lines. He built his present residence in 1875, and has lived therein since 1877.

MICHAEL SHERIDAN, laborer, Inkerman, was born in County Mayo, Ireland, September 12, 1823, and is the eldest in a family of four children born to Michael and Bridget (Harrison) Sheridan, natives of the same place. Our subject was educated in Ireland, where he worked on a farm; he arrived in New York January 12, 1847, and came on the Wayne county, Pa., where he worked in the iron works until July, 1856, when he came to this county, and settled in Sebastopol, here laboring for a blacksmith until 1861, since which time he has been employed by the Pennsylvania Coal Company, in the capacity of headsman, at No. 7 Shaft. Mr. Sheridan was united in marriage September 14, 1851, with Margaret, daughter of Michael and Mary (Kirby) Flynn, natives of County Mayo, Ireland. Their union has been blessed with the following issue: Michael, born September 19, 1853; Mary, born October 13, 1855, was married, January 12, 1880, to Andrew Brennen, a teamster, in Pittston; Catharine, born April 12, 1860; Frank, born July 19, 1862, and Patrick, born April 2, 1864. Our subject is a member of the Catholic Church, and in politics is a Democrat.

GEORGE D. T. SHERMAN, blacksmith, P.O. Gowen, was born in Columbia county, Pa., September 13, 1862, a son of John and Catherine (Leiby) Sherman, natives of Germany, and who were residents of Columbia county, Pa., for many years. The father was a blacksmith and farmer, and is now a resident of Schuylkill county, Pa.; he was twice married, his first wife being Catherine Leiby, and second wife Louisa Crouse. Our subject was reared in Columbia county, educated in the public schools, and learned the blacksmith's trade, which he has followed since 1880. He has been in the employ of Coxe Bros. & Co., from thirteen years, and has resided in Black Creek township since 1888. Mr. Sherman married, April 28, 1885, Alice, daughter of Joseph and Sidney (Benninger) Singley, of Black Creek township, and has four children: Sidney, Joseph e., William T. and Daisy M. Our subject is a member of the Lutheran church, and in politics is a Democrat.

CONRAD S. SHIFFER, mason, Plains, was born, in what is now Plains township, March 6, 1827, and is a son of Henry and elizabeth (Frye) Shiffer, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German origin. Our subject learned his father's trade, and at the age of twenty-one engaged in business for himself at Scranton, where he remained fourteen years, and where he enlisted, September 22, 1864, in Company G, One Hundred and Ninety-ninth P.V.I.; he participated in the battle of Fort Gregg and many skirmishes; was discharged at Richmond, Va., June 28, 1865. He then returned to Plains and worked with his brother, Jeremiah, till the following spring, when he entered into partnership with him in the contracting and building business for seven years; he built his present residence and removed therein in 1871. Mr. Shiffer was married, February 12, 1859, to Miss Harriet Rider, of Binghamton, N.Y., by whom he had two children, viz.: Lillie E., married to James Mandeville, a bookkeeper, in Binghamton, N.Y.; and Edward A., a lath contractor, also in Binghamton. After the death of his first wife, Mr. Shiffer was married, January 24, 1867, to Miss Katie Maria Halleck, of Pike county, N.Y., and they have had eight children, viz.: Harry W. (deceased), Sarah E. (deceased), Eva J., Ida M., Alma A., Rachel A., John M. (deceased) and Katie M. (deceased). Our subject is a member of the G. A. R., and politically is a Democrat.

GEORGE H. SHIFFER, outside foreman at the Mill Creek and Delaware Breakers, Plains township, P.O. Hudson, was born on the spot where his present residence stands, May 7, 1859. He is a son of Jeremiah B. and Mary A. (Sperring) Shiffer, natives of Luzerne county, and of English and German descent, respectively. He is a grandson of Henry Shiffer, who was an early settler in the county. His father, who was a mason by trade, reared a family of twelve children, seven of whom are living, viz.: Nettie, married to James L. Mitchell, coal operator at Tyrone, Pa.; May (Mrs. R. D. McCaa); George H.; Jeremiah E.; William, mine foreman at Tyrone, Pa.; Albertie B., druggist at Mill Creek, living with his mother; and Josephine, also living at home. Our subject began working in the old Miner drug store, Wilkes Barre, when but fourteen years of age; he remained there six months, went to school the next winter, and for three years was employed as errand-boy by the Delaware & Hudson Coal Company. He was then promoted to docking boss, which position he held four years; he has been outside foreman since 1881. Mr. Shiffer was married, December 24, 1880, to Martha E., daughter of John and Ellen (McCloskey) Maxfield, of Wilkes Barre. They have had born to them four children, viz.: Nettie, Alice, Jeremiah (deceased) and Cora. This wife died January 16, 1887, and he was afterward married, September 12, 1888, to Miss Josephine, daughter of Alexander McCaa, of Plains, and they have two children, viz.: Isabel and Edna. Mr. Shiffer has always given his political support to the Democratic party, and he is at present serving as school director of Plains township.

JEREMIAH E. SHIFFER, engineer in the Delaware Colliery, Hudson, Plains township, was born in the town where he now lives, September 26, 1861, and is a son of Jeremiah Shiffer. Our subject received a good public-school education, and began working about the mines at the age of sixteen years, an occupation he has since followed, working himself up to his present position, which he accepted in 1887. Mr. Shiffer was married, December 29, 1887, to Miss Ellen, daughter of Thomas Carter, of Plains, and they have had three children, viz.: Fred, Annie M. and Ida, the latter of whom they buried July 19, 1892. Mr. Shiffer has always been a steadfast Democrat, and has rendered his party much valuable aid. He built his present residence in 1890.

HIRAM SHIFFER, a prominent citizen of Mill Creek, Plains township, P. O. Hudson, was born December 25, 1825, in what was known as the "Half-way House" (which is still standing east of Plainsville in Plains township). He is a son of Henry and Elizabeth (Frye) Shiffer, natives of Germany, who emigrated to Northampton county at an early day, where the father worked at the stonemason's trade, and later came to Plains and carried on the "Half-way House," also following his trade. Here the bounding deer and much other game were the victims of young Hiram's aim, and he now has in his home some very beautiful antlers, plucked from their proud heads. Our subject, who is the seventh in order of birth in a family of nine children, began life for himself at the age of twelve years, working on the farm for his board and clothes, and attending school in the winter. At the age of sixteen he was employed by Peter Wagner, of Lackawanna county, to work on a farm for eight dollars a month, remaining with him five years. In the spring of 1846 he went to Philadelphia, on the canal; and on his return he stopped at Harrisburg, where he enlisted in Company K, Ringgold's Battalion, garrisoned at Carlisle; but, being a minor, as soon as his father learned where he was, he served a writ on the authorities, and secured his discharge, with much reluctance on the part of the young soldier, who thus early evinced a great craving for a military career. Nine days after his departure his company was ordered to the front, in the Mexican war, where Major Ringgold and most of his men were slain at the battle of Palo Alto. After this our subject worked at various occupations, in different places, chiefly at boat-building; he worked at this for William Riddle, of Wilkes Barre, for five years, and subsequently was in the business for himself at Tunkhannock seven years; one of the boats he built, named the "Defender of Tunkhannock", was the first boat that ran up the North Branch Canal from Pittston; while at Tunkhannock he was foreman on the construction of the first bridge across the Susquehanna at that place; he afterward leaed a yard and built boats at Plainsville for five years. In 1866 he built his present residence and removed therein, and engaged with the Delaware & Hudson Coal Company as boss-carpenter, which position he held until 1888. Then, after two years' retirement, resumed work for the same company as nightwatchman at the Mill Creek Breaker. Mr. Shiffer was married July 16, 1846, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of William and Rachel (Culver) Culver, of Forty Fort; they had nine children, six of whom are living, viz.: Mylurt, Caroline (Mrs. Butler Norris), Welden, Abraham, Sarah E. (Mrs. Charles Sutton) and Ruth (Mrs. Seth Colvin). Mrs. Elizabeth (Culver) Shiffer died April 4, 1863, and Mr. Shiffer was again married, this time, February 22, 1865, to Miss Ellen Otison, who died February 19, 1883. On March 25, 1888, he married, for his third wife, Mrs. Agnes Gilmore, daughter of James and Agnes (Scoly) Noble, and widow of Robert Gilmore, by whom she had ten children, seven of whom are living. Mr. Shiffer is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he is steward; his wife is a member of the Presbyterian Church. He is a member of the I.O.O.F. and Encampment; in his political views he has stood by the Republican party since its organization, and, while in Tunkhannock, he held the office of constable.

ABRAHAM SHIFFER, carpenter at the Delaware Breaker, Hudson, Plains township, was born in Tunkhannock, Pa., December 29, 1857, and is a son of Hiram Shiffer. He received a common school education, and at the age of twelve years began working on the breaker, where he remained five years, and has since followed his present trade. Mr. Shiffer was married, March 27, 1880, to Mary E., daughter of Giles E. and Amanda (Roberts) Stevens, natives of New York, and of English and German origin, respectively; her father, who came to Luzerne County in 1857, was successively engaged, as follows: on the canal, then as coal and iron police, special police, watchman at the Black Diamond Colliery, and regular police in Wilkes-Barre; he died April 8, 1885, and is survived by his widow; the family consisted of seven children, four of whom are living, viz.: Dollie A. Smith (a half sister), Mary E., John M. and Sarah A. To Mr. and Mrs. Shiffer were born four children: Ida M., Jessie A., Edith and Daisy. Our subject is a member of the Junior Order United American Mechanics, and in his political views is a Republican. He built his present residence in 1887.

WELDEN SHIFFER, engineer at the Mill Creek Slope, Hudson, Plains township, is a son of Hiram Shiffer. He began working about the mines at the age of fifteen, and since has worked himself up to his present position, which he has occupied for twelve years. Mr. Shiffer was married, August 5, 1885, to Miss Anna, daughter of John Maxfield, of Plains, now of Wilkes-Barre. After the death of his wife, May 2, 1886, he returned to his former boarding place with his brother-in-law, Seth Colvin. Mr. Colvin was born in East Benton, Pa., December 2, 1864, and is a son of James L. and Mary E. (Post) Colvin, natives of Pennsylvania and of Yankee origin. His father, who commenced work as carpenter on the Delaware & Hudson Gravity Railroad, April 1, 1864, was killed by the cars one year later. The family consisted of six children, four of whom are living, Mr. Colvin being the second in birth. He began life working at the painter's trade, which he followed one year, then worked about the mines two years, was brakeman on the Delaware & Hudson Railroad seven years, and since 1881 has been conductor on that road. Mr. Colvin was married, January 28, 1879, to Miss Ruth, daughter of Hiram Shiffer, and has four children, viz.: Mary E., James L., Hiram and Alva G. He is a member of the Order of Railroad Conductors and the I. O. R. M. He is a Republican in his political views, and at present a member of the school board in Plains township.

ALEXANDER SHINER, farmer, P. O. Tank, was born in Sugarloaf township, June 14, 1840, a son of Chester and Lydia (Wenner) Shiner. His paternal grandfather, James Shiner, was a son of Andrew and Margaret (Smith) Shiner, all pioneers of Sugarloaf township. James Shiner was a lumberman and farmer, and cleared a farm in Sugarloaf, where he resided until his death. His wife was Jennie Chesney, and his children were Andrew, Margaret, Susan (Mrs. James K. Drake). The father of our subject, who was a native of Briar Creek township, Columbia Co., Pa., cleared a farm in Sugarloaf township and died there. His wife was a daughter of George Werner of Luzerne County, and his children were Alexander, Eliza (Mrs. D. W. Zehner), Daniel, Melinda (Mrs. John Wagner), Martha (Mrs. A. W. Minick), Chester, Samuel and Lydia (Mrs. Nathan Knelly). Our subject was reared in Sugarloaf township, where farming was his occupation, and he has resided in Black Creek township since 1880. On December 30, 1866, he married Hannah, daughter of David and Catherine (Cutshaw) Shellhammer, of Black Creek township, and they have two children, Willis and Annie (Mrs. Alonzo Houseknecht), the latter of whom has one son, Clarence L. The farm now occupied by Mr. Shiner was cleared and improved by David Shellhammer, who was a farmer, millwright and carpenter, built the first gristmill in the northeastern part of Black Creek township, and erected three mills on the present site of Shiner's Mills. Mr. Shiner is a member of the Reformed Church, in politics is a Republican, and is an enterprising and public-spirited citizen.

NATHANIEL SHINER, general foreman of the carpenter work for J. C. Hayden & Co., Jeansville, was born in Sugarloaf township, this county, September 17, 1844, and is a son of Chester W. and Lydia (Wenner) Shiner, natives of Pennsylvania. George Wenner, his paternal grandfather, was an old Revolutionary soldier, having fought under Washington. Nathaniel, who is the third in a family of thirteen children, was reared and educated in his native place and, though quite young when the war broke out, enlisted in February, 1862, in Company E, Ninety-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers. He served through the campaigns of the army of the Potomac, participating in many severe fights, and was mustered out in 1865, having received a hip wound. After returning from the war he followed railroading one year, and then went to Scranton where he learned the carpenter's trade, after which he removed to Plymouth, where he did contract work two years, then one year in Wilkes-Barre. In 1872 he came to Jeansville, and worked at his trade until 1873, when he was given the position as foreman at the Jeansville Carpenter Shops under J. C. Hayden. In this he continued until 1879, when he traveled for the Jeansville Iron Works, in the capacity of a master mechanic. In 1880 he went to Mahanoy City, and there engaged in contracting and building until 1890, when he returned to Jeansville, and took his present position. Mr. Shiner has been twice married: first time on December 25, 1865, to Miss Esther, daughter of David and Catherine (Godshall) Shellhammer, natives of Luzerne County, and one child, William C., was born to this union. This wife died April 1, 1882, and Mr. Shiner married, for his second, January 22, 1884, Miss Mary Dreher, of Mahanoy City. Six children were the fruits of this union, namely: Joseph (deceased), Stanley L. (deceased), Chester, Nelly G., Frank and George (deceased). Mr. Shiner is a member of the following societies: I. O. O. F., Knights of Pythias, P. O. S. of A., O. U. A. M., and G. A. R. of Wilkes-Barre. Politically, he votes the Republican ticket; the family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church.

HENRY J. SHIPTON, paperhanger and decorator, Nanticoke, was born at Bloomsburg, Pa., December 31, 1867, and is a son of Henry and Effie (Hurley) Shipton, the former a native of England and the latter of Pennsylvania and of Irish descent. In his father's family there were two children, Matilda M. (now Mrs. John T. Harley, of Wilkes-Barre), and the subject of these lines. The mother of our subject died when he was about seven years of age, leaving him practically without a home from that time, as his father did not take much interest in his family. Our subject supported himself at this early age by selling newspapers, doing errands and such other work as he was able. He spent part of his time with an uncle, Isaac Kitchen, at Bloomsburg, where he was always welcome, but even in his early youth he preferred to rely on no one but himself for support, when his father did not give him the advantages which most parents offer to their children. He had attended school two terms previous to his mother's death, and this was substantially all the public school training he received. When about thirteen years of age his ambition was to learn the art of photography, but unable to pay the required tuition, and his father refusing to give him any assistance, his next choice was to learn the trade of paperhanger and decorator. He accordingly began an apprenticeship with B. H. Vannatta, of Bloomsburg, Pa., and remained with him the required three years, at the same time engaging in various outside work in order to make his expenses for which his salary was insufficient. As our subject had a natural talent for artistic work in the line of his trade, at the end of three years he was considered a superior workman and remained in the employ of Mr. Vannatta three years as his leading journeyman. He then went to Berwick and entered the employ of L. Wolf as painter and decorator, remaining with him until May, 1887, when he came to Nanticoke, Pa., and entered the employ of William A. Moharter, and remained with him about three months, when he accepted a position from Willover & Co., where he worked about six months. Mr. Shipton then entered the employ of D. B. Williams, the leading paperhanger and decorator of Nanticoke, and in August, 1890, went to Washington, D.C., and was employed by A. G. Mann, an extensive decorator of that city. Here he remained about three months, and then traveled through Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia, and worked in the mines a short time in Caketon, W. Va., thence proceeding to Parkersburg, Va., thence to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he worked at his trade a short time. He then went to Mays Landing, Ky., then to Little Rock, Ark., then back to Cincinnati, and then to Pittsburgh, and April 17, 1891, found him again in Nanticoke. He is now in the employ of D. B. Williams, and has charge of all his painting, paperhanging and decorating. Politically, Mr. Shipton is a Democrat.

PETER C. SHIVE, physician and surgeon, Plains, was born in Bucks County, August 18, 1830, and is a son of Henry and Ann (Crouthanel) Shive, natives of Pennsylvania and descendants of early German settlers of Bucks County, Pa. In his father's family there were seven children, of whom but two grew to maturity and are still living, viz.: Catherine, who married Samuel Miller, a farmer in Bucks County, and Peter C. The subject of this sketch was reared on the farm and educated in the common schools and Freeland Seminary, at Norristown, Pa. He taught several terms of school, read medicine with Dr. Samuel Keeler, of Hagersville, Pa., and graduated from the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania, March 2, 1861. He practiced medicine in Bucks County six years, and in 1867, removed to Plains, bringing with him a stock of drugs, which he has since completed and to which he has added other lines of merchandise. Dr. Shive was married November 11, 1852, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Abraham Delp, of Bucks County, Pa., and by her he had one child, Simon, now a practicing physician (he was born February 19, 1854, and married Nettie Shellenburger, by whom he has had two children, of whom Edward B. is living). Mrs. Elizabeth Shive died November 28, 1862, and Dr. Shive married, for his second wife, Miss Hannah, daughter of Enos and Louisa (Cressman) Sibles, of Bucks County, Pa. Mrs. Shive is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and Dr. Shive is a member of the German Reformed Church; the F. & A. M. (in which he is master mason, Knight Templar, and member of the Chapter and Council Lodge of Philadelphia), the I. O. O. F. and Encampment; the Luzerne County Medical Society, the Lehigh Valley Medical Society, and the Pennsylvania Medical Society; in politics he is a Democrat.

FRED M. SHOEMAKER, Wilkes-Barre, was born in that borough, October 19, 1837, and is a son of Hon. Charles Denison and Stella Mercer (Sprigg) Shoemaker. He was educated at Wyoming Valley Institute, Kingston, and French's Scientific School, New Haven, Conn., and for several years followed the occupation of surveyor and engineer. Later he was collector for the Wyoming Valley Canal Company two years. Early in 1862 he was elected first lieutenant of Company K, Seventh Pennsylvania Reserves, but in August of the same year he was compelled to resign on account of disability. About September, 1863, he again entered the service as adjutant of the One Hundred and Forth-third Pennsylvania Regiment, and in the fall of 1864 was again obliged to resign on account of disability. He then embarked in the coal business in his native county, continuing in this until 1889, when he engaged in zinc and lead mining in Missouri, and is now president of the Corry Mining Company, of Dade County, that state. He was twice married: His first wife was Caroline, daughter of Nicholas Shoemaker, of Nichols, N. Y., by whom he has one son, Charles Denison Shoemaker; she died in March, 1876. His second wife was Jane Wilson, of Huntington, this county. Mr. Shoemaker is a member of the G. A. R.; politically, he is a Republican.

JACOB I. SHOEMAKER, retired farmer and manufacturer, Wyoming borough, was born April 7, 1839, a son of Isaac C. and Catharine A. (Shoemaker) Shoemaker, natives of New York and Pennsylvania, respectively, and of German origin. Our subject, who is the eldest in a family of six children, four of whom are now living, was educated in the common schools and Wyoming Seminary, and at the age of twenty was taken in as partner with his father in the manufacture of flour, feed, meal, yarns and flannels; two years later his brother was also admitted to the firm, which was known as I. C. Shoemaker & Sons, till the death of the father in 1875; it then became I. C. Shoemaker's Sons till 1881, when S. R. Shoemaker retired, the business being then conducted by our subject alone until 1882, when he leased to James Fowler & Sons, and also retired. July 1, 1863, Mr. Shoemaker enlisted in Company E, Forty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, receiving his discharge September 2, 1863, by order of Governor Curtin. He was married December 23, 1863, to Mary M., daughter of John and Catherine B. (Bruce) Sharps, natives of Pennsylvania and of English origin. This union was blessed with five children, three of whom are now living: Fannie S., born October 14, 1864; Edward N., born August 1, 1867; and Harry, born November 15, 1880, attending the West Side high school. Mr. and Mrs. Shoemaker and their children, Fannie and Edward, attend the Methodist and Presbyterian Churches; Mr. Shoemaker is a member of the F. & A. M., I. O. O. F., G. A. R.; he has been a member and president of the borough council since it was organized; is a trustee in the Methodist Church. He is a trustee of the Wyoming Seminary; president of the Cemetery Association; president of the Wyoming Bible Society; director of the Pittston Ferry Bridge Company; director of the Peoples Saving Bank, of Pittston, and politically is a staunch Republican.

HON. LAZARUS DENISON SHOEMAKER, Wilkes-Barre. The subject of this sketch was born in Kingston township, Luzerne County, November 5, 1819. There and in the city of Wilkes-Barre he has continued to reside, except when absent at college, or in public service. His remote ancestor in America was Hendrick Jechemsen Schoonmaker, who emigrated from Amsterdam, Holland, in the year 1640, and settled in the town of Rochester, Ulster Co., N.Y. He purchased a large tract of land in that locality, which he occupied up to the time of his death in 1729; and in the history of that day he seems to have been a prominent man in the affairs of his country. He left a family of two sons and two daughters. The eldest son, Jochem Hendrick, who was born at Albany, married Anna, daughter of Frederick and Margaret Hussey. He died in 1713, and left fourteen children. During the Revolution, the names of his descendants appear frequently on the rolls of the patriot army. One of his sons, Benjamin, in 1735 purchased a farm near Stroudsburg, Monroe Co., Pa., and occupied it until his death, which occurred in 1775. While living in Pennsylvania, his name became changed from Schoonmaker to Shoemaker, the latter being the English of the former. In the recorder's office at Easton, Northampton Co., Pa., the farm which he purchased is conveyed to him as grantee, as "Benjamin Schoonmaker," while his name in his will some forty years later is subscribed by him as "Benjamin Shoemaker," and his descendants have so continued to write it. He held several offices of trust, and left a competence for his widow and children. His wife was Elizabeth, daughter of Nicholas Depui, the first settler of Shawnee, on the Delaware River. Nicholas emigrated from Artois, in the north of France, in 1664. Benjamin and Elizabeth were blessed with two sons Elijah and Daniel and six daughters. Elijah, the eldest, and the grandfather of our subject, settled at Forty Fort on a claim sold to him by John Fish, a Connecticut claimant under the Susquehanna Purchase, in the Wyoming Valley in 1774. On this tract is located the Forty Fort cemetery and the old church, and near the spot where he erected the log house for his residence, on the west bank of Abraham creek. His wife was Jane, a daughter of John McDowell, of Cherry Valley, Monroe Co., Pa., who emigrated from the North of Ireland in 1735. Elijah and his wife became at once permanent and prominent settlers in the new home, and were successful in clearing their farm. On July 3, 1778, occurred the memorable battle of Wyoming, and Elijah was slain, leaving his widow and one son, Elijah, three months old, who was the father of our subject, and became the owner of a large and valuable farm. In 1814 he was elected sheriff of Luzerne County. In May, 1800, he married Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Col. Nathan Denison, and by her he had a family of six sons and three daughters, all of whom are deceased except the youngest daughter, Caroline (wife of Dr. Levi Ives of New Haven, Conn.), and the youngest son, the subject of this sketch. Mr. Shoemaker died in July, 1829, in the fiftieth year of his age, leaving a valuable estate still owned by his descendants. The maternal grandfather of our subject, Col. Nathan Denison, moved from Windham, Conn., to this Valley in 1768, where he purchased a farm, and a few years later married Elizabeth Sill, daughter of Jabez and Hannah Sill, formerly of Windham, Conn. This is recorded as the first marriage in the Valley, and their eldest son, Lazarus Denison, as the first white child born in the Valley. The Denisons trace their ancestry to William Denison, who was born in England in 1586, and settled in Roxbury, Mass., in 1631. Our subject's preliminary education was received at the Moravian school, Nazareth Hall, Pa. Later he attended Kenyon College, at Gambier, Ohio, and from there, in 1836, entered the freshman class at Yale University, where he was graduated with honor in 1840. He then engaged in the study of the law with Gen. E. W. Sturdevant in Wilkes-Barre, and in August, 1842, was admitted to the bar, since which time he has been in the continuous practice of his profession, except when called away by the performance of official duties, to which his superior qualification made it the pleasure of his fellow citizens to call him. In 1866 he was nominated, by the Republican party, as their candidate for State Senator, and in a district strongly Democratic was elected by a decisive majority. He was assigned to the position of chairman on the judiciary committee, which he held during the three years of his term; as also on other committees, on all of which he served with entire satisfaction to his constituents, so that in 1870 he was nominated a candidate for Representative in Congress for the Twelfth District of Pennsylvania, to which he was elected by a large majority, and re elected two years later by a still more flattering support. At the expiration of his second term in Congress he declined any further honors of a political character, and resumed his law practice, in which he still continues. In addition to being a leading lawyer, with a successful practice, whose official acts merited the public confidence, Mr. Shoemaker holds a conspicuous place in the banking, industrial and benevolent enterprises of the city. On October 10, 1848, he married Esther W., daughter of Samuel and Clorinda Wadhams, of Plymouth, both of whom are descendants of early New England families, of English descent. The issue of this union was one son and five daughters, now living, viz.: Levi I., who graduated at Yale University, class of 1882, also at the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania, and is now practicing his profession in Wilkes-Barre; Clorinda W. (Mrs. Irving A. Stearns); Elizabeth S. (Mrs. George L. Dickerman); Caroline S. (Mrs. Mrs. William G. Phelps); Jane A. and Esther W., the two last named residing with their father in the city of Wilkes-Barre.

SAMUEL R. SHOEMAKER, retired farmer and manufacturer, of Wyoming borough, was born May 1, 1841, a son of Isaac C. and Catherine (Shoemaker) Shoemaker, natives of New York and Pennsylvania, respectively, and of German origin. He is a grandson of Jacob I. Shoemaker, who learned, while in New York, the saddler's trade, and afterward coming to Wyoming, where he purchased a farm, operating this, and conducting "Shoemaker's Hotel" (now the "Pollock House"), of Wyoming. He is a great-grandson of Isaac Shoemaker, who was a farmer. He was reared on a farm, educated in the public schools and Wyoming Seminary, and, at the age of twenty-one, was admitted as a partner with his father and brother as I. C. Shoemaker & Sons, owners and proprietors of the "Shoemaker Steam Gristmills" and the "Wyoming Woolen Mill;" they were also managers of a large farm until the death of the father, which occurred January 18, 1875, after which the firm became I. C. Shoemaker's Sons until 1881, when our subject sold his interest to his brother, Jacob I., and turned his attention to farming on his half of the homestead. Mr. Shoemaker was married January 7, 1868, to Jennie, daughter of Rufus and Nancy (Harding) Carver, natives of Pennsylvania and of English origin. This union was blessed with two children, Archie C., born August 18, 1869, a dentist of Pittston, Pa., and Amy E., born February 17, 1891, died August 28, 1872. Mr. and Mrs. Shoemaker attend the Methodist Church of Wyoming; Mr. Shoemaker is a member of the F. & A. M., I. O. O. F., K. of H., and Royal Arcanum; he was secretary of the Luzerne County Agricultural Society for 1891, and is secretary of the Wyoming Cemetery Association.

William Mercer SHOEMAKER, Wilkes-Barre, was born in Kingston, Luzerne Co., Pa., June 20, 1840, and is a son of Hon. Charles Denison and Stella Mercer (SPRIGG) SHOEMAKER. His paternal grandfather was Elijah SHOEMAKER, who married Elizabeth DENISON, and his maternal grandfather was Samuel MERCER, son of Col. James MERCER, both of whom were prominent in the history of Lancaster county, Pa. Charles Denison SHOEMAKER was a prominent citizen of Luzerne county in his day, and was a graduate of Yale College. He was prothonotary, clerk of quarter sessions and oyer and terminer, and clerk of the Orphans' Court from January 26, 1824, to April, 1828, and from the latter date until August 21, 1830, he was register and recorder of Luzerne county. On the last named date he was appointed by Governor George Wolf, associate judge of Luzerne county, and served in that office several years. The last years of his life were spent in agricultural pursuits; he died August 1, 1861. The subject of this sketch was educated at Wyoming Institute and Yale College; studied law with Hon. Charles DENISON and G. Byron NICHOLSON, and was admitted to the Luzerne county bar September 3, 1863. On August 24, 1861, having been elected and commissioned second lieutenant of Company L, Ninety-second Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, he was mustered into the United States service, and the regiment, being mounted, was known as the Ninth Cavalry. After nearly two years' service, during which time he was promoted to the first lieutenancy of his company and afterward to the office of adjutant of the regiment, he was compelled, on April 7, 1863, to resign his commission for business reasons, and returned home, soon after which he engaged in the insurance business, in which he still continues. On February 6, 1879, Mr. SHOEMAKER married Miss Ella SCHENCK HUNT, of Elizabeth, N. J., and they have one son, Harold Mercer SHOEMAKER.

William S. SHOEMAKER was born in New Troy (now Wyoming), county of Luzerne, State of Pennsylvania, February 19, 1820. His grandfather, Isaac SHOEMAKER, was of German descent, and came from Northampton county (near Raubville), Pa., to Wyoming Valley in 1807 or 1808, and bought out Benjamin Carpenter and his brother Gilbert. Here he reared a large family; three sons--Jacob, Samuel and Isaac--and four daughters--Katie, Rosanna, Annie and Sallie. He died in September, 1829, leaving a large and valuable property to his children, containing about 300 acres of land, a gristmill, sawmill and fulling-mill. Jacob I SHOEMAKER, the father of the subject of this sketch, was married to Betsy WOHLGEMUTH, in Frey's Bush, N. Y., where he worked as a saddler. They had born to them, while in Frey's Bush, Isaac, Mary Ann and Katie. They then removed to Wyoming Valley, and had born to them Rosanna, William, Margaret and Sallie. The mother of this family died in 1838, and was the first person interred in Wyoming Cemetery; the father died in 1851, and was laid by her side.

William S. SHOEMAKER spent his early boyhood in the hotel, and on the farm of his father. His education was limited to the common schools of the vicinity in which he lived. Soon after becoming of age, on March 11, 1841, he was married by Elder Miller, of Abington, to Maria TRIPP, who was the daughter of Isaac TRIPP and Catharine LA FRANCE, and who then resided in Providence township (now Scranton). They took up their residence in the old homestead of his grandfather, Isaac SHOEMAKER, a house built in "ye olden time," but which was subsequently torn down and a new residence with modern improvements erected by him to take its place; here they always lived and here they died. As the fruits of this union they were blessed with seven children: Katie, who married Stephen J. SHARPS; Rettie, who married Denton D. DURLAND; William H., who married (for his first wife) Jennie LA BAR (who died soon after), and (for his second wife) Mary L. STARK; Martha (now deceased), married to David O. MC COLLUM; Jennie, who married John A. HUTCHINS; Ira R., who married Martha H. HATFIELD, and Stella, who married Fred SENGFELDER. Soon after marriage Mr. SHOEMAKER formed a co-partnership with his brother in the milling business under the firm name of I. C. & W. S. SHOEMAKER. Wheat flour was their specialty, and Carbondale the market at that time, whither it was hauled by horses and wagons, taking two days to make the trip. They conducted the milling business together for several years with success and profit, W. S. finally selling his interest in the same to his brother Isaac. He also managed a large farm left him by his father. During the late war he was sutler for the One Hundred and Forty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, Co. Dana's regiment. He passed through the war encountering many hardships and narrow escapes with his stores, from the enemy, but succeeded in overcoming all obstacles, and was equal to any and all emergencies. After the war Mr. SHOEMAKER again returned to farming, which did not, however, long appear to suit his taste. Being of a speculative disposition, and a man of push, energy and perseverance, he contracted for several hundred acres of coal land adjoining his own, finally selling the coal to the Pennsylvania Coal Co. at a good profit, reserving the surface. He then bought the Perkins' Estate containing about 110 acres of good coal land, of which the same is now under lease to the Mt. Lookout Coal Co., the surface being laid out before his death in town lots, all of which is divided among his several children.

Mr. SHOEMAKER was active in politics, being an earnest worker for the success of the Republican party, and for several years was chairman of the Second Legislative District of Luzerne county. He held a one-third interest in the firm of HUTCHINS & SHOEMAKER until the death of Thomas HUTCHINS, when he and his son-in-law, John A. HUTCHINS, became equal partners, making fire brick and terra cotta pipe. He was also one of the projectors and stockholders of the Wyoming Shovel Works, to which he contributed liberally, and which was subsequently sold to Mrs. Payne PETTEBONE. He was brought up in the Presbyterian Church, his mother belonging to that faith, and was a great worker for this same Church; was one of the building committee for the new Presbyterian church, and one of its trustees for many years. Maria, his wife, was born July 23, 1822, in Providence, and died in Wyoming January 8, 1883. William S. SHOEMAKER died very suddenly July 17, 1884, and was interred by the side of his wife in the Wyoming cemetery, of which association he was president. He was a true friend, an affectionate father and a devoted husband.

William H. SHOEMAKER, a farmer of Wyoming borough, was born September 25, 1847, at Wyoming. He is a son of William S. and Maria (TRIPP) SHOEMAKER, natives of Pennsylvania and of German origin; the father was a farmer by occupation. He reared a family of seven children, six of whom are still living. Our subject was the third in the family in order of birth; he was educated in the common schools, beginning life as a farmer on the homestead. In 1885 he moved to Wyoming borough, where he has since resided. He built his cozy home in 1882, and owns five other houses in this borough and a large farm in Exeter borough. He also owns 110 acres of coal land in Wyoming borough. He was married October 9, 1867, to Miss Jennie LA BAR, daughter of Rev. John LA BAR. She died July 18, 1868. Mr. SHOEMAKER was again married, December 28, 1870, this time to Miss Mary L., daughter of John M. and Sarah (DAVISON) STARK. This happy union was blessed with three children, viz.: Clinton S., born March 9, 1873, and Gertrude T., born January 13, 1875, both graduates of the Wyoming high school; and Arthur W., born January 27, 1878, now attending the same institution. Mrs. SHOEMAKER is a member of the Methodist Church; Mr. SHOEMAKER is a member of the K. of H. In politics he is a sound Republican, and one of the prominent men of the borough.

Ira R. SHOEMAKER, farmer, Wyoming borough, was born March 7, 1852, in Wyoming, a son of William S. and Maria (TRIPP) SHOEMAKER, natives of Pennsylvania and of German extraction; the former was a farmer of Wyoming borough and a son of Jacob SHOEMAKER. Our subject is one of a family of seven children, six of whom are now living. He was educated in the common schools and the Wyoming Seminary. He has followed farming all his life, and now lives on a farm left by his father. He was married October 25, 1882, to Martha H., daughter of James and Jane (ROBERTS) HATFIELD, natives of New York State, and respectively, of English and Welsh origin; her father was a farmer by occupation. This happy union is blessed with four children: Thomas W. H., born January 5, 1886; George H., born March 2, 1889; John R. H., born January 5, 1890, and James D. H., born October 17, 1892. Mr. SHOEMAKER is a sound Republican in politics, and a substantial citizen of his borough.

Hon. John J. SHONK, Plymouth. This gentleman, who is one of Plymouth's oldest citizens now living, was born at Hope, N.J., March 21, 1815, a son of Michael and Beulah (JENKS) SHONK. He comes of German ancestry, his grandparents, John and Dorothy (ROSKY) SHONK, having been natives of Germany. Michael SHONK, our subject's father, was born on the ocean, while his parents were en route for America. They settled in New Jersey, reared a family, and there Michael was educated and married. In 1821, he and his wife came to Plymouth, where they spent the remaining portion of their lives. Their family consisted of eight children, four girls and four boys, John J. being the second in order of birth, and the eldest son. His father being a poor man, young John, instead of attending school, was put to work in the coal mines, as soon as he could be made useful there. He followed this work until he had reached his sixteenth year, after which he engaged at various kinds of employment--such as working on boats, at public work, and on the railroad. In 1854 he embarked in business for himself as coal operator, and was subsequently engaged as lumberman and tanner. He has dealt extensively in coal, operated coal mines, having employed as many as 400 men at one time, and he has always been a friend to the laboring man, kind and generous--almost to a fault. In business, he has succeeded in accumulating a handsome fortune. In religion, he is a Methodist, and at present is president of the board of directors of the Plymouth M. E. Church. In politics, he is a Republican, and has served as school director of Plymouth borough. In 1874 he was elected a member of the State Legislature from Luzerne county, and served four years in that capacity. Socially, he is a charter member of the I.O.O.F., and of the Encampment, Elm Lodge No. 642, Plymouth, Pa. Mr. SHONK has been three times married, and has buried two wives. His present wife, Amanda, is the mother of all his children now living, two sons and two daughters; she is a daughter of Thomas DAVENPORT, and is a native of Plymouth, of French and Dutch descent. Their children now living are: Albert, who resides in Plymouth, engaged in real estate business; Hon. George W., a member of Congress (1892), and by profession, a lawyer; Elizabeth, wife of E. F. STEPHENS, who is engaged in coal business in West Virginia; and Clarissa, now wife of C. W. MC ALARNEY, an attorney, of Plymouth.

Albert D. SHONK, real estate agent, Plymouth, was born October 14, 1847, son of John J. and Amanda (DAVENPORT) SHONK, natives of Pennsylvania, who were among the pioneer settlers of this Valley. Albert D. received his education in this county, and at an early age engaged in the brick business, which he carried on for nine years. He then established a lumber yard, and continued in that for twelve years, at the end of which time he engaged in handling real estate, and has since continued in that line. Mr. SHONK has been twice married: first, March 4, 1869, to Sarah E., daughter of David and Elizabeth (SINGER) HERSHBERGER, natives of Pennsylvania; she died fifteen years later. Five children were born to this union: Fannie, wife of George RENARD, of Plymouth; Edwin H., a student at Wyoming Seminary; Mabel; John J. and William H., at home and attending the public schools. Mr. SHONK was again married, this time February 10, 1886, to Elizabeth, daughter of J. Madison and Jane (ACKLY) NESBITT, of Plymouth. Mr. SHONK has a kind and pleasing disposition, and to meet him once awakens a desire to become better acquainted with him.

George Washington SHONK comes of a German family, and the progenitor of the American branch thereof was John SHONK, who emigrated to America in September, 1790, his son Michael, George Washington SHONK's grandfather, being born on the passage over. John SHONK settled with the Moravian community at Hope, Warren Co., N.J., where he prospered, and where the house he built is still standing. Michael SHONK married Beulah JENKS, who was of Welsh extraction, and whose family, traceable as far back as the year 900, sent numerous representatives to America in its earliest years, and gave numerous descendants who became men and women of distinction in many States. Michael moved from New Jersey to Plymouth in 1821, his son John Jenks SHONK, the father of George Washington SHONK, being at the time but six years of age. John Jenks SHONK became a prominent figure in the business arena of Plymouoth, and when but seventeen years of age was engaged in connection with general real estate and mercantile operations, which he successfully prosecuted through many years. He also has extensive coal interests in Virginia, being a president and director of two coal companies, and of the Kanawha Railroad Company, penetrating the great Kanawha Coal region of that State. In 1874 he was elected to the State Legislature, and re-elected in 1876, the first time as a Prohibitionist and the second as a Republican. He was thrice married, his first two wives dying without issue surviving them. The third wife (George Washington's mother) was Amanda DAVENPORT, whose ancestors were of New England origin, and among the earliest and most respected settlers in the Wyoming Valley. John Jenks SHONK amassed a considerable fortune by constant application to business, fortunate investments and provident habits. George Washington SHONK was born in Plymouth, April 26, 1850. After a preparatory course at the Wyoming Seminary, he entered Wesleyan University at Middletown, Conn., graduating therefrom in 1873. He studied law with Hon. Hubbard B. PAYNE, and was admitted to the bar September 29, 1876. On August 15, 1880, he married Ida E., daughter of Joseph KLOTZ, of West Pittston, and by this marriage they have two children: Herbert Bronson, born October 28, 1881, and Emily Weson, born April 21, 1885. The KLOTZ family is of German origin, and has many and powerful branches in this country. Mr. SHONK soon acquired a considerable practice, both profitable in a business sense, and a strong testimony of the high esteem in which his legal abilities were held. He is a Republican in politics, taking an active interest in his party affairs, and in 1888 he was summoned to the chairmanship of the Republican County Committee, in which position he made a reputation and acquaintance that, in 1890, brought him the Republican nomination for Congress, to which he was returned as elected, receiving 14,555 votes, against 13, 307 cast for his Democratic opponent, John B. Reynolds; though the county at the same time gave from 2,000 to 2,500 majority for the Democratic nominees for State offices. The seat was contested, but the committee conforming a majority of his political opponents, threw the contest out by a unanimous vote

Gerdon J. SHOOK, farmer, Forty Fort, is the second in a family of four children, two now living, of Jacob and Rachel (FULLER) SHOOK, natives of Germany. He was reared on a farm in Wyoming county, Pa., educated in the public schools, and at the age of twenty-one commenced life for himself as a farmer; also drove a milk wagon for four years. In 1857 he came to Forty Fort, and in 1875 purchased his present farm. Since he came to Forty Fort he has followed truck faming. He married Jane, daughter of Peter and Maria (FINCH) VAN BUSKIRK, natives of New Jersey, and has one child, Fredrick, who lives with his parents. Mr. SHOOK has in his possession an old cannon, known as "Old Buntie," found at Forty Fort about seventy-five years ago by Hiram DENISON while plowing. It has been stolen several times, but at last has found a safe resting place with Mr. SHOOK. In politics he is a stanch Democrat.

J. R. SHOTWELL, mason and builder, Kingston, was born January 13, 1842, in Orange county, N. Y., and is a son of Joseph and Achy (FULKERSON) SHOTWELL, also natives of New York, the former of Holland, and the latter of French origin. Our subject was educated in the common schools of Wyoming county, and began life for himself at about the age of twenty-one, in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., where he learned the mason's trade. He worked at masonry in Wilkes-Barre and vicinity, and remained there until 1883, when he removed to Kingston, where he now resides. Mr. SHOTWELL is at present engaged in contracting and general building of masonry. On May 10, 1864, he enlisted in the Civil war, and was in active service at the front during the Peninsular Campaign, and participated in the battles of Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mills, White Oak Swamp, Charles City Cross Roads, Marvin Hill, Chantilly, second Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, and Cold Harbor. He was mustered out with his regiment in June, 1865, at Harrisburg. Although having been a participator in some of the hardest fighting of the war, he fortunately escaped without receiving the slightest wound, and again returned to the quietude of civil life. Mr. SHOTWELL was married, September 30, 1866, to Miss Mary SIMANS, of Franklin township, this county. This union has been blessed with eight children: Sadie, Henry, Wilkes B., Iona, Frank, William, Mamie and Nathaniel. Mr. SHOTWELL is a member of the G.A.R. and the I.O.R.M.; in his political views he is Democratic

John SHUGARD, locomotive engineer, Hazleton. This tried and trustworthy engineer was born in the Province of Hesse, Germany, March 28, 1841, and is the fifth in a family of six children born to Henry and Mary (CROUSE) SHUGARD, natives of Germany. The subject of our sketch was reared and educated in his native land, and in 1858 came to America, locating at Hazleton, where he learned the trade of shoemaker. He followed this occupation until the war broke out, when he enlisted, March 13, 1861, in Company A, Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, under Capt. Ario PARDEE. He served faithfully for three years and two months, and during that time was twice severely wounded: First, at the battle of Antietam, where he received an ugly bayonet thrust in the leg, and second, at the battle of Gettysburg, where he received a gunshot wound in the right arm. During his three years' service he participated in most of the important battles fought by his regiment, and was mustered out of service August 20, 1864, at Chattanooga, Tenn. After returning from the war Mr. SHUGARD became a brakeman on the Lehigh Valley Railroad; after four years of this life, and four years as fireman, he was promoted to the position of engineer on a locomotive, and for twenty years he has faithfully and successfully served in this capacity. He is one of the oldest engineers employed by the company, and has served perhaps as long as any man in this region. In 1865 Mr. SHUGARD was united in marriage with Catherine, daughter of Martin and Catherine REINHARD, of Hazleton, and to this union have been born six children, namely: Catherine, Elizabeth, Anna, George G., Justus D. and John G. Mr. SHUGARD is a member of the Union Veteran Legion and Knights of Pythias. He votes the Republican ticket, and the family attend the German Lutheran Church.

Charles SHUPP, merchant, Plymouth, was born September 7, 1852, in that town, where he was reared and educated. He is a son of Peter SHUPP, who was born in Plymouth in 1820, a son of Philip, who was a son of Philip SHUPP (of German descent), who came to the Valley about 1809. These early pioneers were farmers and lumber manufacturers, and owned the second sawmill in this part of the Valley. After our subject completed his education he, about 1875, entered the mercantile business in which his father was engaged, at which time they converted the credit system to a cash basis. The business was then given over to the control of Charles and his brother Irvin, and they continued as partners until 1879, in which year Charles took full control, and under his superior management, with careful attention to business principles, the business grew to such colossal propostions that it was necessary to enlarge the premises. This he did by occupying the adjoining store-room formerly used by James G. MARTIN as a jeweler's store. Under such management, however, the enterprise could not stop here, for he now occupies the entire two buildings for general store purposes. His next enterprise was in 1888, when he began the manufacture of gentlemen's shirts, and novelties for ladies, in the second story of the building used for store purposes, but this, too, became so extensive as to cause him to abandon, in the fall of 1891, the store building for a large and commodious factory on Back street, where he is now able to meet the demands of the market under the name of "The Wyoming Valley Suit Company," chartered in the spring of that year. This factory gives employment to from two to three hundred hands. In April, 1878, Mr. SHUPP married Miss H. Mary, daughter of David and Mary LEVI, of Plymouth, by which union there have been born three children: Helen, Kenneth and Ruth. Not only is Mr. SHUPP a good citizen, but also a consistent Christian gentleman, whose gentle and courteous demeanor have led him into the good graces of all with whom he comes in contact. He is a member of the M. E. Church, and of the board of trustees of same.

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